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Events, Shows & Fairs

Special Report: Comic-Con, Day 1

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Written by J.C. VAUGHN   
Thursday, 24 July 2014 10:10
San Diego Convention Center, site of Comic-Con International: San Diego, which kicked off with Preview Night on Wednesday, July 23, and continues through Sunday, July 27. Photo by D.G. Amas. SAN DIEGO – It’s the day before Preview Night at Comic-Con International: San Diego. Over the last few days, San Diego International Airport has bubbled quietly with the steady influx of vendors from comic book and original comic art dealers to movie studio minions, all of whom arrived early to set up booths, finish presentations and sweat the last minute details before the opening of the largest pop culture convention in North America.

Today, though, that steady stream will turn into a deluge. Starting tonight and then through the next four days, a tidal wave of fans will cascade through the airport, through the beautiful old Santa Fe rail station and across the interstate highways into downtown San Diego, where the event simply takes over the city.

As recently as 1994, when the San Diego Convention Center was half its present size, there was actually another convention going on at the same time. Its attendance reported at about 30,000 over the course of the convention.

Even though the convention center has doubled in size since then, the show’s attendance has been capped in realm of 130,000 for several years now. Events have expanded to include the hotels on either side of the convention center. By late afternoon Pacific Time, the fashionable, pedestrian-friendly Gaslamp Quarter will team with walkers headed to and from the hall. Area restaurants will have unpleasant wait-lists.

The attendance cap continues to be cause for concern to many. San Diego is scheduled to break ground in Spring 2015 on a major expansion of the facility as Comic-Con’s dominance of the field is not as crystal clear as it once was.

Over the last few years, it’s become clear the ReedPop’s New York Comic Con will give San Diego a run for its money in terms of attendance. Both conventions are just about maxed out due to their present facilities, but San Diego seems to have figured out a path forward while Manhattan’s Jacob Javits Convention Center and government officials thus far have offered little in the way of solutions.

In terms of influence and staying power, the title is not yet really up for grabs. San Diego remains king.

Wednesday’s activities will occur mainly on the show floor, as fans take in displays and see what the vendors have to offer. Traditionally, Preview Night, which is theoretically exclusively for the attendees who purchased admission to the four full days, Thursday-Sunday, has only limited panel activities.

This year’s Wednesday night activities focus on sneak peeks for four television properties based on DC Comics characters (the pilots for the live action shows The Flash, iZombie and Constantine, and the return of animated Teen Titans Go).



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE
San Diego Convention Center, site of Comic-Con International: San Diego, which kicked off with Preview Night on Wednesday, July 23, and continues through Sunday, July 27. Photo by D.G. Amas. When the show opens around 6 p.m. (it’s always a bit earlier, but that’s the posted time), wide open walking space in front of the San Diego Convention Center are a distant and enticing memory. Photo by D.G. Amas.
Last Updated on Thursday, 24 July 2014 10:57
 

Antique show promises treasures to be found in El Dorado

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Written by Associated Press   
Wednesday, 23 July 2014 08:41
Main Street, El Dorado, Ark. Image by Chris Litherland. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. EL DORADO, Ark. (AP) – An antique dealers group in Arkansas is hoping to make the southern part of the state a top destination for enthusiasts of the vintage goods.

The El Dorado News-Times reports the Union County Antique Dealers Association will host a sale that starts Friday and ends Saturday. It will be at the El Dorado Conference Center.

The event is part of an initiative to make El Dorado and southern Arkansas the go-to destination for antique dealers and collectors.

Antique dealers from Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas will be selling items that include furniture, rugs, glassware and pottery.

The president of the Union County Antique Dealers Association says about 500 to 600 people attended the show last year.

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Information from: El Dorado News-Times, http://www.eldoradonews.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-07-22-14 1234GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Main Street, El Dorado, Ark. Image by Chris Litherland. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 23 July 2014 08:51
 

Rare Elvis items featured in first-ever Auction at Graceland, Aug. 14

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Written by Outside Media Source   
Tuesday, 22 July 2014 10:25
The cover of the printed catalog for the Aug. 14 'Auction at Graceland' features a photo of Elvis Presley in front of his beloved Memphis home, Graceland. Photo Courtesy of Graceland, Memphis, TN.

MEMPHIS, Tenn. – Highlights of the rare Elvis Presley artifacts to be included in the first-ever “Auction at Graceland” were announced today, along with registration and catalog ordering details for the auction, which will be held on Thursday, August 14, 2014 at 8 p.m. Eastern / 7 p.m. Central. Fans and collectors from around the world are expected to participate on site and online through LiveAuctioneers for this unprecedented auction, featuring artifacts authenticated by the new Graceland Authenticated.

Among the items in the auction are rare and unique artifacts from the collection of Greg Page, founding member of The Wiggles® and one of the world’s biggest and most well-known Elvis Presley collectors. Page’s items include Elvis’ 1976 Cadillac Seville, a Martin D-28 and Elvis’ copy of the original script for his first film, “Love Me Tender.” All of the items in the auction will be offered from third-party collectors and none of the items included in the auction will come from the treasured Graceland Archives. The mansion and all artifacts in the Graceland Archives continue to be owned by Lisa Marie Presley and are not for sale.

The auction will be held on site at Graceland and powered by LiveAuctioneers (www.LiveAuctioneers.com ) for online bidding. Online auction registration and online bidding will start on August 1, 2014, when the full list of auction items and images will be released online. Visit Graceland.com/Auction for a link to the online auction site.

The official print catalog is now available for ordering, featuring over 70 pages includes photos and details of all the auction items, plus two special bonus ticket replicas– one from Elvis’ 1973 Aloha from Hawaii concert and one from Elvis’ 1961 concert at Bloch Arena at Pearl Harbor -- direct from the Graceland Archives. This exclusive catalog offers an up-close look at these special pieces of Elvis history and is a wonderful collector’s item. More details on purchasing the catalog and auction registration are available at Graceland.com/Auction.

All of the Items included in the auction have been thoroughly authenticated by Graceland Authenticated, a new Graceland affiliated authentication and appraisal service for collectors and fans. Graceland Authenticated sets a new standard for pop culture authentication and appraisal to ensure pop culture artifact accuracy and provide evaluations of privately owned collections.

Featured among the 72 items to be included in the August 14th auction are:

ELVIS PRESLEY SIGNATURE ON LIBRARY CARD

A signed library card was found by the librarian at the school Elvis attended in Tupelo and this is one of the earliest known signatures from the would be King of Rock ‘n’ Roll. Once Librarian realized Elvis’ fame, she searched through all of the books borrowed from the library by Elvis to find his signature. This example is accompanied by a letter from the archives of Graceland stating that the archives has no full Elvis Presley signature pre-dating the one appearing on the offered library card.

1976 CADILLAC SEVILLE

It is estimated that Elvis bought more than 200 Cadillacs in his life, family, friends, strangers, and, of course, his own private collection. Elvis' 1976 maroon and silver Cadillac Seville - V8 automatic is the last known Cadillac driven by the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll. This was also the last Cadillac that Elvis purchased for his personal use.

LOVE ME TENDER SCRIPT

This is Elvis' own copy of the original script for the very first Elvis Presley movie, Love Me Tender. The script's original title, The Reno Brothers, is stamped on the front and spine of the script. That title was passed over because the young singing sensation had a new hit song out: "Love Me Tender." That new title is handwritten in blue ink both directly above the stamped original title and in the upper right hand corner. Stamped in the upper left is the message "Please forward to: ELVIS PRESLEY."

1969 LAS VEGAS SHOW AGREEMENT

A blue folder entitled, “Agreement Between Elvis Presley and Las Vegas International,” contains a 13-page typed agreement. This contract is for the first of Elvis’ 15 Las Vegas engagements. Not only was this Elvis’ first concert appearance since 1961, but it set a Las Vegas record for both attendance and gross ticket sales. After opening night, Elvis performed two shows a day for the remainder of the engagement. The contract stipulates payment of $100,000 per week.

1975 MARTIN D-28 GUITAR

This Martin D-28 Guitar was gifted by Elvis to his friend and bodyguard, Sam Thompson, in January of 1977 and comes with a letter of authenticity from Elvis’ father, Vernon Presley.

GEMSTONE, DIAMOND AND GOLD LION MASK PENDANT AND CHAIN

This 18kt gold custom made pendant is set with 24 diamonds, 2 emeralds and one ruby. This pendant was created at Elvis’ request by Memphis jeweler, Lowell Hays. The piece was worn by Elvis on many occasions, including when he met President Nixon in the Oval Office at The White House.

For more information about how to submit items for consideration for authentication services by Graceland Authenticated and for consideration to be included in future Graceland Authenticated auctions, plus details on authentication service and auction fees, visit Graceland.com/Auction.

About Elvis Presley Enterprises, Inc.

Elvis Presley Enterprises, Inc. (EPE), based in Memphis, manages the operations of Elvis Presley’s Graceland, its related exhibits and attractions, including the Heartbreak Hotel, as well as the Graceland archives, featuring thousands of artifacts from Elvis’ home and career. EPE also produces and licenses Elvis themed live events, tours and attractions worldwide. Graceland is music’s most important and beloved landmark, with hundreds of thousands of fans from around the world visiting the famous home each year. In 2013, Graceland was voted the #1 Iconic American Attraction by USA Today and 10Best.com readers. For more information on EPE and Graceland, visit www.graceland.com.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE
The cover of the printed catalog for the Aug. 14 'Auction at Graceland' features a photo of Elvis Presley in front of his beloved Memphis home, Graceland. Photo Courtesy of Graceland, Memphis, TN. 18K gold pendant custom made for Elvis Presley by Memphis jeweler Lowell Hays. Set with 24 diamonds, two emeralds and one ruby, the piece was worn by Elvis on many occasions, including when he visited President Nixon at The White House. Photo Courtesy of Graceland, Memphis, TN. Elvis Presley's personal script for the film 'Love Me Tender,' which was originally titled 'The Reno Brothers.' Photo Courtesy of Graceland, Memphis, TN. This 1976 maroon and silver Cadillac Seville V8 automatic is the last known Cadillac driven by Elvis Presley. It is also the last Cadillac that Elvis purchased for his personal use. Photo courtesy of Graceland, Memphis, TN.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 22 July 2014 13:54
 

Duncan & Miller glass show highlights once-thriving Pa. industry

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Written by DEBORAH WEISBERG, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review   
Monday, 21 July 2014 10:17
Duncan & Miller No. 50 Block and Rosette water pitcher, early 20th century, 7 inches high. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Jeffrey Evans & Associates. WASHINGTON, Pa. (AP) – Glass collectors gathered over the weekend to celebrate what once was clearly a part of the region's industrial heritage at the 39th annual Duncan & Miller Glass Show & Sale at the Washington County Fair Ground and Expo Center.

The event raised funds for the National Duncan & Miller Glass Museum in Washington and provided enthusiasts with an opportunity to purchase collectibles and to learn how southwestern Pennsylvania once produced more than half of the world's decorative and utilitarian glass.

“The show is pretty spectacular,” said Arlene Ricker of North Strabane, a volunteer with the National Duncan Glass Society, which runs the museum and organizes the two-day event.

Ricker became involved with the society through her own Duncan & Miller Glass Co. collection, including the signature swan.

“They did a lot of interesting things over the years. They went through the same design phases the rest of the decorator world went through, but the swan is their iconic piece,” she said. “The production of each one required 14 skilled craftsmen.”

At its peak, Duncan & Miller was one of the region's most successful glassmakers, out-competing dozens of neighboring companies in quality and design, said museum committee chairwoman Sherry Cooper of East Washington.

“Duncan & Miller sold their glass at Bailey Banks & Biddle, Kaufmann's, Shreve, Crump & Low in Boston – stores of that caliber. Like all the companies, they stayed alive by producing millions of items for barbershops and bars. But their forte was high-end tableware, on par with Orrefors, Baccarat and Saint-Louis.”

The company's roots date to the mid-1800s, when glassmaking procedures were rapidly advancing and coal was readily available to fuel the furnaces used to melt sand to be made into glass. “It's rumored that factory workers from some companies would simply dig coal out of nearby hillsides,” Cooper said.

George Duncan was a partner in Ripley & Co. at 10th and Carson streets on the South Side, Cooper said. “After Ripley died, Duncan bought out the heirs in 1874 and named the company after himself.”

He produced blown and pressed glass pieces and, with the rise of the middle class, began making tableware with a soda ash and calcium carbonate formula (soda lime) that yielded a cheap alternative to leaded glass.

After Duncan died and his South Side factory burned down, his sons moved operations to Washington, opening a state-of-the-art factory in 1893. Their renowned designer, John Ernest Miller, moved with them and became a partner in 1900.

“Miller designed the iron molds that became pitchers, creamers and other items, and was excellent at it,” said Cooper. “There are a number of patents in his name.”

The company employed skilled craftsmen who could execute Miller's work, she said. “Being able to blow glass into an iron mold and have pieces release cleanly without chipping or breaking is an art.”

It was a winning combination that would spawn generations of collectors.

“The company was unbelievably successful. They shipped glass all over the world,” said Cooper, who once spied a Duncan & Miller swan at a London flea market.

Duncan & Miller's heyday was during World War II, when Czech- and Italian-made glass, including then-popular animal-shaped novelties, couldn't leave Europe. “That's when Duncan designed their beautiful, graceful swan,” Cooper said.

After the war, though, machine-made glass was becoming popular, and Duncan & Miller, failing to compete, ceased operations in 1955. “It was the end of an era,” Cooper said.

Because of the company's place in Washington County history, a group of local residents, eager to preserve the heritage, joined in 1975 to form the National Duncan Glass Society.

Heirs of a Duncan factory employee sold the society a period home, circa 1910, at a favorable price so it could be turned into a museum that exhibits rare glass and glassmaking techniques, Cooper said. “There's also a gift shop where we sell Duncan & Miller pieces that people have donated to us. Proceeds help support our society.”

Online:

http://bit.ly/WmEyId

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Information from: Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, http://www.pghtrib.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-07-18-14 1431GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Duncan & Miller No. 50 Block and Rosette water pitcher, early 20th century, 7 inches high. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Jeffrey Evans & Associates.
Last Updated on Monday, 21 July 2014 10:41
 

Faulkner's Miss. home celebrates writer's legacy with conference

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Written by Associated Press   
Friday, 18 July 2014 09:14
William Faulkner bought the 1840s Greek Revival house in 1930 and began refurbishing it. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license. OXFORD, Miss. (AP) – The 41st annual Faulkner & Yoknapatawpha Conference will look at author William Faulkner' writings about people who are saturated in history and have an undeniable sense that the past is still with them shaping their outlook on life.

The conference begins Sunday in Oxford. It ends July 24.

Keynote lectures and panel sessions are free and open to the public.

Throughout the conference, the University library will display Faulkner books, manuscripts, photographs and memorabilia.

Faulkner, a native of New Albany, bought Rowan Oak in Oxford in 1930 and it became his home until his death in 1962.

Faulkner's A Fable won the Pulitzer Prize in 1954. Another of his works, The Reivers, won the Pulitzer Prize in 1962. Faulkner was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature in 1950.

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Information from: Oxford Eagle, http://www.oxfordeagle.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-07-17-14 0814GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE
William Faulkner bought the 1840s Greek Revival house in 1930 and began refurbishing it. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license. Rowan Oak, former home of William Faulkner in Oxford, Miss., is a National Historic Landmark. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.
Last Updated on Friday, 18 July 2014 09:28
 

BP Portrait Award sponsors events for young artists

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Written by Museum PR   
Wednesday, 16 July 2014 12:12

'Young People’s Private View' at the National Portrait Gallery, 2013. Photograph: Othello De’Souza-Hartley © National Portrait Gallery, London.

LONDON – A new season of events, workshops and summer schools for young people aged 14 to 19 is taking place at the National Portrait Gallery, London, as part of the BP Portrait Award 2014.

Now in its fifth year and supported by BP, the BP Portrait Award: Next Generation project aims to encourage aspiring artists and engage young people with portraiture through a dynamic mix of events, including drawing sessions, workshops with past and present BP Portrait Award artists, and an after-hours private view of the exhibition exclusively for young people.

Following the success of the first Young People’s Private View in 2013, the event returns on Monday, July 21, offering hundreds of young people the chance to view the popular BP Portrait Award 2014, hear this year’s second prize winner Richard Twose talk about his experience, meet exhibiting artist Alan Coulson and connect with other young people interested in art. A showcase of youth talent will be a highlight of the night, with the gallery’s young advisory panel, the Youth Forum, giving talks and running drawing sessions, an acoustic performance by 17-year-old musician Roisin McNeill, and spoken word performances.

A special feature this year is Talking Points – an opportunity for young people to respond to the BP Portrait Award 2014 portraits by writing their own short captions, some of which will then be displayed in the exhibition over August and September. Other activities include drawing workshops, music, competitions and refreshments throughout the evening.

Young people, including the Gallery’s Youth Forum, play a key role in designing BP Portrait Award: Next Generation events to give a youth voice to the program. BP Portrait Award: Next Generation has engaged over 1,000 young people and over 100 BP Portrait Award-winning artists since it began in 2010.

For further information about the Young People’s Private View and other BP Portrait Award: Next Generation events visit www.npg.org.uk/bpnextgeneration.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

'Young People’s Private View' at the National Portrait Gallery, 2013. Photograph: Othello De’Souza-Hartley © National Portrait Gallery, London. 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 16 July 2014 12:22
 

Save the date: London Winter Art & Antiques Fair, Nov. 3-9

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Written by Outside Media Source   
Wednesday, 16 July 2014 09:36
Image courtesy of 24th Winter Art & Antiques Fair, London

LONDON - The 24th Winter Art & Antiques Fair (3-9 November 2014) is the only high-caliber art and antiques fair between October and March and a highlight of the winter art season. For the second year running, it coincides with Asian Art in London, when the world’s converge in England's capital city.

Run in association with the UK’s top trade associations, BADA and LAPADA, it showcases over 100 top dealers selling the finest British craftsmanship through the centuries.

22,000 visitors will find over 30,000 pieces across 32 disciplines including: furniture, 20th century design, jewellery, art, Asian pieces, ceramics, sculpture, silver, mirrors, lighting, fossils, clocks, textiles and glass.

Popular with collectors, interior designers and those looking for something different, the stock on sale ranges from 16th century to Modern British and from dining tables to diamond rings.

Incorporating a Mosimanns Bistro and champagne bar and with stylish presentation of the 130 stands, this is a glamorous event with a sparkling preview night.

Every piece on sale is strictly checked by experts before the fair opens to ensure it is authentic so visitors can buy with confidence.

For more information on opening hours and ticket prices, visit: www.olympia-antiques.com . Follow on Twitter: @WFAAF.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

 Image courtesy of 24th Winter Art & Antiques Fair, London

Last Updated on Wednesday, 16 July 2014 11:10
 

Candlelight vigil, memorial planned for punk rocker Tommy Ramone

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Written by Outside Media Source   
Tuesday, 15 July 2014 16:16
Ramones' original drummer Tommy Ramone (1949-2014) at a June 17, 2008 autograph-signing session. Image courtesy Deadblob93

LIDO BEACH, N.Y. - On Wednesday, July 16, Nassau County (N.Y.) legislator Dennis Dunne Sr will join radio station WLIR as they host a candlelight vigil and memorial tribute to Tommy Ramone, original drummer for the band the Ramones. The event will take place at the Malibu Shore Club, Lido Beach, New York, starting at 12 noon.

All are welcome to take part in the memorial event and pay their respects to Tommy Ramone, 65, who died last week. He was the last survivor of the original four-member band that recorded influential punk rock classics like "Blitzkrieg Bop" and "Rockaway Beach."

A pop-culture phenomenon, the Ramones were named to Rolling Stone magazine's list of "100 Greatest Artists of All Time," after thousands of high-energy performances around the world.

The Ramones played many times at the Malibu Shore Club, which became known as the birthplace of alternative rock music on Long Island. To the Ramones, it was a home away from home.

A live musical performance will take place at the Malibu Shore Club tomorrow evening. The club is located at 1500 Lido Blvd., Lido Beach, NY 11561.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Ramones' original drummer Tommy Ramone (1949-2014) at a June 17, 2008 autograph-signing session. Image courtesy Deadblob93
Last Updated on Tuesday, 15 July 2014 17:08
 

Material Culture presents Nicholas Toth, diving helmet maker

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Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 15 July 2014 14:05
Nicholas Toth, artist and diving helmet maker. Image courtesy Material Culture. PHILA., Pa. – Nicholas Toth, master diving helmet maker, will be showcasing his copper and brass artwork and his masterfully designed copper and brass diving helmets at Material Culture on Saturday, July 19, at 2 p.m. The exhibition, which is free and open to the public, will be presented at Material Culture, 4700 Wissahickon Ave., Suite 101, in Philadelphia.

As a highly skilled metal artist and craftsman, Toth has been featured both nationally and internationally, with his work included in permanent museum exhibits and national archives. He is a National Heritage Fellow, receiving this prestigious award in 2003 from the National Endowment for the Arts. In 2006 Toth was recognized by the Historical Diving Society U.S. Chapter for his significant contributions, receiving the ER Cross Award. In 2008 he was awarded the Florida Folk Heritage Award, presented by the Department of State, Division of Historical Resources, and in 2012 Toth was once again honored by the State of Florida, receiving his second Florida Individual Artist Fellowship.

With over 30 years of experience and a lifelong exposure and immersion in the culture and mysteries of the historic gulf front community of Tarpon Springs, he has many stories to tell and much knowledge to share. From the techniques of ancient naked divers to current day technology, Toth's knowledge of the history of diving is informative and engaging. The evolution of hardhat diving will also be highlighted with special emphasis on Greek diving helmets.

Toth is considered to be the only helmet maker in the world that continues to individually create each beautiful diving helmet masterpiece, honoring the traditions and design that have existed since the mid-1800s. The iconic copper and brass diving helmets created by Nicholas Toth are fully functional, authentic and individually hand crafted, using the same tools and techniques that his grandfather, master helmet maker and legendary craftsman, Anthony Lerios, began utilizing over 100 years ago.

Each helmet takes over 320 hours to complete, made with the finest quality copper and brass. The lineage and value of a Nicholas Toth diving helmet is unmatched, with the historical foundation and significance of his grandfather's knowledge and expertise; his masterful skills, techniques and tools utilized; and the quality and beauty of each finely crafted component of the diving helmet. Toth will also showcase several of his new copper and brass art pieces, beautifully inspired by shapes and elements found in the diving helmet.

Toth proudly honors the memory of his grandfather, Anthony Lerios, who died in 1992 at the age of 100. The month of July is especially significant for Toth, since it was July 7, 1913, when his grandfather landed on Ellis Island, having traveled from Greece to the United States.

For additional information about the artist visit his website at www.nicholastothfineart.com .

 

 

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 15 July 2014 15:00
 

Mark Moran to host appraisal event July 19 in Wisconsin

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Written by Outside news source   
Tuesday, 15 July 2014 12:55

Mark Moran

HAYWARD, Wis. – Antiques appraiser and author Mark Moran will provide verbal appraisals on Saturday, July 19, at the Weiss Community Library.

The “What's It Worth?” session is set for 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. The event allows people to have Moran appraise their antiques and collectibles.

Moran, who is not an antiques dealer, stresses that he does not offer to buy or sell on commission the antiques he'll see at the event.

He can be contacted for appraisals on his website, www.markfmoran.com .

The event is a fundraiser for the library. One-third of the appraisal fee goes to the host, in this case the Friends of the Library.

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Last Updated on Tuesday, 15 July 2014 17:19
 

Fenton Art Glass Museum to hold final auction

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Written by Associated Press   
Tuesday, 15 July 2014 08:56
An example of rare Fenton glass, this vase is decorated in the Hanging Vine motif and has an iridized cobalt-blue foot. This particular piece, which is not part of the upcoming Fenton auction, was crafted by the group of European workers who were at Fenton in 1925-26. The vase was sold for $6,200 + buyer's premium by Randy Clark & Associates Auctioneers on Nov. 9, 2008. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Randy Clark WILLIAMSTOWN, W.Va. (AP) - More than 500 Fenton Art Glass pieces are expected to be sold when the Fenton Art Glass Museum holds its final auction.

Collectors from around the world are expected to attend the July 26 auction at the Dexter City Auction Gallery in Dexter City, Ohio. The auction is the last of three to be held.

Fenton Art Glass in Williamstown stopped traditional production in 2011 and now produces jewelry beads. The museum closed in December 2013.

Fenton historian Jim Measell tells the Parkersburg News and Sentinel that bidders can expect to see a wide range of colors and historical items from the second half of the 20th century, along with stretch glass pieces from the 1920s and 1930s.

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Information from: News and Sentinel (Parkersburg, W.Va.), http://www.newsandsentinel.com

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Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
An example of rare Fenton glass, this vase is decorated in the Hanging Vine motif and has an iridized cobalt-blue foot. This particular piece, which is not part of the upcoming Fenton auction, was crafted by the group of European workers who were at Fenton in 1925-26. The vase was sold for $6,200 + buyer's premium by Randy Clark & Associates Auctioneers on Nov. 9, 2008. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Randy Clark
Last Updated on Tuesday, 15 July 2014 09:09
 

World's largest folk art market to open in Santa Fe

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Written by Associated Press   
Thursday, 10 July 2014 10:45
Image courtesy of International Folk Art Alliance SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) - Santa Fe's famed summer market season opens this weekend with the International Folk Market, the world's largest folk art market and one dedicated to helping artisans from impoverished nations start their own businesses.

And as the popular market celebrates its 11th anniversary, it is drawing more than just tourists and locals. Organizers say designers from some of the most prestigious fashion brands are headed west to find inspiration for ethnographic prints and one-of-a-kind handmade pieces that are increasingly popular in the fashion world.

"We've had many fashion experts shop the market, visionary designers from Donna Karan, Yves Saint Laurent, Anthropologie, and Coach among them,'' said market founder Judith Espinar. "We keep hearing that the market is a creativity hotspot, a place to exchange ideas and inspire and be inspired_for artists, retailers, collectors, and visitors alike.''

This year, more than 160 artists from 62 countries will be selling their work, including includes scarves, jewelry, textiles, basket and host of other art pieces.

The market is expected to draw 25,000 visitors from Friday to Sunday. It brings some of the world's finest artisans from far-flung and often poverty-stricken locales, helping participants with travel costs and giving them training for building businesses and cooperatives when they get home. Over the years it has logged $19 million in sales, 90 percent of which goes home with the artists.

"On a trip to India recently, I was reminded of how hard it is to find high quality, handmade folk art,'' said Peter Speliopoulos, creative director of the Donna Karan Collection. "I kept thinking about the Santa Fe International Folk Art Market, and what a well-curated selection of the world's folk art is there. In a weekend you have access to the highest quality art, at good prices, from a world of cultures-- and you feel the richness of interacting with the actual artists themselves. It's amazing."

The folk art event is one of a series of markets taking place in Santa Fe this summer, including markets specializing in Spanish and Indian art and antiques.

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If You Go...

INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART MARKET: July 11-13. Note some events are sold out; http://www.folkartalliance.org/ .

SANTA FE SUMMER ART MARKETS: Schedule, http://santafe.org/Visiting_Santa_Fe/Things_to_Do/Summer_Art_Markets/ .

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Last Updated on Thursday, 10 July 2014 10:53
 

Class of '66 to travel Route 66

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Written by MARTY FINLEY, The News-Enterprise   
Monday, 07 July 2014 12:10

Image by SPUI, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

ELIZABETHTOWN, KY. — Forty-eight years after they graduated, members of the Elizabethtown High School Class of 1966 are reuniting to travel one of the country's most famous highways.

The classmates are banding together to travel a roughly 300-mile stretch of U.S. Route 66 from Springfield, Missouri, to Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

The members who have confirmed their invitation will gather at the starting point of the University Plaza Hotel in Springfield, where many already have booked their reservations. Embracing a spirit of spontaneity, no further reservations have been booked along the route, said Bob Swope, one of the classmates who will make the trip, likely in a 1962 Chrysler Imperial.

"We may want to pack a tent and some sleeping bags," Swope said with a chuckle.

Stephen Rafferty, the classmate who developed a working itinerary for the trip, said there is a simplistic beauty in embracing a self-guided journey without set limitations or hurried schedules.

"Leave it open," Rafferty said. "Where you end up is where you end up."

The group plans to depart from Springfield on July 13 and wrap up their trip the following Sunday, July 20, in Oklahoma City. The itinerary as planned would include stops in Joplin, Missouri; Miami, Oklahoma; and Tulsa.

During his research, Rafferty consulted AAA maps, tour books and other guides and brochures to not only find the best route but also locate entertainment options along the way. To their delight, the approach being taken is filled with museums, wineries and yard sales.

Rafferty joked a visit to Oklahoma's wineries may result in a tour of local jails.

The group estimates an average of 60 miles of travel each day, which is easily attainable in a day's journey while leaving time to tour individual cities and towns.

Tulsa has been penciled in for a two-day stop because the dates the class intends to pass through the city align with a large shopping extravaganza flush with antiques and collectibles.

"Is that where the yard sale is?" Darlene Baumgardner Trimble asked Rafferty of Tulsa. "I'm a two-nighter."

Trimble, a fellow classmate, said she enjoys shopping and site-seeing and is thrilled about hitting such a legendary roadway with old friends.

Route 66 as it was once known technically doesn't exist anymore, decommissioned for decades now and removed from most maps. But patches of it still exist and it attracts flocks of tourists each year who want to travel past the same mile markers so many did in the 1950s and 60s.

Route 66 opened in 1926 and was heavily traveled as people migrated west during the Dust Bowl of the 1930s. The road was developed from Chicago to Los Angeles and runs through Illinois, Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California. It garnered many nicknames, including "The Mother Road."

Swope said his classmates grew up enamored with Route 66 but only started talking about the journey three years ago during a gathering at a classmate's home, where it was noted that most of the class would turn 66 in 2014.

One classmate mentioned a road trip along Route 66 would be a clever way to commemorate the occasion, but they only latched onto the idea when Rafferty developed a rough draft of his itinerary.

About eight classmates have confirmed their participation while many more are on the fence and could probably be swayed with a little "arm twisting," Swope said. Some will be unable to come along, but he hopes those living nearby can make a short trip along the route to have dinner with their classmates.

"I look at it as one great, week-long birthday party for our class," Swope said.

"Before we get too old to do this anymore," Rafferty chimed in.

For classmate Dan Rennie, it will be a chance to reconnect in person with some he hasn't seen in years. Rennie lives outside of Oklahoma City and has supplied Rafferty with brochures and materials on Oklahoma, noting the state and the city have active tourism industries with lots of options over a multi-day visit.

Rennie personally has seen tourists crowd into Oklahoma each year to travel Route 66 and engage those landmarks and businesses still alive along its clip, the specific stops molded by the interests of the traveler.

"It's a kind of individual itinerary," Rennie said.

While speaking by phone to Rafferty, Swope and Trimble, Rennie noted how much the trip means to him personally after years of wandering away from Elizabethtown.

"I'll be happy to see all you guys," he said.

"It'll be a blast," Trimble echoed.

For Rafferty, the trip gives him the freedom to pursue a personal achievement with a group of people he enjoys spending time with.

"If it wasn't for this class, I wouldn't do it on my own," he said.

Read more here: http://www.kentucky.com/2014/07/06/3324855/class-of-66-to-travel-route-66.html#storylink=cpy

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Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 

Last Updated on Monday, 07 July 2014 12:20
 

Carter Center auction raises $1.5 million

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Written by Associated Press   
Monday, 07 July 2014 09:48
Coffee table constructed of antique oak flooring, handmade by former President Jimmy Carter in 2002 as a gift to Lloyd Troyer, a leader in the effort to renovate downtown Plains, Georgia, Carter's hometown. Troyer and his wife, Loretta, donated the table to the recent auction benefiting The Carter Center, where it sold for $110,000. Image courtesy of The Carter Center. ATLANTA (AP) - A recent auction held by The Carter Center has raised more than $1.5 million to benefit the not-for-profit's worldwide health and peace programs.

Center officials say the highest bid was for an original painting by former President Jimmy Carter, which sold for $210,000. More than 150 items were offered during the auction, which was held last weekend in Vail, Colorado, during the annual Carter Center Weekend.

Other top bids included $145,000 for a collection of books by or about 31 presidents with original signatures and $130,000 for a fly-fishing experience with the Carters. A handmade coffee table by Carter also drew $110,000.

The Carter Center was founded in 1982 by the former president and his wife, Rosalynn, in partnership with Emory University.

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Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Coffee table constructed of antique oak flooring, handmade by former President Jimmy Carter in 2002 as a gift to Lloyd Troyer, a leader in the effort to renovate downtown Plains, Georgia, Carter's hometown. Troyer and his wife, Loretta, donated the table to the recent auction benefiting The Carter Center, where it sold for $110,000. Image courtesy of The Carter Center.
Last Updated on Monday, 07 July 2014 10:04
 

Rago's 'Art of Perception' talk to benefit K9s, inmates program

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Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 24 June 2014 12:56
Amy Herman will present 'The Art of Perception' on July 15. Image courtesy Rago Arts & Auction Center. LAMBERTVILLE, N.J. – Rago Arts & Auction Center invites the public to a hear a talk by Amy Herman titled “The Art of Perception,” which will be presented Tuesday, July 15.

Amy Herman holds a B.A. in International Affairs from Lafayette College, a J.D. from the National Law Center, George Washington University, and an M.A. in art history from Hunter College. While working at The Frick Collection, she instituted an interactive program/class using art to help medical students improve their observation skills. After expanding the medical program to seven medical schools in New York, Herman adapted the program for law enforcement professionals across a wide range of agencies including the New York City Police Department, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Department of Justice and the Secret Service. She calls the program she developed “The Art of Perception.”

Miriam Tucker, managing partner of Rago Arts & Auction Center, attended Herman’s presentation of “The Art of Perception” last November at the national conference of the Appraisers Association of America and found it equally entertaining and instructive.

“You'll learn a lot about your ability to observe … or lack thereof,” says Tucker.

Herman’s talk will be given at Rago Auctions, 333 N. Main St. in Lambertville. A social hour will begin at 5:30 p.m. followed by “The Art of Perception” from 6:30-8 p.m.

The suggested donation is $100 per person.

Proceeds will benefit the Puppies Behind Bars, a 501(c)3 organization. Puppies Behind Bars trains prison inmates to raise service dogs for wounded war veterans and explosive-detection dogs for law enforcement, then places them free of charge. The puppies live in prison with their inmate raisers from the age of eight weeks to 24 months. The dogs transform the lives of the inmates who train them and the lives of those they go on to serve. For more information visit puppiesbehindbars.com .

RSVP to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or 609-397-9374 ext. 119.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Amy Herman will present 'The Art of Perception' on July 15. Image courtesy Rago Arts & Auction Center.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 24 June 2014 13:14
 

Vermont promotes Abenaki tribal heritage

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Written by Associated Press   
Monday, 23 June 2014 08:59
Abenaki  couple, an 18th-century watercolor by an unknown artist. Courtesy of the City of Montreal Records Management & Archives, Montreal and Wikimedia Commons. MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) – Vermont is promoting the state's Abenaki heritage.

This summer the Department of Tourism and Marketing is working with Abenaki tribes to help people learn about the first people to live in what is now Vermont.

The information on the VermontVacation.com/Abenaki website serves as a hub for events, exhibits and destinations that welcome visitors to explore the 12,000-year history and culture of today's Abenaki.

Abenaki Heritage Weekend is scheduled for June 28-29 at the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum in Vergennes.

The weekend will feature members of Vermont's four Abenaki tribes and members of the Abenaki Artists Association.

There will be beadwork, quillwork, basketry, pottery, woodworking, and demonstrations and performances of songs, drumming, dancing, games, food preparation, and other life skills.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-06-22-14 1241GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Abenaki  couple, an 18th-century watercolor by an unknown artist. Courtesy of the City of Montreal Records Management & Archives, Montreal and Wikimedia Commons.
Last Updated on Monday, 23 June 2014 09:07
 
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