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Events, Shows & Fairs

NY toasts Lunar New Year with Chinese contemporary art displays

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Written by Museum PR   
Friday, 20 February 2015 16:55
Steel sculpture titled 'Symbiosis' by Xu Jiang. China Central Academy of Fine Art image NEW YORK – As part of “Happy Chinese New Year: Fantastic Art China,” a series of arts and culture initiatives celebrating Chinese Lunar New Year throughout New York City, the China Central Academy of Fine Art is hosting a public exhibit of contemporary Chinese visual art at the David Rubenstein Atrium and Avery Fisher Hall at Lincoln Center now through Feb. 24.

Famous works, including some never previously exhibited outside China, will go on display from artists including:

  • Huang Jiancheng, chief designer of the famed China Pavilion at the 2010 World Expo;
  • Xu Bing, awarded the U.S. State Department’s Medial of Arts in January 2015;
  • Xu Jiang, president of the China Academy of Art whose works have been featured at the Venice Biennale, San Paulo Biennale, and others;
  • Lv Shengzhong, specialist in the ancient Chinese art of paper cutting;
  • Chen Wenling, whose work has been shown by more than a dozen institutions including the China Museum of Art, Korea National Art Museum and Denver Art Museum, and who has received the Perth Coastal Sculpture Public Art prize and Arox international sculpture show grand prize;
  • Zhan Wang, whose signature Artificial Rocks series was the first ever Chinese contemporary sculputures to be featured at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Through Feb. 21, four works will be featured at the Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center, including:

  • Huang Jiancheng will present his famed animated digital tapestry recreating the momentous ancient Chinese painting Along the River during the Qingming Festival, considered by many as the most significant classical Chinese painting in history. The digital artwork has never been exhibited outside of China, and was widely renowned as the centerpiece of the China Pavilion at the 2010 Shanghai World Expo;
  • Xu Bing will exhibit The Character of Characters, a grandiose hand-painted animation explaining the connection between Chinese characters and the temperament of people who write them;
  • Chen Wenling will discuss the symbolism of the era in "The Scene in the Future";
  • Lv Shengzhong, a CAFA professor of experimental art, will showcase his Square Earth, Round Heaven series of traditional Chinese paper cutting.

In addition to these works, the Atrium will be transformed into a contemporary artistic take on a traditional Chinese market, in Lv Shengzhong’s Creativity Bazaar, which will serve as both a real market showing handicrafts from across China and a contemporary art piece. The bazaar will assemble traditional and innovative Chinese craftworks and New Year storing items that are specially collected from across China, including from Shanghai Museum, Nanjing Museum, Hunan Provincial Museum, Zhejiang Provincial Museum, Hubei Provincial Museum, CAFA Museum, Suzhou Museum and Ordos Museum. The bazaar, which will be available for both public viewing and participation, along with the ancient market presented in Huang’s work, together will form a unique comparison and offer audiences an opportunity to better understand Chinese New Year fairs and Chinese traditions of New Year storing.

Finally, upon the completion of the exhibit at the Atrium, two additional works of art will go on display at Avery Fisher Hall at Lincoln Center from Feb. 22 to Feb. 24:

  • Zhan Wang, a professor at CAFA, will display his a piece from his signature sculpture Artificial Rocks, which was part of the first-ever Chinese contemporary sculpture to be featured at the Metropolitan Museum;
  • Xu Jiang, head of the Hangzhou-based China Academy of Art and whose work has been featured at the Venice Biennale, will showcase his steel sculpture Symbiosis, which combines nearly 400 sunflowers in an extravagant display.

Visit fantastic.art.china.cn or follow www.facebook.com/chinanewyearnyc and www.twitter.com/chinanewyearnyc for more information.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Steel sculpture titled 'Symbiosis' by Xu Jiang. China Central Academy of Fine Art image
Last Updated on Friday, 20 February 2015 17:24
 

Marburger Farm gearing up for spring show, March 31-April 4

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Written by Antique show PR   
Thursday, 19 February 2015 14:47

Under one of the dozen big tents at last fall's Marburger Farm Antique Show. Marburger Farm Antique Show  image.

ROUND TOP, Texas – You can tell who they are. The ones with tape measures, the notepads, the paint chips and the stylish comfortable shoes. At the Marburger Farm Antique Show in Round Top, Texas interior design professionals jump into the glory of 10 tents and 12 buildings filled with 350 antiques dealers and artisans. On March 31-April 4 they will lead the way.

Dallas interior designer Kim Turner of KT Designs has shopped for clients at Marburger Farm since its very first show in 1997. “The thing about designers is time,” says Turner. “A good designer does not have time to shop the world or every market nearby. Marburger dealers are professionals at what they do too – they spend the time scouring the planet for the best antiques and they have the contacts all over the world. That’s what designers find at Marburger: not bulk bargains, but the absolutely best and most wonderful things in the world. I am always delighted at Marburger Farm to pay a fair price for something fabulous. Besides, I love the pimento cheese sandwiches.”

Many Marburger Farm exhibitors buy with interior design customers in mind, as well as their retail customers. Dealer Frederica Anderson of Amarillo, Texas, buys largely out of old Santa Fe, New Mexico estates, full of top French, English and American antiques and art. “The designers know how to spot the best piece in the booth,” says Anderson. “At Marburger I sell to a designer from Los Angeles – last time they bought a set of Italian chairs and an 18th century desk. I don’t get these all the time, but designers can spot them from across the show.” For the spring 2015 show, Anderson will offer early frames, a single-door French cabinet in dark wood, as well as a French side table and bench and an Italian Cassone chair. “Designers are looking for more contemporary lines, streamlined and simple. So I focus on antiques that are very old, but not too busy or detailed. Right now, designers want simple but old.”

Alan Hoops of Findlay, Ohio, says that designers are drawn to Marburger Farm because “Marburger is the biggest selection of the best dealers in one location anywhere – and most are professional dealers, not part-time. They are accustomed to dealing with designers and know what designers are looking for.” Hoops will offer well-priced white ironstone and transfer ware. “We just bought 140 pieces of white ironstone in Ohio, our largest selection ever.” Designers and collectors use the simple lines of ironstone dishes inside glass front cupboards or on open shelves or walls.

Dealer Stanley Hildreth of Sebasky & Hildreth from Staples, Minnesota, will offer 18th-19th century furniture and decorative arts, including Staffordshire, sterling and early textiles. A stunner from a Minneapolis estate will be an 18th century Queen Anne chinoiserie secretary in red and white lacquer. Sounds like the definition of the “one-of-a-kind” objects that designers expect to find at this one-of-a-kind show. Hildreth says that cost is a factor for designers, in comparison to the cost of buying new objects. “When it comes to the quality that a good designer wants, they can buy much more quality, dollar for dollar, with an antique than with high-quality new items. The really good new items are extremely expensive. An antique repurposed, re-covered, reimagined will always beat the new on quality and price.”

For amenities to make shopping easier and more fun, Marburger Farm offers a long list for every visitor: free parking and parking shuttle, mile-high pies and full-service breakfast and lunch cafe, show-wide WIFI and golf carts available for rent, the Blacksmith Shop bar, the official show magazine, “The Howdy,” and air-conditioned restrooms. A new benefit for interior designers will be the VIP program with Marburger’s on-site shipper, Distinguished Transport, offering VIP breakfast, swag bags and shipping and storage assistance.

The Marburger Farm Antique Show opens on Tuesday, March 31, with early buying from 10 a.m. through 2 p.m. for $25 for adults, free for children 15 and under. Regular $10 admission begins March 31 at 2 p.m. One admission is good all week, with the show running on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on Saturday, April 4, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Advance tickets, group tickets and shopper WIFI are available. Parking is free. See information on travel, maps, vendors, special events, lodging, on-site shipping and the Marburger Cafe at www.roundtop-marburger.com or call Ashley Ferguson at 800-947-5799. Get a sneak peek on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/marburgerfarmantiqueshow or on the show blog at www.roundtop-marburger.com/blog



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

Under one of the dozen big tents at last fall's Marburger Farm Antique Show. Marburger Farm Antique Show  image.

 Everything from small accents to huge statement pieces can easily be found at Marburger Farm Antique Show. Marburger Farm Antique Show  image.

The sun sets on the Marburger Farm Antique Show last fall. Another big show is on the horizon: March 31-April 4. Marburger Farm Antique Show  image.

Last Updated on Friday, 20 February 2015 09:12
 

Ahlers & Ogletree's pop culture sale struck a responsive chord

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Written by Auction House PR   
Wednesday, 18 February 2015 17:28

1963 Gibson archtop stereo electric guitar (model ES345, serial #100506), with sunburst finish. Price realized: $8,500. Ahlers & Ogletree image

ATLANTA – Pop culture and baby boomer collectibles took center stage at Ahlers & Ogletree’s Feb. 8 Winter Estates Auction, as items connected to such iconic names as Elvis Presley and Ty Cobb attracted hordes of bidders both in-person and online and sold for dizzying dollars in the process. The auction was held in the firm’s gallery at 715 Miami Circle in Atlanta.

LiveAuctioneers.com provide absentee and Internet live bidding.

“Frankly, we were caught off guard by the response we received from this auction, our first one featuring pop culture items,” said Robert Ahlers of Ahlers & Ogletree, adding, “I can assure you, it won’t be our last.” Ahlers & Ogletree has built its reputation on auctions featuring original art, fine estate jewelry and decorative accessories. These were also featured at the Feb. 8 auction.

But it wasn’t just the oil paintings and diamond rings that produced a standing-room only crowd of about 150 people, plus hundreds of Internt bidders. “They also came for the ’50s-era Coca-Cola machine, the 1963 Gibson guitar and the other pop culture items,” Ahlers remarked.

In all, over 500 lots came up for bid in an auction that was strong across all categories. “I knew that merchandise from the baby boomer generation was a niche market, but I didn’t realize it had such a strong and enthusiastic following,” Ahlers said. “Moving forward, we will actively pursue consignors with merchandise that was equal to the great items we had in our February auction.”

Following are highlights from the auction. All prices quoted are hammer.

A framed collection of Elvis Presley memorabilia and autographs, including a Presley-signed copy of the sheet music for I Got Stung, recorded in Nashville in 1958, with his signature in black pen lower right, fetched $5,000. The presentation also contained photos of Elvis singing on stage and playing the piano. A plaque was inscribed “The King of Rock and Roll, 1935-1977.”

A mid-to-late 1950s Coca-Cola 10-cent vending machine by Vendo, beautifully restored and bright red, changed hands for $3,000. The machine, designed to hold 81 bottles, had shelves that were adjustable to hold 6-ounce, 10-ounce or 12-ounce bottles. The machine stood 58 ½ inches tall by 27 inches wide. It came with the keys, for retrieving dimes from the 10-cent mechanism.

A baseball signed by the legendary Ty Cobb, showing his signature and the date in ballpoint pen (“Ty Cobb, 12/16/59”) brought $2,250. The ball, housed in an acrylic box with black base, had been given to the consignor’s wife when Cobb was in treatment at a hospital where she worked. The signature was consistent with other balls signed by Cobb late in life.

A 1963 Gibson archtop stereo electric guitar (model ES345, serial #100506), with sunburst finish and two PAF Humbucker pickups, gaveled for $8,500. The guitar, about 41 inches long, boasted maple plywood top and sides, mother of pearl double parallelogram fret markers on the mahogany neck, the Gibson logo on top of the front headstock and a hard case.

A late 19th or early 20th century Melchior Brothers Imperial oak and leather barber’s chair rose to $3,000. The chair featured a full recline, adjustable footrest and hydraulic lift. The square-back tufted leather upholstery back and seat were surmounted with an adjustable headrest. The whole was edged in silver-colored rivets and nickel-plated arm supports over an ornate plating footrest.

The auction’s top two lots came from the fine art category, as a pair of gouache under glass renderings of ducks in flight by Athos Menaboni (Italian/American, 1895-1990), titled Mallard and Black Duck, realized $10,000 and $9,000 respectively. Both works were framed, pencil-signed and titled by Menaboni, who was primarily a bird painter, as well as a decorator and an illustrator.

Rounding out just some of the day’s top lots, a men’s Rolex Presidential 18K yellow gold watch with gold textured bark finish dial with diamond markers, with case, sold for $9,000; and a mid-20th century Chinese Export porcelain saucer form bowl with a hand-painted exterior showing prunus fruit trees, vine and leaves, with the Qianlong Period mark, hit $1,300.

For details call Allers & Ogletree at 404-869-2478 or e-mail them at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

1963 Gibson archtop stereo electric guitar (model ES345, serial #100506), with sunburst finish. Price realized: $8,500. Ahlers & Ogletree image

Framed collection of Elvis Presley memorabilia and autographs, including a Presley-signed copy of the sheet music for ‘I Got Stung!’ Price realized: $5,000. Ahlers & Ogletree image

Mid-to-late 1950s Coca-Cola 10-cent vending machine by Vendo, beautifully restored and bright red. Price realized: $3,000. Ahlers & Ogletree image

Baseball signed by baseball legend Ty Cobb, showing his signature and the date (12/16/59) in ballpoint pen. Price realized: $2,250. Ahlers & Ogletree image

Late 19th or early 20th century Melchior Brothers Imperial oak and leather barber’s chair. Price realized: $3,000. Ahlers & Ogletree image

A pair of gouache under glass renderings of ducks in flight by Athos Menaboni (Italian/American 1895-1990) brought $10,000 and $9,000. Ahlers & Ogletree image

Men’s Rolex Presidential 18K yellow gold watch with gold textured bark finish dial with diamond markers. Price realized: $9,000. Ahlers & Ogletree image

Last Updated on Wednesday, 18 February 2015 18:05
 

Cotswolds Art & Antiques Fair at Blenheim Palace April 16-19

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Written by Antique show PR   
Wednesday, 18 February 2015 15:56

Kinghams Art Pottery Ltd, Martin Brothers vase decorated with grotesque character fish, 1899, £5,500. The Cotswolds Art & Antiques Dealers' Association Fair image

WOODSTOCK, UK – The Cotswolds Art & Antiques Dealers' Association Fair returns to the elegant setting of Blenheim Palace, Woodstock, Oxfordshire, April 16-19. Now in its fourth year, the fair takes place in the Orangery overlooking the magnificent Formal Gardens of the Palace.

The 24 exhibitors, all members of the Cotswolds Art & Antiques Dealers' Association, can boast to being part of the “best of the best fairs” in having the best specialist dealers in the UK, exhibiting the best stock available in the best stately home with the finest view in England.

The Cotswolds Art & Antiques Dealers' Association (CADA) is the pre-eminent of the regional trade associations with many of its 50 members exhibiting at the top London and international fairs. New faces at the fair this year are Delomosne & Son Ltd., antique dealers from Chippenham handling English and Irish 18th & 19th century glass and porcelain. All works are for sale with prices ranging up to £100,000.

The charm of the fair is the unique opportunity to hunt for exceptional and quirky antiques and fine art to be from all corners of the Cotswolds without having to travel the length and breadth of the area. The very best of every discipline is showcased including furniture, pictures, silver, early needlework, antique boxes, sculpture, clocks and barometers, carpets and textiles, jewelry, Oriental and English ceramics, garden ornaments and many other decorative objects.

Highlights within the fair include a number of rare needleworks dating from the 17th century from Witney Antiques including a delightful English silk work embroidery of a lady playing the lute surrounded by small insects, animals and birds, circa 1660. Another is a sampler finished in 1723, just one year after the building of Blenheim Palace had been completed. From David Pickup is an unusual, if not unique, English brass chandelier dated 1688.

Collectors of ceramics will enjoy spotting a very good early Pratt ware large model of a spotted cat, circa 1800, price £3,750 along with a very good quality 18th century Derby porcelain large figure of Britannia, price £1,250 from Andrew Dando.

Chairman of the Association, John Howard, the leading specialist dealer in 18th and 19th century British pottery has sourced a rare English delftware pottery blue charger with the royal portrait of Queen Anne with the initials A R, along with an excellent provenance. The price is £17,500. More art pottery in the form of a Martin Brothers vase is a grotesque character fish from 1899, priced £5,500 by Kinghams Art Pottery Ltd. Chinese ceramics are well represented by Catherine Hunt Oriental Ceramics such as a transitional double gourd bottle vase for £13,500 and a Kangxi Islamic-style bottle vase for £4,000. Hall-Bakker Decorative Arts specializes in a wide range of post 1860s design such as an Art Nouveau Galle cameo vase of seule fleur form, got £1,350, and an Arts and Crafts sea green glass vinaigrette by James Powell & Sons, circa 1907 for £650.

Decorators are always asked to find antique carpets and textiles and this year's highlight from Legge Carpets is a Suzani from Uzbekistan from the late 19th century, a silk embroidery on hand-woven linen. A quite exceptional early George III period mahogany coffer/box from W.R. Harvey (Antiques) & Co. Ltd., priced £2,250, would enhance any Cotswolds manor house.

Paintings are well represented in the fair and the Kyffin Gallery is showing an oil on canvas of Polperro, Cornwall by Dutch artist Hendrik Jan Wolter (1873-1952). Born in Holland in 1873 he considered himself a passionate plein-air painter and was inspired by painting water, sea and harbors.

Régate à Henley, an oil on panel painted by Jacques Emile Blanche (1861-1942) in 1920 can be found on Trinity House Paintings Ltd. stand. Sarah Colegrave deals in 19th and 20th century pictures and she is bringing Arriving at the Ball an oil by Cyrus Cincinnato Cuneo (1879-1916), price £2,500. Cuneo tragically died from blood poisoning at the age of 37 caused by the accidental stab of a hatpin at a dance. Also on Colegrave’s stand is a watercolor of the UK's very first sex symbol, Frances Day, the golden girl of the 1930s painted by Robert Stewart Sherriffs (1906-1960), price £1,800.

Elizabeth Harvey-Lee, specialist print dealer is bringing an original etching from 1898 of Rudyard Kipling by William Strang RA, who was an admirer of Kipling and etched his portrait several times. It is priced £850. Among the many watercolors with Newman Fine Art is one of interest to local residents of The Town Hall and North & South Bridge Street, Banbury, Oxon, by William Frederick Austin (1833-1899), signed and dated 1863. It is priced £1,850. Lovers of marine art will enjoy Frigate Getting Underway, signed and dated 1854 by William Joy (1803-1866) from Stuart Boyd Fine Art.

Howards Jewelers of Stratford is taking two stands, one creating a sparkling display of jewelry including a stunning Victorian diamond and enamel serpent bangle, circa 1870 and a broad selection of silver on the second. Tobias Birch of Montpellier Clocks has a couple of stunning highlights including a rare and small English rosewood mantel clock, circa 1830, and a fine and rare long-case regulator of the best “Mudge & Dutton” quality, circa 1790.

Garden design is well represented by Architectural Heritage who has a huge range of antique statuary such as a pair of decorative wrought iron garden gates, circa 1900 for £1,800, a late 19th century sundial and a stained and painted glass window from circa 1860 illustrating the “Arms of England,” which are the armorial bearings of Richard I or Coeur de Lion, priced £1,800.

The event runs 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. daily.

For details log on to the Cotswolds Art & Antiques' Dealers website: www.thecada.org.



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

Kinghams Art Pottery Ltd, Martin Brothers vase decorated with grotesque character fish, 1899, £5,500. The Cotswolds Art & Antiques Dealers' Association Fair image 

Andrew Dando, early 19th century Pratt ware moneybox in the form of a house, Yorkshire, circa 1820, 14.5cm, £875.The Cotswolds Art & Antiques Dealers' Association Fair image 

Andrew Dando, early Pratt ware large model of a spotted cat, Staffordshire or Yorkshire, circa 1800, 17.3cm, £3,750. The Cotswolds Art & Antiques Dealers' Association Fair image 

 Architectural Heritage, 19th century, circa 1860, stained and painted glass window, height 62cm, £1,800. The Cotswolds Art & Antiques Dealers' Association Fair image

David Pickup, rare late 17th century brass chandelier, English, dated 1688. The Cotswolds Art & Antiques Dealers' Association Fair image 

 Joanna Booth, Brussels tapestry, Flemish, circa 1560, woven in wool and silk, 270 x 190 cm. The Cotswolds Art & Antiques Dealers' Association Fair image

John Noott Galleries, John Emms (1844-1912), ‘Sharing Supper,’ 12in x 16in. The Cotswolds Art & Antiques Dealers' Association Fair image 

 Peter Bunting Antiques, portrait of a young lady, English, circa 1720, oil on canvas, £3,500. The Cotswolds Art & Antiques Dealers' Association Fair image

Last Updated on Wednesday, 18 February 2015 16:25
 

Gen. Sherman's burning of Columbia recalled 150 years later

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Written by Associated Press   
Wednesday, 18 February 2015 10:25

Ruins seen from the capitol, Columbia, South Carolina, 1865, as photographed by George N. Barnard (1819-1902), U.S. Army

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) – University scholars, specialists in historic foods and members of the public are gathering to recall the 150th anniversary of Union Gen. William Sherman's capture and burning of the South Carolina capitol in Columbia.

A daylong symposium is being held at the Columbia Museum of Art on Tuesday. A lunch featuring foods from the era and afternoon panel discussions are included.

The University of South Carolina is hosting the event. Scholars from Yale University, the University of Pennsylvania and USC are discussing topics such as the emancipation of blacks, the evolution of warfare and how the burning created an urban disaster.

Registration is required for the talks. Other events are free and open to the public, including the unveiling of a historical marker.

Copyright 2015 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-02-17-15 1455GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

 Ruins seen from the capitol, Columbia, South Carolina, 1865, as photographed by George N. Barnard (1819-1902), U.S. Army

Last Updated on Wednesday, 18 February 2015 10:39
 

Int'l Society of Appraisers' conference set for March 20-23 in Philly

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Written by Outside Media Source   
Wednesday, 11 February 2015 15:15

CHICAGO –The International Society of Appraisers (ISA) annual conference, Assets 2015, will bring together hundreds of personal property appraisers from across the United States and Canada, March 20-23 in Philadelphia. Taking place at the newly restored Radisson Blu–Warwick Hotel Philadelphia, the 2015 conference will feature a broad range of distinguished antiques and fine art speakers, special events, optional tours and more.

This year's conference has attracted a roster of speakers and sponsors that read like a Who’s Who of industry leaders. Speakers include renowned scholars from Winterthur and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, premier gallerists, distinguished principals and department heads from Christie’s, Freeman’s, Gurr Johns, NYU and the IRS.

“Record support for Assets this year reflects ISA's growing reputation for offering the gold standard in appraising art and antiques,” said ISA President Cindy Charleston-Rosenberg, ISA CAPP. “Each and every program segment reflects ISA’s unique collaborative approach to the discipline of appraising: marrying scholarship to appraisal theory and methodology and an inviting collaborative culture of shared expertise.”

The diverse conference program and associated programs have been developed by combining product knowledge, scholarship and advanced methodology with practical, accessible tools to improve appraisal proficiency, and grow a client base.

The educational program includes:

• General sessions, applicable across valuation disciplines.

• Specific break-out sessions for antiques, residential contents and fine art, designed for dealers and appraisers.

• Premium tours of Philadelphia’s mural art, museums, and galleries.

• A Lunch and Learn session to deepen knowledge through collaboration and discussion.

Beyond the educational programs, the conference schedule includes new member functions, exhibitor displays, museum tours and plenty of networking opportunities, from luncheons to smaller social events.

In addition to the appraisal-related content of auction specialists, IRS appraisers, art advisory experts, and decorative art scholars, ISA is pleased to feature business development authority Shelly Berman-Rubera, founder & President of Small Business Results, as the conference closing speaker. Berman-Rubera will be presenting on growing and propelling appraisal practice revenue. ISA appraisers have regularly requested expert advice and consultancy on growing and expanding the professional appraisal practice. Through the combination of credentials and experience, Berman-Rubera offers small business owners, entrepreneurs, and independent professionals unique and inspiring business development consulting and programs. All personal property appraisers, from the solo professional to the large multi-office practices will benefit from this closing presentation.

Event sponsors for Assets 2015 include Artnet, Bonhams, Chubb, Collector Systems, Eli Wilner & Co., EstateSales.net, Freeman's Auction, Great Gatsby's, Heritage, Jackson’s, Modernism.com, Prices 4 Antiques, The Potomack Company, Stevens Company, Quinn’s, William Bunch Auctions and Worthpoint.

“For the first time in ISA's history, exhibition space has sold out,” says Charleston-Rosenberg. “Only a handful of advertising opportunities to partner with ISA at conference remain. Networking with ISA professional and qualified appraisers and presenting to ISA membership, the largest of the professional personal property appraisal organizations, has become increasingly attractive to business allies and expert presenters alike.”

About the International Society of Appraisers:

Founded in 1979, the International Society of Appraisers (ISA) is the largest of the professional personal property appraisal associations representing the most highly trained and rigorously tested independent appraisers in the United States and Canada. ISA is a not-for-profit association, formed to support member needs and to enhance public trust by producing qualified and ethical appraisers who are recognized authorities in personal property appraising.

ISA is recognized for hosting the finest personal property appraisal conferences in the profession. Visit ISA at www.isa-appraisers.org for speaker bios and to register for Assets 2015.

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Last Updated on Wednesday, 11 February 2015 17:02
 

Helen Mirren brings Nazi-looted art film to Berlin fest

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Written by DEBORAH COLE   
Wednesday, 11 February 2015 14:13
Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer by Gustav Klimt. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. BERLIN (AFP) – Oscar winner Helen Mirren presented her new movie about Nazi looted art in Berlin on Monday, saying Germany and Austria should not rest until all the works are returned.

The 69-year-old British actress stars in U.S.-British co-production Woman in Gold, premiering at the 65th Berlin film festival.

Mirren plays Maria Altmann, who fought the Austrian government for years to secure the return of five Gustav Klimt paintings stolen by the Nazis from her Jewish family during World War II.

They include two stunning portraits of Altmann's aunt Adele Bloch-Bauer, completed with gold leaf, as well as three landscapes.

Altmann finally won her battle in 2006 and died five years later aged 94.

She "was such a remarkable, wonderful, funny, sexy, witty, humane ... a great, great woman," said Mirren, who picked up an Academy Award for her portrayal of Elizabeth II in 2006's The Queen.

"I didn't know if I'd be able to do her justice, because she deserved it," she said of Altmann.

The case brought to light the issue of the Nazis' systematic plundering of cultural treasures, an estimated 100,000 of which are in the possession of the world's great museums, hidden away in private collections or lost forever.

Asked about the progress made by Germany and Austria in coming to terms with the issue, Mirren said she saw progress but added: "We mustn't ever feel that we've come to the end of that particular human journey."

 

- 'Story in one image' -

 

In the film, directed by Simon Curtis, Mirren plays Altmann as an elderly woman living in Los Angeles who enlists the grandson of Austrian composer Arnold Schoenberg, a California lawyer played by Ryan Reynolds, to accompany her back to Vienna to take on the Austrian authorities.

The story is also told in lushly shot flashbacks beginning with Klimt, played by German actor Moritz Bleibtreu, painting Adele, until Altmann was forced to flee Austria after Hitler annexed the country in 1938.

The present-day Austrian officials implore Altmann to drop the case, calling Woman in Gold, hanging in Vienna's Belvedere museum, "Austria's Mona Lisa."

Mirren said she visited the Belvedere during the shoot and discovered the haunting, unfinished Klimt painting of Amalie Zuckerkandl, who was later killed at the extermination camp Belzec.

"In a way I found that just the most emotional thing to see," Mirren said, fighting back tears.

"To me that brings all of the whole story together in one image."

Mirren, who was previously unfamiliar with the Altmann case, said that now, almost a decade on, Austria understood its moral implications.

"Vienna was enormously welcoming to us to shoot – there was never any sense of resentment or anger or anything," she said.

"They said 'we are grateful to Maria Altman here in Vienna because she made us look at our past in a realistic way and take on board things that we had never taken on board before'."

Altmann sold the 1907 iconic gilt Portrait of Adele Bloch Bauer I to makeup magnate Ronald Lauder for $135 million dollars, then the highest known price ever paid for a painting.

It now hangs on permanent display at Lauder's Neue Galerie museum in New York.

The Berlin film festival runs until Sunday.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer by Gustav Klimt. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 11 February 2015 14:40
 

UK’s Petworth House site of antiques & art fair May 8-10

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Written by Antique show PR   
Thursday, 05 February 2015 13:52
'On the Dunes' by Edward Brian Seago, oil on canvas, £100,000-150,000 from Haynes Fine Art of Broadway. The Antiques Dealers Fair Limited image PETWORTH, UK – The Antiques Dealers Fair Limited is organizing a brand new event – The Petworth Park Antiques & Fine Art Fair – on the grounds of Petworth House, the magnificent National Trust property in West Sussex, which inspired such great British artists as J.M.W. Turner and John Constable. Scheduled for Friday, May 8, through Sunday, May 10, the Petworth Park Antiques & Fine Art Fair will be held in a marquee in the 700-acre deer park, which surrounds the late 17th century mansion and borders the Sussex town of Petworth.

A wonderful excuse to visit the fair this May is that each ticket also gains free entry to Petworth House (and Park) to see all its treasures, including paintings by J.M.W. Turner and Van Dyck. In a reciprocal arrangement, Petworth House ticket holders and National Trust members can also have free entry to the fair.

A treat is in store for art lovers, with several exhibitors offering a wide range of paintings and sculptures from antique to contemporary. Horton London is bringing Auguste Rodin’s Femme qui se peigne, a 24cm-tall bronze, inscribed "A. Rodin" and numbered 1 of 8, priced at £25,000 and A Water Party, oil on canvas signed by John James Chalon (1778-1854) and dated 1836, £3,600.

Haynes Fine Art of Broadway has collections of oil and watercolor paintings by Thomas Sidney Cooper (1803-1902), Heywood Hardy (1894-1933) and Edward Brian Seago (1910-1974), including Seago’s On the Dunes, oil on canvas, with a price guide of £100,000 to £150,000.

Worthing based Wilsons Antiques has paintings celebrating the Sussex coast with Thomas Bush Hardy’s watercolor of Littlehampton Harbour, circa 1880, priced at £2,750. Other Sussex exhibitors include Petworth dealer Ronald G. Chambers Antiques offering a wide range of the finest quality mahogany, rosewood and walnut antique furniture dating from 1700 to 1910; Moncrieff-Bray Gallery, from the nearby hamlet of Egdean, selling contemporary art and sculpture; Tim Saltwell with Regency and Edwardian fine furniture and interior accessories, including a fine Napoleon III gilt bronze and blue Celeste Sèvres-style porcelain mantel clock, circa 1870, £7,950; and Garret & Hurst Sculpture bringing 19th century bronzes, including a fine early signed bronze cast of Giselle by pioneer of animalier sculpture Pierre-Jules Mêne (1810-1879).

Spectacular pieces of jewelry can be found from a number of dealers at the fair. London-based Richard Ogden Ltd. is bringing an Edwardian openwork platinum brooch set with a large cushion cut aquamarine of approximately 24 carats and rose cut diamonds, selling for £3,800 and an unusual, quirky tsavorite garnet and diamond set grasshopper brooch, mounted in 18K white and yellow gold with cabochon ruby set eyes, £5,275.

There is a great opportunity to pick up antique furniture from a number of specialists. Freshfords Fine Antiques from Bath is bringing a George III mahogany inlaid secretaire bookcase in the manner of Gillows of Lancaster and London, circa 1795, £13,850.

With over 30 antiques shops, Petworth itself is a favored destination for collectors of antiques, fine and decorative art, so it seems fitting to add a stylish antiques fair to the area. Some 35 specialist dealers, predominantly members of LAPADA, the Association of Art & Antiques Dealers and the British Antique Dealers' Association, will showcase their finest wares including traditional furniture, jewelry, silver, antique and contemporary paintings and sculpture, glass, clocks, Oriental rugs and carpets, objets d’art and much more.

Unique to this new event is a sculpture park with a number of art dealers providing differing works of art for outdoors, with works by local and other artists shown by Moncrieff-Bray Gallery, The Jerram Gallery and others.

Ingrid Nilson, director of the Antiques Dealers Fair Limited said, “We are most grateful to the National Trust for inviting us to hold this new event. We are excited to work with them and have the support of the Petworth Antiques & Decorative Arts Association and the Petworth Business Association and are looking forward to building a thoroughly attractive event for visitors from far and wide. The grand 17th century Petworth House boasts an internationally important art collection. Together with its ‘Capability Brown’ landscaped country park, it will provide a magnificent backdrop for our newest fair.”

Refreshments are available throughout the day. Tickets for the antiques fair cost £10 each and can be bought in advance from organizers – The Antiques Dealers Fair Limited – or at the door. There will also be free parking for antiques fair visitors in a specially located nearby car park. For tickets or more information contact The Antiques Dealers Fair Limited on +44 (0)1797 252030 or visit the website www.petworthparkfair.com

 




ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE
'On the Dunes' by Edward Brian Seago, oil on canvas, £100,000-150,000 from Haynes Fine Art of Broadway. The Antiques Dealers Fair Limited image Eighteen carat gold tsavorite garnet, diamond and ruby set grasshopper brooch, £5,275 from Richard Ogden Ltd. The Antiques Dealers Fair Limited image The Antrobus Basket by Joseph Story and William Elliott, London, 1810, £8,950 from Mary Cooke Antiques Ltd. The Antiques Dealers Fair Limited image Petworth House and Park, the magnificent National Trust property in West Sussex, site of the Petworth Park Antiques & Fine Art Fair, May 8-10. Martin Offer image
Last Updated on Thursday, 05 February 2015 14:55
 

Lincoln funeral re-enactment could be boon for Springfield

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Written by Associated Press   
Monday, 02 February 2015 10:09
Abraham Lincoln's tomb in Springfield, Illinois. Image by Robert Lawton. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic license. SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) – Springfield officials say the 150th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln's funeral could be a windfall for the city, which is preparing a series of tributes that include a re-enactment of the funeral in May.

An exhibition called “Remembering Lincoln” opens Sunday at the Illinois State Museum, beginning a celebration that leads up to a three-day tribute and re-enactment of Lincoln's funeral that begins May 1. Lincoln was buried in Oak Ridge Cemetery in Springfield on May 4, 1865.

Hotel rooms are already being booked for that weekend, said Gina Gemberling, acting executive director of the Springfield Convention and Visitors Bureau. But many are still available, she told The State Journal-Register.

Old Capitol Goods, the official vendor for the Lincoln Funeral Coalition, has memorabilia such as “Honest Abe” posters and T-shirts that read, “Abraham Lincoln Farewell Tour.” There are also commemorative U.S. flags with 36 stars, replicas of the flag that draped Lincoln's coffin.

“We have people coming from outside the United States and all over the country,” store co-owner Dana Homann said. “There's going to be a lot going on, and it's not just the funeral procession.”

Springfield hosted a 200th anniversary celebration for Lincoln's birthday in 2009, and hotels saw rooms booked weeks in advance. Visitors included President Barack Obama, and shop owners said business boomed.

“We were up about 30 percent that year,” Homann said. “The recession hit in 2008, and we were spared.”

___

Information from: The State Journal-Register, http://www.sj-r.com

Copyright 2015 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-01-30-15 2117GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Abraham Lincoln's tomb in Springfield, Illinois. Image by Robert Lawton. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic license.
Last Updated on Monday, 02 February 2015 10:15
 

Tate Modern launches monthly artists’ film premieres

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Written by Museum PR   
Tuesday, 27 January 2015 14:10
Phillip Warnell, 'Ming of Harlem: Twenty One Storeys in the Air,' film still. © Big Other Films, 2014

LONDON – Tate Film will present the UK premier of Ming of Harlem: Twenty One Storeys in the Air as part of a new program, Artist Cinema. The first in a new strand of monthly artists’ film premieres at Tate Modern, this fascinating debut feature-length film by British director Phillip Warnell tells the real-life story of Antoine Yates, who kept a tiger called Ming and a large alligator in his high-rise New York apartment for several years.

Warnell’s film investigates the philosophical questions posed by co-habitation with animals. In order to recreate Yates’s absurdly cramped living conditions, much of the film was shot under controlled conditions in a British zoo. Philip Warnell is a filmmaker, artist and academic based in London. Warnell’s cinematic work explores a range of philosophical ideas, such as human-animal relations and the poetics of the body and its dimensionality. Ming of Harlem is Warnell’s second collaboration with philosopher Jean-Luc Nancy. The work explores the interplay between film, politics and notions of sense as theorized by Nancy in his voiceover.

“Perfectly incarnating the typology of an artist’s film, Ming of Harlem opens the new strand of Artist Cinema at Tate Modern. Ming of Harlem bridges the fields of philosophy, ethology and sociology, producing knowledge across several disciplinary areas and questioning the status of reality and fiction. In doing so, it anticipates the kind of films that Tate Film will be presenting throughout the upcoming years,” said Andrea Lissoni, curator of film and international art at Tate Modern.

Ming of Harlem has garnered much critical acclaim, having won the Georges Beauregard International Prize at the International Film Festival Marseille earlier this year. The evening will begin with a screening of Warnell’s first collaboration with Nancy, the short film Outlandish: Strange and Foreign Bodies (2009). The UK premiere of Ming of Harlem will be followed by a live Q&A with Phillip Warnell and Jean-Pierre Rehm, director of the FIDMarseille-International Film Festival Marseille.

Ming of Harlem is the inaugural work to be premiered at Tate Modern as part of the Artist Cinema program. This strand of film previews will include Singularity by Catalonian director Albert Serra on March 13. It is a unique preview of his in-development project commissioned for the Catalan participation at the forthcoming 56th Venice Art Biennale as a Collateral Event. The Cast by Clemens von Wedemayer will premiere on April 30, a highly anticipated three-part experimental film incorporating 3-D animation with a narrative based on an incident that took place during the shooting of the film Ben Hur. And on May 20, Rosa Barba’s The Hidden Conference will receive its world premiere, capturing unseen and uncurated art works in storage at the Neue National-galerie in Berlin.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Phillip Warnell, 'Ming of Harlem: Twenty One Storeys in the Air,' film still. © Big Other Films, 2014
Last Updated on Tuesday, 27 January 2015 16:35
 

Jackie O auction to be featured Thursday on 'CBS This Morning'

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Written by CATHERINE SAUNDERS-WATSON, Auction Central News International   
Wednesday, 14 January 2015 12:41

Robert Davidoff silver gelatin print of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis at West Palm Airport in Florida. From a group lot of two photos that will convey with copyright. Est. $800-$1,200. PBMA image

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. (ACNI) – Rico Baca and Wade Terwilliger, owners of Palm Beach Modern Auctions (PBMA), have confirmed to Auction Central News that CBS This Morning is planning to air a feature tomorrow about their January 17th auction. The story will air sometime between 8 and 9 a.m.

A CBS News team arrived at PBMA’s West Palm Beach exhibition center this morning to interview Baca about two archives containing personal notes Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis wrote to her favorite couturier and interior designer, respectively. The dates on the various pieces of correspondence run from the mid 1980s through the early 1990s. An additional auction highlight is an estate archive of Kennedy family photos taken in Palm Beach by photographer Robert Davidoff.

The TV coverage is also scheduled to include interviews with the aforementioned designers who worked with Onassis: Bill Hamilton, longtime head of design for Carolina Herrera; and Richard Keith Langham, who was associated with the Keith Irvine interior design firm.

“The notes in Bill Hamilton’s archive show that his relationship with Mrs. Onassis wasn’t just about the business of making her look elegant and stylish; they were friends, as well,” Baca told Auction Central News. “Some of the notes reveal how involved she was in the actual design process, but others are simply very warm notes expressing appreciation for things Bill had done for her.”

A cordial relationship also existed between Onassis and Langham, who created English-country-style rooms in several of the first lady’s homes. Langham’s eclectic archive of correspondence includes thoughtfully composed thank-you notes and an illustrated book titled The White House, inscribed: “For Richard – Perhaps this great house will know your touch one day – your friend Jacqueline Kennedy” (dated March 4, 1987).

CBS This Morning, the award-winning TV show anchored by Charlie Rose, Gayle King and Norah O’Donnell, covered a Palm Beach Modern Auctions event once before, in a broadcast that aired almost exactly two years ago. The subject was the company’s January 19, 2013 auction of the Steve Rubell/Studio 54 Archive, which garnered worldwide press and a then-record number of Internet bidders for PBMA through LiveAuctioneers.

PBMA’s Jan. 17, 2015 auction will begin at 12 noon Eastern Time, with absentee and Internet live bidding available through LiveAuctioneers.

For additional information on any item in the sale, call 561-586-5500 or e-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

UPDATE: View the video segment on CBS This Morning at this page:

http://www.cbsnews.com/videos/jacqueline-kennedy-onassis-letters-to-top-designers-up-for-auction/

View the fully illustrated auction catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

#   #   #

Copyright 2015 Auction Central News International. All rights reserved. This information may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission of the copyright holder.



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

Robert Davidoff silver gelatin print of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis at West Palm Airport in Florida. From a group lot of two photos that will convey with copyright. Est. $800-$1,200. PBMA image

Lot 47 consists of a signed note, drawing and envelope from Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis to Bill Hamilton, then-head of design at Carolina Herrera. Provenance: Bill Hamilton Archive. Estimate: $800-$1,200. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers and Palm Beach Modern Auctions

Last Updated on Thursday, 15 January 2015 11:27
 

Newark Museums featured in 61st annual Winter Antiques Show

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Written by Museum PR   
Monday, 12 January 2015 13:46

Bridal ensemble. South Africa, c. 1960. Plastic beads, leather, cotton, thread, cloth, wire and tin buttons. Worn by Ntombiyise Mandwandwe Shiza. Image courtesy of the Newark Museum

NEWARK, N.J. (PRWEB) – Did you know that the modern American museum was invented in Newark in 1909? The Newark Museum’s vast and diverse collections will be highlighted at the 61st annual Winter Antiques Show, which will take place at the Park Avenue Armory in New York City from Jan. 23- Feb. 1.

From traditional to contemporary, from ancient to modern, the museum’s collections showcase a broad range of works that explore the past, inspire the present and provide a glimpse into the future. Selected as the Winter Antiques Show’s annual loan exhibition, “Ahead of the Curve: The Newark Museum, 1909-2015,” will feature pieces from the museum’s American, as well as Asian, African, Ancient Mediterranean, and Native American objects.

The 2015 loan exhibition sponsor is Bessemer Trust.

Celebrating its 106th year, the Newark Museum has been at the forefront of collecting and exhibiting since the opening of its inaugural exhibition of The Eight (Robert Henri, Everett Shinn, John Sloan, Arthur B. Davies, Ernest Lawson, Maurice Prendergast, George Luks, and William J. Glackens) that was organized by the Macbeth Gallery in New York that mounted the first “Eight” show.

“The Newark Museum was one of the first to acquire an oil painting by Ernest Lawson (1910), the first to exhibit folk art (1930), and the first to give a one-man show to a living American artist – Max Weber – in 1913,” said Ulysses Grant Dietz, the museum’s chief curator and curator of decorative arts.

“Additionally, the museum possesses the first abstract painting ever completed by an American artist, a work done by Arthur Dove in 1910. The museum has continued to build on this solid American foundation, while looking outward towards the world. It was the first to seriously explore the art of Tibet, and the only museum whose holdings represent the Arts of Africa from the Mediterranean to the Cape of Good Hope.“

The Winter Antiques Show is America’s most distinguished antiques show, featuring exceptional objects exhibited by 73 specialists in American, English, European and Asian fine and decorative arts from antiquity through the 1960s, all vetted for authenticity.

The Newark Museum is located at 49 Washington St. in the heart of the downtown/Arts District of Newark, New Jersey.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

Bridal ensemble. South Africa, c. 1960. Plastic beads, leather, cotton, thread, cloth, wire and tin buttons. Worn by Ntombiyise Mandwandwe Shiza. Image courtesy of the Newark Museum 

Last Updated on Monday, 12 January 2015 13:56
 

New Mexico museum hosts Antique Treasures Day, Jan. 25

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Written by Museum PR   
Monday, 12 January 2015 13:09

Registrar Holly Radkew in the New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum's collection storage room. Image courtesy of the New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum.

LAS CRUCES, N.M. – The New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum is adding a new twist to an event that celebrates old things.

Antique Treasures Day is from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday, Jan. 25, and the museum is inviting the public to bring unusual objects, or photos of unusual objects, to try to “stump the curator.” In this new activity, the panel of experts will try to identify the objects, and will also be available to answer questions and give advice about how to preserve artifacts and family heirlooms.

The focus of the event is the museum’s collection and preservation program. It’s the only day each year that visitors to the museum get the opportunity to enjoy a behind-the-scenes look at this program. Visitors will get a sneak-peek, guided tour into the museum’s enormous collections storage room where more than 10,000 artifacts are housed in a climate-controlled environment.

The guided tours begin every 15 minutes and the number of people allowed on each tour is limited.

Museum curators will talk about the process of donating artifacts along with their care and preservation once they arrive at the museum. Also part of the tour will be a discussion about how artifacts are chosen for and used in exhibits.

Admission is $5 for adults, $3 for senior citizens and $2 for children ages 5 to 17.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

Registrar Holly Radkew in the New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum's collection storage room. Image courtesy of the New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum. 

Last Updated on Monday, 12 January 2015 13:20
 

South Bend, Ind., celebrating its sesquicentennial in 2015

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Written by MARGARET FOSMOE, South Bend Tribune   
Monday, 05 January 2015 10:13
The Studebaker National Museum in South Bend, Ind. The auto company was based in South Bend. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. SOUTH BEND, Ind. (AP) – The year 2015 is South Bend's 150th birthday, and the city is getting ready to mark the occasion.

Starting Friday and continuing throughout the year, there will be a communitywide celebration of the city's past, present and future.

The year will offer a host of community events, competitions, entertainment and other ways for residents to learn more about the city – including a major weekend birthday celebration in May.

“It's my hope that people will engage with the city in ways they haven't before,” Aaron Perri, chair of the South Bend 150 committee and executive director of Downtown South Bend Inc., told the South Bend Tribune.

Part of the goal of the year's celebration is to encourage residents to plan for the city's future, Perri said. “When people get an attachment to the city, a transformation can happen,” he said.

An anniversary celebration “gives you a chance to look at what you'll be in the future,” St. Joseph County historian John Kovach said. “You have to be able to reinvent yourself,” he said, noting that what became South Bend transformed itself from a fur trading post into an industrial center and is moving into a new era.

The St. Joseph Valley had long been occupied by American Indians. The first permanent settlers arrived here in the early 1820s, and South Bend formally incorporated as a city and elected its first mayor in 1865.

The peak of the year's festivities will be May 22-24, which has been dubbed a birthday weekend celebration. May 22 is the anniversary of South Bend being granted a city charter.

Activities that weekend will include a “Taste of South Bend” event featuring food booths operated by locally owned restaurants, a temporary garden created on the Jefferson Boulevard Bridge, an “Artisan Alley” event, a sports-oriented Adventure Park, bumper cars on the base of the Howard Park Ice Rink, a Gus Macker basketball tournament, a Kids Zone, a “Tech Hub” showing off area technology developments, a wine/beer mixer, a zip line across the St. Joseph River, three South Bend Cubs home games at Four Winds Field, fireworks and more. A South Bend River Lights sculpture will be unveiled May 22.

The May celebration will be a great reason for former South Bend residents to come home for the weekend, and organizers hope former residents will visit and perhaps plan reunion events here during 2015, said Rob DeCleene, executive director of Visit South Bend Mishawaka.

Mugs and shirts with the SB150 logo are available for purchase at Studebaker National Museum.

Each month during the year, SB150 will focus on a theme. January's theme is landmarks, and on Jan. 19 (Martin Luther King Jr. holiday) many area museums and other landmarks will offer free public admission.

A torch run through the city's neighborhoods, an essay contest and a photo contest also will be included in the year's celebration. Some other events scheduled during the year:

  • Indiana University South Bend's Schurz Library until Jan. 31 will present a free exhibit, “A History of IU South Bend in 30 Objects.”
  • The annual South Bend Brew Fest, on Jan. 24 at Century Center, will feature at least 150 area craft beers. See: www.southbendbrewfest.com.
  • Studebaker National Museum in February will open a new exhibit about the history of the Studebaker family, and later in the year will unveil a ``South Bend Then and Now II'' photo exhibit. In June, The History Museum in South Bend will open a display of architectural fragments of buildings that formerly stood in South Bend, accompanied by historic photos showing the buildings themselves.

___

Information from: South Bend Tribune, http://www.southbendtribune.com

Copyright 2015 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-01-01-15 1912GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
The Studebaker National Museum in South Bend, Ind. The auto company was based in South Bend. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
Last Updated on Monday, 05 January 2015 10:27
 

Re-enactment focuses on little-known Colonial militia

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Written by BRUCE SHIPKOWSKI, Associated Press   
Friday, 02 January 2015 11:16
Old Barracks in Trenton, N.J., the last of five such barracks authorized by the Colonial legislature in 1758 to house soldiers in the French and Indian War. Image by Jack E. Boucher, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. TRENTON, N.J. (AP) – Two New Jersey college students are shining a bright light on a little-known militia that helped turn the tide of America's Revolutionary War.

Rutgers-Camden University graduate students Matt White and Dave Niescior have led the effort to organize a re-enactment of the Philadelphia Associators' overnight march from Trenton to Princeton, which took place from Jan. 2 to 3, 1777.

The “To Princeton with Peale” events will focus on the contributions made by the militia, which was commanded by Charles Wilson Peale. He was an artist and naturalist who painted portraits of the era's leading figures.

“We wanted to create an event that could connect historic sites, historical events, and important – yet largely unknown – historical ideas,” White said. “Dave and I were actually at a bar having a few drinks, discussing an event we participated in at Valley Forge National Historical Park several weeks earlier, and wondered what we could do to build off of such a great event.”

Niescior said this is the first time the historic march has been re-enacted, and the group hopes to stay true to the original as much as possible. He also notes it will take place in real time on the actual anniversary dates of the events it commemorates.

The re-enactment will start Friday with a daylong “living history” event at the Old Barracks Museum in Trenton. Niescior and White will then be joined by about 40 others, who will travel overnight along the same route the militia took with the Continental Army.

The festivities conclude Saturday, when re-enactors will take part in a free walking tour and living history event at Princeton Battlefield State Park.

To stage an authentic depiction, participants are being held to a high standard of quality with regards to their uniforms and general appearances. The uniforms have been faithfully and accurately recreated, he said, and participants have thoroughly researched their roles to help explain the militia members' experiences and the march's importance.

Those participating in the event are drawn from several living history organizations in the region.

White said they chose Peale's group because he had extensively researched that company and was very familiar with the names and wide range of backgrounds of many of its members.

He also noted that without the militia's efforts, it's doubtful that George Washington would have returned to New Jersey after the Continental Army's victory at Trenton. Thus, the victory at the Battle of Princeton and the ramifications it had would not have happened.

“They played such a crucial, yet largely underappreciated, role in the Princeton campaign,” he said. “We think it's important to be able to show people why and how everyday citizens of Philadelphia could affect this campaign and ultimately the outcome of the war.”

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-01-01-15 1458GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Old Barracks in Trenton, N.J., the last of five such barracks authorized by the Colonial legislature in 1758 to house soldiers in the French and Indian War. Image by Jack E. Boucher, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
Last Updated on Friday, 02 January 2015 11:25
 

Benefit preview launches LA Jewelry, Antiques & Design Show

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Written by Antique show PR   
Monday, 29 December 2014 14:03
Cartier 18K yellow gold and fancy yellow diamonds, onyx and emerald two-headed tiger bangle. Image courtesy Los Angeles Jewelry, Antiques & Design Show LOS ANGELES – The Los Angeles Jewelry, Antiques & Design Show will launch with an opening night premiere party benefitting the FIDM Museum Fashion Council on Wednesday, Jan. 14, at the Los Angeles Convention Center, South Hall.

Proceeds from the party will benefit the FIDM Museum Fashion Council. A volunteer group dedicated to supporting the museum’s educational goals, as well as the acquisition of important objects, their current focus is fundraising to support the purchase of the Helen Larson Historic Fashion Collection—1,400 pieces of clothing and accessories dating from the 1600s to the 1930s, assembled by Southern Californian Helen Larson between 1946 and 1996.

Highlights include a circa 1610 Italian jerkin, 18th-century cloth-of-silver and gold garments, 19th-century haute couture, and many ensembles with royal provenance, including over 30 objects worn by Queen Victoria. The collection includes Helen Larson’s personal correspondence with eminent fashion curators and dealers, and purchase records.

The opening will debut a special exhibit of wearable art curated by Kevin Jones, curator of the FIDM Museum. The exhibit will feature exceptional examples of world-class fashion.

The evening’s host committee includes Alana Banner and Devin Peters, Donna Bunce, Gabrielle and Christophe Choo, Tsion Chudnovsky Esq., Lily Collins, Jill Tavelman Collins, Beatriz Hyp, Zee Allred and Drago Gligic, Randy Harding and Ana Launes, Linda and Robert Knoth, Eleni V. Lambros, Mona Lee Nesseth, Roberto Pellecchia, Mariel Pinkman, Linda Plochocki, Mima and Dale Ranson, George Rozsahegyi, Boyd S. Smith, Eileen Talebi, Deborah Veady, Valaree Wahler, Ruth and Hutton Wilkinson, and Adele Yashioka and Bruce Collins.

The Los Angeles Jewelry, Antiques & Design Show is attended by collectors, philanthropists and celebrities such as Barbra Streisand, James Brolin, Leonardo DiCaprio, Jerry Bruckheimer, Henry Winkler, Kevan Hall, Patricia Arquette, Lauren Graham, Lily Collins, Michelle Monaghan, Debra Wilson, Princess Anita Theodora of Orange-Nassau, Gabrielle, Duchess of Schoeneberg, Hill Harper, Robert LaSardo, Domingo Zapata, Bria Murphy, James DuMont, Alex Lombard, Sue Wong, Consul General for the U.A.E. Abdulla Ali Saboosi.

The Los Angeles Jewelry, Antiques & Design Show will take place on Jan. 14-18 at the Los Angeles Convention Center, South Hall, 1201 S. Figueroa St., Los Angeles, CA 90015. The 2015 opening night premiere party will take place on Wednesday, Jan. 14, from 8 p.m.-11 p.m., with a Vanguard Preview beginning at 7 p.m. Vanguard tickets are $200 and Friend tickets are $125. To purchase tickets and see related benefits, visit http://www.eventbrite.com/e/los-angeles-jewelry-antique-show-january-15-19-2014-tickets-1816558375.



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE
Cartier 18K yellow gold and fancy yellow diamonds, onyx and emerald two-headed tiger bangle. Image courtesy Los Angeles Jewelry, Antiques & Design Show Cartier 18K white gold diamond, emerald and black onyx Windsor Panthere earrings. Image courtesy Los Angeles Jewelry, Antiques & Design Show
Last Updated on Monday, 29 December 2014 14:15
 
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