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Grand Prix Cafe



Spokes: MotoGP - Motegi, Japan

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Written by Staff Writer   
Friday, 08 November 2013 16:05

Dani Pedrosa still has an outside shot at winning the 2013 MotoGP title after a third-place finish in Japan. Image by thomasrdotorg. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

MOTEGI, Japan – I'm still trying to work out what actually happened last week. You know; the whole black flag/Marquez debacle. The Honda team seems to have experienced collective amnesia when pressed by more privileged journalists than I—they won't let me within half a mile of the grid in case I try and win the championship, again—and Marquez’s statement was essentially an enigma wrapped into a mystery, thus: "The plan we had was not correct. We thought that we could do that lap. We thought we could go into the pit at the end of lap 11. The problem was not with the pit board; that was fine. When I saw ‘Box' I came in." Pick the bones out of that.

After pondering and musing with regard to what actually happened, who was ultimately to blame (outside of the ludicrous ruling in the first instance)? I asked my dad what his thoughts were on the incident. His reply was pretty straightforward: "Little (expletive) tried one on didn't he.”

Regardless of what I or my dad think, the fact of the matter is that the championship has been flung wide open. Lorenzo, now, has a real chance to retaining his title. Even Pedrosa has a shot. But more pertinently, it's raining on race day.

And did it rain; sessions canceled, practices abandoned—not because of the conditions on the track per se. It had more to do with safety regarding the air ambulance.

When the hastily arranged qualifying was finally under way it turned up a few surprises too. Go Mr. Hayden. Not such a great start for English and a nice surprise for the Japanese wildcard who starts behind him in 12th.

 

2013 MotoGP Motegi Qualifying Results:

1. Jorge Lorenzo (Yamaha) 1:53.471

2. Marc Marquez (Honda) 1:54.129

3. Nicky Hayden (Ducati) 1:54.539

4. Daniel Pedrosa (Honda) 1:54.542

5. Valentino Rossi (Yamaha) 1:54.732

6. Andrea Dovizioso (Ducati) 1:55.036

7. Alvaro Bautista (Honda) 1:55.135

8. Stefan Bradl (Honda) 1:55.610

9. Aleix Espargaro (Aspar) 1:55.719

10. Yonny Hernandez (Aspar) 1:55.998

11. Cal Crutchlow (Yamaha) 1:56.058

12. Katsuyuki Nakasuga (Yamaha) 1:56.125

13. Bradley Smith (Yamaha) 1:57.114

14. Colin Edwards (Forward Racing) 1:57.297

15. Andrea Iannone (Ducati) 1:57.347

 

We're lucky to see Marquez on the grid at all because he had a horrific crash during warm-up.

Virtually all the bikes have been kitted out with fancy new brakes—the discs are like wagon wheels—but they're not properly tested, and Pedrosa has stuck (sensibly in my opinion) to the originals. Again, this sort of spontaneous activity on the part of the management surprises me. Could they not wait until the start of the next season after a full session of winter testing?

They can't, and we're off. Predictably Hayden is mobbed before turn one, Lorenzo—a superlative starter of that there is no doubt—takes the lead followed by a crowd-pleasing Rossi, that kid Marquez and Pedrosa. A lap later Rossi goes wide on account of those new-fangled brakes, and Marquez and Pedrosa dive in, the latter almost being hit when Rossi cuts back.

Rossi isn't having a fun day, with 22 to go he fluffs the brakes again. This time he leaves the circuit only to return with filthy tires in a very humble 11th. At the front, Lorenzo isn't getting away from the steely gaze of his countrymen but he's dead smooth. Planted into the asphalt at every possible aspect he almost looks calm.

Twenty to go: The three amigos are pulling away from Bradl. English (Cal Crutchlow) has popped into seventh. He'll wind up here at the flag, so a so-so day for my fellow countryman who faces an interesting 2014 with Ducati. With 18 laps to go, Rossi is up to ninth already but eyes naturally land on Pedrosa who is running the “old” brakes. He's looking a lot more settled than Marquez, who appears to be more on edge than usual. Indeed, it looks as if Pedrosa may even have the upper hand, something that Marquez could do well without. At one point Pedrosa is so close I'm wondering if team orders are preventing him from busting a move.

Sixteen remaining: Bautista takes Bradl. He's not having a bad season all told. Rossi's now in eighth. Up front, Lorenzo starts to come under pressure from Marquez, who seems to have found his feet. Pedrosa, too, is very much a part of the tight top three. It's frustrating to watch in many respects. Marquez is better on the brakes. Lorenzo is better out of the corners, with Pedrosa matching both of their strong points but unable to make any headway.

With 11 to go Marquez attempts to up the ante, but just can't get the drive to hold an advantage. In the interim, Aleix Espargaro washes out and hits the dirt, and is he ever unhappy about it.

Ten laps from the finish Pedrosa seems to have backed off a little, possibly fearing being tangled up in a collision as Marquez pokes at Lorenzo. Marquez just can't get the drive out of the turns, and as a subsequence plays a protracted games of catch-up on the brakes. With eight to go Marquez has lost a quark of his vitality, possibly due to the injury he sustained during warm-up. Even if he does pass Lorenzo, where is there to go?

Six to go: Rossi is sixth as we catch the backmarkers, which signals tense times ahead. Lorenzo loses a spot of time with one of them, and Marquez looms closer still. It balances out when he too succumbs to a slower bike. The guys at the back seemed to have calmed the frenetic running of the race. The three amigos pause for breath and settle in to pace that'll see them finish in the order they began.

It’s a fairly quiet race by MotoGP standards. Indeed, after all the confusion with the weather during qualifying it was relatively pedestrian. Yet the inevitable Hayden and Dovizioso show never disappoints, Hayden may have begun in fourth but he wound up dueling with his old sparring partner right until the checkered flag. I hope that's not English way back there next year. He and Dovizioso were teammates in 2012 and are due to be again in 2014. Actually, perhaps the word “mates” isn't appropriate.

Good 11th for the Japanese wildcard. I'll be betting he'll be having a good evening later.

 

2013 MotoGP Motegi Results:

1. Jorge Lorenzo (Yamaha)

2. Marc Marquez (Honda)

3. Daniel Pedrosa (Honda)

4. Alvaro Bautista (Honda)

5. Stefan Bradl (Honda)

6. Valentino Rossi (Yamaha)

7. Cal Crutchlow (Yamaha)

8. Bradley Smith (Yamaha)

9. Nicky Hayden (Ducati)

10. Andrea Dovizioso (Ducati)

11. Katsuyuki Nakasuga (Yamaha)

12. Colin Edwards (Forward)

13. Randy De Puniet (Aspar)

14. Andrea Iannone (Ducati)

15. Yonny Hernandez (Ducati)

16. Hector Barbera (Avintia Blusens)

17. Hiroshi Aoyama (Avintia Blusens)

18. Danilo Petrucci (Came IodaRacing)

 

One race to go and a maximum of 25 points still available...

 

Riders' World Championship:

1. Marc Marquez ESP Honda (F) * 318 points

2. Jorge Lorenzo ESP Yamaha (F) 305 points (-13)

3. Dani Pedrosa ESP Honda (F) 280 points (-38)

4. Valentino Rossi ITA Yamaha (F) 224 points (-94)

5. Cal Crutchlow GBR Yamaha (S) 188 points (-130)

6. Alvaro Bautista ESP Honda (S) 160 points (-158)

7. Stefan Bradl GER Honda (S) 146 points (-172)

8. Andrea Dovizioso ITA Ducati (F) 133 points (-185)

9. Nicky Hayden USA Ducati (F) 118 points (-200)

10. Bradley Smith GBR Yamaha (S) * 107 points (-211)

11. Aleix Espargaro ESP ART (CRT) 88 points (-230)

12. Andrea Iannone ITA Ducati (S) * 57 points (-261)

13. Michele Pirro ITA Ducati (S) 50 points (-268)

14. Colin Edwards USA FTR-Kawasaki (CRT) 40 points (-278)

15. Randy de Puniet FRA ART (CRT) 36 points (-282)

16. Hector Barbera ESP FTR-Kawasaki (CRT) 31 points (-287)

17. Danilo Petrucci ITA Ioda Suter-BMW (CRT) 24 points (-294)

18. Yonny Hernandez COL ART (CRT)/Ducati (S) 21 points (-297)

19. Hiroshi Aoyama JPN FTR-Kawasaki (CRT) 13 points (-305)

20. Claudio Corti ITA FTR-Kawasaki (CRT) * 11 points (-307)

21. Ben Spies USA Ducati (S) 9 points (-309)

22. Katsuyuki Nakasuga JPN Yamaha (S) 5 points (-313)

23. Alex de Angelis RSM Ducati (S) 5 points (-313)

24. Karel Abraham CZE ART (CRT) 5 points (-313)

25. Michael Laverty GBR PBM/ART (CRT) * 3 points (-315)

26. Bryan Staring AUS FTR-Honda (CRT) * 2 points (-316)

 

And it's going all the way to the wire.

Toodle Pip.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

Dani Pedrosa still has an outside shot at winning the 2013 MotoGP title after a third-place finish in Japan. Image by thomasrdotorg. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license. 

Last Updated on Friday, 15 November 2013 14:23
 

Spokes: MotoGP - Phillip Island, Australia

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Written by Staff Writer   
Tuesday, 29 October 2013 15:59

With the exception of champion Casey Stoner (center) the podium of the 2010 Australian Grand Prix looked similar this year with Jorge Lorenzo (left) winning and Valentino Rossi (right) again finishing third. Image by motoracereports. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

PHILLIP ISLAND, Australia – You know that feeling when a close friend does something so entirely out of character, so unexpected, you have to reprogram your sense of reality? Perhaps they're recalling the bizarre incident as you're relaxing over a glass of wine in the morning and the information drops into your cerebral cortex with such a resounding clang you feel inspired to look them directly in the eye, jump to your feet and shout, “You what?” You may even do a swear in between the “you” and “what,” as I did.

No, you see, “no” is the utterance presented to the unacceptable, the denied, the refused, the entirely unwelcome. Before the race I watched the bloke from Bridgestone explain the situation with what can only be described as bewilderment, learning, as I did, that the lone tire supplier to the entire MotoGP grid had, basically, not done its job. The upshot, I was informed, is that their tires were running too hot on the new Philip Island surface resulting in a dangerous increase in core temperature and blah blah blah … So the bikes would have to come in midway.

No.

You what?!

In the rules of the old game, bikes were allowed to pit when weather conditions permitted. Flags would be waved to inform the riders that, if they wished, they could pit and change to a second bike already decked out with the appropriate footwear. In the new game, cobbled together for this event, competitors must pit on lap 9 or 10—that's it—and you get onto a second bike with exactly the same tires, just cooler.

Oh, on account of the new surface and shoddy work from the tire manufacturer, it's now only 19 laps as opposed to the 27, meaning the race is pretty much over before it starts.

Has anyone got an aspirin?

 

2013 MotoGP Phillip Island Qualifying Results:

1. Jorge Lorenzo (Yamaha) 1:27.899

2. Marc Marquez (Honda) 1:28.120

3. Valentino Rossi (Yamaha) 1:28.647

4. Alvaro Bautista (Honda) 1:28.713

5. Daniel Pedrosa (Honda) 1:28.748

6. Cal Crutchlow (Yamaha) 1:28.809

7. Bradley Smith (Yamaha) 1:28.941

8. Nicky Hayden (Ducati) 1:29.295

9. Andrea Dovizioso (Ducati) 1:29.660

10. Andrea Iannone (Ducati) 1:29.756

11. Colin Edwards (Forward) 1:30.264

12. Randy De Puniet (Aspar) 1:30.735

13. Aleix Espargaro (Aspar) 1:30.081

14. Claudio Corti (Forward) 1:30.530

15. Yonny Hernandez (Blusens) 1:30.641

Knowing what we know, the pole positions are virtually arbitrary as the pit stop could dramatically change the nature of the race. In F1 pit crews come by the dozen and their routine is practiced to the point of perfection. In this instance one bloke has been hastily assigned to catch the machine as it arrives into the pit and another to hold the freshly shod bike before it departs. Before the race we see riders weakly practicing jumping from one bike to the other. It all looks rather Heath Robinson—far, far away from the slick operation we've come to expect from a world-class premier sport. While we're about it, it doesn't look that safe either. Would you want to stand there as Alvaro Bautista approaches you at full tilt with race-angry eyes?

A poor start for Pedrosa in fifth, and another good beginning for Rossi on the front row again, but it's pretty much the same script elsewhere as we scream into the first of 19 laps. Lorenzo leads the charge. Behind him Pedrosa has made a cracking start and slots into the fray. Marquez is in third and for a short while, Brit Bradley Smith is in the running before Rossi grabs a fistful of fourth. Before the lap ends, Marquez has pushed Pedrosa back into third.

It's worth noting a couple of things. Firstly, if Marquez wins today Lorenzo must be second or the former will be world champ. That's right, already. Secondly, the weather: In addition to the wind, it looks like it might rain. Should it rain, don't ask me how that would work regarding the second bike pit stop.

With 18 laps to go the race has just started and already it feels like we're halfway through. Bautista takes Smith's fifth, one in front of English. But all eyes are at the pointy end: Lorenzo is thinking about getting away while Marquez and Pedrosa stay close.

Seventeen remaining: English takes Smith, Bautista is closing on Rossi and now Marquez is catching Lorenzo, who has failed to increase his gap. A couple of laps later it's clear Lorenzo is slowing things down as Pedrosa joins the party.

Thirteen to go: Bautista, English and Rossi have become one as Marquez and Pedrosa aim for Lorenzo. These three have merged into a single entity as the dreaded bike-swap looms. With 10 laps to go the some of the riders enter the pit lane, leap onto another bike and take the long, slow road to the track. Marquez nearly drops his Honda as he makes up as much time as possible after Lorenzo pits. A lap later he's still out there having missed the window for his bike-change. When he does pit it's with eight to go. He rejoins the action just as Lorenzo is passing the pit lane exit and two make significant contact with Lorenzo getting the better of the collision. With Pedrosa in second, once again, the three amigos are reunited, but it's short-lived.

Because Marquez missed the specified laps for pitting he's black-flagged, dismissed, persona non grata. Outrageous! Two other riders, Bryan Staring and Damian Cudlin, suffered a similar fate, but their championship wasn't being put into jeopardy. Pedrosa was penalized for speeding in the pit lane and was ordered to drop a place. He lets Marquez pass with six to go but with Marquez out a few moments later, his slate is wiped clean, bizarrely.

Whoever set the rules for today’s race needs to be dropped. Why on earth the pit window wasn't flagged—as it would have been if it rained—is beyond me. And as for Marquez, why was he punished so harshly? He failed to adhere to a cobbled-together, ad hoc directive on account an inexcusable error on the part of Bridgestone and the Philip Island management. He deserved to lose a place, maybe a few points, but to black-flag the kid is making a travesty out of the sport.

Lorenzo went on to win the race just as the heavens opened. Had the rain appeared sooner I've no idea what the management was intending to do, unless the recently pitted bikes were reshod with wet tires they would have just stopped the race, I guess, making it even shorter that it already was—or maybe they would just given them umbrellas.

The only highlight of the day was to see Rossi on the podium and a half-decent fourth for English, but it was all very hollow. With Marquez out and the ghost of Casey Stoner very much in the fabric of today it's best we draw a line under the Australian GP and sort of forget it even happened.

 

MotoGP Phillip Island Results 2013:

1. Jorge Lorenzo (Yamaha)

2. Dani Pedrosa (Honda)

3. Valentino Rossi (Yamaha)

4. Cal Crutchlow (Yamaha)

5. Alvaro Bautista (Honda)

6. Bradley Smith (Yamaha)

7. Nicky Hayden (Ducati)

8. Andrea Iannone (Ducati)

9. Andrea Dovizioso (Ducati)

10. Randy de Puniet (ART)

11. Aleix Espargaro (ART)

12. Colin Edwards (FTR-Kawasaki)

13. Yonny Hernandez (Ducati)

14. Hector Barbera (FTR)

15. Danilo Petrucci (Ioda-Suter)

16. Luca Scassa (ART)

17. Claudio Corti (FTR-Kawasaki)

18. Michael Laverty (ART)

19. Lukas Pesek (Ioda-Suter)

20. Hiroshi Aoyama (FTR)

21. Damian Cudlin (PBM)

 

Of course, the lead Marquez built this season has been decimated. Lorenzo is back in the running after coming so close to being relegated last year’s world champion. Pedrosa, too, has a theoretical chance winning the title, but really it’s a Marquez/Lorenzo shootout right until the bitter end.

Standings:

1. Marc Marquez (Spain) Honda 298

2. Jorge Lorenzo (Spain) Yamaha 280

3. Dani Pedrosa (Spain) Honda 264

4. Valentino Rossi (Italy) Yamaha 214

5. Cal Crutchlow (Britain) Yamaha 179

6. Alvaro Bautista (Spain) Honda 147

7. Stefan Bradl (Germany) Honda 135

8. Andrea Dovizioso (Italy) Ducati 127

9. Nicky Hayden (U.S.) Ducati 111

10. Bradley Smith (Britain) Yamaha 99

11. Aleix Espargaro (Spain) Aprilia 88

12. Andrea Iannone (Italy) Ducati 55

13. Michele Pirro (Italy) Ducati 50

14. Colin Edwards (U.S.) FTR 36

15. Randy de Puniet (France) Aprilia 33

 

See you in Japan, if it's not underwater.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

With the exception of champion Casey Stoner (center) the podium of the 2010 Australian Grand Prix looked similar this year with Jorge Lorenzo (left) winning and Valentino Rossi (right) again finishing third. Image by motoracereports. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Last Updated on Friday, 15 November 2013 14:26
 

Spokes: MotoGP - Sepang, Malaysia

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Written by Staff Writer   
Friday, 18 October 2013 12:30

A late-race charge propelled Alvaro Bautista to a fifth-place finish at Sepang. Motoracereports image. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

SEPANG, Malaysia — I wouldn't say my closing comment last week was wrong. To recap, I suggested that Marc Marquez wouldn't be penalized after slightly coming into contact with Dani Pedrosa, severing the speed sensor cable on Pedrosa’s Honda, which resulted in his losing control and crashing out of the race—and likely the world championship. No, I don't think it was I who was wrong at all.

Unfortunately, Race Direction saw it differently and Marquez was awarded a third penalty point on his license, the first two having been “awarded” for ignoring yellow flags during the British Grand Prix. The points accumulate in a fashion that's not dissimilar to the civilian equivalent. One has to get a specified amount, in this instance four, before the punitive element comes into force. Should he receive another he'd be required to start from the back of the grid.

Livio Suppo, Team Principal of Repsol Honda noted that, "Marc has been penalized with one point on his license. That means there is no consequence for this race. Basically, they said that in this particular case it was more or less OK, but they are taking Marc’s whole season into consideration and he has been close to touching the rider in front of him on more than one occasion. Honda, who automatically lost the 25 constructers points they gained, seemed to regard the matter a great deal more philosophically than I.

But that was then, this is now. We're in a typically muggy, humid, hot and, frankly, unpleasant Sepang in the latter stages of the 2013 MotoGP. No Stefan Bradl, who had a fairly low-key crash in free practice but managed to catch his foot on the rumble strip as he slid off, breaking his ankle. He could be OK to race at Philip Island next but it's a pity, especially as we've seen a lot more him mixing it with the pointy end lately.

MotoGP Sepang Qualifying Results 2013:

1. Marc Marquez (Honda) 2:00.011

2. Valentino Rossi (Yamaha) 2:00.336

3. Cal Crutchlow (Yamaha) 2:00.359

4. Jorge Lorenzo (Yamaha) 2:00.578

5. Dani Pedrosa (Honda) 2:00.692

6. Alvaro Bautista (Honda) 2:00.974

7. Bradley Smith (Yamaha) 2:01.306

8. Andrea Dovizioso (Ducati) 2:01.635

9. Aleix Espargaro (ART) 2:02.151

10. Andrea Iannone (Ducati) 2:02.536

11. Nicky Hayden (Ducati) 2:02.900

12. Stefan Bradl (Honda) 2:01.083

13. Colin Edwards (FTR-Kawasaki) 2:02.858

14. Claudio Corti (FTR-Kawasaki) 2:03.175

15. Hector Barbera (FTR) 2:03.212

16. Hiroshi Aoyama (FTR) 2:03.418

17. Yonny Hernandez (Ducati) 2:03.651

18. Randy de Puniet (ART) 2:03.805

19. Michael Laverty (ART) 2:04.198

20. Danilo Petrucci (Ioda-Suter) 2:04.310

21. Luca Scassa (ART) 2:05.199

22. Bryan Staring (FTR-Honda) 2:06.038

23. Lukas Pesek (Ioda-Suter) 2:06.203

24. Damian Cudlin (PBM) 2:06.273

 

Qualifying was disrupted by one wet corner on account of an impromptu shower. This caught a few of the faster fellows out, hence a rather interesting grid, notably Valentino Rossi, who has his best start today since 2010. It's incredible when you think about it. He loves it here. Incidentally, Rossi has won nine times already but I'm sure he's not loving it quite as much today; it's 65 percent relative humidity.

No surprise for guessing who scoops pole, and a great start by Cal Crutchlow, who completes the front row despite an arm injury. Bearing down behind are the other two equally focused Amigos (Jorge Lorenzo and Pedroso) and the spontaneous Alvaro Bautista, who continues to show real form this year.

They'll be no tire tactics today. Virtually all the riders are on soft front/rear tires. This will certainly aid turn one that arrives following long drag from the start, and we join the riders there.

Lap 1, 20 to go: Lorenzo is at the helm followed by Pedrosa, Marquez, Rossi and Bautista. English has been dropped off due to a poor start.

It's action from the off: Rossi takes Marquez, Marquez takes Rossi and then Bautista takes Rossi, who returns the favor. With 19 to go we learn that Laverty, Edwards and Barbera have been summoned to endure ride-through penalties on account of jump-starts. Meanwhile, the three Amigos are now a single entity. It's going to be a hot afternoon.

Eighteen to go: English remains in the zone and slightly behind him the other English rider, Bradley Smith, is keeping an eye on things as it all kicks off. It starts with Bautista going wide and losing touch with Rossi. But where it’s at is the front. The pressure is on Lorenzo, Pedrosa's body language indicates that he's not going to let anyone get in his way today and a couple of laps later he passes the world champion, inadvertently dragging Marquez with him at the end of the start and finish on lap 15. Lorenzo isn't having any of it and the pair make contact as Lorenzo grabs back second. Pedrosa makes a dash as Rossi comes screaming in behind the Lor-quez unit. Marquez passes again, this time Lorenzo physically shoves Marquez away as he screams through the inside.

Fourteen to go and it's still on. Marquez passes but Lorenzo finds a way through. It's sensational stuff to watch. It dawns on me that Marquez summons the darkest of talents out of his rivals. The kid has changed the rules, of that there can be no question.

With 13 laps remaining Rossi is in with the Spanish. English is preying on Bautista and takes his spot for fifth place. “Splendid” is scribbled into my notes. The typical dingdong between Hayden and Dovizioso is prematurely cut short when Hayden's bike gets all on fire. He's demonstrably very cross indeed.

Twelve to go: Lorenzo goes slightly wide and Marquez nips up the inside. Lorenzo weakly responds but it's clear that he's all punched out. As we hit the middle part of the race it seems as if the excessive heat is taking its toll on the riders. Only English and Bautista seem to be unsettled. Pedrosa holds his 1.8- second lead and Marquez puts some muggy sunshine in between himself and his former sparring partner.

Eight to go: Bautista takes English but apart from that, all the riders are settled into their groove, dreaming, hallucinating, about a cool shower and a cold beer. Even Marquez has decided that second place is fine today as Pedrosa makes hay. He's really on it today. Maybe, just maybe, he's something in store for 2014?

Six to go: Laverty crashes out as fellow Englishman Crutchlow gets onto Bautista. With four laps to go Bautista goes slightly wide at the end of that start/finish straight and English gets through—the only racing out there at the moment. There are big, lazy gaps punctuating each rider now, save the dustup between English and Bautista.

Three laps left and Pedrosa is riding like his life depends on it. As the laps are long and arduous he knows that the pit board informing him that he's 1.8 ahead one lap could easily say 0.8 the next, and he's got that Marquez lad behind him.

With two to go Bautista is right on English. There's nothing in it until Bautista passes on the last lap. With Pedrosa now almost 3 seconds ahead of the field, English fight back hard, but to no avail and Bautista finally takes fifth.

 

MotoGP Sepang Results 2013:

1. Dani Pedrosa (Honda)

2. Marc Marquez (Honda)

3. Jorge Lorenzo (Yamaha)

4. Valentino Rossi (Yamaha)

5. Alvaro Bautista (Honda)

6. Cal Crutchlow (Yamaha)

7. Bradley Smith (Yamaha)

8. Andrea Dovizioso (Ducati)

9. Aleix Espargaro (ART)

10. Yonny Hernandez (Ducati)

11. Hiroshi Aoyama (FTR)

12. Randy de Puniet (ART)

13. Claudio Corti (FTR-Kawasaki)

14. Hector Barbera (FTR)

15. Colin Edwards (FTR-Kawasaki)

16. Danilo Petrucci (Ioda-Suter)

17. Luca Scassa (ART)

18. Bryan Staring (FTR-Honda)

 

To parody a football cliche, it was a race of two halves, the former containing some of the best MotoGP racing in a generation, the latter a sultry grind to the flag, relatively at least. An excellent day for Dani, and not too bad a result from his Spanish brothers. Marquez pretty much has 2014 in the bag. Indeed he could even win at Philip Island.

 

Riders' World Championship:

1. Marc Marquez ESP Honda (F) * 298 points

2. Jorge Lorenzo ESP Yamaha (F) 255 points (-43)

3. Dani Pedrosa ESP Honda (F) 244 points (-54)

4. Valentino Rossi ITA Yamaha (F) 198 points (-100)

5. Cal Crutchlow GBR Yamaha (S) 166 points (-132)

6. Alvaro Bautista ESP Honda (S) 136 points (-162)

7. Stefan Bradl GER Honda (S) 135 points (-163)

8. Andrea Dovizioso ITA Ducati (F) 120 points (-178)

9. Nicky Hayden USA Ducati (F) 102 points (-196)

10. Bradley Smith GBR Yamaha (S) * 89 points (-209)

11. Aleix Espargaro ESP ART (CRT) 83 points (-215)

12. Michele Pirro ITA Ducati (S) 50 points (-248)

13. Andrea Iannone ITA Ducati (S) * 47 points (-251)

14. Colin Edwards USA FTR-Kawasaki (CRT) 32 points (-266)

15. Hector Barbera ESP FTR-Kawasaki (CRT) 29 points (-269)

16. Randy de Puniet FRA ART (CRT) 27 points (-271)

17. Danilo Petrucci ITA Ioda Suter-BMW (CRT) 23 points (-275)

18. Yonny Hernandez COL ART (CRT)/Ducati (S) 17 points (-281)

19. Hiroshi Aoyama JPN FTR-Kawasaki (CRT) 13 points (-285)

20. Claudio Corti ITA FTR-Kawasaki (CRT) * 11 points (-287)

21. Ben Spies USA Ducati (S) 9 points (-289)

22. Alex de Angelis RSM Ducati (S) 5 points (-293)

23. Karel Abraham CZE ART (CRT) 5 points (-293)

24. Michael Laverty GBR PBM/ART (CRT) * 3 points (-295)

25. Bryan Staring AUS FTR-Honda (CRT) * 2 points (-296)

26. Javier del Amor ESP FTR-Kawasaki (CRT) 1 points (-297)

 

We're coming to the end of one of the finest seasons we've seen in a good long while. Do join me in Australia, metaphorically of course, I'm not carrying your bags.

Toodle pip.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

 A late-race charge propelled Alvaro Bautista to a fifth-place finish at Sepang. Motoracereports image. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Last Updated on Friday, 15 November 2013 14:26
 

Spokes: MotoGP - Motorland Aragon, Spain

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Written by Staff Writer   
Wednesday, 09 October 2013 13:38

Marc Marquez competing in Moto2 in 2011. Image by motoracereports. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

ALCAÑIZ, Spain – Round 14 and the penultimate European race before returning to Spain at the very end of the season. Motorland is located in the flat, arid northeastern region of Spain making it susceptible to windy conditions, and race day is no exception. Motorland's clearly not standing in the way of the Three Amigos, who've taken the front row, and for the seventh time this season, Marc Marqez, the young rookie, has clinched pole by one-hundredth of a second over the current world champion, Jorge Lorenzo. Indeed, the entire front row qualified within one-tenth of a second. Brothers and sisters, we've a race on our hands.

MotoGP Aragón Qualifying Results 2013

1. Marc Marquez ESP Repsol Honda Team (RC213V) 1:47.804

2. Jorge Lorenzo ESP Yamaha Factory Racing (YZR-M1) 1:47.814

3. Dani Pedrosa ESP Repsol Honda Team (RC213V) 1:47.957

4. Valentino Rossi ITA Yamaha Factory Racing (YZR-M1) 1:47.962

5. Stefan Bradl GER LCR Honda MotoGP (RC213V) 1:48.128

6. Alvaro Bautista ESP Go&Fun Honda Gresini (RC213V) 1:48.302

7. Cal Crutchlow GBR Monster Yamaha Tech 3 (YZR-M1) 1:48.653

8. Bradley Smith GBR Monster Yamaha Tech 3 (YZR-M1) 1:48.854

9. Andrea Dovizioso ITA Ducati Team (GP13) 1:49.219

10. Aleix Espargaro ESP Power Electronics Aspar (ART CRT) 1:49.348

11. Nicky Hayden USA Ducati Team (GP13) 1:49.428

12. Andrea Iannone ITA Energy T.I. Pramac Racing (GP13) 1:50.094

13. Yonny Hernandez COL Ignite Pramac Racing (GP13) 1:50.685

14. Hiroshi Aoyama JPN Avintia Blusens (FTR-Kawasaki CRT)* 1:50.995

15. Danilo Petrucci ITA Came IodaRacing Project (Suter-BMW CRT)* 1:51.030

16. Randy De Puniet FRA Power Electronics Aspar (ART CRT) 1:51.297

17. Colin Edwards USA NGM Forward Racing (FTR-Kawasaki CRT)* 1:51.327

18. Claudio Corti ITA NGM Forward Racing (FTR-Kawasaki CRT)* 1:51.519

19. Hector Barbera ESP Avintia Blusens (FTR-Kawasaki CRT)* 1:51.552

20. Michael Laverty GBR Paul Bird Motorsport (ART CRT) 1:51.639

21. Bryan Staring AUS Go&Fun Honda Gresini (FTR-Honda CRT) 1:52.102

22. Luca Scassa ITA Cardion AB Motoracing (ART CRT) 1:52.305

23. Lukas Pesek CZE Came IodaRacing Project (Suter-BMW CRT)* 1:52.989

24. Damian Cudlin AUS Paul Bird Motorsport (PBM-ART CRT)* 1:53.521

 

The usual characters make up the front row. Then we have Rossi heading up the second—always great to see him up at the top—with his nemesis, Alvaro Bautista, separated by a much-improved Stefan Bradl. English isn't happy; he wasn't settled in qualifying and the team seemed to be struggling to get the right setup. It also doesn't help that he's a big fellow and the windy conditions won't help with aerodynamics. Blast.

Andrea Dovizioso gets a place on his rival and teamate Nicky Hayden, their position split by Andrea Iannone riding a nonfactory Ducati. It's worth noting that Michele Pirro, the Pramac Ducati tester who's been covering for Ben Spies, will be replaced by Yonny Hernandez for the remainder of the season. Pirro's busy schedule has taken its toll on the young Italian, and he'll sit out the rest of 2013 season. Hernandez is the first Columbian to take a proto-MotoGP ride and he does his team, and country, proud by qualifying in 13th leading the CRT contingent. To confuse things further, Laverty takes Hernandez ride and wildcard Australian rider Damian Cudlin cheerfully takes his. You'll be pleased to note that I can keep up.

Dani Pedrosa is a good starter. He takes advantage of this simple fact by running on hard tires that will come into their own in the latter stages of the race but penalize him during the former, especially the first few laps. Indeed, Pedrosa does get a good start. He and Lorenzo briefly pass Marquez on the short scream to turn one (we're very much off and racing, by the way) but it's a short-lived affair. Marquez takes second and Lorenzo pulls out a lead. Rossi holds fourth, Bradl maintains fifth and English has taken sixth after shoving Bautista back to seventh. But he's looking for a way back in.

Twenty-two laps to go: Laverty, Petrucci and Scassa have all managed to leave the track. Only Scassa makes it back on. Bautista has taken English for sixth. It's worth noting that Hernandez holds his 13th place.

Twenty-three left: Lorenzo isn't breaking away and Pedrosa is the fastest guy out there. Indeed, Marquez's second place is threatened. Pedrosa must have a good result today. It's his birthday for one thing and cake tastes better with a trophy. A couple of laps later both Marquez and Pedrosa have caught Lorenzo. The Three Amigos unite again in the Spanish desert, and all hell is about to break loose.

Nineteen to go: Pedrosa takes Marquez and the pair cozy-up with Lorenzo. Marquez is in battle mode. He's jabbing at Pedrosa and they briefly make contact. Marquez runs wide but, unbeknownst to either, the rookie has inadvertently (one hopes) severed a sensor cable disabling Pedrosa's traction control system. A few seconds later Pedrosa highsides out of the Spanish Grand Prix and perhaps, more pertinently, out of the world championship contention. Happy Birthday, not.

Seventeen left: The incident has extended Lorenzo's lead by 2 seconds. Let’s take some time to look at what's happening farther down the grid until Marquez, inevitably, catches the current world champion—because you know it's gonna happen.

Sixteen remaining: There's nothing in it for third. Rossi heads up Bradl, Bautista and English with Smith within striking distance. Bautista, who seems to be on a roll this season—sometime literally—is trying to pass Bradl, but he's too busy to notice English sneak up and take his fifth position.

A couple of laps down and Marquez is now within striking distance of Lorenzo. He assumes the position and prepares himself to charge. As usual, this isn't undertaken lightly. Instead, Marquez prefers to apply pressure just by being present. In the corner of his eye Lorenzo will see him poking and jibing until, with 10 laps to go he passes Lorenzo to the roar of the Spanish crowd. Or put in another way, the Spanish fans heap adoration on the young rider who's just passed their world champion.

With eight laps to the flag Marquez has pulled ahead of Lorenzo but he's not getting away. Indeed, it's not beyond the realm of possibility that Lorenzo let Marquez through to give himself some breathing space.

Rossi, in third place, is under pressure from Bautista, he of the “by any means necessary” school of thinking. With six laps left it's almost a relief when the pass—clean—is executed. But the Spanish wildcard isn't dropping Rossi off. Instead, he's merely slowed proceedings sufficiently to allow Bradl and English to join the warring factions and make third place open to all.

In the closing few laps Marquez, once again, gets his nose ahead of Lorenzo, who seems to have cooled-off, in a relative way, of course. With Marquez reasonably secure for his sixth win of the season—complete with the smashing of more records—all eyes have defaulted to Rossi who is battling with local lad Bautista. Two laps to go and Rossi dramatically takes back his third place, but he's on Bautista's home turf and the pass goes down about as well as a cup of cold sick. Bautista instantly cuts back only to find Rossi, once again, in front. Really, this is too much and it’s not looking like stopping anytime before the flag.

The too-ing and fro-ing between Rossi and Bautista allows Bradl, currently running fifth, to get in. Bautista isn't covering his bases as he lunges at Rossi, allowing Bradl to slip past and take his fourth. But Bautista, having already lost his third place, isn't going to concede, especially in front of the home crowd. He takes his fourth back, only to learn that Rossi has disappeared into the horizon. Magic stuff, true return-to-form racing of yore.

 

MotoGP Aragón Results 2013:

1. Marc Marquez (Honda)

2. Jorge Lorenzo (Yamaha)

3. Valentino Rossi (Yamaha)

4. Alvaro Bautista (Honda)

5. Stefan Bradl (Honda)

6. Cal Crutchlow (Yamaha)

7. Bradley Smith (Yamaha)

8. Andrea Dovizioso (Ducati)

9. Nicky Hayden (Ducati)

10. Andrea Ionnone (Ducati)

11. Aleix Espargaro (ART)

12. Yonny Hernandez (Ducati)

13. Randy de Puniet (ART)

14. Hiroshi Aoyama (FTR)

15. Claudio Corti (FTR Kawasaki)

16. Colin Edwards (FTR Kawasaki)

17. Luca Scassa (ART)

18. Bryan Staring (FTR Honda)

19. Lukas Pesek (Ioda-Suter)

 

Marquez's win hasn't been controversial as such, but it comes with a frown from his teammate, who spends a portion of his birthday being checked out by doctors after a short trip in an ambulance. Pedrosa is far from happy claiming, somewhat diplomatically, that Marquez was “on the limit.”* It's unlikely Marquez will be penalized over the incident but, at the time of writing this, the officials have yet to make a decision regarding culpability. Even if they decided to strip Marquez of his points (they won't) and give the win to Lorenzo (nope) he'd still be heading up the championship anyway.

My ruling would be straightforward. This is racing, stuff happens. Bad luck, Dani.

Toodle pip.

 

Riders' World Championship:

1. Marc Marquez ESP Honda (F) * 278 points

2. Jorge Lorenzo ESP Yamaha (F) 239 points (-39)

3. Dani Pedrosa ESP Honda (F) 219 points (-59)

4. Valentino Rossi ITA Yamaha (F) 185 points (-93)

5. Cal Crutchlow GBR Yamaha (S) 156 points (-122)

6. Stefan Bradl GER Honda (S) 135 points (-143)

7. Alvaro Bautista ESP Honda (S) 125 points (-153)

8. Andrea Dovizioso ITA Ducati (F) 112 points (-166)

9. Nicky Hayden USA Ducati (F) 102 points (-176)

10. Bradley Smith GBR Yamaha (S) * 80 points (-198)

11. Aleix Espargaro ESP ART (CRT) 76 points (-202)

12. Michele Pirro ITA Ducati (S) 50 points (-228)

13. Andrea Iannone ITA Ducati (S) * 47 points (-231)

14. Colin Edwards USA FTR-Kawasaki (CRT) 31 points (-247)

15. Hector Barbera ESP FTR-Kawasaki (CRT) 27 points (-251)

16. Randy de Puniet FRA ART (CRT) 23 points (-255)

17. Danilo Petrucci ITA Ioda Suter-BMW (CRT) 23 points (-255)

18. Yonny Hernandez COL ART (CRT)/Ducati (S) 11 points (-267)

19. Ben Spies USA Ducati (S) 9 points (-269)

20. Claudio Corti ITA FTR-Kawasaki (CRT) * 8 points (-270)

21. Hiroshi Aoyama JPN FTR-Kawasaki (CRT) 8 points (-270)

22. Alex de Angelis RSM Ducati (S) 5 points (-273)

23. Karel Abraham CZE ART (CRT) 5 points (-273)

24. Michael Laverty GBR PBM/ART (CRT) * 3 points (-275)

25. Bryan Staring AUS FTR-Honda (CRT) * 2 points (-276)

26. Javier del Amor ESP FTR-Kawasaki (CRT) 1 points (-277)

 

*Isn't that the point of all this?



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

Marc Marquez competing in Moto2 in 2011. Image by motoracereports. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Last Updated on Friday, 15 November 2013 14:26
 

Spokes: MotoGP - Misano, Italy

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Written by Staff Writer   
Friday, 20 September 2013 15:49
The late Marco Simoncelli, who grew up near the Misano Circuit, which now bears his name. Image by motoracereports. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license. MISANO, Italy – We're in Italy again, at the recently renamed Misano Marco Simoncelli Circuit in the Province of Rimini.

A relatively young circuit, Misano MS is a “T”-shaped complex that's composed of short straights and tight turns, all running under a rather bumpy, petulant surface.

Perhaps it’s not the ideal circuit to commemorate local-boy Marco Simoncelli. In 2010, Japanese rider Shoya Tomizawa was killed here in similar circumstances to Marco after falling and being hit by two other riders. The Misano track already had the dubious honor of breaking the back of defending world champion Wayne Rainey in 1993 (exactly 17 years to the day before Shoya was killed) instantly ending his career and ensuring he'd never walk again.

I'm not suggesting Misano should be omitted from the GP calendar, nor am I pouring scorn on the designated location with which to plaintively remember the late, would've-been-great, Marco Simoncelli. But there's no doubt Misano has accumulated a lot of baggage in a relatively short period of time. It comes preloaded with negative signifiers and I'm sure this must make racing here harder than most.

Having said all that it could be argued that Misano MS serves as a stark reminder that outside all of the glitz and glamor of MotoGP racing bikes is still a very dangerous activity.

So without further ado, lets see where we're at.

 

MotoGP Misano Qualifying Results 2013:

1. Marc Marquez (Honda) 1:32.915

2. Jorge Lorenzo (Yamaha) 1:33.428

3. Valentino Rossi (Yamaha) 1:33.573

4. Dani Pedrosa (Honda) 1:33.726

5. Cal Crutchlow (Yamaha) 1:34.014

6. Aleix Espargaro (ART) 1:34.028

7. Stefan Bradl (Honda) 1:34.098

8. Alvaro Bautista (Honda) 1:34.230

9. Andrea Dovizioso (Ducati) 1:34.338

10. Nicky Hayden (Ducati) 1:34.362

11. Michele Pirro (Ducati) 1:34.467

12. Andrea Iannone (Ducati) 1:34.519

13. Bradley Smith (Yamaha) 1:34.869

14. Colin Edwards (FTR-Kawasaki) 1:35.174

15. Hiroshi Aoyama (FTR) 1:35.534

16. Randy de Puniet (ART) 1:35.596

17. Hector Barbera (FTR) 1:35.866

18. Claudio Corti (FTR-Kawasaki) 1:35.885

19. Danilo Petrucci (Ioda-Suter) 1:36.027

20. Michael Laverty (PBM) 1:36.788

21. Yonny Hernandez (ART) 1:36.844

22. Karel Abraham (ART) 1:36.877

23. Bryan Staring (FTR-Honda) 1:37.283

24. Lukas Pesek (Ioda-Suter) 1:37.886

 

Valentino Rossi cheerfully interferes with the golden ratio that is the Three Amigos. Third is a great starting spot for him. Not so good for Dani Pedrosa, who is currently running second in the world championship. He's on the second row next to Bradl and a rather down-in-the-mouth Cal Crutchlow, who seems to be keeping a low profile following the disappointment at Silverstone. The same can't be said for Marquez, whose starts in second, and Lorenzo, who seems to be coming back into the fray of late. A win today could see him overtaking Pedrosa in the championship standings.

After today there are only five races to go with a maximum of 125 points available. If Lorenzo wants a shot at retaining his world championship title he's got to get in now. And this he does from the off.

Twenty-eight laps to go, Lorenzo is charging ahead. Behind, Pedrosa has passed Marquez and Rossi, but it's Aleix Espargaro who’s raising eyebrows. He's appeared in fourth following a too-good-to-be-true start from sixth. It was fairly obvious he'd miscalculated his timing and jumped the lights. He'd done well to qualify a spot on the second row, and I think his nerves just got the better of him. It's almost as if he knew he'd made an error. Rossi was almost given his place back a few corners later, and shortly after Espargaro had to suffer the humiliation of a ride-through penalty. Bad luck, son.

Twenty-seven to go, Lorenzo is already over a second ahead. Pedrosa seems to be stretching ahead from Marquez, who has yet to find his rhythm. For a while it looks as if Rossi might be preparing himself to have a go. English, too, is taking advantage of the uncertainty ahead, but one man whose not in any doubt about the day is Lorenzo. In two laps he's already 2 seconds ahead of the field. That takes nerve.

Twenty-five: Marquez and Rossi have caught up with Pedrosa. Iannone has crashed out and Pesek has retired, and once again the two Ducatis are dancing in ninth and 10th spot. This time Hayden is having the upper hand. Those crazy guys!

Twenty-four: Marquez, still showing signs of discomfort, goes wide allowing Rossi through. A lap later, Rossi is still in third and catching Pedrosa—much to the delight of his home crowd. By now Lorenzo is almost 3 seconds ahead of the field. He's absolutely on it—smooth, committed and as secure as one could under the circumstances.

Twenty-one: Abraham has pitted; in too much pain from an earlier crash. Back to the action, the two Ducatis are still slugging it out, but now Michele Pirro has entered the fray, which is interesting. He’s essentially riding next year’s Ducati. It's like a test-lab on rubber fitted with a whole bunch of new gizmos and devices that will be—if the boffins deem them a success—applied to the 2014 factory Ducati, the one that English will be riding. And indeed, Divisiozo who has just passed Hayden with 20 laps remaining. But this time, Pirro passes too. Yeah?

Nineteen to go: Poor old Hernandez is out, again, and English, who was recently joined by Stefan Bradl, is now fighting to keep his fifth. A couple of laps later things are getting hot at the front. Marquez seems to have adopted his rapidly marketable predatory squat. He's like an ever-clenched fist, and with 16 laps to go his inside pass on Rossi is at once seamless and instantaneous. One second he’s behind, the next he's not. Just like that.

Now loosening-up and gaining confidence, Marquez is soon closing in on Pedrosa. With 12 laps to go he's in attack mode, head down, back up. This time the pass is so incredibly fast I can't actually work out how and when it happened. Even in slow motion it seems hard to figure out the physical space he's managed to slip through. But Pedrosa isn't done quite yet.

All this to-and-fro action has worked out well for Lorenzo, who, after losing some of his advantage, is now over 3 seconds ahead. Eight to go, Pedrosa hasn't let Marquez slip away. Indeed, the tables seem to have been turned somewhat, but Pedrosa isn't riding smoothly. He looks a bit crazed, almost livid, that his rookie teammate has somehow taken advantage. Seven to go and Pedrosa passes in anger, but it's short lived. Marquez takes it back—inside—and tries to crawl away. Lorenzo is now over 4 seconds ahead.

A few laps later a punch-drunk Pedrosa has noticeably taken his foot off the gas. This is about points. He needs to finish at the top and crashing out now would be the final blow to his championship hopes. Indeed, the whole field seems to be breathing more calmly—all except for English and Bradl, who are still duking it out. On the very last lap English just goes very slightly wide and Bradl slips past. It's touch and go who will cross the line as English fights back but Bradl grabs fifth by a tire tread.

Way, way ahead, Lorenzo is already on a plane flying to Teruel. I'd imagine he's weighing up the what-ifs.

 

MotoGP Misano Results 2013:

1. Jorge Lorenzo (Yamaha)

2. Marc Marquez (Honda)

3. Dani Pedrosa (Honda)

4. Valentino Rossi (Yamaha)

5. Stefan Bradl (Honda)

6. Cal Crutchlow (Yamaha)

7. Alvaro Bautista (Honda)

8. Andrea Dovizioso (Ducati)

9. Nicky Hayden (Ducati)

10. Michele Pirro (Ducati)

11. Bradley Smith (Yamaha)

12. Colin Edwards (FTR-Kawasaki)

13. Aleix Espargaro (ART)

14. Hiroshi Aoyama (FTR)

15. Danilo Petrucci (Ioda-Suter)

16. Claudio Corti (FTR-Kawasaki)

17. Randy de Puniet (ART)

18. Michael Laverty (PBM)

 

Championship standings after round 13

1. Marc Marquez ESP Honda (F) 253 points

2. Jorge Lorenzo ESP Yamaha (F) 219 points

3. Dani Pedrosa ESP Honda (F) 219 points

4. Valentino Rossi ITA Yamaha (F) 169 points

5. Cal Crutchlow GBR Yamaha (S) 146 points

6. Stefan Bradl GER Honda (S) 124 points

7. Alvaro Bautista ESP Honda (S) 112 points

8. Andrea Dovizioso ITA Ducati (F) 104 points

9. Nicky Hayden USA Ducati (F) 95 points

10. Bradley Smith GBR Yamaha (S) 71 points

11. Aleix Espargaro ESP ART (CRT) 71 points

12. Michele Pirro ITA Ducati (S) 50 points

13. Andrea Iannone ITA Ducati (S) 41 points

14. Colin Edwards USA FTR-Kawasaki (CRT) 31 points

15. Hector Barbera ESP FTR-Kawasaki (CRT) 27 points

16. Danilo Petrucci ITA Ioda Suter-BMW (CRT) 23 points

17. Randy de Puniet FRA ART (CRT) 20 points

18. Ben Spies USA Ducati (S) 9 points

19. Claudio Corti ITA FTR-Kawasaki (CRT) 7 points

20. Yonny Hernandez COL ART (CRT) 7 points

21. Hiroshi Aoyama JPN FTR-Kawasaki (CRT) 6 points

22. Alex de Angelis RSM Ducati (S) 5 points

23. Karel Abraham CZE ART (CRT) 5 points

24. Michael Laverty GBR PBM-ART (CRT) 3 points

25. Bryan Staring AUS FTR-Honda (CRT) 2 points

26. Javier del Amor ESP FTR-Kawasaki (CRT) 1 points

 

(F) = Factory Team

(S) = Satellite Team

(CRT) = Claiming Rule Team

 

Constructors' World Championship

1. Honda 291

2. Yamaha 270

3. Ducati 115

4. ART 73

5. FTR 33

6. FTR Kawasaki 31

7. Ioda-Suter 23

8. PBM 3

9. FTR Honda 2


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
The late Marco Simoncelli, who grew up near the Misano Circuit, which now bears his name. Image by motoracereports. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.
Last Updated on Friday, 15 November 2013 14:26
 
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