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General Interest

Antiques Roadshow uncovers early Rockwell painting in Oregon

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Written by Associated Press   
Monday, 06 June 2011 13:21
Norman Rockwell (1894-1978). Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. EUGENE, Ore. (AP) – Eugene delivered a “wow” moment for The Antiques Roadshow on Saturday after a Norman Rockwell painting was deemed to be worth an estimated $500,000, tied for the second most valuable item ever appraised in the 15-year history of the Public Broadcasting Service television program.

The daylong taping of the show involved about 6,000 local ticket holders who brought their collectibles to the Lane Events Center for appraisal.

John Jordan, the show's publicist, said he could not reveal the identity of the painting's owner but confirmed the person lives in the Springfield area.

The artwork is a 1919 original oil-on-canvas painting by Rockwell titled The Little Model that was used on a cover of Collier's magazine. The painting depicts a girl with a dog, posing in front of a fashion poster. The owner told appraiser Nan Chisholm, of Nan Chisholm Fine Art in New York City, that the painting had been in the family for at least 90 years after Rockwell gave it to his great-grandmother.

“As we start our 16th season here in Eugene, we couldn't be more excited about such an extraordinary, rare treasure, and we look forward to sharing it with America,” said Marsha Bemko, the show's executive producer.

A collection of Chinese jade items appraised last year holds the show's highest value at $710,000 to $1,070,000. A 1937 Clyfford Still oil painting was also valued at $500,000 in 2008.

While the Roadshow has been to Portland twice, this was the program's first visit to Eugene.

“About half of the cities (the Roadshow visits) have an item in the six figures,” Jordan said, “but we don't ever expect it. This was very nice.”

Jordan said Eugene also produced two other notable finds:

A 1935 Birger Sandzen oil-on-canvas painting was valued at $40,000 to $60,000. The painting by the notable Swedish-American impressionist has remained in the original frame since it was purchased by the owner's grandfather.

A circa 1970-80 gem-and-gold encrusted carved onyx figure from Venice, Italy, also was valued at $40,000 to $60,000.

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Information from: The Register-Guard, http://www.registerguard.com

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-06-05-11 1722GMT

 


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Norman Rockwell (1994-1978). Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 08 June 2011 16:07
 

Repaired Auschwitz sign won't go back to gate

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Written by Associated Press   
Friday, 03 June 2011 14:01
The original Auschwitz gate sign, stolen in late December 2009, has been replaced with a replica. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. WARSAW, Poland (AP) – The notorious sign that once spanned the main gate at Auschwitz will not return to its original spot after being recently repaired from the damage it suffered during a 2009 theft, an international council that oversees Auschwitz-Birkenau decided Thursday.

The sign bearing the Nazis' cynical slogan “Arbeit Macht Frei” (Work Sets You Free) will instead be housed in a planned exhibition hall, said Pawel Sawicki, a spokesman for the memorial site.

Sawicki said the proposal to house the sign in a secure indoor center came from the Auschwitz memorial museum director Piotr Cywinski. There were no objections to that proposal by the International Auschwitz Council – a 25-member body made up of Holocaust survivors, historians and others – at a two-day meeting that ended Thursday.

Experts say the sign is best preserved in a situation of stable humidity and in temperatures ranging from 63 to 66 fahrenheit – conditions that require it to be indoors, a statement issued after the council meeting said.

The exhibition hall where the sign will go on permanent display is still under development and is expected to open in the coming years. It will be located at the site of the death camp that Nazi Germany operated in occupied Poland during World War II.

The sign was stolen in December 2009 in a shocking heist. Police found the sign in less than three days after a countrywide search, but by then it had been cut into several pieces – damage that took months to repair.

The sign, welded back together and otherwise restored almost to its previous state, was presented to the public last month.

A replica of the sign now hangs in its place.

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-06-02-11 1643GMT




ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
The original Auschwitz gate sign, stolen in late December 2009, has been replaced with a replica. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
Last Updated on Friday, 03 June 2011 14:26
 

Middleton family home sold at auction

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Written by AFP Wire Service   
Friday, 03 June 2011 12:00
The childhood home of Catherine Middleton, now Duchess of Cornwall, has sold at auction for $795,000. June 16, 2008 photo by Nick Warner from Windsor, England. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

LONDON (AFP) - The childhood home of Prince William's wife Catherine was sold at auction on Friday to a local couple of teachers for £485,000 ($795,000, 545,000 euros).

West View, the four-bedroomed, detached house where the future royal bride grew up, is in the village of Bradfield Southend. It is near Bucklebury, where the Middleton family now lives, in Berkshire, west of London.

Michael and Carole Middleton bought the red-brick Victorian home in 1979 when he was a pilot and she worked as a British Airways flight attendant. They raised their three children there before selling it in 1995.

The house retains many Victorian features and still has the outbuilding used as an office for Party Pieces, the Middleton family business.

Teachers Emma Appleby, 35, and her partner Tom Wyatt bought the house for £10,000 below the guide price.

"We've been looking for a property for a while but there's not a lot on the market," Appleby told the Reading Chronicle local newspaper. "The Middleton factor came second, I didn't really think about it," she said. "It should be lovely, I'm really looking forward to it."

William and the former Kate Middleton, now the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, married on April 29 at London's Westminster Abbey, with hundreds of thousands on the streets to cheer them on and around two billion people watching on television across the globe.

The couple now lives on the island of Anglesey, northwest Wales, where Prince William works as a search and rescue helicopter pilot.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
The childhood home of Catherine Middleton, now Duchess of Cornwall, has sold at auction for $795,000. June 16, 2008 photo by Nick Warner from Windsor, England. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.
Last Updated on Friday, 17 June 2011 12:59
 

Women's group breaks rank on Alamo management

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Written by Associated Press   
Friday, 03 June 2011 09:33
The Battle of the Alamo was fought at this site in San Antonio, Texas, in 1836. SAN ANTONIO (AP) – Some within a prominent women's legacy group that has cared for the Alamo for more than a century now want to turn the responsibility over to the state.

Some within the Daughters of the Republic of Texas want the group to walk away from the San Antonio shrine to Texas independence, the San Antonio Express-News reported. That faction wants the group to turn its focus on its dream of a new headquarters-museum complex in Austin.

“Some members are tired of operating the Alamo entirely (and) want to give it up and concentrate on DRT” and the museum project, the group's president general, Karen Thompson, wrote in an email to its 26-member board.

The email went out just after the Legislature approved a bill that would put the Alamo under state control and have the group's Alamo activities subject to the supervision of the General Land Office. The bill awaits Gov. Rick Perry's action.

Under the law, the state would take over the Alamo if it cannot agree to a new arrangement with the 7,000-member legacy group by Jan. 1 for the Alamo's management.

Kathleen Carter of San Antonio, one of the Daughters, told the Express-News that she's “dumbfounded” that a faction of 20 to 30 members from cities outside San Antonio was seriously proposing walking away from the Alamo.

“I'm appalled at the email. Certainly if the DRT feels that way, we can't function as (Alamo) custodians. To give up the Alamo is to give up everything we've worked for,” she said.

Meanwhile, Alamo staff are excited about the “level of professionalism that will come” with state management and the DRT remaining as caretakers, said state Sen. Leticia Van de Putte, D-San Antonio, who pushed for the bill's passage.

In her email, Thompson said the group could urge Perry to veto the bill. Perry spokeswoman Lucy Nashed said only that Perry “will thoughtfully review this bill in its final form and make a decision.”

The Texas attorney general's office has performed a yearlong investigation of the Daughters of the Republic of Texas. In a statement to a state Senate committee April 12, the office reported such concerns as the group's slow response to an engineer's report on the Alamo's leaky roof, a "serious lack of transparency" in responding to questions about financial dealings, and possible misappropriation of state money.

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Information from: San Antonio Express-News, www.mysanantonio.com

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-06-02-11 0658GMT

 




ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
The Battle of the Alamo was fought at this site in San Antonio, Texas, in 1836.
Last Updated on Friday, 03 June 2011 09:50
 

Kentucky man trying to save Bybee Pottery

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Written by Tom Hoepf   
Thursday, 02 June 2011 11:10
 Bybee Pottery is considered the oldest pottery operation in the United States west of the Appalachian Mountains. This 17 1/2-inch stoneware jar from the early 1900s is attributed to Bybee. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Case Antiques. RICHMOND, Ky. (AP) – A Madison County man is working to save the iconic Bybee Pottery business that has operated near Richmond for more than 200 years.

Jimmy Cornelison told The Richmond Register that he won't let the business close without a fight.

“I got my first paycheck here from my grandfather when I was 11,” Cornelison said. “Bybee Pottery is not going to close if I can possibly help it.”

The business is currently in a state of suspension. Bybee laid off its eight employees in February and sold its remaining inventory. It currently is neither making nor selling products, but Cornelison says Bybee has some product that is formed and could be fired.

He said the business has been having economic problems, especially in the last three years.

More than 50 retailers that sold the company's folk-art plates, pots, bowls, mugs and other items have gone out of business, he said. Meanwhile, the cost of materials has seen a sharp increase.

Minerals applied to the potter's clay create the colors that make the distinctive patterns in Bybee's pottery. Cornelison said the cost of just those minerals went up 40 percent since Jan. 1.

Cornelison said he is working on options he hopes will keep the pottery business open, though it's doubtful that Bybee Pottery would return to the height of its popularity in the early 1980s.

Lori Murphy-Tatum, executive director of the Richmond Tourism Commission, says losing Bybee would be a blow to the community.

Another iconic craft industry left Madison County in 2007, she said. Churchill Weavers, which has operated in Berea since the 1920s, was sold in 2007 and its diminished operations were moved elsewhere.

But Tatum says she's got faith in Cornelison.

“If anybody is up to the challenge of keeping Bybee going in its third century, it's Jimmy Cornelison,” she said.

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Information from: Richmond Register, http://www.richmondregister.com

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 

AP-WF-06-01-11 1541GMT

 




ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Bybee Pottery is considered the oldest pottery operation in the United States west of the Appalachian Mountains. This 17 1/2-inch stoneware jar from the early 1900s is attributed to Bybee. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Case Antiques.
Last Updated on Thursday, 02 June 2011 11:57
 
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