Payday Loans
payday loans
ADVERTISEMENTS
Banner
Banner

Get Free ACN Daily Headlines

LiveAuctioneers

Search Auction Central News

ADVERTISEMENTS
Banner
Banner
Bookmark and Share
General Interest

Princess Beatrice’s royal wedding hat tops $131,341

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Associated Press   
Monday, 23 May 2011 11:01
Princess Beatrice wearing the hat designed by Philip Treacy. Image courtesy of ebay.co.uk

LONDON (AP) – Auction site eBay says a bidder has offered 81,100 pounds ($131,341) for the spiraling headpiece worn by Princess Beatrice to last month's royal wedding. The auction ended Sunday.

The 22-year-old granddaughter of Queen Elizabeth II startled commentators with the swirling hat she wore to the wedding of her cousin Prince William and Kate Middleton.

The silk Philip Treacy creation has been compared to antlers, a toilet seat and a pretzel, and has been photoshopped into scores of unlikely scenarios on the Internet.

Beatrice has taken the joke in stride and put the hat on sale for charity. Proceeds will go to UNICEF and Children in Crisis.

On Saturday 38 bidders were competing for the hat, described on eBay as a “unique sculptural celebratory headpiece.”

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-05-21-11 1038GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Princess Beatrice wearing the hat designed by Philip Treacy. Image courtesy of ebay.co.uk
Last Updated on Monday, 23 May 2011 12:54
 

Blackbeard's anchor target of dive off N.C. coast

PDF Print E-mail
Written by MARTHA WAGGONER, Associated Press   
Friday, 20 May 2011 11:12
 American painter Jean Leon Gerome Ferris (1863–1930) depicted the ‘The Capture of the Pirate, Blackbeard, 1718.' RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) – The work to retrieve an anchor from the wreck of what is believed to be the pirate Blackbeard's flagship will began this week off the North Carolina coast, but what's underneath that artifact is just as interesting to researchers.

The anchor is the second-largest item on the site of what's believed to be the Queen Anne's Revenge, outsized only by another anchor, project director Mark Wilde-Ramsing said Wednesday. It's about 13 feet long with arms that are 8 feet across. The other anchor is about 7 inches longer.

“It's a big, cumbersome, flat piece that's going to require some good logistics and some good weather,” he said in a telephone interview after a news conference at the University of North Carolina Wilmington.

The recovery effort is taking place in the Atlantic waters near Beaufort, where the shipwreck is about 20 feet underwater. The actual dive will begin Monday and continue through June 3, with only two days off.

The anchor is located in the central part of the shipwreck, and it's on top of other items that the team hopes to recover. At the bottom of the pile is the wooden hull structure, the ribs and the plank – the only parts of the ship that survived the test of time, saltwater, currents and tides, Wilde-Ramsing said. Those parts of the ship survived because ballast was stored there to keep the ship upright and other items, including six cannons and four anchors are also in the pile.

But Wilde-Ramsing and his team hope other, smaller items are trapped inside, things that will tell the tale of how the men lived on the Queens Anne's Revenge and the waters it traversed.

“We hope little things got stuck in there, which would tell us what the pirates were eating ... micro botanical stuff so we'll be able to tell where the ship traveled,” he said. “Most of the little things are gone, except for this one place, where hopefully they've been entombed.”

The shipwreck was located in 1996, and Wilde-Ramsing says the team hopes to recover all the artifacts by the end of 2013.

The largest exhibit of the shipwreck's artifacts will be shown starting June 11 at the N.C. Maritime Museum in Beaufort.

In 1717, Blackbeard captured a French slave ship and renamed it Queen Anne's Revenge. Blackbeard, whose real name was widely believed to be Edward Teach or Thatch, settled in Bath and received a governor's pardon. Some experts believe he grew bored with land life and returned to piracy.

He was killed by volunteers from the Royal Navy in November 1718 – five months after the ship thought to be Queen Anne's Revenge sank.

The Queen Anne's Revenge shipwreck site, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Sites, has already yielded more than 250,000 artifacts.

___

Online:

Martha Waggoner can be reached at http://twitter.com/mjwaggonernc

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-05-18-11 2106GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
American painter Jean Leon Gerome Ferris (1863–1930) depicted the ‘The Capture of the Pirate, Blackbeard, 1718.'
Last Updated on Friday, 20 May 2011 11:51
 

Museum’s art puts damper on wedding parties

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Associated Press   
Friday, 20 May 2011 10:10
 Opened in 2009, the Art Institute of Chicago’s Modern Wing has become a popular site of wedding parties. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license. CHICAGO (AP) – The Art Institute of Chicago has caused quite a stir among some brides who booked summer weddings on an outdoor terrace at the museum only to find their coveted view of the city is being blocked by art.

Gabrielle Berger, who holds a degree in art history and formerly worked at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, booked the outdoor terrace months ago, expecting the lush greenery of Millennium Park and Chicago's legendary skyline would be the backdrop to her June wedding. Instead Restless Rainbow, designed by artist Pae White for the terrace, will obstruct that view.

“I knew what risks we were taking in booking the space,” Berger, who thought the stark white walls of the museum's modern wing would fit with her wish for a “minimalist” wedding, told the Chicago Tribune. “But what they've selected to display in the space during wedding season is absurd.”

Renting the terrace costs $5,000, and it's $10,000 for the entire third floor, including the Terzo Piano restaurant, according to Art Institute spokeswoman Erin Hogan.

The artwork, which opens to the public Saturday, consists of colorful vinyl strips that wrap around the terrace's glass panels and sweep across the floor. The panels on the north end of the terrace, which overlooks over Millennium Park, are 18 feet tall.

Hogan said that once White's plans for the terrace were finalized in March, the museum informed those who booked summer weddings and other events. She said the museum is looking for ways to address the concerns of wedding parties that have expressed concerns over how White's art will affect their celebrations.

“At the same time, we are an art museum committed to bringing contemporary art – and art of all periods and places – to our visitors,'' Hogan said.

To appease unhappy couples, the Art Institute has been coming up with alternatives, including full access to Nichols Bridgeway, which connects the modern wing to Millennium Park.

Wedding planner Renny Pedersen says a client has decided to serve cocktails on the bridge, after a wedding in the museum's Griffin Court, a sky-lit passageway that serves as the entrance to the modern wing.

“Whenever you are booking a modern space, you have to be OK with things that might be beyond your control,” Pedersen said. “You have to have a really, really good sense of humor.”

Anna Gonis reserved the terrace to serve cocktails for her wedding party on June 25. She has persuaded 10 other couples to join her in a formal complaint to museum officials.

“This isn't against the artist themselves; it is an amazing opportunity for them,” Gonis said. “But in fairness, the institute needs to keep in mind the other individuals who have contracted the space.”

White visited the exhibit on Tuesday, as it was still being installed. She said she had just learned about the unhappiness of some future brides who planned to use the site.

“It is just news to me, so I am just kind of processing it,” said the artist. “My intention was not to be disruptive.”

___

Information from: Chicago Tribune, http://www.chicagotribune.com

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-05-19-11 0717GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Opened in 2009, the Art Institute of Chicago’s Modern Wing has become a popular site of wedding parties. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.
Last Updated on Friday, 20 May 2011 10:30
 

X marks the spot of new Captain Kidd exhibit

PDF Print E-mail
Written by RAPHAEL G. SATTER, Associated Press   
Thursday, 19 May 2011 09:52
Howard Pyle's fanciful painting of William ‘Captain’ Kidd burying treasure. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

LONDON (AP) – Many know of Captain Kidd, the Scottish-born buccaneer who terrorized the Indian Ocean and was hanged as a pirate at London's Execution Dock.

Fewer know of his services to the British crown, his royal seal of approval, and the powerful, well-connected noblemen who Kidd believed double-crossed him.

A new exhibit at the Museum of London Docklands argues that Kidd's career wasn't as black-and-white as the skull-and-crossbones, and invites people to ask whether the 17th century adventurer was made a scapegoat for other men's schemes.

Curator Tom Wareham said he wanted to highlight the degree to which corrupt lawmakers, conniving noblemen and greedy London merchants all played their part in funding, outfitting and organizing pirate expeditions.

There was little doubt about Kidd's guilt, Wareham said. But those who backed him shared in it too.

“They are guilty,” he said. “Of avarice, basically.”

The beginning of William Kidd's story remains unclear. The famed seaman was born in Greenock, Scotland around 1645 and moved to New York – then merely an outpost of Britain's budding empire – sometime thereafter. By 1689 he was cruising the Caribbean as a British gun-for-fire against the French.

It was a respectable enough life. The seasoned sea captain was routinely called upon by authorities in New York and Massachusetts to help clear their coasts of enemy ships. He married one of New York's wealthiest widows and even lent equipment to help build the city's famed Trinity Church.

But his involvement in a shadowy get-rich-quick scheme – backed by some of the most powerful men in Britain – would prove his undoing.

Kidd's mission was to prowl the Indian Ocean, hunting pirates and plundering French vessels. Several well-connected noblemen were involved, including Lord Somers, who arranged to get Kidd a royal seal of approval, and Lord Bellamont, who helped organize the expedition and would later serve as governor of New York.

But the plan was of shaky legality, and in any case things went wrong from the start. Kidd set sail on Feb. 27, 1696, but his crew made rude gestures at a warship as they floated down the River Thames. The Royal Navy, unamused, pressed many of them into service, which meant Kidd had to make a lengthy detour to New York to recruit more sailors.

He made it to waters off East Africa, but the constraints set on him by his sponsors meant he needed to earn cash quickly. Kidd unsuccessfully attacked a convoy of Muslim pilgrims from Africa and preyed on Indian Ocean shipping, infuriating the subcontinent's Mughal rulers, with whom the British East India Company was doing a lucrative business.

Two of his captures were French-flagged ships – legitimate targets, from his point of view – but he was already being denounced as a pirate for abusing natives, torturing sailors, and clashing with allied vessels. His relationship with his crew was dreadful; at one point he mortally wounded his gunner, William Moore, by smashing his head with a bucket.

Meanwhile, Kidd's backers, hit by allegations of corruption, were falling out of favor. By the time Kidd arrived in New York to seek Bellamont's protection, he had already become too much of a liability. Bellamont turned him in.

Kidd claimed he'd acted lawfully, but documents showing that two of the vessels he'd struck were French disappeared before his trial. From his prison, Kidd claimed that he'd been set up and sold out.

“Some great men would have me dye for Solving their Honor,” he wrote.

Still, Kidd claimed to have a trump card, saying in a letter that he'd hidden treasure away at a secret location in the Caribbean, a stash which he valued at 100,000 pounds – then worth about 5,000 times a sailor's annual wage.

“It is an enormous sum of money – absolutely enormous,” said Wareham.

The letter got London talking, but it couldn't save Kidd's life. He was hanged at London's Execution Dock on May 23, 1701 – almost 310 years ago. His body was coated in pitch, squeezed into a gibbet cage, and left for several years as a warning before being taken down and buried in secret.

But Kidd's desperate promise of treasure practically beyond measure would ensure that his name would live on.

The search for Kidd's missing booty was the focus Edgar Allen Poe's The Gold Bug and an inspiration for Robert Lewis Stevenson's Treasure Island. The final part of the exhibit is packed with the pirate-themed books and movie posters.

Curator Hilary David said Kidd's promise of wealth practically beyond measure gave pirate stories one of their most enduring tropes.

“It seems that this is the origin of all the ‘pirates’ buried treasure’ stories,” said Hilary Davidson, a curator at the museum. “After the treasure is mentioned in the letter, X marks the spot forever.”

The exhibit, "Pirates: The Captain Kidd Story," opens Friday.

___

Online:

Museum of London Docklands: http://www.museumoflondon.org.uk/docklands/

___

Raphael G. Satter can be reached at: http://twitter.com/razhael

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 

AP-WF-05-18-11 1514GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Howard Pyle's fanciful painting of William ‘Captain’ Kidd burying treasure. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
Last Updated on Thursday, 19 May 2011 10:31
 

1848 panoramic view of Cincinnati is like no other

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Associated Press   
Tuesday, 17 May 2011 11:08
An etching of the Cincinnati riverfront, which appeared in the Sept. 27, 1862 issue of ‘Harper’s Weekly,’ can’t compare to the detail of Fontayne and Porter’s series of daguerreotypes of the same scene recorded 14 years earlier. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. CINCINNATI (AP) – The Cincinnati library system plans to unveil on Saturday a series of groundbreaking 1848 photos that create a two-mile panoramic view of the Cincinnati riverfront.

The Cincinnati Riverfront Panorama was captured by Charles Fontayne and William S. Porter as they stood on a Newport, Ky., rooftop and looked across the Ohio River, the Cincinnati Enquirer reports.

The photos go on permanent display at the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County main branch beginning with the unveiling ceremony.

“It's a one-of-a-kind object,” said Ralph Wiegandt, conservator for the George Eastman House of International Museum of Photography and Film in Rochester, N.Y. “It boggles the mind. We're still reveling in its magnificence.”

The library acquired the photos – the size of large postcards – in the early 20th century and they have been in storage since 1955 for protection. The Eastman House examined, cleaned and stabilized the photos in 2006 and 2007.

The Enquirer reports that photography was in its infancy in 1848 and the panorama showed that photos could not only capture images of people but also of landscapes. It's considered the oldest surviving photo of its kind of an American city. The eight images are daguerreotypes made in a camera on a silver plate.

The exhibit will include interactive screens where viewers can zoom in on details from the photos, such as laundry on a clothesline, names on steamboats, a man sitting on a log outside a sawmill and the Second Presbyterian Church clock tower reading 1:55 p.m. – a detail unknown until the Eastman House did its work.

“We can see far more in the photos than Fontayne and Porter could when they took the pictures,” said Patricia Van Skaik, manager of the library's genealogy and local history department.

“It enables us to understand what life was like in Cincinnati in the mid-19th century in a way that we have never been able to before.”

Fontayne and Porter worked as partners in a Cincinnati photo gallery from 1847 to 1854.

Their photos won a top award at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia in 1849 and were displayed at the first world's fair at London's Crystal Palace two years later.

“It's truly a miracle in every way,” Wiegandt said. “Everything worked. There's nothing to compare it to.”

___

Information from: The Cincinnati Enquirer, http://www.enquirer.com

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-05-15-11 2114GMT

 



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
An etching of the Cincinnati riverfront, which appeared in the Sept. 27, 1862 issue of ‘Harper’s Weekly,’ can’t compare to the detail of Fontayne and Porter’s series of daguerreotypes of the same scene recorded 14 years earlier. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 17 May 2011 12:38
 
<< Start < Prev 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 Next > End >>

Page 65 of 106
ADVERTISEMENTS

Banner Banner