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General Interest

Wild critters inhabit decoy carver Charles Perdew’s house

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Written by SHANNON CRAWLEY-SERPETTE, (LaSalle) News-Tribune   
Thursday, 18 September 2014 09:12
Decoy carver Charles Perdew's home in Henry, Ill. Image courtesy of the Charles Perdew Museum Association. HENRY, Ill. (AP) – Pat Selquist knows exactly how she would spend the money if she were lucky enough to win the lottery.

As soon as the money was in her account, she'd begin renovating and repairing the Charles Perdew house in Henry.

Unlike the restored Charles Perdew workshop, the house is not open to the public. And there's good reason for that. For safety's sake, you have to watch where you step in the dilapidated structure. Long vacant, the only things living there these days are animals that make their way into the house's many openings.

The house, like its creator, is truly one of a kind. Charles, a renowned decoy carver whose work commands hefty sums, designed the house and began building it on Oct. 11, 1907. As one might imagine, the house has some interesting features. That doesn't surprise Selquist, who serves as president of the Charles Perdew Museum Association.

“Nothing is unusual with Charlie,” she said.

Never one to waste anything, he used newspapers, cardboard and other materials for insulation.

“He insulated part of the house with sawdust,” Selquist said.

He used Masonite in various areas of the house.

“It's covered with oilcloth,” Selquist said.

The oilcloth was then painted by his wife, Edna Perdew, who was an accomplished artist in her own right.

“That's the backdrop for all her murals on the wall,” she said.

The murals in some rooms are faded, but the mural in the bathroom is still quite vivid.

Edna's kerosene stove still sits in the kitchen, and it's the only one she ever had, Selquist said.

Edna and Charles had one son and three grandchildren.

“All three of the grandchildren were born in this house,” Selquist said. “They all lived here together (for a while).”

Although efforts have been made to stabilize the house, Selquist said it would take hundreds of thousands of dollars to properly restore it.

The annual Charles Perdew Museum Association dinner and auction, the association's main fundraiser of the year, will begin at 6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 27 at the River Valley Bowl in Henry. Doors open at 5 p.m.

Tickets are $20 per person and are available from Perdew museum board members, The Paint Store, Henry State Bank, Heartland Bank or at the door that night.

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Information from: News-Tribune, http://www.newstrib.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-09-17-14 1040GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE
Decoy carver Charles Perdew's home in Henry, Ill. Image courtesy of the Charles Perdew Museum Association. The reconstructed Charles Perdew workshop and museum. Image courtesy of the Charles Perdew Museum Association.
Last Updated on Thursday, 18 September 2014 09:27
 

Tracking the Roosevelts, from Maine to North Dakota

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Written by BETH J. HARPAZ, AP Travel Editor   
Wednesday, 17 September 2014 11:01

Sagamore Hill was Teddy Roosevelt's summer White House. The home is on the North Shore of Long Island near Oyster Bay. Image courtesy of http://www.theodore-roosevelt.com

NEW YORK (AP) – Ken Burns' new documentary about the Roosevelts – presidents Theodore and Franklin, and Franklin's wife Eleanor – is bound to stir interest in some of the places connected to them. Here's a look at some major Roosevelt sites, including birthplaces, family homes, vacation retreats and national parks and monuments from Maine to North Dakota.

THEODORE ROOSEVELT SITES

THEODORE ROOSEVELT BIRTHPLACE: Theodore Roosevelt lived at 28 E. 20th St. in Manhattan from his birth in 1858 until he was 14. The building was demolished in 1916, but later reconstructed and decorated with original and period furnishings. A free half-hour tour tells the story of Roosevelt's family: He was descended from Dutch traders who made their fortune in New York (Roosevelt means rose field in Dutch, and is pronounced “rose-velt”), and he was Eleanor Roosevelt's uncle and Franklin Roosevelt's distant cousin. A sickly child, Teddy became fit using a gym on a terrace off his bedroom here. Museum artifacts include a shirt with a bullet hole; Roosevelt was shot on the campaign trail in Milwaukee but finished his speech before getting medical care; http://www.nps.gov/thrb/.

THEODORE ROOSEVELT NATIONAL PARK: This park in the badlands of western North Dakota commemorates Theodore Roosevelt's sojourn to the region in the 1880s, hunting bison and working on a ranch; http://www.nps.gov/thro.

MOUNT RUSHMORE: Theodore Roosevelt is one of four presidents whose faces adorn Mount Rushmore in South Dakota, along with George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and Abraham Lincoln. Roosevelt's legacy includes his leadership in conservation, creating national parks and wilderness areas, and preserving antiquities. He was also seen as a fighter for the common man, taking on corporate monopolies; http://www.nps.gov/moru/.

SAGAMORE HILL: This was Teddy Roosevelt's summer White House, where he vacationed with his family. The home, on the North Shore of Long Island near Oyster Bay, New York, is closed for renovation, though a nearby museum and grounds are open; http://www.nps.gov/sahi.

FRANKLIN AND ELEANOR ROOSEVELT SITES

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY AND MUSEUM: Through exhibits on Pearl Harbor, “Fireside Chats,” the New Deal and many other defining aspects of FDR's presidency, this site in Hyde Park, New York, brings to life his leadership during the Great Depression and World War II. But visitors will also learn about FDR's personal life, from his domineering mother, to his struggles with polio, to his relationships with Eleanor and other women. Nearby National Park Service sites include Springwood, where FDR was born and lived; Val-Kill, Eleanor's retreat; and Top Cottage, FDR's private digs; http://www.nps.gov/hofr/ and http://www.fdrlibrary.marist.edu/.

FRANKLIN DELANO ROOSEVELT MEMORIAL: This evocative, unusual memorial in Washington, D.C., consists of a series of outdoor galleries with waterfalls, sculptures and famous FDR quotes such as “The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.” Sculptures show FDR with his dog and FDR in a wheelchair; http://www.nps.gov/nr/travel/presidents/fdr_memorial.html.

WARM SPRINGS: Warm Springs, Ga., was known for therapeutic swimming pools that offered relief from polio. FDR, who was partly paralyzed from polio, frequently visited, regaining some of his strength here and eventually building a home known as the Little White House. He died here in 1945 during his fourth presidential term. Visitors can see the home, pools and other sites related to polio history; http://www.nps.gov/nr/travel/presidents/roosevelts_little_white_house.html.

CAMPOBELLO: FDR had a 34-room summer home off the coast of Maine on Campobello Island, in New Brunswick, Canada, where his mother's family vacationed. It was here that he first experienced symptoms of polio in 1921. The home is open for tours from late May through Columbus Day (Oct. 13). The area's rocky shores, trails and driving roads can be visited year-round. A bridge connects Lubec, Maine, with Campobello, but you must have a passport to cross; http://www.nps.gov/roca/index.htm.

FOUR FREEDOMS PARK: This park, located on Roosevelt Island in New York City's East River, memorializes FDR's “Four Freedoms” speech, made in 1941, extolling freedom of speech, freedom of worship, freedom from want and freedom from fear. An excerpt is engraved on a granite monument near a bust of FDR. The park, designed by architect Louis I. Kahn, is considered a sleek Modernist masterpiece. Its tree-lined plazas, steps and other structures offer vantage points full of symmetry and angled views for seeing the Manhattan skyline. Reachable via subway or the Roosevelt Island tram; http://www.fdrfourfreedomspark.org.

ROOSEVELT HOUSE PUBLIC POLICY INSTITUTE AT HUNTER COLLEGE: FDR and Eleanor received this six-story Manhattan town house as a gift in 1908 from FDR's mother Sara Delano Roosevelt. A single front door opened into two units – one for the mother-in-law and one for FDR and his family. They lived here for decades; this is where FDR recovered from polio, ran for governor and president, and planned the New Deal. It's now owned and used by Hunter College for lectures and events, and can be toured Saturdays, 10 a.m., noon and 2 p.m.; 47-49 E. 65th St., New York City; http://www.roosevelthouse.hunter.cuny.edu/tours.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-09-16-14 1147GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

Sagamore Hill was Teddy Roosevelt's summer White House. The home is on the North Shore of Long Island near Oyster Bay. Image courtesy of http://www.theodore-roosevelt.com  

Last Updated on Wednesday, 17 September 2014 11:17
 

Brightman's Cartier Tigers with royal provenance in Nov. 11 auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Monday, 15 September 2014 11:29
Cartier Tiger onyx and diamond bracelet and clip brooch with emerald eyes, made in the 1950s, to be auctioned as one lot on Nov. 11, 2014 at Christie's Geneva. Estimate: $1.8 million to $2.5 million. Christie's Images Ltd. 2014

GENEVA– Two pieces of tiger jewelry by Cartier, formerly from the legendary collection of the Duchess of Windsor and given to Sarah Brightman by her then husband Andrew Lloyd Webber, are the early highlights of the upcoming Magnificent Jewels auction at Christie’s in Geneva on November 11. The two tiger pieces comprising of an onyx and diamond clip brooch and bracelet, with emerald eyes, were both made in the 1950s and are to be sold as one lot with a combined estimate of US$1,800,000-2,500,000.

The Cartier Tiger Collection has been a highlight of 20th century jewelry design since it first appeared in 1928. The rarity of these pieces is enhanced by the story behind their ownership – two romantic tales where they became symbols of love through the act of giving. Edward VIII was King for less than a year when he abdicated in 1936 to marry Wallis Simpson. Living in France, together they created a remarkable collection of avant-garde jewels that defined the style of the 1940s and 1950s. These pieces were bought by the Duke and Duchess of Windsor from Cartier between 1956 and 1959.

In the legendary sale of her collection in 1987, in Geneva (the most valuable collection of jewels ever auctioned at the time), a total of seven Great Cats pieces, by Cartier were offered, including the two tiger pieces now presented for sale. It was at this auction that Andrew Lloyd Webber bought them for his then wife, Sarah Brightman. They were a present to her to celebrate the huge London and Broadway success of The Phantom of the Opera, which he wrote and in which she starred. Over the years, the jewels have brought immense joy to Brightman, who would now like to release them to new splendor in order for others to appreciate them as she did.

By virtue of their unique history, Sarah Brightman intends to offer a portion of the proceeds from the sale to The Andrew Lloyd Webber Foundation, which significantly supports the arts, music in schools, The Architectural Heritage Fund and awards 30 performing arts scholarships annually. This donation will ensure the causes they both support benefit from the sale.

Visit Christie's online at www.christies.com .

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ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE
Cartier Tiger onyx and diamond bracelet and clip brooch with emerald eyes, made in the 1950s, to be auctioned as one lot on Nov. 11, 2014 at Christie's Geneva. Estimate: $1.8 million to $2.5 million. Christie's Images Ltd. 2014 Left: The Duchess of Windsor wearing the Cartier Tiger jewels, at the gala opening of the new Lido Revue in Paris, Dec 11, 1959, © Getty Images/Popperfoto; Right: Sarah Brightman wearing the Cartier Tiger jewels at The Phantom of the Opera opening party at Beacon Theatre, New York, Jan 26, 1988 ©Getty Images/Wire Image. Images provided by Christie's
Last Updated on Thursday, 18 September 2014 08:43
 

Lighthouse on Wisconsin's Door County island going high tech

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Written by Associated Press   
Friday, 12 September 2014 09:17

Plum Island rear light. Photo by Jjegers. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 via Wikimedia Commons.

PLUM ISLAND, Wis. (AP) - A lighthouse on an uninhabited Door County island is going high tech.

Plum Island sits off the end of the peninsula that forms Wisconsin's "thumb.'' Federal officials are planning to replace its historic lighthouse lens with an LED lantern.

The current lens is called a Fresnel lens. The U.S. Coast Guard says lenses of that type were originally installed in lighthouses in the late 1800s and early 1900s.

At that time, lighthouses were staffed by lighthouse keepers who cleaned the lenses daily and covered them with a light cloth during the day to protect them from ultraviolet rays.

But the Coast Guard says lighthouses are now automated, and with no staffers to protect the lens, officials are removing the lenses for preservation. They'll be loaned to local museums for public display.

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Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 

Last Updated on Friday, 12 September 2014 09:24
 

Deal averts sale of NJ shore town's historic carousel

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Written by Associated Press   
Friday, 05 September 2014 09:00
More than 100 years old, the Dentzel/Looff carousel at Casino Pier was moved to Seaside Heights in 1932. Image courtesy of Casino Pier. SEASIDE HEIGHTS, N.J. (AP) – The Seaside Heights Carousel that survived Superstorm Sandy and a boardwalk fire will not be going up for sale.

A deal has been reached to keep the merry-go-round in the New Jersey shore town.

The Asbury Park Press reports under terms of an agreement introduced by the town's council on Wednesday, the town and Casino Pier would swap oceanfront property in exchange for the town taking control of the carousel.

The company that owns the carousel announced in July it was selling the carousel at auction to make room for new attractions.

The carousel was hand-built in 1910 and has operated in Seaside since 1932. It has 58 animals, 36 of which move up and down. It has two benches and a Wurlitzer organ.

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Information from: Asbury Park (N.J.) Press, http://www.app.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-09-04-14 1202GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
More than 100 years old, the Dentzel/Looff carousel at Casino Pier was moved to Seaside Heights in 1932. Image courtesy of Casino Pier.
Last Updated on Friday, 05 September 2014 09:27
 
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