Payday Loans
payday loans
ADVERTISEMENTS
Banner
Banner

Get Free ACN Daily Headlines

LiveAuctioneers

Search Auction Central News

ADVERTISEMENTS
Banner
Banner
Bookmark and Share
General Interest

Microsoft co-founder says he found sunken Japanese warship

PDF Print E-mail
Written by MARI YAMAGUCHI, Associated Press   
Thursday, 05 March 2015 11:47
Drawing of IJN Superbattleship Musashi in her 10/1944 configuration. Image by Alexpl. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license. TOKYO (AP) – Microsoft co-founder and philanthropist Paul Allen and his research team have found the wreckage of a massive Japanese World War II battleship off the Philippines near where it sank more than 70 years ago, he said Wednesday.

The apparent discovery of the Musashi, one of the largest battleships in history, comes as the world marks the 70th anniversary of the war's end.

Allen and the team aboard his yacht M/Y Octopus found the ship on Sunday, more than eight years after their search began, Allen said in a statement issued by his publicity agency, Edelman.

Detailed images captured by a high-definition camera mounted on an underwater probe confirmed the wreckage as that of the Musashi, it said. Allen said on his website that the video and still images showed a valve wheel with Japanese letters saying “main valve handle” which used to be in a lower engineering area, a catapult system used to launch planes, a large gun turret, and one of the ship's two 15-ton anchors. He said the team also found the ship's bow.

Japanese experts said they were eager to study the images to try to confirm the ship's identity.

Kazushige Todaka, head of a private museum specializing in the battleship Yamato, Musashi's sister vessel, said the details in the images matched those of the Musashi, which was the only battleship that sank in the area.

“Judging from the location, it must be the Musashi,” Todaka told NHK public television.

The Musashi, commissioned in 1942, sank in October 1944 in the Sibuyan Sea during the Battle of Leyte Gulf, losing about half of its 2,400 crew members. The ship was repeatedly hit by torpedoes and bombs dropped by planes from Allied aircraft carriers.

The naval battle, considered the largest of World War II, crippled the imperial fleet, cut off Japanese oil supplies and allowed the U.S. invasion of the Japanese-held Philippines.

Allen's team found the battleship at a depth of 1 kilometer (3,280 feet) in the Sibuyan Sea using the autonomous underwater vehicle on its third dive after narrowing the search area with detailed undersea topographical data and other locator devices, the statement said.

“The Musashi is truly an engineering marvel and as an engineer at heart, I have a deep appreciation for the technology and effort that went into its construction,” Allen said.

He said he is fascinated with World War II history after being inspired by his father's service in the U.S. Army, and that he was “honored” to play a part in finding a key vessel in naval history, and in honoring the memory of those who served aboard the ship.

Allen said he respects the wreckage as a war grave and plans to work with Japan's government to make sure the site is treated properly in line with Japanese traditions. Japanese Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga told reporters that he had no immediate comment.

Suikokai, an organization that supports Japanese navy veterans and conducts research in maritime defense, said that if the discovery is confirmed, a memorial service could be held at the site.

Todaka at the Yamato Museum said the findings, especially during the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II, were a “great achievement” that could inspire many Japanese to revisit the history of the war, whose memory has faded over the past decades.

Copyright 2015 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-03-04-15 1514GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Drawing of IJN Superbattleship Musashi in her 10/1944 configuration. Image by Alexpl. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.
Last Updated on Thursday, 05 March 2015 12:09
 

Rare ‘First Folio’ to visit Shakespeare's Globe theater

PDF Print E-mail
Written by JILL LAWLESS, Associated Press   
Wednesday, 25 February 2015 16:47
The Victoria and Albert Museum's copy of the First Folio (Mr William Shakespeare's Comedies, Histories & Tragedies), London 1623. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons LONDON (AP) – A rare first edition of William Shakespeare's plays is to go on display in the Bard's spiritual home, just a few hundred yards from where it was printed in 1623.

Shakespeare's Globe says a First Folio discovered last year in a library in Saint-Omer, France, will be displayed at the London theater for two months from July 2016.

Actor Mark Rylance said Monday that he's delighted “my favorite book in the world” is coming to the recreated Elizabethan playhouse. The theater lies across the River Thames from the site of London's 17th-century printing houses near St. Paul's Cathedral.

About 750 copies of Shakespeare's collected plays were printed seven years after the playwright died. Some 230 copies are known to survive, including the book found among belongings from a now-defunct Jesuit college in Saint-Omer, near Calais.

Saint-Omer librarian Remy Cordonnier identified the folio, which was missing its title page and had been misidentified as an 18th-century printing.

He said annotations suggest it was been used for student performances at the college – some of the bawdier jokes have been crossed out.

One First Folio sold at Christie's auction house in 2006 for $6.8 million, and Saint-Omer mayor Francois Decoster said Cordonnier had told him of the discovery by saying, “I think we've found the second-most-precious book in the world.” He said the town already has a copy of the most valuable, the 15th-century Gutenberg Bible.

Rylance, a former Globe artistic director who is currently starring as Henry VIII's adviser Thomas Cromwell in BBC television series Wolf Hall, said that 17 Shakespeare plays were not printed in the playwright's lifetime. Without the First Folio they would have been lost.

“This one will return and live a few hundred yards from where it was originally created,” he said, looking out across the Thames from the Globe. “Magical.”

Copyright 2015 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-02-24-15 1656GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
The Victoria and Albert Museum's copy of the First Folio (Mr William Shakespeare's Comedies, Histories & Tragedies), London 1623. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Last Updated on Wednesday, 25 February 2015 17:09
 

Chubb survey: spending on art, antiques will continue strong in 2015

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Corporate PR   
Tuesday, 24 February 2015 09:29
Chubb Corporation logo by source. Licensed under fair use via Wikipedia WARREN, N.J., – An overwhelming majority of 445 respondents (83 percent) to a survey at the recent Winter Antiques Show in New York plan to increase (39 percent) or keep their spending on arts and antiques the same (44 percent) in 2015. The survey, which was conducted by the Chubb Group of Insurance Companies, also found that only 7 percent plan to decrease their spend, and 10 percent do not intend to make an art or antique purchase this year.

“Buyers’ appetites are clearly not satiated – even after 2014, when 42 percent of survey respondents increased their spending on art and antiques,” said Melissa Lalka, vice president and worldwide fine art manager for Chubb Personal Insurance. “Increased buyer activity, coupled with record-setting sales reported by the leading auction houses, can significantly impact art values – and collectors should keep in mind that their art and antiques can become alarmingly underinsured.”

The survey also found that 32 percent of respondents believe they already have adequate coverage under their current homeowner's or renter's insurance policy for newly acquired works. Thirty-four percent would purchase new or additional coverage, and 21 percent said that they are unsure about their coverage and would need to check with their agent, broker or insurance company. Thirteen percent said they do not insure their art.

“It’s always a good idea to check with your agent and broker,” advised Lalka. “A standard homeowner’s policy provides relatively little coverage for art and antiques. Depending on the value of your purchases, there’s a good chance they should be itemized on your policy, or that you may need the broader coverage provided by a valuable articles policy.”

Lalka also suggested that collectors appraise their collections at least every three to five years and to have their agents or brokers adjust the level of coverage accordingly. For rapidly appreciating works, she suggested updating appraisals every one to two years to ensure they remain fully covered by insurance in the event of a loss.

The survey also asked collectors why they purchase art and antiques. Fifty-six percent said they do so out of passion, 3 percent for investment opportunity and 38 percent for both.

Chubb was the presenting sponsor of the 61st annual Winter Antiques Show, building on its 19-year affiliation with one of the top international fine art and antiques events. The 2015 show ran from Jan. 23 to Feb. 1 and featured 73 exhibitors of fine and decorative art.

Chubb is a leading provider of insurance for private collectors of art, antiques, jewelry and other valuable possessions. Chubb’s Masterpiece® Valuable Articles policy provides worldwide coverage for fine art and antiques, jewelry, furs, silverware, musical instruments, stamps, coins and other collectibles. The policy includes coverage for breakage, mysterious disappearance and newly acquired items, as well as inflation protection.

For more information regarding the Chubb Corporation, including a listing of the insurers in the Chubb Group of Insurance Companies, visit www.chubb.com.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 24 February 2015 10:43
 

Alumnus gifts Princeton with book collection worth $300M

PDF Print E-mail
Written by AFP wire service   
Wednesday, 18 February 2015 11:55

The opening of the original printing of the Declaration, printed on July 4, 1776 under Jefferson's supervision. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

NEW YORK (AFP) – Princeton University has been gifted an astonishing trove of rare books valued at nearly $300 million that includes the first six printed editions of the Bible and the original printing of the Declaration of Independence.

The Ivy League school in New Jersey said Tuesday that the book-loving philanthropist William Scheide, a Princeton alumnus who died aged 100 in November, had bequeathed the university some 2,500 rare printed books and manuscripts.

The collection's enormous value makes it the largest gift in the university's history.

"I cannot imagine a more marvelous collection to serve as the heart of our library," Princeton president Christopher Eisgruber said.

"We are grateful for Bill Scheide's everlasting dedication to Princeton and his commitment to sharing his breathtaking collection with scholars and students for generations to come."

The vast collection includes the first six printed editions of the Bible, starting with a 1455 Gutenberg Bible; the original printing of America's Declaration of Independence; handwritten music by Beethoven; and Shakespeare's first, second, third and fourth folios.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

The opening of the original printing of the Declaration, printed on July 4, 1776 under Jefferson's supervision. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 18 February 2015 12:02
 

Footage found of 1915 Chicago ship disaster that killed 844

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Associated Press   
Thursday, 12 February 2015 12:16
Passengers being rescued from the hull of the SS Eastland by the tugboat Kenosha in the Chicago River. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. CHICAGO (AP) –Film clips have surfaced of a 1915 disaster that left 844 people dead when a ship headed to a company picnic capsized in the Chicago River.

The first-known footage of the disaster was spotted by Jeff Nichols, a doctoral student at the University of Illinois at Chicago, who was looking through seemingly unrelated material on World War I.

Nichols said he found the clips in Dutch newsreels. Title cards describing what happened precede them.

“It's as easily recognizable to someone who cares about Chicago history as the Titanic, so I knew what I had right away,” Nichols told the Chicago Tribune.

The SS Eastland, which was carrying 2,500 people, turned onto its side while docked in the Chicago River in July 1915. It was one of five boats chartered that day to take Western Electric workers and their families and friends across Lake Michigan to a park.

The ship was top-heavy with several lifeboats and rafts, and a crowd gathered on the port side to watch other boats made the Eastland even more unbalanced. It rolled over, sending people and debris flying and trapping passengers in the lower decks, where they drowned.

One 55-second clip shows first-responders and volunteers walking on the boat, and a second 30-second clip shows workers trying to right the ship at least a week later.

Frank Roumen, a collections manager with EYE Film Instituut Nederland, confirmed in an email sent to The Associated Press that the footage is in the institute's archives.

Nichols posted links to the clips on the Facebook page of the Eastland Disaster Historical Society, which later put them on its website.

Ted Wachholz, the historical society's chief historian, said photos of the disaster showed movie cameras on tripods, leading him to believe footage existed somewhere. Nichols said that after his initial discovery he found a copy of one of the clips in another museum, and he guessed that other copies could be out there.

“These (lost) films are discovered where you'd least expect them, so it's not a surprise that it was in the Netherlands,” Nichols said. “If it were close at hand, then it would have been discovered a long time ago.”

The last known survivor of the disaster, 102-year-old Marion Eichholz, died in November.

Copyright 2015 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

AP-WF-02-10-15 1947GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE
Passengers being rescued from the hull of the SS Eastland by the tugboat Kenosha in the Chicago River. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. The Eastland docked in Cleveland, Ohio, around 1911. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
Last Updated on Thursday, 12 February 2015 13:37
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Page 1 of 118
ADVERTISEMENTS

Banner Banner