Payday Loans
payday loans
ADVERTISEMENTS
Banner
Banner

Get Free ACN Daily Headlines

LiveAuctioneers

Search Auction Central News

ADVERTISEMENTS
Banner
Banner
Bookmark and Share
Crime & Litigation



Bulgarian police return smuggled antiquities to museum

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Associated Press   
Tuesday, 15 April 2014 10:41
One of the many priceless treasures held in the collection of the National Historical Museum in Bulgaria, this 4th-century gold wreath and ring came from the burial site of an Odrysian aristocrat at the Golyamata Mogila tumulus, situated between the villages of Zlatinitsa and Malomirovo in the Yambol region. Photo by Ann Wuyts, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license. SOFIA, Bulgaria (AP) - Bulgarian police have handed the remnants of three ancient necklaces to the country's most important museum after seizing the artifacts from smugglers who looted them from archaeological sites.

Police gave the artifacts to the National Museum of History in Sofia, whose collection is among the largest in the Balkans. The museum's collection includes items dating back to prehistoric times.

The museum's director, Bozhidar Dimitrov, says the broken jewelry pieces are among the oldest such items ever discovered in Bulgaria. The pieces date to the third millennium B.C.

Dimitrov says the remnants will be restored and shown to the public.

Police offered no details on how they found and seized the items, nor any suggestion on how the smugglers had intended to sell them abroad.

#   #   #

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.





ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
One of the many priceless treasures held in the collection of the National Historical Museum in Bulgaria, this 4th-century gold wreath and ring came from the burial site of an Odrysian aristocrat at the Golyamata Mogila tumulus, situated between the villages of Zlatinitsa and Malomirovo in the Yambol region. Photo by Ann Wuyts, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 15 April 2014 11:27
 

Harry Belafonte, MLK estate reach settlement on documents

PDF Print E-mail
Written by JESSE J. HOLLAND, Associated Press   
Monday, 14 April 2014 09:38
Harry Belafonte. Image by David Shankbone. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license. WASHINGTON (AP) – Singer and activist Harry Belafonte will get to keep three of Martin Luther King's documents that the King estate had blocked him from selling.

Lawyers announced a confidential settlement Friday between Belafonte and the estate letting Belafonte retain possession of the documents. No other terms were announced, and the lawyers refused to comment further.

“The parties express their appreciation to one another for the good faith efforts that led to this resolution,” the lawyers said in a joint statement.

Belafonte sued the civil rights leader's estate in October in federal court in Manhattan after being blocked from auctioning the documents. The papers are an outline of a Vietnam War speech by King, notes to a speech King never got to deliver in Memphis, Tenn., and a condolence letter from President Lyndon B. Johnson to King's wife after his 1968 assassination.

Belafonte's lawsuit said King and his widow, Coretta Scott King, gave Belafonte a number of items. Court papers said Belafonte had held the Vietnam War speech outline since 1967, when King left it behind after working on it in Belafonte's apartment. It said the Memphis speech notes were found in King's suit pocket after he was assassinated. According to the lawsuit, Coretta Scott King offered the notes to Belafonte but he suggested they instead be given to one of King's longest-serving confidants. When that man died in 1979, his widow delivered the notes to Belafonte, it said.

The letter from Johnson was given to Belafonte by Coretta Scott King about a decade ago after she admired the collection of historic documents on a wall of his home, the lawsuit said.

It's not yet known what Belafonte plans to do with the documents. Sotheby's Inc. has held them since 2008 pending resolution of the dispute.

“Sotheby's is very pleased to hear that the parties have reached an agreement and we anticipate returning the documents to Mr. Belafonte,” a spokeswoman said in a statement.

King's family and estate have sent numerous cease-and-desist letters to stop various uses of King's written work and image, and followed up with court action if they weren't satisfied with the results. Last year, they sued Andrew Young, a King confidante who helped their father coordinate civil rights efforts throughout the South, over footage of King that shows up in a series produced by Young's foundation. That lawsuit is still pending.

In 1987, Coretta Scott King sued Boston University and lost over papers her husband had given to the school where he earned his doctorate. In 2011, the estate filed a federal lawsuit in Jackson, Miss., against the son of Maude Ballou, who was King's secretary in the late 1950s, over documents including letters from King. They lost, and those documents were put up for auction by Ballou.

The three surviving King children – eldest sibling Yolanda died in 2007 – have also sued each other. In 2008, Bernice King and Martin Luther King III sued Dexter King, accusing him of acting improperly as head of their father's estate. The three reached a settlement in October 2009.

The three King children are currently fighting in court over possession of King's Nobel Peace Prize medal and one of his Bibles. The slain civil rights icon's estate, controlled by his sons, is locked in a legal dispute with Bernice King over ownership of the items. The Martin Luther King Jr. Estate Inc., which is run by Martin Luther King III and Dexter Scott King, wants to sell the items, while Bernice is opposed to the sale.

The Bible and peace prize medal are being held in a safe deposit box controlled by the court pending the outcome of the dispute.

___

Follow Jesse J. Holland on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/jessejholland

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-04-11-14 2114GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Harry Belafonte. Image by David Shankbone. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.
Last Updated on Monday, 14 April 2014 09:57
 

German recluse agrees to deal on handling of art hoard

PDF Print E-mail
Written by GEIR MOULSON, Associated Press   
Wednesday, 09 April 2014 10:19
BERLIN (AP) – A reclusive collector who hoarded hundreds of valuable artworks at his Munich home has agreed to cooperate with German authorities' efforts to determine which pieces were seized by the Nazis.

As part of the deal announced Monday, Cornelius Gurlitt will get back those works that are indisputably his.

Authorities found some 1,400 items at Gurlitt's home while investigating a tax case in 2012, though it only became public last November. Officials say at least 458 works may have been seized from their owners by the Nazis, and Gurlitt's representatives are in talks with several claimants seeking restitution. The works include Henri Matisse's Femme assise, for which two claims have been made.

Officials have said for months they would like to reach an agreement with Gurlitt, who in February filed an appeal against the artworks' seizure.

The Bavarian Justice Ministry, the federal culture minister's office and Gurlitt's representatives said in a joint statement that works whose Nazi-era history officials are checking will remain in authorities' custody, and the task force set up by authorities to examine them will endeavor to conclude its research within a year. Gurlitt will get at least one representative on the task force.

Works on which background research hasn't been completed in a year will be returned to Gurlitt, but the collector will continue to grant access for further work, the statement added. Pieces on which restitution claims are pending will be held in trust after the year is up.

All works whose history isn't being examined “will be returned to him promptly,” said Gurlitt's lawyer, Christoph Edel.

Gurlitt spokesman Stephan Holzinger said he is expected to get at least 300 to 350 works back. He inherited the collection – which includes works by Pablo Picasso, Marc Chagall and Pierre-Auguste Renoir – from his father Hildebrand Gurlitt, an art dealer who traded in works confiscated by the Nazis.

___

Frank Jordans contributed to this report.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-04-07-14 1502GMT

 

 

Attorney general obtains restraining order against Ivey-Selkirk

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Associated Press   
Wednesday, 09 April 2014 08:35

ST. LOUIS (AP) – Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster said Monday that his office has obtained a temporary restraining order prohibiting a suburban St. Louis auction house from doing business, citing complaints from dozens of customers about missed payments for auctioned items.

Koster's office is investigating Clayton, Mo.-based Ivey-Selkirk Auctioneers & Appraisers, and obtained an order in St. Louis County Circuit Court prohibiting the company from doing business. In addition to the order, a civil petition filed Thursday accuses the auction house of unfair business practices and making false promises.

Messages left Monday with Ivey-Selkirk were not immediately returned.

Koster said that about 40 customers have complained to his office over the past several months, saying they were not paid for items the company auctioned on their behalf.

“We are examining very closely the circumstances that apparently led this company to cease doing business, leaving consumers without payment,” Koster said in a statement. “Our priority is to protect consumers who never received the money they were owed.”

The company's website says that Ivey-Selkirk auctions feature 18th and 19th century fine art and antiques and 20th century modern design work, fine jewelry, automobiles, decorative arts and collectibles.

Koster's petition seeks to permanently prohibit Ivey-Selkirk and owner Malcolm Ivey from providing auction services in Missouri. It also seeks repayment for customers, along with civil penalties.

The temporary restraining order prohibits the auction house from accepting consigned items, selling goods, removing anything from its office, destroying documents or spending funds received from current or former clients.

Ivey-Selkirk is one of the oldest businesses of its kind in the country. Ivey told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch in February that the company was restructuring following the sudden departure of seven employees to start their own firm. He declined at the time to discuss his company's financial condition.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-04-07-14 2104GMT

 

 

 

Germany returns looted Guardi painting to Poland

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Associated Press   
Tuesday, 01 April 2014 09:04
Francesco Guardi's 'Palace Stairs.' The 18th century painting depicts the Scala dei giganti (Giant's Staircase) of the Doge's Palace Venice. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. BERLIN (AP) – Germany is returning a painting by 18th-century Venetian artist Francesco Guardi that was looted from Poland by the Nazis.

The painting Palace Stairs was taken from Poland's National Museum in 1939. After World War II, the painting passed into the collection of the State Gallery of Baden-Wuerttemberg.

The handover Monday by German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier to his Polish counterpart Radoslaw Sikorski in Berlin is symbolically important for ongoing talks between Germany and its eastern neighbor over the return of thousands of cultural artifacts.

German troops looted and destroyed large numbers of artworks during World War II.

Berlin, meanwhile, wants to recover some 300,000 documents, including manuscripts by Mozart and Beethoven, abandoned by retreating German troops in what is now Poland.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-03-31-14 1110GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Francesco Guardi's 'Palace Stairs.' The 18th century painting depicts the Scala dei giganti (Giant's Staircase) of the Doge's Palace Venice. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 02 April 2014 09:30
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Page 10 of 164
ADVERTISEMENTS

Banner Banner