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Crime & Litigation



Two arrested in theft of antique cars believed sold for scrap

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Written by Associated Press   
Friday, 23 May 2014 09:12
Suspects Douglas Gabel (left) and John Kasper (right). Photo courtesy of Saline County Sheriff's Office

SALINA, Kans. (AP) — Saline County Sheriff Glen Kochanowski says two men are in custody in connection with the theft and destruction of five antique cars.

Kochanowski says Gary Hansen discovered in early April that five of the antique cars he kept in a rural area of the county were missing.

KAKE TV reports that a 53-year-old Herington man, Douglas Gabel; and a 47-year-old man from Hope, John Kasper; were arrested in the case Wednesday and are being held in the Saline County Jail. Gabel faces 10 charges of felony theft and criminal damage to property. Kasper is charged with three counts of theft and three counts of criminal damage to property. Sheriff Kochanowski says more arrests are possible.

Kochanowski says it’s likely the cars were sold for scrap. The missing cars include a 1939 Plymouth, a 1949 Studebaker two-door coupe and a 1950 Studebaker four-door.

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Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. Auction Central News and KAKE TV (www.kake.com) contributed to this report.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Suspects Douglas Gabel (left) and John Kasper (right). Photo courtesy of Saline County Sheriff's Office
Last Updated on Friday, 23 May 2014 09:26
 

Miami pastor gets jail time in fake Damien Hirst art case

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Written by JENNIFER PELTZ, Associated Press   
Thursday, 22 May 2014 10:11
NEW YORK (AP) – A Miami pastor was sentenced Monday to six months in jail for peddling bogus examples of some of British artist Damien Hirst's signature paintings.

Kevin Sutherland had faced a possible seven years in prison in the attempted grand larceny case, which accused him of knowingly trying to sell five fake Hirsts for $185,000 to an undercover detective. Sutherland, who plans to appeal, said he was just an art-world tyro who got confusing signals about the pieces' authenticity.

Sutherland, 46, leads the small, nondenominational Mosaic Miami Church in Miami. Defense lawyer Sanford “Sam” Talkin emphasized Sutherland's good works to the judge, and Mosaic Miami members and others wrote letters on his behalf.

Sutherland was convicted last month of agreeing to sell paintings and prints mimicking Hirst's pharmaceutical-themed “`spot” paintings and round “spin” paintings, two of the artist's best-known themes.

Part of a group dubbed the Young British Artists in the 1990s, Hirst received Great Britain's prestigious Turner Prize in 1995.

The Manhattan district attorney's office noted that Sotheby's auction house had raised red flags about the authenticity of one of the paintings, but Sutherland nonetheless told the detective he didn't know of any doubts about them.

But Sutherland said the auction house never clearly told him the artworks were counterfeit. He said he believed their authenticity was guaranteed when he bought them from Vincent Lopreto, an admitted California art scammer who testified against him.

Lopreto pleaded guilty this year to identity theft and other charges. Two other men also admitted guilt in phony-Hirst cases brought by Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance Jr.

“Because the art industry is largely unregulated, it is particularly important to hold accountable those who fraudulently deal artwork,” Vance said after Sutherland's conviction.

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Reach Jennifer Peltz on Twitter (at) jennpeltz.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-05-19-14 2213GMT

 

 

 

Last Updated on Thursday, 22 May 2014 10:15
 

Family challenges seminary's sale of Thomas Eakins portrait

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Written by Associated Press   
Tuesday, 20 May 2014 08:23
''The Right Reverend James F. Loughlin' (1902), by Thomas Eakins, one of the portraits to be sold by St. Charles Borromeo Seminary. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. PHILADELPHIA (AP) – Descendants of Msgr. Patrick Garvey are challenging the Archdiocese of Philadelphia's plans to sell a portrait of Garvey painted by Thomas Eakins.

The Philadelphia Inquirer reports that former federal prosecutor Robert E. Goldman is helping the family and says that the seminary does not own the portrait from 1902. He says that the portrait was given to St. Charles Borromeo Seminary to be exhibited, not sold.

The Archdiocese announced plans in March to sell part of the art collection at its St. Charles Borromeo Seminary, including five portraits by Eakins.

Archdiocese spokesman Ken Gavin says the portrait was given to the seminary by Garvey's nephew.

Church officials said they plan to use the money to help overhaul the seminary's St. Charles' Main Line campus.

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Information from: The Philadelphia Inquirer, http://www.inquirer.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

AP-WF-05-17-14 1101GMT

Last Updated on Tuesday, 20 May 2014 08:51
 

Cops: Man rustled 10-foot rooster statue at antique shop

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Written by Associated Press   
Thursday, 15 May 2014 09:37
Photographic portrait of a rooster, showing wattles, earlobes and comb. Photo by Muhammad Mahdi Karim, licensed under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2. CHARLEROI, Pa. (AP) - Police have charged a southwestern Pennsylvania man with rustling a rooster -- a 10-foot fiberglass statue of one, anyway -- and were still looking for another man who allegedly helped him.

Thirty-year-old Brody Nichols, of Fallowfield Township, didn't immediately return a call Tuesday on charges including theft and fleeing police filed after the incident early Saturday in Charleroi.

Police believe Nichols and another man removed the statue from a yard next to Tim's Secret Treasures, an antique store.

Police gave chase when they saw Nichols and another man had stopped to adjust the bird, which was strapped into the back of a pickup about 3:25 a.m.

Nichols lost police when he turned onto a dirt road, but they recognized who he was by that time. The bird toppled out of the truck and was returned to its owner.

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Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Photographic portrait of a rooster, showing wattles, earlobes and comb. Photo by Muhammad Mahdi Karim, licensed under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2.
Last Updated on Thursday, 15 May 2014 10:01
 

Attorney details plundered artwork's journey to Okla.

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Written by Associated Press   
Wednesday, 14 May 2014 11:02

'Shepherdess Bringing in Sheep,' Camille Pissaro, oil on canvas, 1886. Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, University of Oklahoma. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Paintings.

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) – A woman adopted as a child by a French couple after World War II is the rightful heir to a painting by artist Camille Pissarro, stolen from her family by the Nazis, which now resides at the University of Oklahoma, her attorney told an Oklahoma House panel on Monday.

Attorney Pierre Ciric presented members of the Oklahoma House Committee on Government Modernization with an account of Leone Meyer's claim to the painting and how it was plundered by Nazi forces from a bank in southern France during the German occupation during World War II.

Ciric also testified that both Meyer and her father, Raoul Meyer, attempted to recover the painting, the 1886 oil painting Shepherdess Bringing in Sheep by Pissarro.

Oklahoma oil tycoon Aaron Weitzenhoffer and his wife, Clara, purchased the painting from a New York gallery in 1956. When Clara Weitzenhoffer died in 2000, the painting was among more than 30 works valued at about $50 million that she donated to the university.

Meyer's family learned in 2012 the painting was on display at OU's Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, Ciric said, and the family sued in federal court in New York in 2013. The University of Oklahoma has filed a motion to dismiss on several grounds, including improper jurisdiction and statute of limitations, and the case is ongoing.

Rep. Mike Reynolds, the chairman of the House panel, has been a vocal critic of the university for not returning the painting.

“Why is a piece of art that everyone agrees was stolen in 1941 any less stolen today?” said Reynolds, R-Oklahoma City. “I actually consider this an embarrassment to the state of Oklahoma.”

University officials have maintained that the full history of the painting's ownership is not known, and that simply transferring the piece without knowing all the facts would set a bad precedent.

University spokeswoman Catherine Bishop said Monday that OU officials are seeking “cooperative dialogue” with Meyer and her attorneys.

“The university has engaged in good faith with the plaintiff to seek a mutually agreeable resolution and has offered to meet with the plaintiff and her representatives in Paris,” Bishop said in a statement. “Our goal is to seek a fair and reasonable resolution to plaintiff's modern-day claim or, if the plaintiff prefers, to continue with the legal process and abide by the results.”

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-05-12-14 2242GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

'Shepherdess Bringing in Sheep,' Camille Pissaro, oil on canvas, 1886. Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, University of Oklahoma. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Paintings. 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 14 May 2014 11:08
 
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