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Collectibles Worldwide

'In Dog We Trust' rug earns $9,650 for animal charity

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Written by Associated Press   
Thursday, 22 January 2015 11:49
The misprinted rug, which reads 'In Dog We Trust,' sold at auction for $9,650. The sale will benefit Canine Estates, a sanctuary in Palm Harbor, Fla., for abandoned, abused and injured dogs rescued primarily from high-kill shelters. Image courtesy of Pinellas County Sheriff's Office. LARGO, Fla. (AP) – A misprinted rug at the Pinellas County Sheriff's Office has sold for $9,650 after a seven-day online auction.

The green rug displaying a large sheriff's star was placed a few months ago in the lobby of the new public safety complex, which houses the Pinellas County Sheriff's Office.

An employee recently spotted a spelling error on the rug. Instead of "In God We Trust," it said, "In Dog We Trust." The $500 rug was removed the following day.

On Jan. 15, the auction began with a starting bid of $100. In total, 83 bids were placed. The buyer's name was not available Wednesday.

Auction proceeds will go to Canine Estates, a Palm Harbor nonprofit for injured and abandoned dogs.

Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
The misprinted rug, which reads 'In Dog We Trust,' sold at auction for $9,650. The sale will benefit Canine Estates, a sanctuary in Palm Harbor, Fla., for abandoned, abused and injured dogs rescued primarily from high-kill shelters. Image courtesy of Pinellas County Sheriff's Office.
Last Updated on Thursday, 22 January 2015 13:06
 

Original Tintin comic book cover art stars at Brussels fair

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Written by PHILIPPE SIUBERSKI   
Thursday, 22 January 2015 10:09
A copy of the Tintin adventure titled 'L'Etoile Mysterieuse.' Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com archive and Fauve Paris. BRUSSELS (AFP) – Intrepid boy hero Tintin stars at one of Europe's top art fairs next week when the original cover of his 1942 Shooting Star adventures goes on sale for 2.5 million euros.

The yellowing sketch by Belgian creator Herge shows Tintin and his faithful dog Snowy on a barren rocky beach looking in astonishment at a huge mushroom.

In its finished form, brightly colored, the red-and white capped mushroom looks like a well-known and very dangerous psychedelic fungus.

The drawing has attracted huge interest from fans and collectors alike who are increasingly prepared to pay huge sums for such iconic works.

A rare 1939 Tintin cartoon sold for 539,880 euros in December while in May, a two-page spread depicting Tintin across various adventures was bought for 2.65 million euros in Paris, a world record equal to $3.58 million at then prevailing exchange rates.

It was all very different not so long ago.

"Twenty-five years ago when you went to a comic strip creator like Tardi ... to buy a cover, they would look at you oddly as if to say 'and who on earth is interested in that,'" said Alain Huberty, part-owner of the local gallery selling the cartoon at the Brussels Antiques and Fine Arts Fair.

The Shooting Star cover – L'Etoile Mysterieuse in the original French – is just one of five still in the hands of private collectors while the bulk of Herge's work is now held by a family foundation set up after his death in 1983.

Such cartoons first attracted collectors in the 1980s who would often sell them on to specialist bookshops, eventually drawing in the public and then the auction houses as their creators won recognition as artists in their own right.

Herge was among the first sought out, followed by other major talents in the Franco-Belgian stable such as Franquin, responsible for Spriou and Gaston LaGaffe, Peyo who gave the world The Smurfs and Jacques Martin with Alix.

"The price is determined first by the name and then by the quality," said Huberty. "An exceptional piece can command an exceptional price, as the Tintin sales show."

At the same time, Huberty cautioned against getting carried away, warning that there could be a "bubble" building in prices for second-rank works but not for the greats such as Herge.

The Brussels Antiques and Fine Arts Fair (www.brafa.be) opens Jan. 24 for a week.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
A copy of the Tintin adventure titled 'L'Etoile Mysterieuse.' Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com archive and Fauve Paris.
Last Updated on Thursday, 22 January 2015 10:34
 

Arms makers issue guns honoring NH Fish & Game's 150th year

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Written by Associated Press   
Wednesday, 21 January 2015 11:57

CONCORD, N.H. (AP) - Two firearms manufacturers are creating limited edition guns to mark the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department's 150th anniversary.

Ruger is issuing a limited run of 150 collectible M77 Hawkeye rifles featuring the Fish and Game Department's anniversary seal in 14 karat gold, and LHR Sporting Arms is making a commemorative muzzleloader rifle. A portion of all sales will benefit the Wildlife Heritage Foundation of New Hampshire.

In addition, the guns bearing serial number 001 will be auctioned, with the proceeds going to the heritage foundation fund.

For more information, visit http://wildnh.com/150/ltd-guns.html.

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Copyright 2015 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This information may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 21 January 2015 12:06
 

Sheriff auctioning rug misprinted 'In Dog We Trust' to aid K9 shelter

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Written by TAMARA LUSH, Associated Press   
Tuesday, 20 January 2015 09:48
The Pinellas County Sheriff's Office is auctioning this misprinted rug, which reads 'In Dog We Trust,' to benefit Canine Estates, a sanctuary in Palm Harbor, Florida, for abandoned, abused and injured dogs rescued primarily from high-kill shelters. As of the publication of this article, bidding was up to $6,150. Image courtesy of Pinellas County Sheriff's Office. LARGO, Fla. (AP) – Is “In Dog We Trust” your motto?

If so, a sheriff's office in Florida has a rug for you. The Pinellas County sheriff's office said Thursday it will auction off a rug that had “In Dog We Trust” on it instead of “In God We Trust.”

The 6ft by 8ft forest green rug with the sheriff's gold badge was in the entrance area for a couple of months when the error was discovered Wednesday by a deputy.

Proceeds from the auction will go to Canine Estates, a local animal rescue organization.

Pinellas Sheriff Bob Gualtieri says he wanted to put the rug on the auction block because the story garnered so much attention.

The rug was initially valued at $500.

Bidding had reached $6,150 as of the time of this article's publication. The auction closes Wednesday.

___

On the Web: www.onlineauction.com/auction/2076173

Follow Tamara Lush on Twitter at http://twitter.com/tamaralush

Copyright 2015 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-01-15-15 2338GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE
The Pinellas County Sheriff's Office is auctioning this misprinted rug, which reads 'In Dog We Trust,' to benefit Canine Estates, a sanctuary in Palm Harbor, Florida, for abandoned, abused and injured dogs rescued primarily from high-kill shelters. As of the publication of this article, bidding was up to $6,150. Image courtesy of Pinellas County Sheriff's Office. Closeup of rug's logo shows the misprinted phrase 'In Dog We Trust.' Image courtesy of Pinellas County Sheriff's Office.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 20 January 2015 14:35
 

'Charlie Hebdo' issues attract astronomical bids after terror attack

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Written by AFP Wire Service   
Friday, 09 January 2015 10:04
The French satirical magazine 'Charlie Hebdo' has never been exclusionary in the nations, political parties or religions it spoofed. On the cover of this issue, former US Presidential candidate Mitt Romney proclaims, 'For a really white White House!' The background sign says 'No vote for immigrants.' Fair use of a low-resolution image under guidelines of US Copyright Law PARIS (AFP) – Within hours of a terrorist attack that decimated the staff at Charlie Hebdo, copies of the latest issue of the satirical French weekly were drawing bids of more than 70,000 euros ($82,500) online.

The 60,000-print run of issue number 1177 sold out nearly instantly following the assault on the magazine's headquarters that killed 12 people, including some of its top journalists.

By midday Wednesday, scores of the three-euro magazine bearing a cartoon likeness of controversial French author Michel Houellebecq on its cover were popping up online at astronomical prices.

Of the more than 80 ads offering the issue on eBay, some were available for immediate purchase at up to 50,000 euros ($58,938).

"Rare, latest issue Charlie Hebdo," said one advert.

Charlie Hebdo has already announced it will be back next week with a one million-copy memorial edition in response to the global outrage over the massacre.

Bids on some editions had gone over 70,000 euros, but as winners of eBay's auctions can back out, there is no guarantee the money will come through.

In addition to the recent copies, people were offering some of the satirical paper's other notorious issues, including the November 2011 edition that prompted a firebombing of its offices.

That issue titled "Charia Hebdo," with an image lampooning the Prophet Mohammed on the cover, had at one point received bids that topped 14,000 euros ($16,500), which the seller promised to donate to helping victims of the attack.

When contacted by AFP, eBay said it can't stop people from being interested in a certain type of item.

"It's a tragic event and it's drawing lots of media attention, which encourages curiosity. The more people are interested in something the higher auctions go," an eBay spokesperson told AFP. "It's this curiosity effect that we can't do anything against."

However, the company reserves the right to pull ads that violate its terms of use.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE
The French satirical magazine 'Charlie Hebdo' has never been exclusionary in the nations, political parties or religions it spoofed. On the cover of this issue, former US Presidential candidate Mitt Romney proclaims, 'For a really white White House!' The background sign says 'No vote for immigrants.' Fair use of a low-resolution image under guidelines of US Copyright Law Bidding on an example of the back issue titled 'Charia Hebdo,' with an image lampooning the Prophet Mohammed on its cover, at one point had received online bids topping $16,500. Translated, the comment in the bubble says '100 lashes if you don't die of laughter!' Fair use of a low-resolution image under guidelines of US Copyright Law
Last Updated on Friday, 09 January 2015 11:04
 

Tupelo plans events to celebrate Elvis’ 80th birthday

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Written by Associated Press   
Tuesday, 06 January 2015 13:10

A movie still from Elvis Presley's third film, 'Jailhouse Rock.' (1957). Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

TUPELO, Miss. (AP) – On Thursday, Tupelo launches a birthday celebration fit for the king of rock ’n’ roll.

Seven organizations will participate in a citywide event schedule, culminating with an Elvis Presley-themed concert from the North Mississippi Symphony Orchestra and Richard Marx.

“It was time to step up our game as it relates to Tupelo and Elvis' birthday,” said Tupelo Convention and Visitors Bureau executive director Neal McCoy.

“We wanted to see what we could involve and incorporate from our community to help celebrate Elvis' birthday. We feel it's a pretty good reflection of what our community has to offer, and hopefully things Elvis would be proud of today,” McCoy told the Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal.

The Elvis Presley Birthplace will host their annual birthday party Thursday for the late musician, who would have been 80 this year. Events continue throughout the day with a sing-along version of the film Jailhouse Rock at Link Centre and a theatrical production, aptly named Graceland at Tupelo Community Theatre's Off Broadway location.

“In years that end in five or zero, we always get bigger crowds,” said CVB spokeswoman Jennie Bradford Curlee. “We wanted to build in more things for people to see and experience around town.”

The schedule for Friday is packed, starting with an exhibit at CVB, topped off with free banana pudding.

“Elvis' first appearance was on WELO on Mississippi Slim's radio show, broadcast from the courthouse,” McCoy said. “So, we're going to do a Mississippi Slim exhibit here in the lobby, with the local food trucks here and free banana pudding.”

In addition, the Gumtree Museum will be hosting a party with the opening of an Elvis art exhibit from Betty Harper, an officially licensed Graceland artist and music from the Memphis Jones Trio.

Friday concerts will also take place at the birthplace with Elvis tribute artist David Lee and special guest Tara Kay as Reba McEntire, and at the BancorpSouth Arena with Eric Church and the Outsiders.

“It's good to have so many choices,” McCoy said. “We're hoping these become annual-type events for the city. It's a great way to come out of the hibernation of the holidays and get into the ebb and flow of the arts in our community.”

McCoy plans to make Tupelo the place to be for the birthday event.

“So much of Elvis is traced back to Tupelo. It's a singular event – his birth,” he said. “It's a great draw for us and we wouldn't have another chance to do something really big for the birthday until 2020, for the 85th, so we didn't want this to get away from us. We hope this will invite people to always want to be in town for the birthday.”

Presley was born in Tupelo on Jan. 8, 1935, and moved to Memphis with his parents at age 13. He was 42 when he died Aug. 16, 1977, in Memphis.

___

Information from: Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal, http://djournal.com

Copyright 2015 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-01-05-15 1001GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

 A movie still from Elvis Presley's third film, 'Jailhouse Rock.' (1957). Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 06 January 2015 13:29
 

No snow in the forecast for collector's antique sleds

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Written by FLINT MCCOLGAN, York Daily Record   
Monday, 29 December 2014 09:31
Child's sled decorated with hand-painted flowers and original red paint. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com archive and Rich Penn Auctions. RED LION, Pa. (AP) – There was no fresh snow to wipe off at Skip Palmer's Red Lion doorstep on Christmas Eve, but there was a sled-shaped welcome mat nonetheless.

A hand-stitched sign – a gift from a neighbor – on a door just off the sitting room announces “Skip's Toys.” Inside are “approximately 150” sleds, although there are “maybe a little more than that right now,” Palmer guesses – with more in the basement.

The grandfather of six and great-grandfather of “six with two more on the way” has been collecting sleds for the last 10 or 12 years.

“Two companies in York make them,” he said, heading straight to the back of the room to show off a Royal Plane Big Speedster from 1924. It came from the American Twin Novelty Co., which later combined with Acme Wheel and Wagon Co. to become the American Acme Co., he explained.

Walking around the room there were sleds from all over. He said the Northeast was the best place for sled-making, although there were good ones from as far west as Indiana. Most of the sleds had a card describing their origin and type.

Collecting seems to be in his blood. His kitchen is outfitted with rows and rows of McCormick brand spice tins from long ago. Above that rack and all around are eggbeaters and he happily demonstrated some of the more unusual ones. The eggbeaters are joined by a row of antique ice-cream scoops.

“A friend of mine, he started collecting sleds and he had a couple hanging on his wall and I thought that was pretty neat,” Palmer said. “So I ran into some really nice-sized hand-painted sleds.''

The collection grew from there.

“It kind of overtook the rocking horses and the baby carriages and all that other stuff,” he said.

A few Victorian-era baby carriages have already been moved out of the showroom to the sitting room. The rocking horses still take up space in the prime sled area but his enthusiasm for them is waning.

As Missy the kitten gently rocks a horse upholstered in burlap he said he'd like to get rid of the horses – even the ones dating to the mid-1800s – to make room for more sleds.

He does admit it's an expensive hobby. He buys primarily from eBay and from friends who stumble upon old sleds in their travels. He still sometimes buys from antique stores if he finds a decent price.

Sleds sell across the price spectrum. Some, like the miniature doll sleds hanging from a post at the front of the room, have sold at unexpectedly high prices if they're in good shape.

“I've seen these go anywhere from $1,000 to $1,300,” he said, tracing a place where the paint has faded on one of them with his finger.

But at least one famous sled sells for much higher: Rosebud from Citizen Kane.

Most of those sleds – specially made for the movie – were burned, Palmer said. But the one that's still out there somewhere has sold for “big bucks.”

Compared to the painted or plain, handcrafted sleds made of hardwoods and metal surrounding him, Palmer said that modern sleds “got junky.”

“They wouldn't last, I mean not like the older ones. Especially the steering sleds,” he said. “Kids had to take care of these because it was probably the only one they got.”

___

Online:

http://bit.ly/1xNdWAr

___

Information from: York Daily Record, http://www.ydr.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-12-26-14 2149GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Child's sled decorated with hand-painted flowers and original red paint. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com archive and Rich Penn Auctions.
Last Updated on Monday, 29 December 2014 09:40
 

Watson's Nobel medal for DNA discovery sells for $4.75M

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Written by AFP Wire Service   
Thursday, 04 December 2014 16:00

'Practically all the scientific disciplines in the life sciences have felt the great impact of your discovery,' said Professor A. Engström upon presenting the 1962 Nobel Prize to James D. Watson (pictured left, Photo: Science Source ). Image provided by Christie's.

NEW YORK (AFP) - The Nobel Prize medal of celebrated American geneticist James Watson sold for $4.75 million in just minutes at auction on Thursday in New York.

The sale, the first of a Nobel Prize by a living laureate, was considerably more than the $2.5-$3.5 million estimate, the auction house Christie's said.

Watson was awarded the prize in 1962 for discovering the double-helix structure of DNA nine years earlier -- one of the 20th century's most important scientific findings.

Made of 23K gold, the medal features the profile of Swedish chemist and inventor Alfred Nobel.

Christie's also sold Watson's handwritten notes for his speech during the Nobel banquet on December 10, 1962. Valued at $300,000-$400,000, the fives pages went under the hammer for $365,000.

Watson had also participated in the Nobel conference. A corrected, 46-page manuscript valued at $200,000-$300,000 sold for $245,000.

The author of numerous scientific volumes, Watson intends to donate a portion of the proceeds to the University of Chicago, where he studied, Clare College at the University of Cambridge, where he worked, and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, where he served as president for many years.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

'Practically all the scientific disciplines in the life sciences have felt the great impact of your discovery,' said Professor A. Engström upon presenting the 1962 Nobel Prize to James D. Watson (pictured left, Photo: Science Source ). Image provided by Christie's.

Last Updated on Thursday, 04 December 2014 16:10
 

Magicians stage effort to restore Houdini's grave

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Written by COLLEEN LONG, Associated Press   
Wednesday, 03 December 2014 11:03

Color lithograph poster, ‘Harry Houdini King of Cards,’ Chicago, National Printing and Engraving, circa 1898, half-sheet, 19 3/4 inches by 27 3/4 inches, $20,400. Photo courtesy of Potter & Potter.

NEW YORK (AP) – Nestled next to the late Lewins, Blums and Levys in a spooky old cemetery in New York City lies the final resting place of America's most legendary magician, interred under a granite monument that bears his stage name in bold letters: Houdini.

It is an impressive tribute to the man who grew up as Ehrich Weiss and died on Halloween of 1926 of complications from appendicitis. Over the years, the site has been venerated, vandalized, thieved and forsaken, but a group of magicians now wants to officially end the mystery of who will care for the grave.

“Houdini was a visionary. He was an inventor, an escape artist, and he gave back to society in so many ways,” said Dorothy Dietrich, a magician who runs a Houdini museum in Scranton, Pennsylvania. “It's the least we can do to give back in some small way for all he's given to us.”

Dietrich serves on a national Society of American Magicians committee working to raise money to restore Houdini's gravesite and allow for the permanent care of the monument at Machpelah Cemetery in Queens. It will cost about $1,200 annually to maintain the grounds, plus thousands more for restoration.

Houdini, the son of a rabbi, was at the height of his fame when he purchased 24 plots at the 6-acre graveyard located in a swath of open space crowded with cemeteries. His parents and siblings are buried there and his grandmother was exhumed in Hungary and brought to New York. The only person not beside him is his wife, Bess – Machpelah is a Jewish cemetery, and she was buried at a Catholic graveyard in Westchester.

The gravesite features an undulating bench known as an exedra, plus a Houdini bust, a vase, two benches and markers for each person buried. A mosaic emblem of the magician society adorns the site; Houdini was president when he died. Cemetery managers say thanks to a steady stream of gawkers, the grave is usually stuffed with wands and other trinkets – plus refuse.

They have done their part over the years to keep up the gravesite, but it's their job to look out for all the dead – not just the famous dead.

“I must respect all of the families there,” said manager David Jacobson. “It's a sacred place for everyone there.”

Most of Houdini's relatives have long since died and those left don't have extra money to fund the upkeep, Dietrich said. The plot has been cared for over the years by fans like Dietrich, who used her own money to mold and replace a broken bust and who travels to the cemetery to prune and clean.

Dietrich took up the mantle after the local magician society chapter had a dispute with the cemetery and stopped paying annual fees. Depending on who tells it, spiteful cemetery managers were unwilling to work with Houdini fans and shuttered the site on the anniversary of his death. Or, magicians drumming up publicity for an annual Halloween gravesite ritual known as a “broken wand” ceremony also unwittingly brought vandals who trashed the site until Machpelah managers started locking the gates on Oct. 31 somewhere in the mid-1990s. Over the years, the bust was smashed or stolen at least twice. Benches at the plot perimeter were broken and markers for Houdini's siblings Leopold and Gladys were damaged.

The bad blood was captured in articles where cemetery managers were falsely accused of grave robbing and magicians were falsely accused of pilfering funds donated by David Copperfield to fix the gravesite benches.

But that's all over now, says David Bowers, head of the Houdini gravesite restoration committee. He said the national magician society – not the local chapter – is working with Dietrich and the cemetery to pay for the upkeep and plans to clean and recaulk the granite, give the mosaic a face lift and fix the damaged markers. He doesn't have a cost estimate yet but says repairs will take two years.

Anyone interested in donating can go to the society's website to learn more, said Bowers of Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, who will become the society's next president in July. After the group raises funds for Houdini's grave, it will move on to other dearly departed magicians whose eternal resting places may need some sprucing.

“I'm very passionate about what we're doing with Houdini's grave site,” he said. “There are so many misstatements about Houdini's life and death. I think it's important that we get out the truth.”

___

Online:

www.houdini.org

http://magicsam.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-11-29-14 0252GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
The Harry Houdini gravesite in Machpelah Cemetery in Queens. Image by Anthony 22. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 03 December 2014 11:21
 

G.I. Joe action figures honored for 50 years of service

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Written by M. SCOTT MORRIS, Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal   
Wednesday, 03 December 2014 10:11
Rare Hasbro talking G.I. Joe Action Pilot, 1967. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com archive and Morphy Auctions. TUPELO, Miss. (AP) – Years ago, Barbie was queen of the dolls, and toy makers wanted to do something similar for boys.

“No daddy would let his boy play with a doll,” said Joey Tutor, a 51-year-old Pontotoc resident. “They came up with the name ‘action figure.’ If anybody called it a doll, they lost their job.”

The action figure in question is G.I. Joe, a toy Hasbro released upon American boys in 1964.

“This is the 50th anniversary,” Tutor said. “Fifty years ago, the first G.I. Joes were wrapped under Christmas trees for the first time.”

Tutor has a more than passing acquaintance with the character. He played with G.I. Joes as a kid, and now he collects them as an adult. He's got more than 200, as well as Jeeps, helicopters, boats, space capsules, trucks and so much more to go with them.

“At one time, I had a room in my house that I kept them all in,” he said. “I moved and lost that room, so I keep a lot of them in storage. I have some of my vintage ones on display at home.”

He recently spent quality time with his collection while preparing for an exhibit at the Oren Dunn City Museum at Ballard Park. The exhibit will run through January.

Tutor gave most of his childhood Joes away to his cousin many years ago. When his son, Joseph, was born, Tutor decided to introduce him to the toy that had provided so much fun.

“We started collecting the new stuff that was coming out,” he said, “and I wondered if we could find any old stuff, the kind I had when I grew up.”

He went to garage sales and flea markets, and then something unexpected happened.

“A couple of years ago, I found this great thing I'd never heard of called eBay,” he said. “It's made things a lot easier, but I still like going to antique stores. The search is part of the fun. ‘Wow. Found one.’”

One of his favorites is also a fine example of American manufacturing.

“He's not the oldest in my collection. He's a 1967 talker, which was my first G.I. Joe,” Tutor said. “He said seven phrases.”

He didn't hesitate to pull the Joe's string, and then translated the slightly garbled response: “G.I. Joe, U.S. Army, reporting for duty.”

“It still works, all these years later,” Tutor said. “That's amazing, when you think about it.”

As the Vietnam War progressed, mothers didn't want their boys playing with war toys, so Hasbro introduced policemen, firefighters and adventurers.

“Instead of fighting wars, they started going after tigers and pygmy gorillas and sharks,” Tutor said.

A character with a mechanical arm and leg called “Mike Power” was introduced to compete with “The Six Million Dollar Man.” Another Joe, “Eagle Eye,” has become known as “Creepy Eye” in the collector community.

“His eyes move,” Tutor said. “He watches you.”

Hasbro has created female characters that appeared in the G.I. Joe cartoon, but Tutor's collection remains mostly male-centric.

“They made a G.I. Joe nurse. I wish I could afford one of those. It was only made one year, in 1967,” he said. “It flopped. It was a terrible seller. No girl wanted someone with G.I. Joe on it and no boy wanted a girl. Now, I think it's the most sought-after G.I. Joe.”

Visitors to the exhibit will be able to spot one G.I. Jane, a Vietnam nurse released in the 1990s.

There's also a doll mixed among the action figures. Tutor's wife, Denise, noticed one of his adventure Joes was dressed in similar colors to one of her old toys.

“It's her Midge doll,” Tutor said. “She put it in the set. She said that's so he doesn't have to be alone in the jungle now.”

___

Information from: Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal, http://djournal.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-12-02-14 1434GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Rare Hasbro talking G.I. Joe Action Pilot, 1967. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com archive and Morphy Auctions.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 03 December 2014 10:26
 

Hats off to DiMaggio & Ruth, whose super-rare caps are headed to auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Monday, 24 November 2014 12:41
Baseball cap game-used by Babe Ruth during the 1934 Tour of Japan. $50,000 reserve. Grey Flannel Auctions image WESTHAMPTON, N.Y. – The VIP hat rack is full at Grey Flannel Auctions’ December 17th Holiday Auction, and you won’t believe whose caps are displayed side by side – none other than New York Yankee immortals Babe Ruth and Joe DiMaggio.

“It’s totally coincidental that two of the rarest and most coveted baseball caps of all time found their way to the same auction, but it’s our good fortune that they did. We’re tremendously proud to be offering these unique items to collectors,” said Richard E. Russek, president of Grey Flannel Auctions.

The game-used Babe Ruth cap, which was sourced from the Ruth family more than 30 years ago, is the only example known to have been worn by the Bambino during his 1934 Tour of Japan, which took place only weeks after his departure from the Yankees. The December 17 Grey Flannel event marks the first time the Ruth cap from the historic Tour of Japan has ever come to auction.

“The 1934 tour made headlines around the world,” said Russek. “Nearly half a million Japanese fans lined the streets of Tokyo to welcome the great former-Yankee ballplayer, who rode through the Ginza district an open-top limousine. He and his teammates stayed in Japan for a month and played 18 exhibition games against Japanese players in 12 cities. That tour was a chapter in baseball history all on its own.”

The cap has “US” embroidered on the front, and inside the sweatband, the name “Babe Ruth” is embroidered in chain stitching. The cap is accompanied by an LOA from the consignor, who was close friends with a prominent person in the Babe Ruth Baseball Little League organization, who in turn had obtained it directly from the Ruth family. The minimum bid on the cap, which will also open the auction as Lot 1, is $50,000.

A circa-1937 rookie-era Yankees cap that was game-used by the great Yankee Clipper, Joe DiMaggio, is entered as Lot 635. The extremely rare navy blue wool cap with NY logo is in beautiful, all-original condition. Embroidered inside the sweatband is “7 J. DiMaggio.” The consignor’s family has owned and treasured the DiMaggio cap since the day the legendary slugger took it off his head and handed it to them. The auction reserve on this item is $25,000.

Bidding in Grey Flannel’s Holiday Auction will close on December 17, 2014. For additional information, call 631-288-7800, ext. 223; or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .Visit them online at www.greyflannelauctions.com .

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
(Left to right) Baseball cap game-used by Babe Ruth during the 1934 Tour of Japan, $50,000 reserve; baseball signed by 10 of the 1932 New York Yankees, including Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig, $5,000 reserve; Joe Dimaggio game-used circa-1937 rookie-era Yankees cap with stitching inside sweatband that says ‘7 J. DiMaggio.’ $25,000 reserve. Grey Flannel Auctions image
Last Updated on Monday, 24 November 2014 13:39
 
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