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Collectibles Worldwide

Lennon's heartfelt letter supporting Yoko Ono's music sells for $28K

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Written by Auction House PR   
Friday, 24 October 2014 13:28
John Lennon letter in support of Yoko Ono's music, handwritten to New York broadcast legend Joe Franklin, auctioned for $28,171 on Oct. 23, 2014. Image courtesy of RR Auction

BOSTON - A John Lennon letter handwritten to New York broadcast legend Joe Franklin in which a passionate case is made for acceptance of Yoko Ono's music sold for $28,171 on Thursday evening, October 23rd. Massachusetts-based RR Auction conducted the sale.

The two-page handwritten letter, 8.5 by 11 inches, on Apple memorandum letterhead, is dated December 13, 1971.

Lennon writes in part: "I know you're a musician at heart! and especially I know you dig jazz.—Well, Yoko's music ain't quite jazz but to help you get off on it, or understand it, please listen to a track on the 'Yoko/Ono/Plastic Ono Band,' called 'AOS,' which was recorded in 1968 (pre Lennon/Beatles!) with Ornette Coleman at Albert Hall London, you could call it free form, anyway Yoko sits in the middle of avante-garde, classic, jazz—and now through me and my music—rock 'n' roll!"

He continues: "On the new album 'Fly' the experiment goes a step 'further'—free form music—with robot musicians! (not computer—electronic—)—check the inside of Fly double-album for info and photo of the 'musicians,' of course Yoko can explain her music better in person, this is a kind of introduction."

"This letter shows how proud John was of Yoko and how he believed in her as a multi-talented artist,” said Bobby Livingston, executive VP at RR Auction."The letter is one of the finest Lennon letters we have ever offered, and it was not a surprise that it brought in such an impressive figure."

Visit RR Auction online at www.rrauction.com .

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ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE
John Lennon letter in support of Yoko Ono's music, handwritten to New York broadcast legend Joe Franklin, auctioned for $28,171 on Oct. 23, 2014. Image courtesy of RR Auction John Lennon letter in support of Yoko Ono's music, handwritten to New York broadcast legend Joe Franklin, auctioned for $28,171 on Oct. 23, 2014. Image courtesy of RR Auction
Last Updated on Friday, 24 October 2014 16:18
 

USPS tips hat to Caped Crusader with release of Batman stamps

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Written by ACNI Staff   
Tuesday, 21 October 2014 17:21
Image courtesy of USPS WASHINGTON – If you’re a fan of DC Comics superheroes – and who isn’t – you might want to plan a trip to the post office to pick up the recently issued stamps honoring Batman. Or, if you can stand the wait, order them online at www.usps.com .

This month the USPS released the new sheet of 20 Forever stamps featuring depictions of Batman from four different comic-book eras. In addition to images of Batman in action, each sheet includes four versions of circular Bat-Signal stamps. Be careful -- they could easily be mistaken for thumb-size stickers.

A sheet of 20 Batman Forever stamps costs $9.80. It’s a small price for such amazing art.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Image courtesy of USPS
Last Updated on Wednesday, 22 October 2014 08:08
 

Wolfman meets Picasso in Nov. 11-13 pop culture auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Monday, 20 October 2014 16:42

‘Werewolf of London’ 1935 lobby card, rarest of six different Werewolf lobby cards entered in the auction, est. $5,000-$10,000. Hake’s image

YORK, Pa. – From Mickey Mouse to Picasso, Spider-Man to JFK, Hake’s will make a stop at nearly every popular collecting corner during its November 11-13, 2014 auction, with a few unexpected surprises along the way. A trusted source for entertainment memorabilia and historical Americana since 1967, Hake’s consistently lives up to its reputation as a knowledgeable, trustworthy source for authentic pop-culture collectibles. Their November absentee-auction event includes a number of antique and vintage items that even Hake’s own experts have never handled before.

The political memorabilia category is summarized by a statement from none other than Hake’s founder, Ted Hake, who described it as “…the overall best political section we have cataloged in 47 years of operation.”

“That’s saying something, when you consider that political items have been the cornerstone of almost every catalog we’ve produced since the beginning,” commented Hake’s president, Alex Winter. “Also, Ted is the author of several definitive price guides for political items. He doesn’t use the term ‘rare’ unless it’s deserved.”

On the subject of rare politicals, a prime example would be the card Abraham Lincoln autographed and dated Sept. 24, 1863 with an inscription to “A.R. Walker.” Was Walker an associate, friend or constituent? “We don’t know the answer to that,” Hake said, “but what we do know is that Lincoln had many other things on his mind that day, including sending a telegram to his wife in New York City to notify her that her brother-in-law had been among those killed in a Civil War battle at Chattanooga.” Accompanied by a JSA letter of authenticity and Hake’s COA, the card is estimated at $5,000-$10,000.

Thanks to Ken Burns’ recently released TV documentary The Roosevelts, a sharper focus has been cast on the political career of Theodore Roosevelt, who ran as the Progressive Party’s Presidential candidate in 1912 together with VP hopeful Hiram Johnson. An extremely scarce, sepia real-photo jugate button of the running mates with a bull moose logo is entered in Hake’s sale with a $2,000-$5,000 estimate. A visually appealing button in the classic 1.25-inch size, it comes with provenance from the prestigious Don and Mildred Wright collection.

Within the political memorabilia hobby, probably fewer than six examples are known of a “Jack Once More in ’64” 4-inch button produced in anticipation of John F. Kennedy’s 1964 campaign. “Buttons of this type rarely come to auction. The only other one we could document from the last five years or so was severely spotted,” said Hake. Estimate: $2,000-$5,000.

Representing a unique buying opportunity for art collectors, a 23- by 24-inch (framed) original artwork by Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973) is titled Soleil de Mediterranee (Mediterranean Sunshine). The work depicts the shining sun of the French Riviera above the Mediterranean Sea. Clearly, it was created for someone Picasso knew well. In addition to being signed and dated “le 7.8.56 Cannes A.M.” beneath the words “La Californie,” referring to the town’s most exclusive neighborhood, it has an added personal inscription from the artist. Translated, it says, “My dear friend / my telephone here 901-82” and “My best to you / Picasso.” The wax pastel comes with extensive provenance that includes, on verso, the embossed seal and inked thumbprint of the artist’s daughter, Maya Widmaier-Picasso. The vibrant original artwork is estimated at $35,000-$50,000.

Many auction lots contain prized original comic strip art and cels. Among the highlights are three pen-and-ink daily strips by premier Mickey Mouse artist Floyd Gottfredson. One of them, dated Aug. 14, 1934, contains an installment of the “Bobo the Elephant” storyline in which Mickey and Minnie Mouse harbor the pachyderm and protect him from others who want to take him away. Annotated by the artist in blue pencil, this artwork was obtained by the consignor as a child in the 1950s and is fresh to the collecting community. Its estimate, like the estimate for the original art from a second “Bobo the Elephant” strip – dated Sept. 28, 1934 – is $10,000-$20,000.

Original art for a third Gottfredson strip – dated March 9, 1934 and also fresh to the market – illustrates an installment of “The Captive Castaways” storyline. In this adventure, Mickey and Minnie Mouse are taken aboard a smugglers’ ship by the evil Pegleg Pete. Estimate: $5,000-$10,000. Cels include two rare black and white cels of different scenes from the animated short Two-Gun Mickey, released Dec. 15, 1934. Each is estimated at $5,000-$10,000.

Peter Parker, a k a The Amazing Spider-Man, made his debut appearance in the 1962 Marvel comic book Amazing Fantasy #15. A key Silver Age comic, AF #15 is pursued by collectors in any condition; a 9.6 copy has sold for as much as one million dollars. Hake’s will offer an issue that was CGC-certified 5.0 VG/Fine with a presale estimate of $10,000-$20,000.

From the horror movie realm, few classics eclipse the 1935 film Werewolf of London when it comes to lobby cards. Hake’s will present at auction not one, but six, original Werewolf lobby cards from the series of eight issued by Universal Pictures. “Usually the title card is the most valuable in a set of lobby cards, but one particular Wolfman card in our sale is, by far, the hardest one to obtain. It could be the one that a lot of collectors need in order to complete their set,” said Winter. “It came from one of our earliest customers, who worked in a bookstore and started collecting ephemera many years ago.” Bidding will start at $2,000 and is expected to reach $5,000-$10,000.

Toy collectors can always count on a Hake’s to bring fresh collections to the open market. The November auction includes a superb private collection of toys of all types, including prototypes, vehicles, wind-ups and more. The collection will be on display at the Nov. 1 Allentown (Pa.) Antique Toy Show and Sale.

For information on any item in the sale, call tollfree: 866-404-9800 or 717-434-1600. Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Visit Hake's online at www.hakes.com.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

 ‘Werewolf of London’ 1935 lobby card, rarest of six different Werewolf lobby cards entered in the auction, est. $5,000-$10,000. Hake’s image

 Abraham Lincoln Civil War-era autographed, inscribed card from Sept. 24, 1863. Est. $5,000-$10,000. Hake’s image

 1912 Theodore Roosevelt & Hiram Johnson real-photo jugate button, sepia, 1.25 inches dia., ex Don and Mildred Wright collection, est. $2,000-$5,000. Hake’s image

 4-inch button produced in anticipation of John F. Kennedy’s 1964 campaign, one of fewer than six known, est. $2,000-$5,000. Hake’s image

 Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973), ‘Soleil de Mediterranee,’ original wax pastel artwork, 23 x 24in framed, 8 x 8¼in matted, provenance from the artist’s daughter, Maya Widmaier-Picasso, est. $35,000-$50,000. Hake’s image

 ‘Amazing Fantasy’ #15, Marvel Comics, featuring the debut appearance of The Amazing Spider-Man, August 1962, CGC graded 5.0 VG/Fine, est. $10,000-$20,000. Hake’s image

 Mickey Mouse ‘Two-Gun Mickey’ (1934) original black & white nitrate production cel, est. $5,000-$10,000. Hake’s image

 Original March 9, 1934 daily comic strip art for ‘Mickey Mouse – The Captive Castaways,’ by Floyd Gottfredson, est. $5,000-$10,000. Hake’s image

Last Updated on Monday, 20 October 2014 16:55
 

'73 Telecaster stage-played by Stevie Ray Vaughan in Oct. 19 auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Monday, 06 October 2014 14:09
1973 Fender Telecaster guitar stage-played by the immortal blues-rock guitarist Stevie Ray Vaughan (1954-1990), to be auctioned by Profiles in History Oct. 19, 2014. Est. $7,500-$10,000. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers and Profiles in History LOS ANGELES - An incredibly rare Fender Stevie Ray Vaughan stage-played Telecaster electric guitar headlines the extensive music items being auctioned at Profiles in History’s October 17-20, 2014 Hollywood Auction. The beautiful 41-year-old Telecaster (pre-auction estimate of $7,500+) previously belonging to American singer-songwriter Tom Pacheco and may be the only known example of a stage-played Telecaster used by the legendary Texas blue-rock guitarist Stevie Ray Vaughn. Internet live bidding will be available through LiveAuctioneers.

Also to be auctioned is a Koontz "Triple Neck" guitar commissioned in 1965 and delivered two years late by New York luthier Sam Koonz. The one-of-a-kind custom guitar sports a unique multi-bound, flamed maple, chambered body with “Florentine” cutaways and three 1-piece, bolt-on mahogany necks with Grover tuners. This is the second Triple Neck guitar ever constructed, but is the first Triple Neck to integrate a standard 6-string, 12-string, and 6-string bass. The pre-auction estimate is $6,500+.

The “Ventures Model,” later named the “Mark 1,” was considered to be the flagship of the Mosrite guitar line. This exceptionally rare, Pacific blue custom color guitar named after the Ventures -- who have sold 110 million records worldwide -- was signed by four band members: Bob Bogle, Nokie Edwards, Mel Taylor and Harvey Newquist. The signatures are on the pickguard of the genuine vintage Mosrite Ventures model. Pre-auction estimate: $8,000+.

Doug Irwin’s (noted luthier of “The Grateful Dead” founder and guitarist Jerry Garcia) screaming dollar sign custom-made masterpiece electric guitar is a one-of-a-kind guitar, master built for Bob O’Connor, the lead guitarist of the 70’s West Coast band “$27 Snap on Face.” Auction estimated at $7,500 +, the incredible artistic piece of rock-n-roll history features a three-piece thin maple neck with two mahagony strips, beautifully grained walnut-face headstock with Irwin’s famous Mother-of-Pearl inlaid “Eagle.”

Additional guitars being offered include: the exceptionally rare and unique custom color translucent 2- piece flamed maple Mosrite California grape “Double Axe” Electric Guitar (pre-auction estimated at $5,500); the Mosrite “Joe Maphis” double neck six and twelve string electric guitar ($4,500+); The “Barry Collier” custom-made British Rebeth Gothic Cross Electric Guitar ($3,200+); The custom-built Porno for Pyros 1987 Gibson EDS 1275 six string & twelve string guitar acquired and toured by Peter DiStefano which was featured on stage at the 1994 Woodstock festival ($5,000+); and the Dean “Playboy Playmate Victoria Fuller” hand-painted ML Guitar signed by Hugh Hefner ($6,000+).

In addition, the music memorabilia also features the wonderful vintage 1970s classical acoustic “Elvis Presley” Concorde guitar from the collection of Joe Esposito ($15,000+), along many other rare items.

View the fully illustrated auction catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Interneat at www.LiveAuctioneers.com .

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ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE
1973 Fender Telecaster guitar stage-played by the immortal blues-rock guitarist Stevie Ray Vaughan (1954-1990), to be auctioned by Profiles in History Oct. 19, 2014. Est. $7,500-$10,000. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers and Profiles in History 1973 Fender Telecaster guitar stage-played by the immortal blues-rock guitarist Stevie Ray Vaughan (1954-1990), to be auctioned by Profiles in History Oct. 19, 2014. Est. $7,500-$10,000. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers and Profiles in History
Last Updated on Monday, 06 October 2014 14:30
 

Guinness World Records tabs biggest ‘Harry Potter’ collection

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Written by Associated Press   
Wednesday, 01 October 2014 08:31
Ceremonial crown vase, a movie prop from the Harry Potter movie 'Chamber of Secrets,' 2002. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com archive and Premiere Props. MEXICO CITY (AP) – A Mexico City man is in Hogwarts heaven after his collection of “Harry Potter” memorabilia was named the world's largest.

Menahem Asher Silva Vargas has spent nearly 15 years hoarding all things related to British author J.K. Rowling's young-adult wizard-fantasy series, which spawned eight blockbuster films.

His collection fills two rooms and counts everything from magic wands and toy figurines to Gryffindor scarves and replica Quidditch brooms.

Guinness World Records officially recognized it Monday as the world No. 1, at 3,097 pieces. The old mark was 807.

Silva Vargas said he began with no intent to amass a huge collection. But soon it was like being under a spell.

He laughingly called his obsession both a blessing and a curse: “My salary, my bonuses ... it all ended up here.”

Copyright 2014. Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-09-29-14 2328GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Ceremonial crown vase, a movie prop from the Harry Potter movie 'Chamber of Secrets,' 2002. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com archive and Premiere Props.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 01 October 2014 08:47
 

Unique gold Aston Martin DB5 in online auction to aid children's charity

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Written by Outside Media Source   
Wednesday, 10 September 2014 16:25
Unique gold Aston Martin DB5. Image courtesy of Aston Martin The Americas GAYDON, England - A unique Aston Martin DB5 is going under the hammer for charity this month in an event created to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Goldfinger – the first James Bond film to feature the now iconic luxury British sports car.

Bond film creators EON Productions have commissioned a one-off gold-plated third scale replica of James Bond’s iconic Aston Martin DB5 which global auctioneers Christie’s is offering in a special online auction to benefit the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC).

The replica DB5 has been signed by legendary Bond production designer Sir Ken Adam, who designed the Q branch modifications to the car for Sean Connery as agent 007 in 1964’s Goldfinger.

Prop-makers Propshop, who created the scale model DB5 sports cars required for special effect scenes in the most recent Bond film, Skyfall, using 3D scans of the full size DB5, have created, under licence, a one-off gold model with 24-carat gold plated detailing, complete with radio controlled machine guns, bullet-proof shield and revolving number plate.

The unique Goldfinger model is expected to sell for between £40,000-60,000 ($66,000-100,000). Bid now through Sept. 17, the 50th anniversary of the world premiere of Goldfinger, at www.christies.com/goldfinger.

Also included in the sale is a unique Goldfinger Seamaster Aqua Terra wristwatch created by Omega to celebrate the anniversary of the film. Omega’s Seamaster wristwatches have featured in every Bond movie since 1995. The one-of-a-kind wristwatch is made in 18k yellow gold, the hands coated with Super-LumiNova so that they can be read in all conditions. A counterweight to the mechanism has been crafted in the form of the iconic 007 logo. It is estimated to fetch between £8,000-12,000 ($13,000-20,000), and the full specifications are available online.

Other lots included in the charity sale are a first edition book Goldfinger by Ian Fleming (estimate: £1,000-2,000 / $1,600-3,300); an original British cinema poster for Goldfinger designed by Robert Brownjohn with the famous golden girl in the background (estimate: £2,000-3,000 / $3,300-5,000); and a special golden edition of Taschen’s The James Bond Archives, one of 40 artists' proofs signed by Daniel Craig (estimate: £2,000-3,000 / $3,300-5,000).

The auction coincides with the release of the Goldfinger Limited Edition gold SteelBook™ Blu-ray on Sept. 22 from MGM and Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment.

Nicolette Tomkinson, Head of Popular Culture at Christie’s, said: “The Aston Martin DB5 is clearly an iconic sports car. However this Goldfinger model version, with 24-carat gold detailing, is truly unique and as such we anticipate worldwide interest and competitive bidding. We are confident that this online-only sale will raise a significant sum for the NSPCC.”

To view additional information and images, or to bid online, go to www.christies.com/goldfinger .

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Unique gold Aston Martin DB5. Image courtesy of Aston Martin The Americas
Last Updated on Wednesday, 10 September 2014 16:44
 

Play ball! Cleveland's historic League Park redux

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Written by MARK GILLISPIE, Associated Press   
Monday, 25 August 2014 11:04

An early 1900s postcard pictures Cleveland's League Park. Only the building on the far right and a wall survived demolition in the early 1950s. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

CLEVELAND (AP) – Even in Cleveland, League Park probably doesn't mean much to a casual baseball fan. The former home of the Cleveland Indians sat neglected and largely forgotten for decades in a not-so-well-traveled east side neighborhood.

But the persistence and, after her death, the memories of a longtime Cleveland councilwoman kept her dream alive to restore the park where Cy Young threw the first pitch in 1891 and where Babe Ruth hit his 500th home run. And on Saturday, the city and baseball fans celebrated its reopening.

Fannie Lewis died in 2008, but those who knew her well can still hear her hectoring council colleagues and administration officials like an outraged baseball manager to raise dollars for the project.

Cleveland public works director Michael Cox laughed when he recalled how hard Lewis fought for League Park.

“If she disagreed with you, she would fight you tooth and nail,” Cox said.

The city has spent $6.3 million to make League Park once again a handsome place to play baseball. Cox remembers playing baseball on what was left of the field in the late 1950s and early ’60s, unaware of the historical significance of the turf beneath his feet. The Indians last played at League Park in 1946 and the Negro Leagues' Cleveland Buckeyes in 1950.

The Cleveland Rams of the National Football League played four regular-season games there en route to an NFL title in 1945. The Buckeyes won the Negro League World Series that same year, a feat that white-owned Cleveland newspapers largely ignored. Most of League Park was demolished in 1951, but the Browns continued to practice football there into the 1960s.

In a nod to modernity and the vagaries of Cleveland's spring weather, the entire playing surface is now covered in field turf to prevent rainouts of high school games. There are metal bleachers that can hold a couple hundred people instead of the grandstands that seated more than 20,000.

The old ticket office, which housed a commercial laundry for a time, will become the new home for Cleveland's Baseball Heritage Museum. The only other remnant from the original park is a brick wall that runs along East 66th Street.

The quirky dimensions of the original field have been maintained. The right field line is just 290 feet away, topped with a 40-foot-high fence to replicate the high wall that once stood there. Babe Ruth hit his 500th homer over that wall onto Lexington Avenue in 1929, just a few months before the world was plunged into the Great Depression. Straightaway center field is 460 feet from home plate and the left field line stretches 375 feet, both abnormally long distances in the modern baseball era.

Pete Shimrak said he watched his first Indians game at League Park in 1939 when he was 7 years old. The pitching match-up, he said, was Indians' all-star right-hander Mel Harder versus the formidable Bobo Newsom of the Detroit Tigers.

It was a different era, Shimrak said. Men dressed in suits, ties and hats. The team didn't draw well, and given the park's cozy design, “Every seat was a good seat,” Shimrak said.

He recalled attending a game on Aug. 14, 1945, and hearing the public address announcer tell the sparse crowd of 2,000 that World War II had come to a merciful end. People stood clapping and celebrating for a long time. Indians players and coaches joined their opponents, the Boston Red Sox, on the field to hug and congratulate one another.

Shimrak said he saw many of the American League greats play at League Park before teams were stripped of their stars by the war. He recalled watching the Red Sox's Ted Williams, perhaps the game's greatest hitter, hit a ball over the right field wall and onto the street.

Now 82, Shimrak ended up having more than just a rooting interest in baseball. He was a minority owner of the Indians from 1972 to 1986 and had a piece of basketball's Cleveland Cavaliers franchise at a time.

Shimrak thinks the Yankees' Joe DiMaggio was the greatest player he ever saw. League Park and “Joltin' Joe” are forever entwined in baseball lore. It was the site of the final game of his 56-game hitting streak.

“I hated them then,” Shimrak said of Williams and DiMaggio. “But now I'm so glad I got to watch them play.”

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-08-22-14 2020GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

An early 1900s postcard pictures Cleveland's League Park. Only the building on the far right and a wall survived demolition in the early 1950s. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Cleveland has renovated all that remains of the former home of the Cleveland Indians. Photo by Christopher Busta-Peck. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 1.0 License.

Last Updated on Monday, 25 August 2014 15:57
 

CGC rated 9.0 Action Comics #1 Sells for $3.2M

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Written by J.C. VAUGHN   
Monday, 25 August 2014 10:34
This CGC-certified 9.0 copy of 'Action Comics #1,' the first appearance of Superman, sold on eBay on Sunday, Aug. 24, for $3,207,852. The price for a copy of the first appearance of Superman keeps going up, up and away. With two days to go, the CGC-certified 9.0 copy of Action Comics #1 listed on eBay by Pristine Comics, was already the all-time record for the most valuable comic book ever sold. And it wasn’t nearly done.

A bid at 4:50 PM PDT on Friday, Aug. 22, brought the comic to $2,100,000, a mere $60,000 short of record set by ComicConnect with their CGC-certified 9.0 copy of Action Comics #1 ($2.16 million). Then at 5:35 p.m. Pacific time, the comic hit $2,193,819.38.

The last two minutes of the auction began with the price sitting at $2.6 million, but by the time the bidding ended on Sunday at 6 p.m. Pacific, the newly established record was $3,207,852.

This copy of Action Comics #1 was distinguished from the only other 9.0 copy certified to date by the whiteness of its pages. The Nicholas Cage copy, the other 9.0, was listed with “cream to off-white pages.” Allowing that not all copies have been certified thus far – including the Mile High pedigree copy – this has been touted as the finest copy known.

Sold by Darren Adams’ Washington state-based Pristine Comics, this issue is the sixth comic book to sell for $1 million or more, following three other copies of Action Comics #1, a single copy of Detective Comics #27, the first appearance of Batman) and a single copy of Amazing Fantasy #15, the first appearance of Spider-Man.

“Considering the level of commitment required of the potential purchasers for this issue, we can definitely say the bidding was spirited. There were 48 bids, ending in a new world record. The $3 million has arrived,” said Robert M. Overstreet, author and publisher of The Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide.

“We have been numerous six-figure comics for more than a decade, and while the group is still small, the idea of seven-figure comic books is no longer anything new. The market has recognized with Action Comics #1 that there just aren’t that many copies in any condition of the first appearance of one of the most recognized characters in the world,” he said.

Adams announced the copy’s grade and his decision to sell in on eBay on July 23, 2014, with his company’s ad in The Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide #44 on the day of its release.

_

Our thanks to J.C. Vaughn and Scoop for sharing this report.

 

From Scoop. ©2014 Gemstone Publishing. Used by Permission. All rights reserved.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
This CGC-certified 9.0 copy of 'Action Comics #1,' the first appearance of Superman, sold on eBay on Sunday, Aug. 24, for $3,207,852.
Last Updated on Monday, 25 August 2014 15:52
 

Sparky Anderson trophies to star in Aug. 20 auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Wednesday, 13 August 2014 13:34
Sparky Anderson's Baseball Hall of Fame plaque. Grey Flannel Auctions image. WESTHAMPTON, N.Y. – Memorabilia belonging to the Baseball Hall of Fame manager George “Sparky” Anderson will be sold Aug. 20 by Grey Flannel Auctions. Items consigned by the Anderson family include Sparky’s Baseball Hall of Fame plaque, which has already been bid to more than $7,800.

Sparky Anderson was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2000, having played only one season in the majors, in 1959 for the Philadelphia Phillies. The colorful Anderson managed the Cincinnati Reds to World Series championships in 1975 and 1974 and led the Detroit Tigers to a World Series championship in 1984. He was named American League Manager of the Year in 1984 and 1987. In addition to becoming the first manager to win a World Series in both leagues, Anderson won seven division titles and five pennants compiling a .619 postseason winning percentage.

He died Nov. 10, 2010, at age 76.

Also selling at the Aug. 20 auction will be several trophies presented to Anderson and a collection of presentation bats and autographed baseballs. Included in the autographed baseballs are a single-signed ball by Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame outfielder Ted Williams and a single-signed Sparky Anderson ball commemorating his 2,000th win as a major league manager, dated 4-15-93.

For more information about Grey Flannel Auctions' Hall of Fame sale visit the website: www.greyflannelauctions.com .



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Sparky Anderson's Baseball Hall of Fame plaque. Grey Flannel Auctions image.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 13 August 2014 14:14
 

Baseball Hall of Fame plans traveling exhibit of historical artifacts

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Written by Associated Press   
Friday, 08 August 2014 09:07
A logo for the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Fair use of low-resolution image under guidelines of United States Copyright Law COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. (AP) - The National Baseball Hall of Fame is teaming with IMAX, Major League Baseball and other partners for a national traveling exhibit featuring historical artifacts from the Cooperstown museum and state-of-the-art interactive digital media.

The announcement made Wednesday in New York says the tour will visit major league cities and spring training sites starting in the spring of 2016.

In addition to IMAX and MLB Advanced Media, the Hall of Fame is partnering on the project with Boston Red Sox Chairman Tom Werner and Creative Artists Agency, a leading entertainment and sports agency.

Plans call for the exhibit to visit all 30 major league cities within the first three years, followed by three years of repeat visits to cities of high demand and large markets with minor league teams.

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Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Last Updated on Friday, 08 August 2014 09:15
 

Trucker killed crashing into 'M-A-S-H' Ohio hotdog eatery

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Written by Associated Press   
Monday, 04 August 2014 08:36
Tony Packo's Cafe in Toledo. Image by Stephan Brown. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic License. TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) – Authorities say a tractor-trailer driver has died after he crashed into Tony Packo's, the Ohio hot dog eatery made famous on M-A-S-H.

Police are still investigating the crash. No one was inside the restaurant at the time.

Toledo Fire Lt. Matthew Hertzfeld says firefighters were dispatched to the scene at about 7:15 a.m. Friday. He says the driver had to be extricated from the vehicle. The man's name has not been released.

Hertzfeld says the restaurant has significant structural damage to its front and will have to be stabilized.

Tony Packo's became a household name in the 1970s when actor Jamie Farr portrayed a homesick U.S. soldier in the Korean War who longed for Packo's hot dogs.

The original Packo's remains a tourist destination and is decorated with M-A-S-H memorabilia.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-08-01-14 1506GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Tony Packo's Cafe in Toledo. Image by Stephan Brown. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic License.
Last Updated on Monday, 04 August 2014 09:02
 
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