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Collectibles Worldwide

Play ball! Cleveland's historic League Park redux

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Written by MARK GILLISPIE, Associated Press   
Monday, 25 August 2014 11:04

An early 1900s postcard pictures Cleveland's League Park. Only the building on the far right and a wall survived demolition in the early 1950s. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

CLEVELAND (AP) – Even in Cleveland, League Park probably doesn't mean much to a casual baseball fan. The former home of the Cleveland Indians sat neglected and largely forgotten for decades in a not-so-well-traveled east side neighborhood.

But the persistence and, after her death, the memories of a longtime Cleveland councilwoman kept her dream alive to restore the park where Cy Young threw the first pitch in 1891 and where Babe Ruth hit his 500th home run. And on Saturday, the city and baseball fans celebrated its reopening.

Fannie Lewis died in 2008, but those who knew her well can still hear her hectoring council colleagues and administration officials like an outraged baseball manager to raise dollars for the project.

Cleveland public works director Michael Cox laughed when he recalled how hard Lewis fought for League Park.

“If she disagreed with you, she would fight you tooth and nail,” Cox said.

The city has spent $6.3 million to make League Park once again a handsome place to play baseball. Cox remembers playing baseball on what was left of the field in the late 1950s and early ’60s, unaware of the historical significance of the turf beneath his feet. The Indians last played at League Park in 1946 and the Negro Leagues' Cleveland Buckeyes in 1950.

The Cleveland Rams of the National Football League played four regular-season games there en route to an NFL title in 1945. The Buckeyes won the Negro League World Series that same year, a feat that white-owned Cleveland newspapers largely ignored. Most of League Park was demolished in 1951, but the Browns continued to practice football there into the 1960s.

In a nod to modernity and the vagaries of Cleveland's spring weather, the entire playing surface is now covered in field turf to prevent rainouts of high school games. There are metal bleachers that can hold a couple hundred people instead of the grandstands that seated more than 20,000.

The old ticket office, which housed a commercial laundry for a time, will become the new home for Cleveland's Baseball Heritage Museum. The only other remnant from the original park is a brick wall that runs along East 66th Street.

The quirky dimensions of the original field have been maintained. The right field line is just 290 feet away, topped with a 40-foot-high fence to replicate the high wall that once stood there. Babe Ruth hit his 500th homer over that wall onto Lexington Avenue in 1929, just a few months before the world was plunged into the Great Depression. Straightaway center field is 460 feet from home plate and the left field line stretches 375 feet, both abnormally long distances in the modern baseball era.

Pete Shimrak said he watched his first Indians game at League Park in 1939 when he was 7 years old. The pitching match-up, he said, was Indians' all-star right-hander Mel Harder versus the formidable Bobo Newsom of the Detroit Tigers.

It was a different era, Shimrak said. Men dressed in suits, ties and hats. The team didn't draw well, and given the park's cozy design, “Every seat was a good seat,” Shimrak said.

He recalled attending a game on Aug. 14, 1945, and hearing the public address announcer tell the sparse crowd of 2,000 that World War II had come to a merciful end. People stood clapping and celebrating for a long time. Indians players and coaches joined their opponents, the Boston Red Sox, on the field to hug and congratulate one another.

Shimrak said he saw many of the American League greats play at League Park before teams were stripped of their stars by the war. He recalled watching the Red Sox's Ted Williams, perhaps the game's greatest hitter, hit a ball over the right field wall and onto the street.

Now 82, Shimrak ended up having more than just a rooting interest in baseball. He was a minority owner of the Indians from 1972 to 1986 and had a piece of basketball's Cleveland Cavaliers franchise at a time.

Shimrak thinks the Yankees' Joe DiMaggio was the greatest player he ever saw. League Park and “Joltin' Joe” are forever entwined in baseball lore. It was the site of the final game of his 56-game hitting streak.

“I hated them then,” Shimrak said of Williams and DiMaggio. “But now I'm so glad I got to watch them play.”

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-08-22-14 2020GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

An early 1900s postcard pictures Cleveland's League Park. Only the building on the far right and a wall survived demolition in the early 1950s. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Cleveland has renovated all that remains of the former home of the Cleveland Indians. Photo by Christopher Busta-Peck. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 1.0 License.

Last Updated on Monday, 25 August 2014 15:57
 

CGC rated 9.0 Action Comics #1 Sells for $3.2M

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Written by J.C. VAUGHN   
Monday, 25 August 2014 10:34
This CGC-certified 9.0 copy of 'Action Comics #1,' the first appearance of Superman, sold on eBay on Sunday, Aug. 24, for $3,207,852. The price for a copy of the first appearance of Superman keeps going up, up and away. With two days to go, the CGC-certified 9.0 copy of Action Comics #1 listed on eBay by Pristine Comics, was already the all-time record for the most valuable comic book ever sold. And it wasn’t nearly done.

A bid at 4:50 PM PDT on Friday, Aug. 22, brought the comic to $2,100,000, a mere $60,000 short of record set by ComicConnect with their CGC-certified 9.0 copy of Action Comics #1 ($2.16 million). Then at 5:35 p.m. Pacific time, the comic hit $2,193,819.38.

The last two minutes of the auction began with the price sitting at $2.6 million, but by the time the bidding ended on Sunday at 6 p.m. Pacific, the newly established record was $3,207,852.

This copy of Action Comics #1 was distinguished from the only other 9.0 copy certified to date by the whiteness of its pages. The Nicholas Cage copy, the other 9.0, was listed with “cream to off-white pages.” Allowing that not all copies have been certified thus far – including the Mile High pedigree copy – this has been touted as the finest copy known.

Sold by Darren Adams’ Washington state-based Pristine Comics, this issue is the sixth comic book to sell for $1 million or more, following three other copies of Action Comics #1, a single copy of Detective Comics #27, the first appearance of Batman) and a single copy of Amazing Fantasy #15, the first appearance of Spider-Man.

“Considering the level of commitment required of the potential purchasers for this issue, we can definitely say the bidding was spirited. There were 48 bids, ending in a new world record. The $3 million has arrived,” said Robert M. Overstreet, author and publisher of The Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide.

“We have been numerous six-figure comics for more than a decade, and while the group is still small, the idea of seven-figure comic books is no longer anything new. The market has recognized with Action Comics #1 that there just aren’t that many copies in any condition of the first appearance of one of the most recognized characters in the world,” he said.

Adams announced the copy’s grade and his decision to sell in on eBay on July 23, 2014, with his company’s ad in The Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide #44 on the day of its release.

_

Our thanks to J.C. Vaughn and Scoop for sharing this report.

 

From Scoop. ©2014 Gemstone Publishing. Used by Permission. All rights reserved.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
This CGC-certified 9.0 copy of 'Action Comics #1,' the first appearance of Superman, sold on eBay on Sunday, Aug. 24, for $3,207,852.
Last Updated on Monday, 25 August 2014 15:52
 

Sparky Anderson trophies to star in Aug. 20 auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Wednesday, 13 August 2014 13:34
Sparky Anderson's Baseball Hall of Fame plaque. Grey Flannel Auctions image. WESTHAMPTON, N.Y. – Memorabilia belonging to the Baseball Hall of Fame manager George “Sparky” Anderson will be sold Aug. 20 by Grey Flannel Auctions. Items consigned by the Anderson family include Sparky’s Baseball Hall of Fame plaque, which has already been bid to more than $7,800.

Sparky Anderson was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2000, having played only one season in the majors, in 1959 for the Philadelphia Phillies. The colorful Anderson managed the Cincinnati Reds to World Series championships in 1975 and 1974 and led the Detroit Tigers to a World Series championship in 1984. He was named American League Manager of the Year in 1984 and 1987. In addition to becoming the first manager to win a World Series in both leagues, Anderson won seven division titles and five pennants compiling a .619 postseason winning percentage.

He died Nov. 10, 2010, at age 76.

Also selling at the Aug. 20 auction will be several trophies presented to Anderson and a collection of presentation bats and autographed baseballs. Included in the autographed baseballs are a single-signed ball by Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame outfielder Ted Williams and a single-signed Sparky Anderson ball commemorating his 2,000th win as a major league manager, dated 4-15-93.

For more information about Grey Flannel Auctions' Hall of Fame sale visit the website: www.greyflannelauctions.com .



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Sparky Anderson's Baseball Hall of Fame plaque. Grey Flannel Auctions image.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 13 August 2014 14:14
 

Baseball Hall of Fame plans traveling exhibit of historical artifacts

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Written by Associated Press   
Friday, 08 August 2014 09:07
A logo for the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Fair use of low-resolution image under guidelines of United States Copyright Law COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. (AP) - The National Baseball Hall of Fame is teaming with IMAX, Major League Baseball and other partners for a national traveling exhibit featuring historical artifacts from the Cooperstown museum and state-of-the-art interactive digital media.

The announcement made Wednesday in New York says the tour will visit major league cities and spring training sites starting in the spring of 2016.

In addition to IMAX and MLB Advanced Media, the Hall of Fame is partnering on the project with Boston Red Sox Chairman Tom Werner and Creative Artists Agency, a leading entertainment and sports agency.

Plans call for the exhibit to visit all 30 major league cities within the first three years, followed by three years of repeat visits to cities of high demand and large markets with minor league teams.

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Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Last Updated on Friday, 08 August 2014 09:15
 

Trucker killed crashing into 'M-A-S-H' Ohio hotdog eatery

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Written by Associated Press   
Monday, 04 August 2014 08:36
Tony Packo's Cafe in Toledo. Image by Stephan Brown. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic License. TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) – Authorities say a tractor-trailer driver has died after he crashed into Tony Packo's, the Ohio hot dog eatery made famous on M-A-S-H.

Police are still investigating the crash. No one was inside the restaurant at the time.

Toledo Fire Lt. Matthew Hertzfeld says firefighters were dispatched to the scene at about 7:15 a.m. Friday. He says the driver had to be extricated from the vehicle. The man's name has not been released.

Hertzfeld says the restaurant has significant structural damage to its front and will have to be stabilized.

Tony Packo's became a household name in the 1970s when actor Jamie Farr portrayed a homesick U.S. soldier in the Korean War who longed for Packo's hot dogs.

The original Packo's remains a tourist destination and is decorated with M-A-S-H memorabilia.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-08-01-14 1506GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Tony Packo's Cafe in Toledo. Image by Stephan Brown. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic License.
Last Updated on Monday, 04 August 2014 09:02
 

New postage stamp depicts Civil War Siege at Petersburg

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Written by Associated Press   
Friday, 01 August 2014 13:18
The Petersburg Campaign stamp. Image courtesy of the U.S. Postal Service. PETERSBURG, Va. (AP) – The U.S. Postal Service is issuing a Civil War stamp depicting the 1864 Siege at Petersburg.

A dedication ceremony was conducted Wednesday at the Petersburg National Battlefield for the new stamp.

The ceremony was held near the site of an underground explosion that took place 150 years ago and created a huge depression in the earth. That led to the battle being named “Battle of the Crater.”

The stamp depicts the 22nd United States Colored Troops engaged in the June 15-18, 1864, assault on Petersburg. The Petersburg Campaign stamp is a reproduction of an 1892 painting by J. Andre Castaigne.

The stamp is part of the Postal Service's commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, which claimed the lives of more than 620,000 soldiers.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-07-30-14 0632GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
The Petersburg Campaign stamp. Image courtesy of the U.S. Postal Service.
Last Updated on Friday, 01 August 2014 14:07
 

JFK returns to old look in new collectors' coins

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Written by MICHAEL HILL, Associated Press   
Friday, 25 July 2014 09:34

2014 50th Anniversary Kennedy Half-Dollar gold proof coin. U.S. Mint image.

WEST POINT, N.Y. (AP) – President John F. Kennedy is getting his old look back on new collectors' coins.

The slain president's profile debuted on the half dollar 50 years ago, and the image was subtly tweaked and sharpened in the 1990s. Now the U.S. Mint is producing collectors' coins that restore the original 1964 design, which incorporated suggestions from a grieving Jacqueline Kennedy.

Gold coins being stamped at the mint's West Point plant this week portray JFK's famously tousled head of hair a bit fluffier, his part is less severe and his cheeks less chiseled than on the half dollar discontinued in 2001. The throwback design being featured on the coins this year is truer to both the president's appearance and his widow's wishes, mint officials say.

“We felt we got away from the original,” said West Point plant manager Ellen McCullom. “This really does look a lot more like him ... one of the things that struck me was even the little differences in the nose, and in the face and the lines around the eyes.”

Kennedy replaced Benjamin Franklin on the half dollar in early 1964, months after the president was assassinated on Nov. 22, 1963. Mint officials had begun discussing a Kennedy coin shortly after his death and were able to show his widow and brother Robert Kennedy trial strikes of the coin within a month after the assassination.

Jacqueline Kennedy liked what she saw, but suggested making the hair part less pronounced and adding more accents. Her suggestions helped inform the final design by mint chief sculptor Gilroy Roberts.

In the 1990s, improved technology allowed for tweaks in the design to show more detail – sort of the engraver's version of a high-definition broadcast. Not only did JFK's part become pronounced, but the strands of his hair became more defined, a characteristic collectors sometimes refer to as “spaghetti hair.” His cheeks became more angular, too.

The mint stopped making the Kennedy half dollar for general circulation in 2001, but it has continued on as a collectible coin.

The evolution of JFK's profile in coinage was noticed last year by San Francisco mint employee Michael Levin, who convinced higher-ups that the original design was fuller and more lifelike. That led to the old profile making a comeback on three products from the mint this year. The coin's reverse side, a presidential coat of arms, is unchanged.

The gold proof coins being made at West Point with three-quarter ounces of 24-karat gold will begin going on sale Aug. 5 at the World's Fair of Money in Rosemont, Ill. That coin will be dated 1964-2014 and its price will be around $1,300, depending on the market price of gold.

For those with fewer spare dollars to buy coins, the mint on Thursday will begin offering for $9.95 a set of two uncirculated quality coins from its facilities in Philadelphia and Denver.

A 50th Anniversary Kennedy half dollar silver-coin collection with coins with different finishes from each of the mint's production facilities will go on sale in the fall.

By spotlighting a popular president and the work of an engraver esteemed in the coin world, the mint is guaranteeing interest in the anniversary products, said Douglas Mudd, curator and director of the Money Museum in Colorado Springs, Colo.

“They're going with a win-win situation: popular engraver, very popular person, a lot of nostalgia associated with Kennedy,” Mudd said. “You don't want to change that.”

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

AP-WF-07-24-14 0556GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

 1913 John F. Kennedy proof Half-Dollar, engraver Gilroy Roberts. U.S. Mint image.

Last Updated on Friday, 25 July 2014 09:51
 

Dose of reality: comic book publisher kills off adult Archie

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Written by DERRIK J. LANG, AP Entertainment Writer   
Wednesday, 16 July 2014 09:45
 'Archie Annual Yearbook, Fourth Edition.' Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Burns Auction and Appraisal. LOS ANGELES (AP) – For most of Archie Andrew's life, the red-headed comic book icon's biggest quandary was whether he liked Veronica or Betty.

The character's impending death comes in Wednesday's installment of Life with Archie, a spin-off series that centers on grown-up renditions of Archie and his Riverdale pals. It brings a bold conclusion to Archie Comics' four-year-old modern makeover of the squeaky-clean, all-American character.

Freckle-faced Archie will meet his demise when he intervenes in an assassination attempt on Sen. Kevin Keller, Archie Comics' first openly gay character, who's pushing for more gun control in Riverdale. Archie's death, which was first announced in April, will mark the conclusion of the Life with Archie series.

“I think Archie Comics has taken a lot of risks in recent years, and this is the biggest risk they've taken yet,” said Jonathan Merrifield, a longtime Archie fan who hosts the Riverdale Podcast about all things Archie. “If it shakes things up a little bit, and people end up checking it out and seeing what's going on in Archie Comics, it will be a risk that was smartly taken.”

While casual fans likely still associate Archie with soda shops and sock hops – and that's still holds true for the very much alive teenage character in the original Archie' series – Archie was thrust into adulthood with the launch of Life with Archie in 2010. The series kicked off after alternate futures were envisioned where the love-struck do-gooder married both Veronica and Betty.

Over the past four years, storylines in the more socially relevant series aimed at adult Archie fans have included Kevin's marriage to his husband, the death of longtime teacher Ms. Grundy, Archie love interest Cheryl Blossom tackling breast cancer and Jughead and friends dealing with financial struggles.

It's been a shift not unlike other changes in the modern comic book landscape, where Spider-Man's alter-ego is a multi-racial teenager and Wonder Woman wears pants.

“Every few years, we see a comic book tackling an issue that could be considered provocative,” said Dave Luebke, owner of Dave's Comics in Richmond, Va. “It's interesting that the ending of Life with Archie involves multiple social issues, but it's not surprising.” (Luebke sold his rare 1942 Archie No. 1 comic book in 2009 for $38,837 at a Dallas auction.)

The Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation and several Archie fans praised Archie Comics' decision to have the character sacrifice himself to save Kevin, who is depicted in Life with Archie as a married military veteran turned senator.

“In recent years, Life with Archie has become one of the most unique books on the shelves by using its characters to address real world issues – from marriage equality to gun control – in a smart but accessible way,” said Matt Kane, GLAAD's director of entertainment media. “Though the story is coming to a close, we look forward to seeing Kevin and Archie's stories continue in their remaining titles.”

Others have voiced their concern on Archie Comics' Facebook page and other online forums that the character's death was unnecessary or too politicized.

Jon Goldwater, Archie Comics publisher and co-CEO, defended Archie's demise being a lesson about gun violence and diversity.

“Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but I don't agree,” said Goldwater. “I think Riverdale is a place where everyone should feel welcome and safe. From my point of view, I'm proud of the stance we've taken here, and I don't think it's overtly political on any level.”

Depending on the success of the final installments of Life with Archie, Riverdale Podcast host Merrifield won't be surprised if Archie Comics takes on other topical issues in the near future.

“I'm sure there will be a tearful moment for me,” he said of the character's death. “But this isn't goodbye. He'll be back in a couple of weeks in a book of reprints and the teenage Archie will continue. Archie will still be around. He's always around.”

___

Online:

http://www.archiecomics.com

___

Follow AP Entertainment Writer Derrik J. Lang at http://www.twitter.com/derrikjlang .

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-07-15-14 0521GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
 'Archie Annual Yearbook, Fourth Edition.' Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Burns Auction and Appraisal.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 16 July 2014 10:02
 

Lone Ranger actor's outfit sells for $195K at auction

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Written by Associated Press   
Monday, 14 July 2014 11:29

Clayton Moore, famed for his TV depiction of The Lone Ranger, wore this outfit to public appearances after his retirement from the TV role that brought him fame. The outfit sold to a Texas bidder for $195,000 at A & S Auctions on July 12, 2014. Image courtesy of A & S Auctions

WACO, Texas (AP) — The outfit Lone Ranger actor Clayton Moore wore when making appearances as the character after retiring from television has sold for $195,000 at a Texas auction.

Waco-based A & S Auction Co. said the outfit was sold Saturday.

Moore, who died in 1999, played the masked lawman on the ABC television series "The Lone Ranger" from 1949 to 1957.

The auction house says that after retiring from television, Moore made appearances in character at events including fairs. His outfit included a powder-blue shirt and pants, red kerchief, Stetson hat, boots, gun belt and Colt pistols.

The outfit spent more than a decade in the collection of a late Texas businessman whose family offered it at auction.

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Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

Clayton Moore, famed for his TV depiction of The Lone Ranger, wore this outfit to public appearances after his retirement from the TV role that brought him fame. The outfit sold to a Texas bidder for $195,000 at A & S Auctions on July 12, 2014. Image courtesy of A & S Auctions

Last Updated on Monday, 14 July 2014 11:45
 

Elvis' jets 'Hound Dog II' and 'Lisa Marie' may exit Graceland

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Written by ADRIAN SAINZ, Associated Press   
Thursday, 03 July 2014 11:05
Elvis Presley's jet the 'Lisa Marie' was named for his daughter and is currently on display at Graceland. Photo by T.A.F.K.A.S., licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license. MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) - For 30 years, tourists from around the world have paid money to get a look at two airplanes once owned by Elvis Presley at Graceland in Memphis. Fans enjoy touring the planes for their direct connection to Presley and his jet-setting lifestyle, a sort of touchstone to the life of the King of Rock and Roll and his family.

By April of next year, the planes named Lisa Marie and Hound Dog II could be gone.

Elvis Presley Enterprises, which operates the Graceland tourist attraction, has written to the planes' owners saying they should prepare to remove the jets from Graceland by next spring.

The planes have been a tourist attraction since the mid-1980s. They had been sold after Presley's death, and were eventually purchased by OKC Partnership in Memphis.

OKC Partnership and Graceland agreed to bring the two jets to Graceland. The agreement called for OKC Partnership to receive a cut of ticket sales in return for keeping the planes there.

In an April 7 letter to OKC Partnership's K.G. Coker, Elvis Presley Enterprises CEO Jack Soden says the company is exercising its option to end the agreement and asks Coker "to make arrangements for the removal of the airplanes and the restoration of the site on or shortly after April 26, 2015.''

Their removal could cause an uproar among fans, especially those who visit Graceland every year as part of an annual pilgrimage to events such as Elvis Week and the candlelight vigil commemorating Presley's death.

Dedicated Elvis fan Paul Fivelson of Algonquin, Illinois, says he expects many fans will be upset to hear the planes may be leaving.

"The people who come to Memphis for Elvis Week like seeing those planes there because it's just part of the whole aura of what Elvis was about,'' Fivelson said Tuesday. "It would be kind of blasphemous to take them away, and I think there are probably a lot of fans who will feel the same way.''

The disclosure also raises questions about the future use of the site where the airplanes now sit, across the street from Presley's longtime home.

Elvis Presley Enterprises declined immediate comment.

In November, New York-based Authentic Brands Group bought Elvis Presley Enterprises and the licensing and merchandising rights for Presley's music and image from CORE Media Group. As part of the deal, Joel Weinshanker, founder of the National Entertainment Collectibles Association, acquired the operating rights to Graceland, which attracts about 500,000 visitors each year.

After the sale, Authentic Brands said upgrades to the tourist attraction were planned. Earlier this year, Elvis Presley Enterprises announced plans to build a 450-room hotel, theater and restaurant, with a projected opening date of August 2015. Their plan was approved Tuesday by the Memphis City Council.

Today, Graceland visitors can buy a ticket that includes a tour of Presley's home-turned-museum and the two airplanes. Fans climb into the airplanes for an up-close look at their interiors.

The larger plane, a Convair 880 named after Presley's daughter Lisa Marie, is like a customized flying limousine, complete with a large bed, a stereo system, conference room and gold-plated bathroom fixtures. It was renovated after Presley bought it from Delta Air Lines. Presley took his first flight on it in November 1975.

When Presley died on Aug. 16, 1977, Presley's pilot flew the Lisa Marie to California to pick up Presley's ex-wife, Priscilla Presley, to bring her back to Memphis.

The smaller jet, a JetStar named the Hound Dog II, was also used by Presley.

At one point, after the planes were sold following the singer's death, the Lisa Marie was owned by Raymond Zimmerman, owner of the Service Merchandise chain, according to Coker. The Hound Dog II was in the hands of Hustler head Larry Flynt for a time, Coker said.

OKC Partnership eventually bought the planes and the Lisa Marie was installed at Graceland in 1984. The Hound Dog II came later.

Coker, 76, says OKC may sell the planes if they're removed from Graceland, but he still hopes to negotiate a deal that would keep the planes there. Coker acknowledges that he and his partners would lose money from ticket sales if the planes were removed.

"I would love to see the airplanes stay where they are forever,'' Coker said. "Millions of fans have toured those airplanes and there's a real connection between fans and those airplanes. Those airplanes are part of the Elvis experience.''

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Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Elvis Presley's jet the 'Lisa Marie' was named for his daughter and is currently on display at Graceland. Photo by T.A.F.K.A.S., licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.
Last Updated on Thursday, 03 July 2014 11:22
 

Signed ticket from Gehrig retirement to hit auction block

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Written by Associated Press   
Wednesday, 02 July 2014 14:26
1933 Goudey baseball card of Lou Gehrig of the New York Yankees #92. NEW YORK (AP) - A ticket stub signed by Lou Gehrig on July 4, 1939 -- the day he retired from baseball -- is going on the auction block.

Heritage Auctions says more than 60,000 tickets to the game at Yankee Stadium were sold. Only two are known to have survived.

Of the two, only the mezzanine box ticket was signed by Gehrig. It is estimated to bring over $100,000 at the Aug. 1 sale in Cleveland.

The owner is an unidentified collector.

Gehrig retired after being diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, now known as Lou Gehrig's disease. In his farewell speech that day, he said, "I consider myself the luckiest man on the face of the Earth.''

Heritage's director of sports memorabilia, Chris Ivy, calls it "the most significant baseball ticket in the world.''

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Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 02 July 2014 14:34
 
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