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Collectibles Worldwide

South Bronx Culture Trail to identify vibrant history

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Written by Associated Press   
Wednesday, 16 April 2014 08:53

Jamaican-born DJ Kool Herc, who originated hip hop music in the early 1970s in the Bronx, New York City, promoted hard funk music as an alternative to the violent gang culture of his neighborhood. In this February 28, 2009 photo taken by Bigtimepeace, Kool Herc spins records in the Hunts Point section of the Bronx at an event addressing 'The West Indian Roots of Hip Hop.'

NEW YORK (AP) - It'll soon be easy to identify some significant cultural sites in the Bronx.

The Center for Arts & Education is partnering with nonprofits City Lore and Dancing in the Streets to create the South Bronx Culture Trail.

They're currently identifying sites, which will be designated with physical markers.

The Daily News says among the landmarks is 1520 Sedgwick Ave. where DJ Kool Herc is credited with creating hip hop in 1973.

Other sites include the D Yard, a train yard where early graffiti artists tagged subway cars. There's also Casa Amadeo, one of the city's oldest record stores.

Once launched, the trail will offer guided tours of the Bronx, a map, website and art installations and performances at the sites.

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Information from: Daily News, http://www.nydailynews.com

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Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

Jamaican-born DJ Kool Herc, who originated hip hop music in the early 1970s in the Bronx, New York City, promoted hard funk music as an alternative to the violent gang culture of his neighborhood. In this February 28, 2009 photo taken by Bigtimepeace, Kool Herc spins records in the Hunts Point section of the Bronx at an event addressing 'The West Indian Roots of Hip Hop.'

The front of 1520 Sedgwick Ave., in the Bronx, where DJ Kool Herc lived and threw his first parties. The building is now a landmark on the South Bronx Culture Trail. July 21, 2009 photo by Bigtimepeace.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 16 April 2014 09:20
 

Lost 1920s British movie classic found in Amsterdam

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Written by AFP Wire Service   
Wednesday, 02 April 2014 14:02
Silent film star Betty Balfour (1903-1977) was known as 'the British Mary Pickford.' Fair use of low-resolution image in accordance with the terms of U.S. Copyright Law. THE HAGUE (AFP) - One of Britain's "most-wanted" lost films from the 1920s has turned up in a collection of old canisters rescued from a rural Dutch cinema, Amsterdam's EYE Film Institute said on Wednesday.

"The long-lost British masterpiece called Love, Life and Laughter (1923), featuring actress Betty Balfour, was discovered in the EYE's collection last Friday," spokesman Marnix van Wijk said.

Shot by famed director George Pearson, the film was listed as "missing" by the British Film Institute and featured on a list of 75 movies the BFI said "was not in our vaults" but "which we would love to find."

The silent classic features a youthful Balfour, by far the most popular British screen actress of the time, playing the role of "Tip-Toes," who dreams of dance hall fame and befriends a young aspiring writer played by Harry Jonas. The pair agree to meet each other in two years to see if their dreams came true.

This particular copy was shown in a cinema in Hattem near the central Dutch city of Zwolle between 1929-32, the EYE said.

The cinema closed down and the canisters were in storage at a local television station.

In 2012 a Dutch journalist brought them to the EYE in the Dutch capital.

"It took a while for us to open the canisters to see what's inside," Van Wijk told AFP. "One of our people on Friday got to it, watched the film and saw the title. He went online and then realized 'Hey, this is a really exceptional discovery'," he said.

Bryony Dixon, silent movie curator at the BFI's National Archive, described it as a "very important find."

"Not only does Betty Balfour, the biggest female star of the silent movie period play the lead role, but also it's directed by George Pearson, one of Britain's most talented movie-makers at the time," he said.

At its release the British press hailed it "as a triumph," a "classic" and a "masterpiece," the EYE added.

It premiered for the first time in the Netherlands in Amsterdam's Tuschinski theatre on October 12 1923.

"We are in consultation with the BFI over how it will be restored and when the public will be able to enjoy the movie once again," Van Wijk said.

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Last Updated on Wednesday, 02 April 2014 16:39
 

Soccer fans snap up Sweden's Ibrahimovic postage stamps

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Written by AFP wire service   
Thursday, 27 March 2014 14:04
One of the stamps in a new series issued by Sweden's postal service honoring Paris Saint-Germain striker Zlatan Ibrahiovic. Photo: Posten. STOCKHOLM (AFP) – Sweden's postal service on Thursday began selling stamps featuring Paris Saint-Germain striker Zlatan Ibrahimovic, drawing strong interest from fans as well as collectors.

"We have sold 5 million stamps in advance and that is a lot," Posten's head of stamps, Britt-Inger Hahne, told news agency TT.

Out of the five stamps, three are from the Sweden-England friendly in November 2012 when the Swedish star scored four times to give his side a 4-2 win, saving his most spectacular goal – an outrageous long-range bicycle kick – for last.

"The French are particularly interested. One customer ordered 1,500 packages ... for his French friends," Hahne said in a statement.

"Zlatan has a unique position on the pitch, among his fans and now also on the stamps," she added.

"It's a great honor," Ibrahimovic said in a statement released by the postal service in November last year.

"Personally, I mostly receive bills and they rarely have any pretty stamps. Maybe that will change now," he added.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
One of the stamps in a new series issued by Sweden's postal service honoring Paris Saint-Germain striker Zlatan Ibrahiovic. Photo: Posten.
Last Updated on Thursday, 27 March 2014 14:16
 

Volunteer's Red Cross collection on view at Mich. museum

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Written by ANDY FITZPATRICK, Battle Creek Enquirer   
Thursday, 27 March 2014 09:07
This World War I Red Cross poster will be offered in a May 3 auction by Poster Connection Inc. Image courtesy of Poster Connection Inc. BATTLE CREEK, Mich. (AP) – An organization known for sending volunteers on far-flung missions to help others is the focus of a new exhibit at Battle Creek's natural history museum.

On the basement level of Kingman Museum, a collection of items from the long history of the American Red Cross has been cultivated from the Calhoun and Branch County Red Cross chapter and Battle Creek resident JoAnn King, according to the Battle Creek Enquirer.

King came to the museum recently and saw many of the Red Cross collectibles she's gathered over her more than 30 years as a volunteer in display cases and hanging on walls.

King said she liked what she saw.

“It's in my bedroom, on various shelves, walls, wherever,” King said of her collection's normal home. “I'm just happy that somebody else will get to see it, and maybe it will prompt them to give them blood.”

March 15 was the first day the temporary exhibit was on display for the public. It will be on exhibit through Saturday, when the museum will host Red Cross staff members who will give presentations during the museum's hours of noon through 4 p.m.

For King, the story of the organization that's had a presence in Calhoun County for 98 years is a somewhat personal one. In fact, she still volunteers today, although she said her fellow volunteers at hospitals usually just let her do some paperwork or transport prescriptions.

King said she's been collecting since her volunteer work began over three decades ago, in the Red Cross Bicycle Corps. Her work then moved to blood services and hospitals, and now is just in the latter.

Now, she's amassed an impressive collection full of memories.

“I have a doll,” King said. “She has a little Scottie in front of her and it was from a cover of the Liberty magazine during the Second World War. A friend found the doll, then she was lucky enough to find the magazine for me.”

Another item is a photograph of a mother and her two daughters who were Red Cross volunteers, women King worked with and who were neighbors of hers.

In one corner of the exhibit area, King's blue uniform and tan hat, bearing the well-known symbol of the organization, are under glass.

There are other items from both King and the local Red Cross office that are more modern. A cell phone, from before the era of smart phones, can be found there, a museum piece on its own. A Minimates action figure, a toy known for bringing superheroes and movie monsters to plastic life, bears the Red Cross on its chest.

If this exhibit brings awareness of the local importance of Red Cross to people, then the exhibit has done its job as far as Branch Manager for Calhoun County and Branch County Katy Lagoni is concerned.

“This chapter here has a long history of serving this community and we're proud that we're still doing it today,” Lagoni said.

It's easy to think of Red Cross volunteers working in the wake of tsunamis, earthquakes and other disasters, but there's a lot to do at home as well, according to Lagoni.

“We're responding certainly weekly to house fires and other disasters that families need help with relief and recovery from,” Lagoni said. “We offer a variety of services on a regular basis, from health and safety classes, to babysitting classes, to water safety.”

Lagoni also pointed to the organization's work helping members of the Armed Forces during when they leave on missions and when they return, as well as working with families on disaster preparation.

When people do need the services of the Red Cross, Lagoni said it can change their lives. When it does leave a lasting impression, that's when people – even volunteers – can get the bug to start collecting memorabilia.

“People are fanatical about it, and rightly so,” Lagoni said.

Kingman Museum Education and Outreach Manager Kelly VanRyswyk said including something like the Red Cross collection among its animals, planetarium shows and human biology exhibits is part of Kingman's mission.

“It's educational and touches ages in a whole span,” VanRyswyk said. “It also involves people like Mrs. King who are gracious enough to give us their things to display.”

For King, whose personal items are on display, there's only one way to describe how she feels about the exhibit.

“It makes me feel great,” King said. “I'm real happy to share.”

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Information from: Battle Creek Enquirer, http://www.battlecreekenquirer.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-03-26-14 1333GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
This World War I Red Cross poster will be offered in a May 3 auction by Poster Connection Inc. Image courtesy of Poster Connection Inc.
Last Updated on Thursday, 27 March 2014 09:39
 

Fender's first production model Stratocaster for sale

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Written by JOHNNY CLARK and KRISTIN HALL, Associated Press   
Thursday, 20 March 2014 08:31
Eric Clapton plays his signature model Fender Stratocaster at the Tsunami Relief concert, Jan. 22, 2005. Image by Yummifruitbat. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license. NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gruhn’s Guitars in Nashville is a kind of mecca for fine, vintage musical instruments, but even owner George Gruhn is blown away by the latest addition to his inventory. He says it's the very first production model Fender Stratocaster ever made.

You can own it for a cool quarter million dollars.

“This is special,” Gruhn told The Associated Press. “It's not special as memorabilia because it was owned by anybody special. But it is special because this is effectively like having the right Rembrandt or Van Gogh or Da Vinci. It's special because of what it is and who did this. Not because of who owned it.”

The sunburst-finish Strat bears the serial number 0100. Although some Strats have lower numbers that begin with 0001, Gruhn says they actually were manufactured later in that first year of production. He says the no. 1 Strat was sold to an amateur who evidently took good care of it.

“This one didn't go to a famous performer,” he said. “It actually went to Joe Blow Public. But it stayed in good condition, hardly used. And then, a bit over 30 years ago, Richard Smith, who is a curator today at the museum of the city of Fullerton, Calif., where this guitar was made, bought this guitar.”

Smith purchased the guitar from the original owner. Gruhn said the record-keeping on the guitar is superb because Smith is considered one of the foremost experts on Stratocasters. Smith is selling it on consignment through Gruhn's Guitars.

The Fender Stratocaster, first produced in 1954, has been described as a guitar that changed the world. When it first arrived, its streamlined, space-age contours seemed strange and perplexing to some. But the kids knew what to do with it. Buddy Holly played one. So did Jimi Hendrix, when he transformed the psychedelic experience into sound a decade later. Bob Dylan chose a Stratocaster for his revolutionary electric set, when he fired a defiant shot at tradition during the 1965 Newport Folk Festival.

And 60 years after it was created, the much-copied design of the Stratocaster has hardly changed.

According to Gruhn, Stratocasters are the single most popular, best-selling electric guitars on the planet.

Over the years, a fair number of vintage Strats have sold for $100,000-plus, with some approaching $1 million. Eric Clapton's “Blackie” sold for $959,500 in 2004 and recently the Stratocaster that Dylan played at Newport sold for a record $965,000.

However, Gruhn says the very first production model Strat is something like a national treasure.

“I consider this to be one of the most important pieces of American, truly iconic industrial design, as well as musical instrument design, that we can find today,” he said. “It's a piece of art, it's a piece of industrial design, it's a piece of musical history. And it's part of our national heritage.”

He added, “I think it belongs in a museum ultimately. On the other hand, I don't like to see them put in a museum setting where they will never again be touched without white gloves. Even for the Stradivari quartet at the Library of Congress, it does get played. They don't play those instruments every day, but they are used for concerts. And this instrument is a wonderful sounding guitar. It plays great.”

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Follow Kristin Hall on Twitter at _http://twitter.com/kmhall

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Clark reported from Atlanta.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 

AP-WF-03-18-14 1935GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Eric Clapton plays his signature model Fender Stratocaster at the Tsunami Relief concert, Jan. 22, 2005. Image by Yummifruitbat. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.
Last Updated on Thursday, 20 March 2014 08:51
 

Star-spangled banner stamp unveiled at Smithsonian

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Written by Associated Press   
Friday, 07 March 2014 17:17
The new star-spangled banner stamp. Note: Strike-through on the word 'FOREVER' is shown here to prevent illegal photo reproduction. It does not appear on the actual stamps. USPS image WASHINGTON (AP) - The Smithsonian Institution is beginning a celebration of the 200th anniversary of the flag and song that became the national anthem with a new forever stamp from the U.S. Postal Service.

The star-spangled banner stamp was dedicated Thursday at the National Museum of American History. The Smithsonian has housed the flag that inspired the words for the national anthem since the early 1900s.

This year marks the 200th anniversary of the British bombardment of Baltimore's Fort McHenry. In September 1814, lawyer Francis Scott Key penned the lyrics of "The Star-Spangled Banner'' as he saw the flag. The song became the U.S. anthem in 1931.

The Smithsonian is planning events all year to celebrate the flag and its history, including a simultaneous singing of the anthem nationwide on Flag Day, June 14. It will be led by a celebrity artist singing on the National Mall. The museum also will display Key's original manuscript with the flag for the first time, borrowing the handwritten text from the Maryland Historical Society.

The museum also is challenging restaurants and barkeepers to join the celebration in June by having mixologists in 15 cities create beverages inspired by the star-spangled banner.

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Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
The new star-spangled banner stamp. Note: Strike-through on the word 'FOREVER' is shown here to prevent illegal photo reproduction. It does not appear on the actual stamps. USPS image
Last Updated on Friday, 07 March 2014 17:25
 

Rare complete set of 1923-24 Cuban baseball cards headed to auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Thursday, 06 March 2014 16:37
1923-24 Cuban baseball card for Oscar Charleston, outfielder for the Santa Clara Base Ball Club. From a complete collection of 84 SGC-graded baseball cards issued by Tomas Gutierrez, a Cuban tobacco company that manufactured Diaz brand cigarettes. To be auctioned by Hake's on March 18, 2014. Hake's image. YORK, Pa. – A rare treasure of both Cuban and baseball history will soon be crossing the auction block. Hake's Americana & Collectibles has announced that on March 18 they will sell the only complete collection of Cuban baseball cards issued in 1923-24 by Tomas Gutierrez, manufacturers of Diaz brand cigarettes, ever to cross the auction block.

There are 84 SGC-graded cards in the set, numbering 1 through 83, plus #85. To Hake’s knowledge, no card #84 is known.

“To give you an idea of how valuable this set is to collectors, we sold eight cards from the same series (from the late Richard Merkin’s collection) for $30,000. The cards in this set are in higher grade, and there are 84 of them,” said Hake’s General Manager Alex Winter.

The set spans a who’s who of Cuban baseball talent of the 1920s. The players featured in this set include not only members of the Cuban and Negro League Halls of Fame, but also five players inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame. The estimate on the set is $75,000-$100,000. Bidding is already at $50,000.

The auction also contains early Cuban baseball memorabilia from the fabled Richard Merkin collection, including news service photos of teams and players; a few signed documents, a broadside, scorecards and other rare ephemera.

Cuba’s Place in Baseball History:

Cuba has been a hotbed of baseball talent for far longer than most people might imagine. The Habana Base Ball Club was founded in 1868. Ten years later, the Cuban League was established. After the Spanish-American War, Cuban teams had greater opportunities to compete against their U.S. counterparts, which led to a number of white Cuban players migrating to American teams. At around the same time, Negro League stars found a sunny haven and hospitable welcome in Cuba, where they added muscle to Cuba’s formidable integrated teams.

Early Cuban baseball cards and photos document the superstars of an important era and remind collectors that the island nation 90 miles from Key West was light years ahead of the USA when it came to assessing players on their ability and not their race.

Visit Hake's online at www.hakes.com..

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Four examples from an 84-card collection of Cuban baseball cards issued 1923-24 by Tomas Gutierrez, manufacturers of Diaz brand cigarettes, SGC graded; set numbered 1-83 plus 85. Estimate $75,000-$100,000. Image: Hake’s Americana & Collectibles.
Last Updated on Thursday, 06 March 2014 16:57
 

Larger-than-life Marilyn Monroe statue to leave Calif. for NJ

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Written by Associated Press   
Thursday, 27 February 2014 11:32
The 'Forever Marilyn' statue was inspired by a famous scene from 'The Seven Year Itch.' Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Universal Live. PALM SPRINGS, Calif. (AP) – A massive statue of Marilyn Monroe that has turned heads for two years in Palm Springs is headed east.

The Riverside Press-Enterprise says the 26-foot-tall, 34,000-pound statue will be transported in April from California to Hamilton, N.J., where it will be part of an exhibit honoring its designer, Seward Johnson.

A going-away party, open to the public, is planned for March 27.

The statue of the Hollywood actress arrived in the desert resort city in 2012.

The sculpture depicts Monroe trying to push down her billowing skirt in her memorable scene in the 1955 movie The Seven Year Itch.

The Forever Marilyn statue, on loan from The Sculpture Foundation, was previously in Chicago.

Palm Springs officials say they hope to eventually lure Marilyn back.

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Information from: The Press-Enterprise, http://www.pe.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-02-26-14 1604GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
The 'Forever Marilyn' statue was inspired by a famous scene from 'The Seven Year Itch.' Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Universal Live.
Last Updated on Thursday, 27 February 2014 11:52
 

Book about Beatles includes lifelong fan's rare photos

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Written by ANGELLE BARBAZON, The Elkhart Truth   
Monday, 10 February 2014 09:19
The Beatles wave to fans after arriving at Kennedy Airport on Feb. 7, 1964. United Press International photo, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. ELKHART, Ind. (AP) – Gina Smith's earliest memory as a child is watching The Beatles take the stage for the first time on The Ed Sullivan Show when she was 3 years old.

The Fab Four had landed in the United States for the first time on Feb. 7, 1964, and there they were – Paul McCartney, John Lennon, Ringo Starr and George Harrison – on the black-and-white screen of Smith's television two days later. That was 50 years ago.

“I've never known my life without The Beatles,” said Smith, 53. “From 3 years old, I just fell in love with them.”

Smith collects rare photos of The Beatles, and a few will appear in Some Fun Tonight, a new book being released Friday by author Chuck Gunderson, who contacted Smith through a friend. The two-volume set is brimming with photos and stories chronicling the band's time on tour from 1964 to 1966.

A few photos Smith provided for the book include images of the band in 1966 relaxing poolside with friends at a home in Los Angeles that they rented while on tour.

“They're very intimate photos,” Smith told The Elkhart Truth.

Smith keeps an eye out for rare photos on eBay and at estate sales. Sometimes people contact her because they know she collects memorabilia, including albums, magazines, dolls and video footage.

Smith has seen McCartney perform at least 50 times. She has also met the singer at book and album signings.

“The first time I met him, it was surreal,” she said. “Here's this guy that has meant so much to me all my life. I wasn't crying or anything, but it was emotional, and he was so sweet and just held my hand so tight. He's just a wonderful guy, and he does so much.”

In October, Smith traveled with friends to Los Angeles where Hollywood Boulevard was closed down for a concert to promote McCartney's latest album, New, on Jimmy Kimmel Live. Smith has also seen McCartney play in Hamburg, Germany, and his hometown, Liverpool, England.

Through her travels, Smith has developed friendships with fellow Beatles fans.

“I remember one time we were waiting on the street in New York, and Paul was doing a signing on a Monday, so we started gathering on Saturday afternoon,” Smith recalled. “You meet people that way, and I've made lifelong friends. We're scattered across the country, but we have such a bond. That's one of the coolest gifts of being a Beatles fan, the friendships.”

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Information from: The Elkhart Truth, http://www.elkharttruth.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistribute.

AP-WF-02-07-14 1533GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
The Beatles wave to fans after arriving at Kennedy Airport on Feb. 7, 1964. United Press International photo, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
Last Updated on Monday, 10 February 2014 09:33
 

Beatles artifact from Ed Sullivan Show to be sold at auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Thursday, 06 February 2014 10:13
The Beatles signed the 4-foot-by-2-foot section of a backdrop wall from the New York theater where The Ed Sullivan Show took place.The piece could realized $800,000 to $1 million when it's auctioned April 26. Heritage Auctions image. NEW YORK – A piece of the backdrop from The Ed Sullivan Show, signed by the Beatles when they played the program on Feb. 9, 1964 – the beginning of Beatlemania and the British Invasion – adorned with individual drawings from each member of the band and a note from John Lennon reading, "The 'Beatles' were here 2/9/64," may bring more than $800,000 when it crosses the block at Heritage Auctions on April 26.

"There is no more important band in rock ’n’ roll than the Beatles and there was no moment more important in solidifying their worldwide popularity than the moment they played Ed Sullivan on Feb. 9, 1964," said Garry Shrum, consignment director of music memorabilia at Heritage Auctions. "Now, almost 50 years to the day since it was signed, this piece has emerged from private hands and is looking to take its rightful place as the single-most important piece of Beatles memorabilia in existence."

The piece, measures more than 48-inches long and 16-inches across, features large, clear and clean signatures of each member of the band signed on that eventful night in early 1964, comes out of the collection of voice-over artist Andy Geller, one of the most recognizable voices in all of television.

This band signed the piece vertically, with Ringo Starr signing on top, George Harrison signing below him, with Paul McCartney (signed as "Uncle Paul McCartney") and John Lennon on the bottom. The large autographs are accompanied by drawings by each member of the band and "The Beatles were here" written above John Lennon's signature.

"Holy Grail is a term bandied about in memorabilia circles far too much," said Shrum, "but in this case, it's hard to argue with the designation. This thing really is the Holy Grail of Beatles memorabilia. It's simply the best Beatles-signed piece there is."

The Heritage Auctions Entertainment & Music Auction will take place on Saturday, April 26, at the Fletcher-Sinclair Mansion, 2 E. 79th St. (at Fifth Avenue).

















ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
The Beatles signed the 4-foot-by-2-foot section of a backdrop wall from the New York theater where The Ed Sullivan Show took place.The piece could realized $800,000 to $1 million when it's auctioned April 26. Heritage Auctions image.
Last Updated on Thursday, 06 February 2014 10:27
 

Ain't that peculiar? Yard sale yields Marvin Gaye passport

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Written by AFP Wire Service   
Wednesday, 05 February 2014 10:06
Motown superstar Marvin Gaye (1939-1984) in a 1974 trade ad for the album 'Anthology.' The ad appeared in the April 27, 1974 issue of 'Billboard' magazine. LOS ANGELES (AFP) - You never know what might fall out of some old record albums that cost 50 cents each at a yard sale. Like Marvin Gaye'spassport -- which could be worth $20,000 to collectors today.

Issued in October 1964, the expired US passport depicts a smiling Gaye -- then 25, born in Washington on April 2, 1939, six feet tall, with brown hair and brown eyes -- along with his authentic signature.

"How Sweet It Is (To Be Loved By You)," one of his many hits, had just been released and the Motown sound was dominating the pop charts.

Two decades would pass before Gaye was shot and killed by his pastor father in a heated argument.

The passport reappeared this week on US public television's "Antiques Roadshow," where a male guest from Detroit told how it fell out of some old LPs he'd picked up at yard sale.

"When I got home, I was going through them and out of an album fell this passport," said the guest, identified only as a former employee of the Motown Museum in Detroit. "And so, it literally fell into my hands."

Los Angeles-based appraiser Laura Woolley, an expert in pop culture memorabilia, startled the middle-aged man when she advised him to get it insured for $20,000.

"I'm not kidding you," Woolley said. "Nothing comes up for Marvin Gaye. It's not a really common thing to see Marvin Gaye memorabilia."

Gaye carved a unique place in US pop and soul music history, recording such gems as "Can I Get a Witness," "I Heard It Through the Grapevine," "What's Going On," "Let's Get It On," "Got to Give It Up" and "Sexual Healing".

His ex-wife Anna Gordy Gaye, who married Gaye in 1963, and whose brother Berry Gordy founded Motown Records, died Friday in Los Angeles, her family said. She was 92; she and Gaye divorced in 1977.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Motown superstar Marvin Gaye (1939-1984) in a 1974 trade ad for the album 'Anthology.' The ad appeared in the April 27, 1974 issue of 'Billboard' magazine.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 05 February 2014 10:17
 
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