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Auction Houses in the News

Bob Courtney Auctions planning grand finale May 12

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Written by Auction House PR   
Monday, 25 February 2013 14:06
Bob Courtney Auctions will sell this large bronze fountain at the May 12 auction in Millbury, Mass. Image courtesy of Bob Courtney Auctions.

MILLBURY, Mass. – For the past three decades, Bob Courtney Auctions has been supplying collectors with an array of beautiful antiques, monumental lighting, and some of the rarest and most unique items imaginable. Customers will have one last opportunity to buy from the longtime auction house on Sunday, May 12, when Courtney will present his final auction.

As always, the sale will be held at 12 Providence St. in Millbury. LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding.

Battling lung cancer for the past two years, Courtney says he no longer has the strength and energy needed to continue the auctions. "We would like to thank all ahead of time for their well wishes," a Courtney representative said in a statement.

Brimfield goers will want to note that the auction will be held the Sunday immediately before Brimfield week. The start time has yet to be determined.

While this sale will have only 175-200 lots, smaller than usual, it will not lack in quality, Courtney said.

Although this will be the company's last gallery auction, Bob Courtney Auctions will continue to run its eBay store, which can be located by the username, bobcourtneyauctions. The company features over 1,000 lots for sale or best offer and will continue to add items including furniture, home and industrial lighting, furniture and lighting parts, rarities, little knickknacks and a great selection of glass and porcelain items including numerous salt and pepper shaker sets.

The aforementioned statement issued by Bob Courtney Auctions says: “Bob personally wants to thank everyone that has contributed to the auctions in one way or another. Whether you're a dealer, collector, antique enthusiast or someone who just needed or wanted a specific item, you will not be forgotten. It's been a great run and none of it could have happened without all of you. We truly appreciate everyone's business and support and we want to wish all of you nothing but the best. We hope to see all the familiar faces and we're eager to meet the new.”

For more information call 508-865-1009 or e-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . For this sale, Bob Courtney Auctions will not be mailing the usual color brochure, but customers will be able to view the entire catalog once it is ready on www.liveauctioneers.com. Sales conducted by Bob Courtney Auctions are usually ready for viewing one month in advance.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Bob Courtney Auctions will sell this large bronze fountain at the May 12 auction in Millbury, Mass. Image courtesy of Bob Courtney Auctions.
Last Updated on Monday, 25 February 2013 17:43
 

Original Iwo Jima statue falls short of reserve at $950,000

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Written by JAKE PEARSON, Associated Press   
Monday, 25 February 2013 10:13

Sunset Parade at the Marine Corps War Memorial. Image by Ketone 16. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.

NEW YORK (AP) – A long-forgotten World War II statue of the famous flag-raising at Iwo Jima that had been expected to sell for as much as $1.8 million was passed on by bidders in an auction on Friday.

Bidding for the 12 1/2-foot-tall sculpture of the 1945 flag-raising reached as high as $950,000, below the undisclosed minimum sales price, Bonhams auction house said.

“We're a little disappointed with what happened with the sculpture,” Bonhams Maritime Art Department sales specialist Gregg K. Dietrich said.

Three potential buyers placed competing bids for four or five minutes, Dietrich said.

The sculpture's owner, military historian and collector Rodney Hilton Brown, did not wish to discuss the results of the auction.

Dietrich said prospective buyers could purchase the sculpture through Bonhams, which will negotiate a price on the seller's behalf.

History buffs have fawned over the sculpture, a miniature of the familiar 32-foot-tall bronze Marine Corps War Memorial in Arlington, Va. That sculpture, designed by Felix de Weldon, was patterned after a Pulitzer Prize-winning Associated Press image of the Feb. 23, 1945, flag-raising by Marines and a Navy Corpsman on Iwo Jima's Mount Suribachi.

The smaller sculpture was largely forgotten about for more than four decades after de Walden placed it in the back of his studio, covering it with a tarp. That's where Brown found it in 1990 while researching a book on de Weldon. It was in desperate need of restoration.

Brown bought the 5-ton monument, paying for it with cash and two peculiar collectors' items: a Stradivarius violin and a silver Newport yachting trophy from the 1920s.

In 1995, Brown presented a restored version of the statute to the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum on the 50th anniversary of the Battle of Iwo Jima.

Brown said earlier this month he wanted to sell the sculpture because ``it doesn't fit in my living room.''

“I want to find it a good home,” he said, “so we can pass the flag onto somebody else.”

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-02-23-13 0103GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

Sunset Parade at the Marine Corps War Memorial. Image by Ketone 16. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 27 February 2013 10:36
 

French auction house scraps sale of historic Chinese seal

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Written by AFP Wire Service   
Friday, 15 February 2013 12:41

Photo of 1758 Giuseppe Castiglione silk painting of the Qianlong Emperor (reign: 1735-1796) on horseback and wearing ceremonial armor.

PARIS (AFP) - A French auction house has cancelled its sale of a historic Chinese seal for 1.1 million euros ($1.4 million) after threats of legal action alleging it may have been stolen from Beijing's Forbidden City in 1860.

The auction house in question canceled the sale of the seal auctioned in its December sale due "to the emotions provoked in China," a spokesman told AFP on Friday, adding: "We have conveyed our decision to the buyer and the seller."

The green jade seal, which dates from the Qianlong period (1736-95) and had been expected to fetch up to 200,000 euros, went for over five times that amount to an unidentified telephone bidder.

The Association for the Protection of Chinese Art in Europe (APACE) had urged Artcurial to withdraw it from the sale saying it was taken by Anglo-French troops when they pillaged the Summer Palace.

Artcurial had said that the seal, 2cm high by 4.5cm long, comes from the personal collection of a French family which has owned it since the end of the 19th century.

The Old Summer Palace, or Yuanmingyuan, was looted by a joint British and French military expedition during the second Opium War on October 18-19, 1860.

The event is seen in China as a national humiliation.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

Photo of 1758 Giuseppe Castiglione silk painting of the Qianlong Emperor (reign: 1735-1796) on horseback and wearing ceremonial armor.

Last Updated on Friday, 15 February 2013 12:59
 

Interest running high for JFK memorabilia auction Feb. 17

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Written by RODRIQUE NGOWI, Associated Press   
Friday, 15 February 2013 09:31

President Kennedy’s Air Force One leather bomber jacket. John McInnis Auctioneers image.

BOSTON (AP) – A preview of John F. Kennedy memorabilia including notes by his special assistant on the day the U.S. president was assassinated is drawing hundreds of people to the northern Massachusetts town of Amesbury.

LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding.

David Powers, who died in 1998, was Kennedy's assistant and close personal friend of the president and his wife, Jackie. Powers also was the first curator of the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston, retiring in 1994.

Powers joined Kennedy for his first political campaign for Congress in 1946 and was with him when he was assassinated in Dallas in 1963. Powers collected keepsakes and documents spanning his years of friendship with the Kennedy family.

On Sunday, Powers' collection of about 2,000 photographs, documents, gifts and other JFK items will be auctioned in 723 lots at John McInnis Auctioneers.

The auction house says Powers' relatives found the collection locked away last year as they prepared to sell the family home. Powers' family is keeping some memorabilia and may give other items to the Kennedy Library.

The collection has drawn hundreds from New York, New Jersey, New England and elsewhere to assess the items in the days leading up to the auction, said Dan Meader, an appraiser for the auction house.

The items include Powers' copy of the presidential itinerary for Nov. 23, 1963, the day of the assassination in Dallas. The documents contain handwritten details of Kennedy's final hours, including the time he was shot, how Powers helped carry him in a stretcher to the operating room, the time of death and the aftermath.

The collection also features a leather-bound book of presidential inaugural addresses containing a poignant message written by Mrs. Kennedy to Powers.

“For Dave Powers, The President was going to give you this for Christmas. Please accept it now from me. With my devotion always for all you did to give Jack so many happy hours. You and I will miss him the most, Jackie,” says the inscription, written weeks after Kennedy's assassination.

“It's really emotional,” Meader said. “There are tears in people's eyes ... when they look at the schedule, when they look at notes from Jackie.”

The collection includes items illustrating light-hearted moments of the Kennedy presidency. There is a President's Special Award that Kennedy offered to Powers during a surprise celebration at the White House to mark the aide's 50th birthday.

The tongue-in-cheek award is signed by Kennedy and reads: “Presented to David F. Powers on his 50th Birthday. In recognition of your athletic ability in hiking to my icebox to drink my Heikens,” a reference to Heineken beer.

A red ribbon on the award reads: “Physical fitness program walking 50 miles per month from TV to refrigerator and back.”

The JFK Library, which is charged with promoting the life and legacy of Kennedy, says it is working with Powers' family to determine whether some of the items actually belong to the institution and should be returned.

At the request of the late Robert F. Kennedy, Powers in 1964 began assembling and collecting Kennedy memorabilia that was to become part of the library's permanent exhibit, the library says on its website.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

___

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

President Kennedy’s Air Force One leather bomber jacket. John McInnis Auctioneers image.

Photo of President Kennedy with Jo and Dave Powers. John McInnis Auctioneers image.

 

Last Updated on Friday, 15 February 2013 10:06
 

Leighton Galleries sponsors auction consignment event

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Written by Auction House PR   
Wednesday, 13 February 2013 13:42

This S. Kirk & Son silver covered vegetable dish sold for $2,600 in October. Leighton Galleries image.

ALLENDALE, N.J. – Leighton Galleries will conduct a three-day auction consignment event at the company’s galleries Thursday through Saturday, Feb. 14-16, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Potential consignors are invited to bring antiques and artwork to Leighton Galleries, 6-C Pearl Court in Allendale. Leighton Galleries will provide a presale estimate and may offer to sell the items in an upcoming auction.

For details email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or phone 201-327-8880.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

This S. Kirk & Son silver covered vegetable dish sold for $2,600 in October. Leighton Galleries image.  

Last Updated on Wednesday, 13 February 2013 14:07
 

Skinner closing at 3PM due to impending storm

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Written by Auction House PR   
Friday, 08 February 2013 11:34
BOSTON – Skinner’s Boston and suburban Marlborough, Mass., galleries will close at 3 p.m. Eastern Time today due to the approaching winter storm and widespread road and public transit closures in the Boston area.

According to an announcement sent out by Skinner CEO Karen Keane, the company’s galleries and offices will also be closed on Saturday, Feb. 9 and Sunday, Feb. 10.

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Last Updated on Friday, 08 February 2013 11:36
 

Saco River Auction sells rare baseball photo card for $92K

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Written by Associated Press   
Friday, 08 February 2013 10:49

1865 baseball card depicting the Brooklyn Atlantics amateur baseball club. Image courtesy of Saco River Auction Co.

BIDDEFORD, Maine (AP) – A rare 148-year-old baseball card discovered at a rural Maine yard sale has been auctioned for $92,000.

The card depicting the Brooklyn Atlantics amateur baseball club was sold by Saco River Auction Co. in Biddeford on Wednesday night and it drew plenty of interest. LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

Bidding started at $10,000 and quickly rose to the final $92,000, which included an 18-percent premium.

Winning bidder Jason LeBlanc of Newburyport, Mass., said he bought the card as an investment for his young son in the hope of selling it for a higher price when his son gets older. If the price had gone up one more time, he said he would have dropped out of the bidding.

A Maine man who doesn't want to be publicly identified found the card inside an old photo album he bought while antique picking in the small town of Baileyville on the Canadian border. The man bought the photo album, old Coca-Cola bottles and a couple of oak chairs together in a single purchase for less than $100, said Troy Thibodeau, manager and auctioneer at Saco River Auction.

The card isn't the same as a modern-day baseball card, which became common in the 1880s. Rather, it's an original photograph from 1865 mounted on a card, showing nine players and a manager.

The Library of Congress said last month it was aware of only two copies of the photo. The other is in the institution's collection.

In its book Baseball Americana, the Library of Congress calls the item the first dated baseball card, handed out to supporters and opposing teams in a gesture of bravado from the brash Brooklynites, who were dominant and won their league championships in 1861, 1864 and 1865.

It was impossible to predict what kind of price the card would fetch because of its rarity, Thibodeau said, but he guessed before the auction that the winning bid would fall somewhere between $50,000 and $500,000. The priciest baseball card ever is a 1909 Honus Wagner card, which sold for $2.8 million in 2007.

Tom Bartsch, editor of Sports Collectors Digest, said $92,000 is a good price for a prewar card without a Hall of Famer's picture.

“There are very few artifacts around from the 1860s,” he said. “Baseball was near its infancy in that time.”

View the fully illustrated catalog for Saco River Auction's Feb. 6 sale, complete with prices realize, at www.LiveAuctoneers.com

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-02-07-13 1355GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

1865 baseball card depicting the Brooklyn Atlantics amateur baseball club. Image courtesy of Saco River Auction Co. 

Last Updated on Friday, 08 February 2013 11:15
 

Ballots from 1864 presidential election sell for $8,000

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Written by Associated Press   
Monday, 04 February 2013 11:05

Approximately 260 ballots from the 1864 presidential election were sold as a single lot. Image courtesy Case Antiques.

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Two collectors in Knoxville are trying to figure out what do with their latest acquisition: about 260 ballots from the 1864 Presidential election, most of which were cast for Abraham Lincoln. Case Antiques of Knoxville conducted the Auction on Jan. LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet bidding.

Cole Piper of Knoxville said he and collecting partner Andy Simon of Maryville, Tenn., would probably sort through the items to find the ones they want to keep and may offer the rest to others.

Piper told the Knoxville News Sentinel that he and Simon bid $8,000 to purchase the collection of ballots, which were auctioned in Maryville last month. He said finding more than one ballot from the election is rare.

“No. 1, you don't ever see multiple Lincoln ballots,” said Piper when explaining his excitement. “One will come up for sale and someone will have it, but to see that 270 of them came up for sale was pretty amazing.”

The items started with a $2,500 bid, but quickly rose past their estimated valued of $6,000. Piper and Simon said after the auction they weren't sure what they would do with all the ballots.

“Obviously he and I don't need 270 of them,” said Piper. “We're going to go through and the ones we want we will put in our collection, and probably we'll offer them (the other ones) to other people.”

Although Piper has been a member of the American Political Items Collectors since 1971, most of his collection has consisted of buttons, posters and banners until now. He listed Lincoln among his three favorite presidents, along with Theodore Roosevelt and George Washington.

The ballots were put up for auction by an Ohio family. They included 238 that were cast for the incumbent, Lincoln and his running mate, Andrew Johnson, along with 32 that went to Gen. George McClellan and his running mate, George Pendleton. Twelve of the ballots were handwritten.

View the fully illustrated catalog from the Winter Case Antiques Auction, complete with prices realized, at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

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Information from: Knoxville News Sentinel, http://www.knoxnews.com

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-02-02-13 1759GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

Approximately 260 ballots from the 1864 presidential election were sold as a single lot. Image courtesy Case Antiques.

Last Updated on Monday, 04 February 2013 11:42
 

Christie’s to sell masterpiece discovered on hotel wall

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Written by Pascale Mollard-Chenebenoit   
Wednesday, 23 January 2013 10:39

Charles Le Brun (1619-1690), 'The Sacrifice of Polyxena,' 1647, oil on canvas 179 x 131 cm. Estimate: €300,000-500,000. Image courtesy Christie's Images Ltd. 2013

PARIS (AFP) - It is the art world's equivalent of finding a precious gold coin down the back of a sofa.

A major renovation at Paris's legendary Ritz hotel has resulted in the discovery of a painting thought to be the work of 17th century artist Charles Le Brun that nobody knew was there.
Now, the giant tableau is to be sold by Christie's auctioneers and could raise up to 500,000 euros ($665,000) for the foundation established by owner Mohamed Al Fayed in memory of his son Dodi, the late boyfriend of Princess Diana.
The oil painting has been identified by experts as an early work by Le Brun (1619-1690) that would have been completed before he became the official painter at the court of Louis XIV and established his reputation as one of the dominant figures of 17th century French art.
It adorned one of the suites in which Coco Chanel lived for more than 30 years, but when exactly it was installed in the hotel remains a mystery.
The building that houses the hotel on the swanky Place Vendome dates from 1705 and was initially a family home for French nobles. It became the Ritz after it was bought by Swiss hotelier Cesar Ritz in 1898.
The hotel archives offer no clue as to how the painting ended up there, according to Christie's art advisor Joseph Friedman.
"When I saw this painting in the suite, I had to take a step back. It had a very powerful impact," Friedman told AFP.
"The use of color and the movement are remarkable. The influence of (Baroque master Nicolas) Poussin is obvious."
"A colleague then found the initials CLBF, which stand for Charles Le Brun Fecit (Le Brun did this) and a date, 1647."
Christie's then embarked on a process of consultation with relevant experts and although they have not found any contemporary record of the painting, "no one is in any doubt that it is a genuine Le Brun," according to Friedman.
The man who first spotted the painting was Olivier Lefeuvre, a Christie's France specialist in the period, who came across it in July, a month before the Ritz closed its doors for a two-year renovation.
"I thought it was a Le Brun straight away," he said. "It was very well preserved. It was really quite moving."
The painting depicts the killing of Trojan princess Polyxena after she was implicated in the death of Achilles. In the absence of any historical records, Christie's has named the painting as "The Sacrifice of Polyxena."
According to Lefeuvre, Le Brun most likely painted the scene after a three-year stay in Rome where he studied the work of Raphael and became close to Poussin.
The painting is to go on display in New York next week and will be auctioned in Paris in April.
"Mohamed Al Fayed decided to sell it because he thinks its quality means it should be in a museum," Friedman said. "It deserves to be part of a major collection."
The hotel of choice of Charlie Chaplin and Ernest Hemingway, the Ritz is also infamous as the place where Dodi and Diana dined before their fatal car
crash in 1997.

Viewing in New York will be at Rockefeller Center on Jan. 26, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Jan 27, 1-5 p.m.; Jan. 28, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; and Jan 19, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

Charles Le Brun (1619-1690), 'The Sacrifice of Polyxena,' 1647, oil on canvas 179 x 131 cm. Estimate: €300,000-500,000. Image courtesy Christie's Images Ltd. 2013

Painting in situ at the Hotel Ritz, Paris, Coco Chanel Suite. Charles Le Brun (1619-1690), 'The Sacrifice of Polyxena,' 1647. Image courtesy Christie's Images Ltd. 2013.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 23 January 2013 16:39
 

Morphy's awarded contract to auction Pa. Treasury valuables

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Written by Auction House PR   
Wednesday, 16 January 2013 11:01

An example of the fine jewelry items sourced from the Pennsylvania Treasury’s Bureau of Unclaimed Property is this 18K yellow gold and diamond men’s Rolex watch. Estimate: $6,000-$10,000. Morphy Auctions image.

DENVER, Pa. – Morphy Auctions has been awarded a one-year contract to sell unclaimed valuables on behalf of the Pennsylvania Treasury’s Bureau of Unclaimed Property. The goods to be auctioned come from safe deposit boxes located throughout the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and have been stored in the state treasury’s Finance Building vault in Harrisburg.

“There are more than 75,000 items to inventory. Going through it all is like an amazing treasure hunt that produces one surprise after another. People don’t put cheap things in their safe deposit boxes, and some of these items have been untouched in 20 years – that’s what you call ‘fresh to the market,’” said Dan Morphy, CEO of Morphy Auctions.

Morphy said he and an assistant have been assessing and hand-selecting 400 lots of items for inclusion in a Feb. 8-9 Fine & Decorative Arts sale. So far, there are bags of silver coins, precious-metal bars, 1,500 watches and timepieces by Rolex and other makers; antique firearms and swords; musical instruments, historical documents – including one signed by Benjamin Franklin – and a large selection of fine jewelry.

“There are diamond brooches that we’ve set aside for the February auction that will probably bring $10,000 to $20,000 apiece,” Morphy noted.

The contract between Morphy’s and the Pennsylvania Treasury’s Bureau of Unclaimed Property is renewable by mutual consent at the end of the first year.

“I’m very excited about being awarded this contract and have every hope that our arrangement with the Bureau of Unclaimed Property will become an ongoing one. Morphy’s has the knowledge, experience and capability to sell the types of valuables the Pennsylvania Treasury is entrusting to us, and by using the auction method, they will benefit the people of Pennsylvania. It’s a win-win all around,” Morphy said.

“This is the first live unclaimed property auction in more than a decade for Treasury, so we want to get it right, which is why we selected an auction house with a sterling worldwide reputation and one with a proven track record of getting the best price for valuable items,” Treasurer Rob McCord said. “Morphy Auctions lends us the expertise to properly evaluate and price the items from our vault, which enables our team to focus their efforts on the work to search and reunite the remaining property in our possession with its rightful owners.”

All Morphy auctions containing goods from the Pennsylvania Treasury will feature Internet live bidding through LiveAuctioneers.com.

To contact Morphy Auctions, call 717-335-3435.

View the fully illustrated catalog for Morphy's Feb. 8-9 auction and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at LiveAuctioneers.com.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

An example of the fine jewelry items sourced from the Pennsylvania Treasury’s Bureau of Unclaimed Property is this 18K yellow gold and diamond men’s Rolex watch. Estimate: $6,000-$10,000. Morphy Auctions image. 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 16 January 2013 11:14
 

Grey Flannel Auctions, Basketball Hall of Fame renew partnership

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Written by Auction House PR   
Monday, 14 January 2013 11:40

1972-73 Dave Cowens Boston Celtics MVP Award. Sold for $156,000 by Grey Flannel Auctions.

WESTHAMPTON, N.Y. – Grey Flannel Auctions has announced the renewal of its exclusive partnership agreement with the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Massachusetts. The agreement extends the mutually beneficial arrangement that has existed between the two entities since the early 1990s.

Under the terms of the partnership, Grey Flannel will continue to conduct its Annual Basketball Hall of Fame Induction Auction at the Hall each September. As part of the induction weekend’s activities, Grey Flannel will also keep up its tradition of hosting the annual Reunion Dinner for returning Hall of Famers, new inductees and their families. Additionally, Grey Flannel will maintain its long-held role as the Basketball Hall of Fame’s official appraisers and authenticators.

“We highly value the friendship and close working association that has developed between our company and the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame over the past two decades,” said Grey Flannel Auctions’ president Richard E. Russek. “We are honored that the Hall chose to renew the arrangement that has worked so well for so many years.”

“With prices for authentic, game-worn professional basketball memorabilia skyrocketing, we foresee new world records in our annual Hall of Fame auctions,” Russek said. “Basketball has become a powerful international attraction, and its superstars and legends of the past are viewed as sports royalty everywhere on earth. When we can achieve prices like $156,000 for Dave Cowens’ Celtics MVP Award and $132,000 for one of Dr J’s All-Star uniforms, that tells you what basketball means to its fans.”

Grey Flannel’s 2013 Basketball Hall of Fame Induction Auction will be one of the key events featured within a slate of activities scheduled for Sept. 6-9 at the Hall. For additional information or to discuss consigning to the auction, contact Grey Flannel at 631-288-7800 or e-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . www.greyflannelauctions.com.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

1972-73 Dave Cowens Boston Celtics MVP Award. Sold for $156,000 by Grey Flannel Auctions.

Last Updated on Monday, 14 January 2013 11:48
 

Christie's to sell landmark Hockney painting from 1963 trip

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Written by Auction House PR   
Monday, 07 January 2013 17:42

David Hockney's 'Great Pyramid at Giza with Broken Head from Thebes,' 1963. Christie's image.

LONDON – In February Christie’s postwar and contemporary art department will offer for sale David Hockney’s Great Pyramid at Giza with Broken Head from Thebes (1963). A unique landmark painting, it stands as the only canvas to commemorate the artist’s first trip to Egypt at the age of 26.

Commissioned by art critic David Sylvester and journalist Mark Boxer at the Sunday Times, the trip came shortly after the artist’s graduation from the Royal College of Art. It marks a watershed in his practice in terms of style, scale and composition. Forming part of an important British collection for more than 40 years, this is the first time that this painting has ever been seen at auction. It has a £2.5 million-£3.5 million ($4 million-$5.6 million).

“Egypt is one of the most thrilling countries I’ve ever been to in the sense that these monuments are the oldest known buildings anywhere. After all, when Cleopatra showed Julius Caesar the pyramids, they were already 2,000 years old and more. It is quite awe-inspiring; not even in China are there things older, and I think you feel connected with them, whoever you are,” David Hockney, 1993 (D. Hockney, N. Stangos (ed.), That’s the Way I See it: David Hockney, London 1993, p. 36).

Great Pyramid at Giza with Broken Head from Thebes holds a unique place in the artist’s oeuvre, being the only surviving canvas created following his trip to Egypt in 1963,” said Francis Outred, Christie's head of postwar and contemporary art, Europe. “It represents a watershed moment in the artist’s career, situated between Hockney’s graduation from the Royal College of Art and his move to the sun-drenched swimming pools of Los Angeles in 1964. At the center of the composition we find a single hieratic palm tree sprouting up towards the pinnacle of the geometric pyramid at Giza. The style of the painting is unmistakably Hockney, the artist breaking up the foreground with a piece of piping, forming a stark contrast to the broken Head of Thebes lying buried in the sand. In doing so, the artist was drawing a clear link between ancient and modern, the human and natural landscape.”

Great Pyramid at Giza with Broken Head from Thebes follows on from Hockney’s well-documented obsession with Egypt developed through his encounter with the ancient Egyptian art he encountered at the British Museum and later at the Pergamon Museum, Berlin, as well as his deep admiration for the poetry of Greek Alexandrian poet Constantine P. Cavafy. This was also a time of popular fascination with “Egyptiana,” culminating in Elizabeth Taylor’s leading role as Cleopatra in 1963. The Egyptian inspiration first began to appear in Hockney’s work as early as 1961 (with A Grand Procession of Dignitaries in semi-Egyptian style), and his trip in 1963 sponsored by the Sunday Times and David Sylvester was the fulfilment of a long-held dream. While in Egypt, Hockney undertook some 40 works on paper, but no canvases. This painting is the only surviving work to have been completed upon his return to Britain, standing as the most important monument to his trip.

First exhibited at the Kasmin Gallery in London in 1963, other major works from this inaugural solo show are now housed in the Museum of Modern Art, New York, Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art, Oslo, Hamburg Kunsthalle, Hamburg, Museum Calouste Gulbekian and the British Council collection. It was with the proceeds of this highly successful, inaugural solo-exhibition that Hockney made his first trip to California in 1964. Since it was first exhibited in 1963, Great Pyramid at Giza with Broken Head from Thebes has formed part of major shows including the Calouste Gulbekian exhibition of important postwar artists such as Roy Lichtenstein, Francis Bacon and Jasper Johns held at the Tate Gallery, London in 1964, Hockney’s major retrospective at the Whitechapel Art Gallery, London in 1970 and in Paris, Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Palais du Louvre in 1974.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

 David Hockney's 'Great Pyramid at Giza with Broken Head from Thebes,' 1963. Christie's image.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 08 January 2013 08:59
 

National Geographic auction brings in $3.7 million

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Written by Associated Press   
Monday, 10 December 2012 12:06

Steve McCurry's photo of an Afghan girl brought in a world-record auction price for the artist, selling for $178,900. Christie's image.

NEW YORK (AP) – A New York auction of photographs and artworks from the archives of the National Geographic Society has brought in more than $3.7 million

Christie's said 185 lots were sold Thursday. It's the first time any of National Geographic's enormous collection was put up for sale.

A photo of an Afghan girl taken by Steve McCurry brought in a world-record auction price for the artist, selling for $178,900. That was far higher than the estimate of $30,000 to $50,000.

An oil painting by Tom Lovell of Gen. Robert E. Lee's Civil War surrender at Appomattox brought in $80,500. The estimate was between $15,000 and $25,000.

Edward S. Curtis’ The North American Indian, Portfolios 1-20 and Volumes 1-20 sold for $902,000, just topping the high estimate.

National Geographic sponsors and funds scientific research and exploration through its official journal, National Geographic Magazine, which reaches 8.8 million people worldwide.

A gelatin silver print titled Iceberg, Antarctica, circa 1911 by Herbert G. Ponting hit $37,500, a world-record auction price for a single print by the artist.

Copyright 2012 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-12-06-12 2142GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

Steve McCurry's photo of an Afghan girl brought in a world-record auction price for the artist, selling for $178,900. Christie's image. 

Last Updated on Monday, 10 December 2012 12:37
 

Christie’s sets record for most expensive item sold online

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Written by Auction House PR   
Thursday, 29 November 2012 09:06


Edward Hopper (American, 1882-1967), 'October on Cape Cod,' oil on canvas, painted in 1946. Estimate: $8,000,000–$12,000,000. Price Realized: US$9,602,500. Image courtesy Christie's Images Ltd. 2012.

NEW YORK – On Nov. 28 at Christie's American art auction in New York, an online bidder purchased Edward Hopper’s October on Cape Cod for $9,602,500 (£5,953,550/€7,393,925), setting a new record for the most expensive item sold online at any international auction house.

Christie’s previous house record of $3.3 million was established in 2010 with the sale of a rare Shang dynasty bronze wine vessel.

Since 2007, participation in online bidding in Christie’s auctions worldwide has increased steadily. For the year 2011, 29 percent of Christie’s bidders transacted online, and the company's Internet platform drew 25 percent more bids than the previous year.

Earlier this year, Christie’s announced its further expansion into online-only sales of fine and rare wines, vintage couture, prints & multiples and special collections, offering clients additional online buying opportunities, no matter where in the world they may be located.

Steven P. Murphy, chief executive officer, Christie’s International, commented: “The sale of October on Cape Cod via Christie’s LIVE™ proves once again that our clients are eager to use our online channel to grow their collections with works of significant value and quality. This record-setting online price is a testament to clients’ embrace of the online bidding option as a regular and integral component of doing business with Christie’s.”

The Hopper painting was a star lot of Wednesday’s American Art auction at Christie’s Rockefeller Center headquarters in New York. Painted in 1946, the scene depicts a solitary house along a deserted road in Cape Cod, where Edward Hopper painted many of his greatest works. Tinged with autumn light, the scene is imbued with a profound sense of silence. It is one of a very small number of important oils by the artist still in private hands.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Edward Hopper (American, 1882-1967), 'October on Cape Cod,' oil on canvas, painted in 1946. Estimate: $8,000,000–$12,000,000. Price Realized: US$9,602,500. Image courtesy Christie's Images Ltd. 2012.

 

Last Updated on Saturday, 01 December 2012 23:15
 

Hiroshi Sugimoto’s work on display at Christie’s new Tokyo office

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Written by Auction House PR   
Wednesday, 28 November 2012 14:35

Standing Figure of Juichimen Kannon (Eleven-Headed Kannon)  Heian Period (10th - 11th century)  Wood  ©Hiroshi Sugimoto  Courtesy of Gallery Koyanagi

TOKYO – Christie’s Japan will present an exhibition of works by artist Hiroshi Sugimoto. On view Dec. 7-8, the exhibition is being held to recognize the artist for his design of the new Christie’s Tokyo office.

An internationally acclaimed Japanese artist with a celebrated body of work, Sugimoto produces art in a variety of mediums. Recognized for his accomplishments in contemporary art and architecture, Sugimoto is also known as an avid collector, passionate for a wide range of art, from ancient artifacts to contemporary works. Comprising a series of his photography presented alongside a selection of works of art from his personal collection, the exhibition will be held in the gallery of the Christie’s Tokyo office, designed by the artist.

The year 2013 marks the 40th anniversary of Christie’s Japan, and to coincide with this auspicious achievement, Christie’s Japan has relocated to a prewar stone building designated as “Important Cultural Property” in Marunouchi, one of Japan’s most prestigious business districts, and located between Tokyo station and the Imperial Palace.

Sugimoto oversaw the design of the entire Tokyo office, with special emphasis placed on the aesthetics of the entrance area, gallery space and the main meeting room facing the outer garden of the Imperial Palace.

“What manner of design might befit the Tokyo office of Christie’s, to best reflect its leading role in the booming world art market? I posed this question to myself as an architect,” said Sugimoto. “Artworks both soothe and enrich the human spirit. No matter how opposed we as people might be politically, the artworks gathered here under one roof from so many different countries will surely please our eyes. Accordingly, I based my design for the entrance area in keeping with Prince Shotoku’s injunction to ‘uphold harmony as to act with respect’ that appears at the very beginning of the Seventeen Article Constitution of Empress Suiko’s reign.”

Ryutaro Katayama, managing director of Christie’s Japan, noted that Sugimoto has created a space where the East and the West harmonize, and the past and the present blend together seamlessly.

“This interior marks the artist’s latest aesthetic achievement and one with which Christie’s is proud to be associated,” he said.



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

Standing Figure of Juichimen Kannon (Eleven-Headed Kannon)  Heian Period (10th - 11th century)  Wood  ©Hiroshi Sugimoto  Courtesy of Gallery Koyanagi

Asahi Breweries  (Architect: Philippe Starck)  1997  Gelatin silver print  ©Hiroshi Sugimoto  Courtesy of Gallery Koyanagi

Gyodomen (Gyodo Mask)  Heian Period (10th - 11th century) Wood and gold leaf over lacquer  ©Hiroshi Sugimoto  Courtesy of Gallery Koyanagi

Last Updated on Wednesday, 28 November 2012 15:08
 

Leica camera snapped up for $2.18M at Westlicht auction

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Written by AFP Wire Service   
Monday, 26 November 2012 13:00

Only four of these Leica cameras (M3D-1 to M3D-4) were produced, this one for American photographer David Douglas Duncan.It sold for $2.18 million. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Westlicht Photographica Auction.

VIENNA, (AFP) – A custom-built Leica camera that once belonged to influential American photographer David Douglas Duncan fetched more than 1.6 million euros at a Vienna auction Saturday.

Duncan used the 1955 black M3D Leica when he worked for Life magazine. The final sale including fees was 1.68 million euros ($2.18 million).

Leica built the camera specially for Duncan, according to the Westlicht photo gallery, which ran the auction in the Austrian capital.

Its estimate had been between 250,000 and 300,000 euros.

Duncan is best known for his combat photos, including pictures taken during the Korean and Vietnam wars, and his close friendship with Pablo Picasso.

Saturday's sale also included thousands of NASA vintage photographs and slides that went for 200,000 euros.

Another batch of photographs of Russia's space exploration was sold for 60,000 euros.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

Only four of these Leica cameras (M3D-1 to M3D-4) were produced, this one for American photographer David Douglas Duncan.It sold for $2.18 million. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Westlicht Photographica Auction.    

Last Updated on Monday, 26 November 2012 14:30
 
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