Payday Loans
payday loans
ADVERTISEMENTS
Banner
Banner

Get Free ACN Daily Headlines

LiveAuctioneers

Search Auction Central News

ADVERTISEMENTS
Banner
Banner
Bookmark and Share
Auction Houses in the News

Quinn’s Auction Galleries moves to larger suburban D.C. premises

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 28 February 2012 16:57

A view of the new premises of Quinn’s Auction Galleries and Waverly Rare Books. Quinn’s & Waverly’s image.

FALLS CHURCH, Va. – In order to meet the demands of Washington, D.C.’s booming market for art and antiques, Quinn’s Auction Galleries has relocated to a more spacious venue in the heart of suburban Falls Church. The new 14,400-sq.-ft. premises at 360 S. Washington St. encompass three floors, with the gallery and reception area at street level, the Fine Arts department on the second floor, and executive/administrative offices on floor three. Goods to be offered in future sales are stored at a secure offsite warehouse.

“Having dedicated areas available for each aspect of the business has streamlined our operation. We really need the extra room, because we’ve never been this busy before,” said Quinn’s Vice President Matthew Quinn. In addition to cataloged auctions of fine and decorative art and antiques, Quinn’s conducts regular Wednesday night auctions. Its sister auction company, Waverly Rare Books, is also headquartered at the new location.

The South Washington Street gallery is technically Quinn’s third address since opening for business in 1995. Co-founded by Matthew’s father, antique dealer Paul Quinn, and elder brother David, Quinn’s was originally based in a building on Maple Street in Falls Church. Father and son #1 started out hosting monthly auctions but soon progressed to holding weekly sales that attracted both collectors and the trade.

Matthew had joined the family business, which was on an upswing when, in 2001, tragedy struck. A 6-alarm electrical fire swept through Quinn’s warehouse premises, leaving the business in total ruin and with losses approaching $3 million.

“We refused to be disheartened,” Matthew Quinn said. “We agreed that we had to rebuild, and immediately started drawing up plans for how the new layout should look.”

The community of Falls Church loved the local auction house that sold world-class antiques, and supported the reconstruction effort. “Thanks to the understanding people at Jennings – who owned our burned-out building – the City of Falls Church, and Marriott, who allowed us to continue doing business under a tent on a piece of land they owned, Quinn’s Auction Galleries soldiered on,” Quinn said.

Six months and three days after the fire, the Quinns returned to their newly rebuilt facility to conduct a grand re-opening and fundraiser benefiting the city’s firefighters and the Community Foundation for the National Capital Region.

With a new space, a new look and a renewed sense of confidence, the Quinn triumvirate acquired Waverly’s, a respected auction company specializing in books, maps and manuscripts; and adopted new technology – Internet live bidding – which multiplied their annual revenues to a peak figure of $4 million. At around the same time, Washington lost its century-old auction house Sloan’s, which left a sizable market share open to Quinn’s. Thus began Quinn’s ascent to the next level: national recognition.

“Since then, we’ve more than doubled our annual revenue and expanded our very loyal following. The move to the new venue is the next step forward for us and will enable us to keep up with Washington’s demand for an estate-oriented fine art and antiques auction house,” said Quinn. “The nation’s capital is a sweet spot for ‘old money’ estates, diplomats’ residences and the homes of other people with very good taste who are now at a stage of their lives where it makes sense to downsize. The treasures just keep on coming, and we’re ready for them.”

Quinn’s Auction Galleries and Waverly Rare Books are located at 360 S. Washington St., Falls Church, VA 22046. Tel. 532-5632, e-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Online: www.quinnsauction.com. Quinn's and Waverly choose LiveAuctioneers.com as their Internet live-bidding provider.

View the fully illustrated catalogs and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet in Waverly's March 1 and Quinn's March 3 auctions at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

# # #

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.
View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 28 February 2012 17:08
 

I.M. Chait commences Beverly Hills preview for Asia Week NY sale

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 28 February 2012 15:50

Yuan Dynasty blue and white porcelain bowl, est. $120,000-$150,000. I.M. Chait image.

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. - Today I.M. Chait Gallery & Auctioneers commenced the West Coast preview for its their sixth annual Important Chinese Ceramics & Asian Works of Art Auction. The sale will be held March 21 during Asia Week New York, but the company always hosts a preview at their flagship gallery in Beverly Hills to accommodate their local clientele who may not be able to travel to New York. LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live-bidding services during the sale.

The auction features several stunning and highly valuable Chinese pieces. Highlights include a Yuan Dynasty large blue and white bowl previously in the T.T. Tsui Museum; an important carved spinach jade brush pot originally purchased from Spink London, and a Qianlong Imperial lapis lazuli table screen.

The Beverly Hills preview is on now through March 4, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, or by appointment. Gallery address: 9330 Civic Center Dr., Beverly Hills, CA 90210.

The New York preview will be held from Marcy 16-20, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and on auction day from 10 a.m. until the sale commences. Gallery address: Fuller Building, 6th Floor, 595 Madison Ave. at 57th St., New York, NY 10022

For additional information, call tollfree 800-775-5020 or 310-285-0182; or e-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

Yuan Dynasty blue and white porcelain bowl, est. $120,000-$150,000. I.M. Chait image.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 28 February 2012 17:05
 

Harrisburg, Pa., picks Guernsey’s to disperse collection

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Associated Press   
Friday, 24 February 2012 10:21
Mid-19th-century watercolor street scene of Harrisburg with the German Reform Church as its central subject. Signed 'J.F. Messick 1857.' Auctioned on Jan. 5, 2007 at Pook & Pook. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Pook & Pook. HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) – Officials in Harrisburg have selected a New York City auction house to sell artifacts purchased in a failed bid to build a Wild West museum.

Mayor Linda Thompson announced last week the selection of Guernsey's to sell the city's collection.

On Wednesday the authority that controls the city's water system and trash incinerator announced plans to explore selling its part of the collection at the same time.

The artifacts cost millions of dollars in public money and were purchased by ex-Mayor Steve Reed as part of a failed plan to build museums dedicated to sports, the Wild West and African American history.

The Harrisburg Authority says items purchased after 2004 belong to it, not the city. But authority officials say they don't know exactly what those items are.

Copyright 2012 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-02-23-12 1229GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Mid-19th-century watercolor street scene of Harrisburg with the German Reform Church as its central subject. Signed 'J.F. Messick 1857.' Auctioned on Jan. 5, 2007 at Pook & Pook. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Pook & Pook.
Last Updated on Friday, 24 February 2012 10:36
 

Leslie Hindman expands to Denver; first sale March 11

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Auction House PR   
Friday, 24 February 2012 09:04
Annie McLagan (left) and Maron Hindman. Image courtesy Leslie Hindman Auctioneers. CHICAGO – Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, one of the nation’s leading fine art auction firms, announced today the opening of a new auction facility in Denver. The office is located in Denver’s Golden Triangle, 960 Cherokee St., just blocks away from the Denver Art Museum and the new Clyfford Still Museum. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers has opened salerooms in Naples, Palm Beach, Milwaukee, Denver and will be coming soon to New Orleans.

“The current market is creating the perfect environment for the expansion of our firm,” says Leslie Hindman, CEO/president of the firm bearing her name. “People are interested in selling their valuable personal property in an effort to raise capital or retire debt. Additionally, the influence of the global art market and strong prices realized have resulted in consecutive record years for our company.”

The Anne S. and Robert E. Clay Collection of Native American Art is scheduled to go on the block at Leslie Hindman Auctioneers’ Denver saleroom on March 11. The sale will include over 300 lots of Pueblo pottery, Navajo rugs and Southwestern jewelry. Mr. and Mrs. Clay were active members of the Douglas Society at the Denver Art Museum. Over the years the Clays made donations from their collection to the Denver Art Museum, The Wheelwright Museum in Santa Fe and made loans to other institutions in the area.

The Denver office representatives, Maron Hindman and Annie McLagan, both worked previously with Leslie Hindman Auctioneers in Chicago. McLagan was a director of Salvage One in 1984-1995, then the largest antique architectural salvage company in America and owned by Leslie Hindman. McLagan relocated to Denver with her family. She has been involved as the representative for Leslie Hindman Auctioneers since then. Maron Hindman was the director of marketing at Leslie Hindman Auctioneers in Chicago from 1988-1996 before relocating to Denver in 2010.

The Denver facility will be fully supported by Hindman’s specialists in each department including: fine art, jewelry and timepieces, books and manuscripts, Asian works of art, furniture and decorative arts and vintage couture and accessories. The saleroom will hold three auctions a year and regular appraisal appointments. To view information on the forthcoming auction and appraisal schedule, please visit www.lesliehindman.com.

 

 

Last Updated on Friday, 24 February 2012 09:33
 

RM Auctions to sell historic Ferrari-powered hydroplane

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Auction House PR   
Friday, 17 February 2012 14:15

Ferrari-engined 1953 ARNO XI Hydroplane, image courtesy of RM Auctions.

LONDON – RM Auctions has announced the consignment of the world-famous Ferrari-engined Hydroplane racing boat, ARNO XI, to its highly anticipated Monaco auction, May, 11-12.

A unique piece of history, ARNO XI joins an elite roster of blue-chip automobiles and motorcycles slated for the two-day sale at the Grimaldi Forum. The auction is on the same weekend as the Grand Prix de Monaco Historique.

“We are thrilled to be offering the historic ARNO XI at our Monaco sale. This awe-inspiring racing boat has beauty, history, provenance and performance; it simply ticks every box for any serious collector,” says Peter Wallman, specialist at RM Europe.

ARNO XI was the brainchild of Achille Castoldi, who, wanting to establish a world water speed record, set about developing the ultimate powerboat. During 1952 and 1953, Castoldi, a friend of the famous Ferrari Grand Prix drivers Alberto Ascari and Luigi Villoresi, succeeded in convincing Enzo Ferrari to provide knowledge and technical assistance to develop the boat. The result was horsepower provided by a 12-cylinder, 4,500 cc V-12 Ferrari engine, the same as that installed in the Type 375 Grand Prix car that gave José Froilán González Ferrari’s first ever World Championship Grand Prix Victory at Silverstone in 1951. The only addition was twin superchargers that developed in excess of 502bhp at 6000rpm.

On Oct. 15, 1953, ARNO XI achieved 241.70 km/h (150.19 mph) on Lake Iseo in northern Italy, establishing a world speed record for an 800kg boat. The record, incredibly, still stands today.

When Castoldi was finished with ARNO XI, it was sold to Nando dell'Orto, who went on to race it with great success for more than 10 years, securing numerous wins. The boat went through various aerodynamic improvements during that time, including a modified nose and the addition of a fin, finishing its competitive racing career in 1960 with a European championship victory and numerous fastest laps, many of which still exist.

The current owner acquired the racing boat over 20 years ago, restoring it to concours condition. ARNO XI has been in the water many times since and is not only an impressive sight when seen in action but also sounds magnificent. Well-documented, its sale is accompanied by an extensive history file including numerous period photographs and hand-written notes from the great Ferrari engineer, Colombo, during tests on Lake Iseo and during bench testing at Ferrari’s Maranello factory. This remarkable and unique machine is estimated to achieve between 1 million and 1.5 million euro when it crosses the auction podium in May.

“It’s an exceptional piece of history, made even more famous by the countless models one sees of it in important collectors’ libraries and is likely to appeal to serious car collectors as much as it will to traditional boat collectors,” adds Wallman. “It has that alluring mix of ’50s Ferrari grand prix car with the sheer beauty and simplicity of the hydroplanes of the period. We are honored to have been entrusted with its sale.”

Ahead of the auction, ARNO XI will be displayed at the Milano Autoclassica, Feb. 17-19.

For further information on the upcoming Monaco auction or to discuss consignment opportunities for RM’s Monaco sale, visit www.rmauctions.com or call + 44 (0) 20 7851 7070.



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

Ferrari-engined 1953 ARNO XI Hydroplane, image courtesy of RM Auctions.

 Vintage image of 1953 ARNO XI Hydroplane courtesy of RM Auctions.

Click to view a YouTube video of the ARNO XI Hydroplane on the waters near Geneva.

VIDEO:
Last Updated on Wednesday, 29 February 2012 13:10
 

Christie's 2011 sales total $5.7 billion; online bidding jumps

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Auction House PR   
Wednesday, 01 February 2012 13:46
Christie's New York gallery at Rockefeller Center. Photo by David Shankbone, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Generic license. LONDON – Christie’s has announced 2011 sales of £3.6 billion / $5.7 billion, up 9% by £ (14% by $) compared with 2010 (figures include buyer’s premium). This includes private sales of £502 million / $808.6 million, an increase of 44% by £ (50% by $) on 2010.

“Christie’s ability to curate and offer sales of art to a growing audience has led to continued demand across geographies, collecting categories and at all levels. This is a very encouraging set of results,” said Steven P. Murphy, Chief Executive Officer, Christie’s. “While we are seeing more investors collecting, there are many more collectors who are increasing their investment in their collections as the explosion of interest in art, fueled by globalization, facilitated by the technology that increases access to information and images, meets the art that is coming to the market.”

Post-War and Contemporary led the art categories with auction sales of £735.7 million / $1.2 billion – an increase of 22% by £ (27% by $). The second strongest category was Asian Art which increased 13% by £ (17% by $) and totaled record annual sales of £552.9 million / $890.1 million. The highest price of the year was paid for Roy Lichtenstein’s (1923-1997), I Can See the Whole Room!...and There's Nobody in it!, 1961, on 8 November in New York for $43,202,500 / £26,785,550, a world record price for the artist at auction. In 2011, Christie’s sold 719 works at auction for over $1 million (607 in 2010). Average sold rates (by lot) stayed at 79%, on a par with the previous year. Results also illustrate solid demand at every price level, not just for the most expensive works, with the highest selling rate for works sold between £250,000 and £1 million at 87%. The market at the lower price levels also performed strongly with Christie’s in South Kensington saleroom, offering works of art from £1,000, recording its highest annual total for the second successive year (£115.9 million / $186.6 million).

The international appetite for collecting is also reflected in increased buyer activity in 2011. US and European clients accounted for 77% of sale registrations, with 13% from Greater China, an increase of 2% on 2010. Registered clients from Russia and the CIS increased 15% over the year. New clients represented 12% of the value of global sales.

Christie’s continues to invest in online initiatives making the art market increasingly accessible. In 2011, the auction house's website continued to attract new clients and prompt greater interactive engagement. It welcomed 77% more unique visitors than the previous year. In total 29% of Christie’s bidders transacted online (not including the online-only auction of the Elizabeth Taylor Collection). As part of the sales series dedicated to the Collection of Elizabeth Taylor, Christie’s held the company’s first ever Online-Only sale which ran in parallel to the live auctions at Christie’s New York. The two-week time-based auction was hugely successful with over $9.5 million in total sales and bidders from 25 countries around the world who competed for 973 additional items from Taylor’s personal collection. In total, more than 57,000 online bids were received, as collectors rapidly drove prices from the $50 starting point up into the thousands.

“We are operating in an informed market with pricing, curation and presentation key to success,” continued Steven P. Murphy. “Christie’s goal is to serve its clients. As we continue to see strong auction sales, we are also responding to the wishes of our clients with Private sales growing and accounting for £502 million of our sales total. Collectors also continue to be inspired by the great collections. We saw intense interest in the Gourdon Collection in Paris, the Norton Collection in New York and the Cowdray Collection in London in particular, all attracting a broad audience. The crescendo of the year was the Collection of Elizabeth Taylor which was seen by 58,000 people in an eight-city tour before being sold at auction in New York in December. With bidders from 36 countries, every one of the 1,778 lots found a buyer contributing to total sales of $157 million.

“As we approach the sales over the next fortnight in London, we are optimistic about the market in 2012. We also remain committed to our role as cultural stewards through our auctions, private sales and exhibitions. Christie’s is a unique place where commerce and connoisseurship is the hallmark of the Christie’s team and we look forward to an exciting series of upcoming sales, exhibitions and partnerships.”

Visit Christie's online at www.christies.com.

# # #




ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Christie's New York gallery at Rockefeller Center. Photo by David Shankbone, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Generic license.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 01 February 2012 14:23
 

Cole Porter items to sell at Hindman Auctioneers Feb. 12-14

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Auction House PR   
Friday, 27 January 2012 15:31

Cole Porter at the piano. Image courtesy of Leslie Hindman Auctioneers.

CHICAGO – Leslie Hindman Auctioneers has announced that property from the estate of Cole Porter will be included in their Fine Furniture and Decorative Arts auction on Feb. 12-14. LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding.

The 41 lots include Continental and Asian furniture, Chinese ceramics, English silver, Baccarat and Steuben stemware, and other fine tablewares.

A pair of Italian bergères come from Porter’s Manhattan library, which the decorator Billy Baldwin famously outfitted with brass étagères fabricated by P.E. Guerin. The property comes to the auction house from the living trust of Porter’s first cousin’s daughter, Louise Cole Schmitt.

Cole Porter was born on June 9, 1891 in Peru, Ind., the only child of a well-established family. Porter’s talent and affinity for music became evident at a young age and was central to his studies at Worcester Academy and Yale University. After his education at Yale, he moved to Paris where he kept a luxurious apartment. It was there that he met his wife, Linda Lee Thomas, and received his first commission for music.

Cole Porter’s brilliance as a composer and songwriter, in particular for Broadway musicals, made an indelible impression in the history of American popular music.

The sophistication evident in his musical compositions carries over to his masterfully cultivated collection of furnishings.

Cole Porter died in 1964. He is buried with his wife in his hometown of Peru, Ind., and his property has withstood descent through the family for more than 45 years.

Leslie Hindman Auctioneers is honored to conduct the sale of these objects in memory of one of 20th-century music’s greatest luminaries. Preview exhibition for the sale begins Feb. 8. For more information contact Corbin Horn at 312-280-1212.

View the fully illustrated catalogs and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

Interior of Cole Porter's residence. Image courtesy of Leslie Hindman Auctioneers.

Last Updated on Friday, 27 January 2012 16:01
 

Hearse used to transport JFK’s body sells for $176,000

PDF Print E-mail
Written by JAMIE STENGLE, Associated Press   
Friday, 27 January 2012 10:38

The 1964 Cadillac hearse that transported the body of President John F. Kennedy from the hospital in Dallas to Air Force One sold for $176,000 at the 41st annual Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale Auction last weekend. Image courtesy of Barrett-Jackson Auction Co.

DALLAS (AP) – The man who paid $176,000 for the white hearse used to transport President John F. Kennedy's body following his assassination in Dallas plans to include it in his collection of about 400 cars in Colorado.

Stephen Tebo, a collector and real estate developer from Boulder, bought the hearse Saturday that was being offered by Barrett-Jackson Auction Co. of Scottsdale, Ariz. It sold for a bid of $160,000, plus a $16,000 buyer's premium.

The 1964 Cadillac hearse carried Kennedy's body as well as first lady Jacqueline Kennedy from Parkland Memorial Hospital to Air Force One at Dallas' Love Field for the flight back to Washington on Nov. 22, 1963, according to the auction company.

“It was a solemn duty that it had taking him from the hospital where he was pronounced dead to Air Force One,” said Craig Jackson, CEO and chairman of the auction company. “I think everybody in the world remembers watching the hearse leave the hospital, heading toward Air Force One. It just sort of sunk into everybody that he's gone.”

The hearse had been on display at a funeral home directors' convention in Dallas in October 1963, the auction company said. After the convention, O'Neal Funeral Home of Dallas bought the hearse. It was that funeral home that was called upon to transport the president's body.

In the late 1960s, the hearse was bought by Arrdeen Vaughan, a Texas man who owns funeral homes and a funeral vehicle business. He kept it in a private collection for more than four decades before selling it to the person who eventually put it up for auction.

Tebo said he plans to turn his car collection into a museum, hopefully in five to 10 years. The collection in Longmont, just outside of Boulder, is not currently open to the public, but Tebo does open it up four times a year to different nonprofit groups to help them raise money.

Other cars in his collection include a 1965 Rolls Royce custom made for John Lennon, a taxi used in the TV show Seinfeld and a jeep Frank Sinatra used on his ranch.

Tebo said he had expected the hearse would sell for anywhere from $500,000 to $1 million, so he wasn't planning on bidding. But he jumped it when he saw the bids weren't likely to go that high. As a collector, he said he tries to buy significant vehicles when possible.

Tebo said he wanted the hearse because of its historical significance.

“We remember specifically seeing the hearse leaving the hospital and driving very, very slowing to Air Force One and loading the casket on Air Force One. It was just an incredibly dramatic time in our lives,” Tebo said.

Copyright 2012 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-01-24-12 2336GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

 The 1964 Cadillac hearse that transported the body of President John F. Kennedy from the hospital in Dallas to Air Force One sold for $176,000 at the 41st annual Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale Auction last weekend. Image courtesy of Barrett-Jackson Auction Co.

Last Updated on Friday, 27 January 2012 11:31
 

Bronze death mask of Stalin to be auctioned in Britain

PDF Print E-mail
Written by AFP Wire Service   
Tuesday, 24 January 2012 09:09

Russian dictator Joseph Stalin photographed in Berlin in August 1945. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

LONDON (AFP) – A bronze cast from Joseph Stalin's death mask goes on sale in London today. It is one of only 12 made after the Soviet dictator's death in 1953, Mullock's auctioneers said.

It is being put up for sale along with bronze casts of his hands—the left one withered—for a guide price of between £3,000 and £5,000 ($4,660 and $7,760, 3,580 euros and 5,970 euros).

Bought by art dealer James Birch in Moscow in 1990 and now being sold by a private collector, the bronze shows Stalin's hair swept back from his forehead and his famous mustache is clearly evident.

Ten of the death mask bronzes are thought to be in Russia, with the 11th held in a private collection in London following its sale at Sotheby's auction house in the early 1990s, Mullock's expert Richard Westwood-Brookes said.

#   #   #

 


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

Russian dictator Joseph Stalin photographed in Berlin in August 1945. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 24 January 2012 10:48
 

Harrisburg, Pa., to sell artifacts from museum project

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Associated Press   
Monday, 23 January 2012 10:30

Mid-19th-century watercolor street scene of Harrisburg with the German Reform Church as its central subject. Signed 'J.F. Messick 1857.' Auctioned on Jan. 5, 2007 at Pook & Pook. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Pook & Pook.

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) – Pennsylvania's financially troubled capital city is preparing to auction some 8,000 artifacts bought by a former mayor who had had a grand plan to transform Harrisburg into a historical tourism destination.

The mayor's office said Friday it has selected three finalists to appraise, market and auction the collection. Spokesman Robert Philbin said it spans three centuries of American history.

The artifacts cost millions of dollars in public money and were purchased by ex-Mayor Steve Reed as part of a failed plan to build museums dedicated to sports, the Wild West and African American history.

The three firms selected are Freeman's in Philadelphia, Guernsey's in New York and the Potomack Co., in Alexandria, Va.

Philbin says an auctioneer will be selected before the spring auction season.

Copyright 2012 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-01-20-12 2233GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

Mid-19th-century watercolor street scene of Harrisburg with the German Reform Church as its central subject. Signed 'J.F. Messick 1857.' Auctioned on Jan. 5, 2007 at Pook & Pook. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Pook & Pook. 

Last Updated on Monday, 23 January 2012 11:35
 

Alexander Graham Bell letter, sketch ring up $92,856

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Associated Press   
Friday, 20 January 2012 10:19

A page from a letter from Alexander Graham Bell explaining how to avoid damage from lightning. RR Auction in Amherst, N.H., sold the signed seven-page letter for more than $92,000. Image courtesy of RR Auction.

CONCORD, N.H. (AP) – A New Hampshire auctioneer says an 1878 letter from Alexander Graham Bell to his parents that includes rare and elaborate drawings of the telephone he invented has sold for more than $92,000.

The seven-page letter instructs his parents on how to ground the telephone to avoid harm from lightning strikes.

Bell was responding to a letter from his parents telling him how a lightning strike had damaged their wiring.

The letter was written just two years after Bell obtained the patent on the telephone and made his first call to his assistant, Thomas Watson.

Bidding on the letter offered by Amherst-based RRAuction began in December and ended Wednesday, with the top bid coming in at $92,856.

RRAuction vice president Bobby Livingston expected bidding to top out at $80,000.

Copyright 2012 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-01-19-12 1521GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

A page from a letter from Alexander Graham Bell explaining how to avoid damage from lightning. RR Auction in Amherst, N.H., sold the signed seven-page letter for more than $92,000. Image courtesy of RR Auction. 

Last Updated on Friday, 20 January 2012 10:33
 

NY auction of Brooke Astor's jewels, art moved to September

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Associated Press   
Thursday, 19 January 2012 10:11

Brooke Astor in 2002 in her duplex at 778 Park Ave., New York. Faithful digitized rendering of a unique historic image. Fair use of possibly copyrighted image under the guidelines of U.S. Copyright Law. Image used to illustrate the subject of the commentary; no free photo exists, subject is deceased.

NEW YORK (AP) - A New York auction of jewelry and artwork from the estate of philanthropist Brooke Astor is now scheduled for September.

Sotheby's said Tuesday that the auction has been pushed back from April due to its "wide range and volume.''

The sale now will be held over two days, sometime during the week of Sept. 24.

The proceeds will benefit Astor's favorite charities, including the New York Public Library, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and New York City schools.

Astor died in 2007 at 105.

Anthony Marshall was found guilty in 2009 of exploiting his mother's dementia to help himself to millions of dollars. He's free pending appeal.

The auction will include property from Astor's Manhattan apartment and her country house in Westchester County.

___

Online: www.sothebys.com

#   #   #

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 

Last Updated on Thursday, 19 January 2012 10:24
 

Clars to auction original C.M. Russell sketches Feb. 19

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 17 January 2012 09:00

C.M. Russell signed each of the sketches made for Dr. John Louis Weitman while on a western camping trip in 1899. Image courtesy of Clars Auction Gallery.

OAKLAND, Calif. – Clars Auction Gallery will offer three rare pencil drawings by Charles Marion Russell (American, 1864-1926) as part of their Feb. 19 Antiques and Fine Art Auction. LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding.

Being offered as one lot, this series of three drawings is entitled The Camping Trip and was done by Russell is 1899 as a personal remembrance of the camping trip he took with life-long friend Dr. John Louis Weitman in the mountains of Montana. The sketches were given to Weitman as a gift from Russell and have descended through the Weitman family to his granddaughters who have consigned them to Clars.

These sketches were on exhibit in 1957 and 1985-1987 at the C.M. Russell Museum in Great Falls, Mont., through the generosity of the Weitman family. Now, for the first time, they will be offered publicly along with many of Weitman’s personal items including a letter dated 1905, which mentions Russell. This important offering has been assigned an estimate of $60,000 to $80,000.

Rick Unruh, director of Fine Arts at Clars Auction Gallery who is handling this consignment notes that Dr. John Weitman himself was a renowned physician in Montana until moving to Oakland, Calif., when he retired. His friendship with Russell is evidenced in a photo in which C.M. Russell and Weitman are pictured together.

For more information on this important lot and Clars Feb. 18-19 Antiques and Fine Art sale, call 510-428-0110 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or visit their website at www.clars.com Clars Auction Gallery is located at 5644 Telegraph Ave., Oakland, CA 94609.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.liveauctioneers.com.

#   #   #



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

 The three C.M. Russell pencil sketches will be sold as one lot. Image courtesy of Clars Auction Gallery.

A photo shows Charles M. Russell (second from left) with Dr. John Louis Weitman (far right). Image courtesy of Clars Auction Gallery.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 17 January 2012 12:23
 

Watches, American glass are unexpected gems in Keno sale

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Auction House PR   
Thursday, 12 January 2012 16:23

The gilt brass drum-shape pendant watch appears to be an early case with a later (18th century style) custom-made movement. It has an engraved 24-hour dial with a single hand. The estimate is $2,000-$3,000. Image courtesy of Keno Auctions.

NEW YORK – Pocket watches and early American glass are not what made Leigh Keno famous, but unexpected finds helped propel him and his brother Leslie to the forefront of pop culture in the late 1990s.

As appraisers for the PBS series Antiques Roadshow, the twins spotted a card table and identified it as the work of 18th-century craftsmen John and Thomas Seymour of Boston. Purchased at an estate sale by an elementary schoolteacher for $25, this masterpiece of American furniture making, sold for $541,000 at auction in 1998.

Now Leigh has his own auction house in New York and has put together a sale of Important Americana, Paintings, Furniture and Decorative Arts on Tuesday, Jan. 17, at the start of Americana Week. While a Thomas Seymour card table is one of the headliners in the auction, the unexpected items are attracting many collectors.

A small but unique collection of 17th- to 19th-century pocket watches from the estate of Atlanta art patron George E. Missbach is drawing much attention to the auction, which will have Internet live bidding provided by LiveAuctioneers.com.

“Some of the watches that may appeal to collectors include lot 254, a handsome silver and tortoiseshell pair case pocket watch with sun and moon dial, circa 1700; lot 266, two pocket watches, a unique silver gilt pocket watch with three dials, circa 1860-1880, and a gilt and white enamel pocket watch with painted scene, circa 1880; and lot 268 consisting of two engraved silver pocket watches, the first a silver and engraved brass pair case pocket watch, early 18th century, and a silver quadruple case pocket watch with inner tortoiseshell case, circa 1820,” said Leigh Keno, president of Keno Auctions.

The pocket watches are grouped in lots 253-268.

Of the glassware, grouped in lots 164-174, much of the presale attention has been on the flasks.

A Colombia blown flask in clear with blue tint cornflower, 7 inches high by 4 inches wide, has 13 six-pointed stars in a semicircle above the bust on one side and a large American Eagle on the reverse. This rare flask from a Rhode Island family home has a $5,000-$10,000 estimate.

Colorful pieces include a pair of canary dolphin candlesticks (lot 167) made by the Boston and Sandwich Glass Co., 1845-1865 (est. $1,000-$1,500), and a Sandwich Star-pattern spoon holder/spill, which are paired with a covered sugar bowl in the Gothic Arch pattern, both blue, (est. $1,200-$1,800).



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

The gilt brass drum-shape pendant watch appears to be an early case with a later (18th century style) custom-made movement. It has an engraved 24-hour dial with a single hand. The estimate is $2,000-$3,000. Image courtesy of Keno Auctions. 

 This rare blown flask is clear glass having a blue tint and pictures a bust of Columbia on one side and an American Eagle on the reverse. The 7-inch-tall flask has a $5,000-$10,000 estimate. Image courtesy of Keno Auctions.

Dolphin candlesticks by Boston and Sandwich Glass Co. are favorites of early American glass collectors. These canary-colored candleholders are 10 1/2 inches high and have a $1,000-$1,500 estimate. Image courtesy of Keno Auctions.

Last Updated on Thursday, 12 January 2012 17:05
 

Welcoming Hong Kong Auction Gallery: Gateway to Chinese art

PDF Print E-mail
Written by ACNI Staff   
Friday, 30 December 2011 11:11

The elegant entrance to Hong Kong Auction Gallery at the Lefcourt Colonial Building, 295 Madison Ave., in New York City. Image courtesy of Hong Kong Auction Gallery.

NEW YORK (ACNI) – The Year of the Dragon will sweep into Manhattan with an energetic roar in 2012, as LiveAuctioneers begins its marketing association with a prominent name in Asian art – Hong Kong Auction Gallery. As of Jan. 1, the New York auction house with deeply rooted ties to both Hong Kong and Mainland China will be joining the roster of 1,200+ clients who choose LiveAuctioneers for their Internet live-bidding services. The company’s auction debut on LiveAuctioneers is set for Sunday, March 18.

In 2012, Hong Kong Auction Gallery will celebrate its 10th anniversary, and with this milestone comes a name change. As of the New Year, Hong Kong Auction Gallery will be operating under the name “Gianguan Auctions.” While ownership and soft use of the original Hong Kong Auction Gallery name will be retained during the transition period, the “d/b/a” of Gianguan Auctions will be introduced as the firm’s primary identity.

As gallery associate Mary Ann Lum explained, the name “Hong Kong Auction Gallery” had caused confusion with some of their bidders in the past. “There have been winning bidders in Hong Kong who thought they could come over to the gallery to pick up their purchases,” she said. “We had to tell them that we are located on Madison Avenue in New York and that we would have to ship their purchases to them.” Eventually the decision was made to change the company’s name to prevent any further misunderstanding.

The name “Gianguan” refers to the reign of Emperor Taizong of Tang (Chinese Jan. 23, 599 – July 10, 649) – the Golden Period in Chinese history. It is a fitting new name for an auction house whose performance over the past decade has been "golden," with many world record prices to its credit.

Hong Kong Auction Gallery/Gianguan Auctions operates under the direction of Chinese-born Kwong Lum, who recently was named Chief Consultant to Beijing’s National Museum. This appointment is an acknowledgement of Lum’s reputation as one of the foremost experts in traditional and modern Chinese art and antiques.

In his own right, Lum is a renowned scholar and accomplished artist, calligrapher and poet. To honor his achievements in art and literature, and in recognition of his success in implementing cultural exchange between the East and West, the Chinese Government recently built a 5,500-square-meter art museum for Kwong Lum. Lum asked that the museum be built in his hometown of Jiangmen, in Guangdong Province, rather than in Beijing, where it would have assumed a higher public profile. The Kwong Lum Museum of Art is the first art institution ever built by the Chinese Government for a living artist.

As a boy, Kwong Lum was a painting prodigy. At the age of nine, under the guidance of his art teacher, he began collecting ancient Chinese artwork. His early Sai Yang Tang collection included a dozen 3,300-year-old jade and animal-bone seals of the Shang Dynasty’s King Wuding, a hand scroll of calligraphy by the Northern Song master Huang Tingjian, and paintings and albums of the early Qing Dynasty (1645-1911) artists Shi Tao and Ba Da Shan Ren. In 1957, he took his entire collection of priceless art treasures with him to Canada, where he studied at the Ontario College of Art.

In 1964, Kwong Lum moved to the United States. He has spent more than four decades in New York City, working, painting, writing, collecting and studying traditional artwork, as well as organizing cultural activities to present China’s traditional art legacy to a Western audience.

In 2001, Lum and a group of noted American art connoisseurs launched Hong Kong International Auction House in Hong Kong, conducting auctions of traditional Chinese art in Asia and America on a seasonal basis.

“We consider our auctions an inseparable part of our longterm goal of promoting the cultural and economic exchanges between China and the outside world,” Lum told interviewers from New York Chinese-Language Television and China’s CCTV.

In 2004, Lum opened a New York office in the Lefcourt Building on Madison Avenue and initiated a schedule of quarterly auctions. Now those auctions of premier-quality Chinese and Asian art and antiques will be accessible to art buyers worldwide via Internet live bidding through LiveAuctioneers.com, commencing March 18.

To contact Hong Kong Auction Gallery/Gianguan Auctions, call 212-867-7288. Visit the company’s website at www.gianguanauctions.com.

# # #

Copyright 2011 Auction Central News International. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

The elegant entrance to Hong Kong Auction Gallery at the Lefcourt Colonial Building, 295 Madison Ave., in New York City. Image courtesy of Hong Kong Auction Gallery.

Kwong Lum is not only Hong Kong Auction Gallery's auctioneer, he is also an artist, calligrapher, poet and advisor to the National Museum of China. He is the first living artist to be honored with a museum in his name in that country. Image courtesy of Hong Kong Auction Gallery.

A view of the serene interior of Kong Kong Auction Gallery. Image courtesy of Hong Kong Auction Gallery.

A highlight from one of Hong Kong Auction Gallery's past sales. Image courtesy of Hong Kong Auction Gallery.

A highlight from one of Hong Kong Auction Gallery's past sales. Image courtesy of Hong Kong Auction Gallery.

A highlight from one of Hong Kong Auction Gallery's past sales. Image courtesy of Hong Kong Auction Gallery.

A highlight from one of Hong Kong Auction Gallery's past sales. Image courtesy of Hong Kong Auction Gallery.

A highlight from one of Hong Kong Auction Gallery's past sales. Image courtesy of Hong Kong Auction Gallery.

Last Updated on Friday, 30 December 2011 12:11
 

Welcoming Keno Auctions: A modern approach to American antiques

PDF Print E-mail
Written by ACNI Staff   
Friday, 30 December 2011 11:11

Leigh Keno is one of the most immediately recognizable figures in the antiques and fine art trade. He presides at the podium at all sales conducted by Keno Auctions. Image courtesy of Keno Auctions.

NEW YORK (ACNI) – Antiques were always an accepted part of life for Leigh Keno, the American fine and decorative arts expert who is president of Keno Auctions in New York City.

As a toddler, Leigh went everywhere with his antiques-dealing parents Norma and Ronald Keno – shows, flea markets, tag sales, garage sales – and by the time he was a pre-schooler, he, too, had the antiques “bug.”

Living on an idyllic 100-acre property in Mohawk, New York, Leigh spent much of his free time with his twin brother, Leslie, combing the area around the family home to see what “treasures” the earth might offer. “We even picked up dead bees to study and categorize for our insect collection,” Leigh recalled.

In time, the siblings would receive bicycles, which they used in their search for riverbed bottle dumps and dilapidated barns, from whose boards they would pull the old hinges and hardware that formed one of their first meaningful collections. But it was at shows that the enfants terribles of the antiques business learned their best lessons, by observing the experts and even testing the waters as fledgling dealers.

“By the time we were 11 or 12, we had our own blanket we would lay out at shows to sell our joint inventory of merchandise,” Leigh recalled. “That was our part of the booth. Sometimes we paid our parents part of the booth rent, and we kept records of every purchase and sale and always issued receipts.” In the diary of transactions kept by Leigh and his brother was written the prophetic notation “We are antique dealers.”

“I can remember us pulling on our L.L. Bean boots to comb the muddy turf at Brimfield after a rain, Leigh said. During the very early hours we’d walk around with our flashlights, shining them into vehicles to look for ‘sleepers.’ On plenty of occasions that’s just what we’d find – dealers trying to get some sleep. I remember one time seeing an arm raise up from inside a vehicle and someone saying, ‘Who the heck is that?’”

Not surprisingly, Leigh developed an early interest in folk art and Americana, since those were his parents’ specialties. His favorite category was stoneware, and while still a preteen, Leigh and his brother precociously amassed a collection of the distinctive pottery, including many rare examples. The boys’ collection remained in the Keno home until it was sold – with reluctance – to pay college expenses.

Leigh earned his stripes the proper way. He graduated with a B.A. in art history from Hamilton College and went on to become a graduate fellow at Historic Deerfield and visiting scholar at Wintherthur Museum.

He later worked as the Director of American Furniture Department at Doyle Galleries in New York City, and was Vice President of Appraisals and Specialist in the American Furniture Department at Christie's New York.

In 1986, Leigh opened a gallery specializing in 18th to 20th-century American furniture and decorative arts, which he continued to operate until founding Keno Auctions in 2009.

Leigh is a popular speaker on the lecture circuit and appears regularly on the PBS Television’s Antiques Roadshow. In 2000, Leigh co-authored Hidden Treasures: Searching for Masterpieces of American Furniture, which recounts some of his most memorable furniture discoveries. Since 2001, Leigh has written monthly furniture and design columns for House Beautiful and This Old House magazines and is currently editor-at-large for Traditional Home magazine. Leigh was the co-host of Buried Treasure, a primetime television series on the Fox Network.

Even Washington has taken notice of Keno’s accomplishments. In 2005, President George W. Bush awarded Leigh the prestigious National Humanities Medal, a distinction bestowed upon individuals or groups whose work has “deepened the nation's understanding of the humanities, broadened American citizens' engagement with the humanities, or helped preserve and expand Americans' access to important resources in the humanities.” That description from the National Endowment for the Humanities might very well have been written expressly with the founder and hands-on president of Keno Auctions in mind.

Keno describes his Manhattan-based operation as “a modern auction house that knows the importance of legacy,” adding, “We are dynamic and creative, and have assembled a brilliant network of specialists involved in paintings, furniture, decorative arts and jewelry. We love luxury and inspiration, and offer all of the excitement and thrill associated with the auction process.” And as of the New Year, that excitement will include Internet live bidding through LiveAuctioneers.com.

The gallery’s next high-profile event – and the first to have an association with LiveAuctioneers – is a Jan. 17 auction of Americana, paintings and decorative arts, with an afternoon session featuring the Peter Brams Collection of Important Woodlands Indian Art.

Among the many extraordinary early American pieces in the auction is the Drake Family carved and painted joined chest attributed to the Deacon John Moore Shop (1614-1677, Windsor, Conn.) tradition. A quintessential New England production, it may sell in the vicinity of $80,000-$120,000.

Keno Auctions’ gallery is located at 127 E. 69th St., New York, NY 10021. Their contact telephone is 212-734-2381, and their e-mail address is This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Visit them online at http://www.kenoauctions.com.

To view the fully illustrated catalogs for both sessions of the Jan. 17 sale at Keno Auctions and to sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet, log on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

# # #

Session I:
View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.
Session II:
View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

 

Copyright 2011 Auction Central News International. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

Leigh Keno is one of the most immediately recognizable figures in the antiques and fine art trade. He presides at the podium at all sales conducted by Keno Auctions. Image courtesy of Keno Auctions.

The stylish entrance to Keno Auctions' Upper East Side gallery at 127 E. 69th St. in Manhattan. Image courtesy of Keno Auctions.

Keno Auctions will present the Peter Brams Collection of Important Woodlands Indian Art on Jan. 17, 2012, with Internet live bidding through LiveAuctioneers.com. Image courtesy of Keno Auctions.

Keno Auctions will present Important Americana, Paintings, Furniture and Decorative Arts on Jan. 17, 2012, with Internet live bidding through LiveAuctioneers.com. Image courtesy of Keno Auctions.

The Drake Family carved and painted joined chest with drawer, foliated vine group attributed to the Deacon John Moore (1614-1677, Windsor, Conn.) Shop tradition. Est. $80,000-$120,000. Image courtesy of Keno Auctions.

 Fancy painted and gilt card table, attributed to Homas Seymour (1771-1848) with decoration attributed to the school of John Ritto Penniman (1782-1841) probably executed by Joshua Holden, Boston, circa 1808-1812. Est. $40,000-$80,000. Image courtesy of Keno Auctions.

Prior-Hamblin school, ‘Baby in a Rocking Basket with Cherries,’ circa 1835, oil on canvas, 27 x 22 in. Est. $25,000-$35,000. Image courtesy of Keno Auctions.

Chippendale spiral and fluted and C-scrolled carved and inlaid candle stand with octagonal top, eastern New England, circa 1780. Est. $10,000-$20,000. Image courtesy of Keno Auctions.

Frederick Childe Hassam (American, 1859-1935), ‘Smelt Fishers, Cos Cob, 1902,’ signed and dated lower right ‘Childe Hassam/1902,’ pastel and charcoal over pencil on paper board, 9 5/8 x 10¾ in. Est. $30,000-$50,000. Image courtesy of Keno Auctions.

The Thompson Family Lenni Lenape Seated Human Effigy Feast Ladle, 18th century, probably first half. From the Peter Brams Collection of Important Woodland Indians Art. Est. $40,000-$60,000. Image courtesy of Keno Auctions.

Last Updated on Monday, 02 January 2012 15:16
 
<< Start < Prev 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Next > End >>

Page 15 of 25
ADVERTISEMENTS

Banner Banner