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Auction Houses in the News

Christie’s Shanghai sets up shop in landmark building

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Written by Auction House PR   
Thursday, 21 August 2014 09:00

Christie’s Shanghai is housed at the Ampire Building, built in 1907. Christie's image.

SHANGHAI – One year after its groundbreaking inaugural sale in mainland China, Christie’s announces the opening of a new home and a multipurpose art space in Shanghai’s historical Bund.

Located in the heart of the Bund, the symbol of the city, Christie’s Shanghai is housed at the Ampire Building, which was built in 1907 and has been part of the urban landscape over the past century.

Christie’s says the combination of heritage and style is a perfect match for the company. Covering an area of nearly 1,000 square meters for exhibition galleries and offices, Christie’s Shanghai will serve as a convening place for collectors and art lovers by holding exhibitions, lectures, events, private sales.

To mark the occasion, Christie’s will present its Shanghai autumn auctions on Oct. 24 featuring an evening sale of Asian and Western 20th century and contemporary art, a prestigious lifestyle sale, and the launch of a new category of Chinese contemporary design. A private selling exhibition, “The Art of The Horse,” will be the opening exhibition at Christie's Shanghai on Oct. 21 and tours to Hong Kong in November.

“As we continue to expand in China, Christie’s new art space will allow us to accommodate the many activities that we have planned for China,” said Jinqing Cai, president of Christie’s China. “Our mission is to become an integral part of the art community in China while promoting great works of art by Chinese artists and creative talents globally. The launch of our Chinese Contemporary Design category, for example, is also part of our plan to offer exciting initiatives to art lovers in China and worldwide. After being exhibited at Christie’s Paris, Hong Kong and New York, the collection will be offered at Christie’s Shanghai autumn auction.”



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

Christie’s Shanghai is housed at the Ampire Building, built in 1907. Christie's image. 

Last Updated on Thursday, 21 August 2014 09:08
 

Bonhams auctions '62 Ferrari 250 GTO for record $38.1M

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Written by Associated Press   
Friday, 15 August 2014 13:50
1962 Ferrari 250 GTO Berlinetta. Bonhams image.

CARMEL, Calif. (AP) – A rare 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO Berlinetta once owned by a famed racing driver and Olympic gold medalist has sold for $38.1 million at Bonhams' Quail Lodge Auction.

Thursday's sale at an auction in California during Monterey Car Week is believed to be a record public auction price for a classic car, topping the nearly $30 million paid for a Mercedes W196 last year in England.

The Los Angeles Times reports the $38.1 million total price – including 10 percent buyer fee – is half of what experts said it could fetch. One example reportedly sold for $52 million in a private transaction.

The car is one of just 39 Ferrari GTOs produced and was once owned by racer and retired Olympic gold medal skier Henri Oreiller, who died after crashing it into a building. The car was rebuilt by the Ferrari factory.

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Information from: Los Angeles Times, http://www.latimes.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
1962 Ferrari 250 GTO Berlinetta. Bonhams image.
Last Updated on Friday, 15 August 2014 14:02
 

Bertoia’s to auction Max Berry lifetime collection of antique toys & banks

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Written by Auction House PR   
Thursday, 14 August 2014 13:35
One of the rarest pieces in the Max N. Berry collection is a circa-1876 “Preacher at the Pulpit” mechanical bank made by the J. & E. Stevens Company of Cromwell, Connecticut. Coming to the auction marketplace with a long and distinguished line of provenance, it will be offered at auction with a $150,000-$175,000 estimate. Bertoia Auctions image. VINELAND, N.J. – Jeanne Bertoia, owner of Bertoia Auctions in Vineland, New Jersey, announced today that her company has been chosen to auction the antique toy and bank collection of distinguished Washington attorney and longtime collector/scholar Max Berry. The first in a series of two, possibly three, auctions devoted to the Berry collection will be held at Bertoia’s gallery on November 14 and 15, 2014. Over 500 antique banks, cast-iron horse-drawn toys, early American tin and cast-iron bell toys will cross the auction block, with Internet live bidding through LiveAuctioneers.

“We are thrilled that Max chose us to auction his toys. It’s such an honor for us,” said Bertoia. “Our family has been friends with Max for many years, going back to the great friendship he had with my husband, Bill [the late William S. Bertoia, co-founder of Bertoia Auctions].”

The Max Berry collection is regarded as one of the most important antique toy and bank collections in existence.

“Few collections are on par with Max’s,” Bertoia said. “In terms of rarity and historical significance, it ranks among the very best collections of the past 30 to 40 years.”

Although the lineup of toys for November’s debut sessions is still being finalized, Bertoia singled out two exciting early American rarities that definitely will be included: a circa-1875 J. & E. Stevens “Preacher at the Pulpit” mechanical bank and the only known example of an 1893 Ives cast-iron “Cutter Sleigh” with original figure.

Among the mechanical banks to be auctioned are several that collectors “might only have the chance to bid on once or twice in a lifetime,” Bertoia said.

To satisfy collectors’ curiosity until the printed catalog is available in October, Bertoia’s will be uploading images of Berry’s toys and banks to their website (www.bertoiaauctions.com) on an ongoing basis.

“We would recommend that collectors check back regularly to see what else has been added to the website, but they shouldn’t delay in ordering their catalogs once they become available,” Bertoia said. “Catalogs documenting Max Berry’s collection will be a must-have for every collector’s reference library. They could easily sell out.”

A Washington resident, Max N. Berry has practiced international trade law since 1967. He represents industries and countries throughout Europe, as well as U.S. corporations and trade associations that export various products abroad. In addition, he has been active in national and local politics, and has served on the Business and Finance Council of the National Democratic Party. He has also been significantly involved with nonprofit organizations in Washington and throughout the United States. A long-time patron of the arts, Berry has participated on the boards of many cultural organizations and recently served as the Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Smithsonian Institution. He is also on the Board of Trustees of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and has served as trustee to many other prestigious fine art institutions.

Over the years, Berry has also been an actively involved member of both the Antique Toy Collectors of America and Mechanical Bank Collectors of America, for which he has served as pro bono legal adviser.

“Max is highly respected and very well liked by his fellow collectors – he’s a superstar of the hobby. Many consider him a mentor and turn to him for advice and guidance. He’s also a fantastic storyteller who remembers every detail behind every toy purchase he ever made. When he talks about his collecting adventures, he draws you in and you feel like you were actually there, right alongside him, as he was buying this toy or that bank. We’re expecting a packed house at the preview, where collectors will be able to discuss the toys personally with Max before they are auctioned,” Bertoia said.

To contact Bertoia Auctions, call 856-692-1881 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Visit the company’s website at www.bertoiaauctions.com .

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
One of the rarest pieces in the Max N. Berry collection is a circa-1876 “Preacher at the Pulpit” mechanical bank made by the J. & E. Stevens Company of Cromwell, Connecticut. Coming to the auction marketplace with a long and distinguished line of provenance, it will be offered at auction with a $150,000-$175,000 estimate. Bertoia Auctions image.
Last Updated on Thursday, 14 August 2014 14:34
 

New report examines link between auctions and elephant poaching

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Written by Outside Media Source   
Tuesday, 12 August 2014 11:19
Image courtesy of IFAW WASHINGTON – The International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW www.ifaw.org ) today – World Elephant Day – published a new investigative report finding that the auction industry does not have the safeguards in place to protect elephants. "Although many in the industry claim not to be part of the problem driving the elephant poaching crisis, investigators found almost no data that would support this assertion," the report said.

Titled "Bidding Against Survival: The Elephant Poaching Crisis and the Role of Auctions in the U.S. Ivory Market," the report shows that only 1 of the 351 auctions investigated provided any documentation to authenticate the provenance, age, or legality of the ivory offered for sale.

Until this year, auction houses and other sellers have not been required to certify the ivory being sold," said IFAW Campaigns Officer, Peter LaFontaine."And although the vast majority of retailers may not intentionally traffic in poached ivory, there is no way to know if an ivory carving on the auction block is antique or chiselled from the tusk of an elephant recently killed by poachers."

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service data indicate that individuals and businesses in the United States import and export a significant amount of legal and illegal ivory. The legal ivory market provides a screen under which a parallel illegal trade can thrive.

"We know from U.S. government reports that thousands of illegal pieces of ivory are smuggled into the United States every year; and we also know that auction houses are selling huge amounts of ivory without documentation," added LaFontaine. "It would be naive not to consider that some of the smuggled contraband ends up on the auction block."

IFAW’s three-month investigation into the auction industry focused on data obtained from from 340 auctions hosted by 223 auctioneers and galleries.

The U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service began drafting new regulations in February which, if finalized and implemented as proposed, would require ivory sellers to prove their wares are bona-fide antiques, therefore reducing the number of elephants poached today for US buyers.

"Among the many dealers and auction sites investigated, only one made the effort to verify that its ivory was antique," said IFAW Campaigns Director Beth Allgood."Traffickers are known to smuggle large quantities of illegal ivory into the United States every year, and we welcome strong rules proposed by the Fish & Wildlife Service to stop the US role in the elephant poaching crisis and save elephants from slaughter."

Julian R. Ellison, CEO of LiveAuctioneers, read the IFAW report and said he found it "eye-opening and sobering."

"LiveAuctioneers has always had a zero-tolerance policy toward the sale of illegal ivory. The Agreement our auction-house clients sign in order to use our services clearly states that they must not offer for sale through LiveAuctioneers any product of an animal species that is protected as endangered, or threatened, under applicable national or local laws. The IFAW report leads us to believe we have not gone far enough, so we are reaching out to the IFAW and asking that they help us educate auction houses who use LiveAuctioneers. Based on prior input we've received from auctioneers, they would welcome such guidance. They have no interest in selling illegal ivory or unwittingly contributing to the extinction of an endangered species."

Bidding Against Survival is the only current report on the US ivory market that covers the auction sector. It can be viewed online at http://www.ifaw.org/sites/default/files/IFAW-Ivory-Auctions-bidding-against-survival-aug-2014_0.pdf .

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Image courtesy of IFAW
Last Updated on Tuesday, 12 August 2014 14:31
 

Sale of comic strip art earns $74,040 for Parkinson’s research

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Written by Associated Press   
Tuesday, 12 August 2014 09:28

Bill Watterson and Stephan Pastis 'Pearls Before Swine' daily comic strip original art dated 6-5-2014 (Universal Uclick, 2014).

DALLAS (AP) – Artwork from Calvin and Hobbes creator Bill Watterson's three-day return to comics has brought more than $74,000 at auction to benefit Parkinson's research.

Dallas-based Heritage Auctions says the three comic strips sold Friday for a combined $74,040 to three collectors, all of whom wish to remain anonymous. Heritage had expected the strips to sell for more than $30,000 combined.

Watterson collaborated with Pearls Before Swine cartoonist Stephan Pastis in June after a long absence from the funny pages.

The artwork was sold on behalf of Team Cul de Sac, a charity established in honor of cartoonist Richard Thompson, who has Parkinson's. Proceeds will go to the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research.

Calvin and Hobbes ended in 1995.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-08-09-14 0057GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

Bill Watterson and Stephan Pastis 'Pearls Before Swine' daily comic strip original art dated 6-5-2014 (Universal Uclick, 2014).  

Last Updated on Tuesday, 12 August 2014 09:32
 

Famed opera singer’s estate to be auctioned Aug. 29-30 in W.Va.

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Written by ACNI Staff   
Tuesday, 05 August 2014 10:33
During her decades-long career as a featured soprano, Frances Yeend performed with many of the world’s great symphonies. She is shown on this promotional poster from the New York City Opera Company. Joe R. Pyle Auction image FAIRMONT, W.Va. – Joe R. Pyle, owner of Joe R. Pyle Auctions in Shinnston, W.Va., has announced his company will auction the estate collection of the late opera singer Frances Yeend and her husband, James F. Benner. The auction is slated for Friday and Saturday, Aug. 29 and 30, at the West Virginia Country Music Hall of Fame in Fairmont, W.Va., with Internet live bidding through LiveAuctioneers.com.

Frances Yeend was a renowned soprano who performed with many of the world’s great symphonies and opera companies, including The Metropolitan Opera in New York City. While on tour, Yeend and her husband – a pianist, conductor and vocal coach – spent every free minute combing through antique shops, always returning to their Manhattan residence with a bounty of magnificent art and antiques.

In 1966, the couple retired from the stage and relocated to Morgantown, W.Va., where both joined the faculty of West Virginia University’s music department. Their home near the university campus became a showcase for their lifetime collection, which they continued to expand upon until Yeend’s passing in 2008.

“We are so honored to be selling this remarkable collection, which very easily could have gone to a major East Coast auction house. Frances and Jim were very connected to West Virginia, and it was Jim Benner’s wish that the collection be auctioned here,” said Pyle.

Auction Central News will publish a full preview of highlights from the upcoming auction in the weeks to come, with a link to the online catalog where potential bidders can sign up to leave absentee bids or participate live online during the auction through LiveAuctioneers.

For additional information about the sale, call Joe R. Pyle Auctions tollfree at 888-875-1599 or 304-592-6000. Web: www.joerpyleauctions.com

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
During her decades-long career as a featured soprano, Frances Yeend performed with many of the world’s great symphonies. She is shown on this promotional poster from the New York City Opera Company. Joe R. Pyle Auction  title=
Last Updated on Tuesday, 05 August 2014 10:51
 

‘Phantom of the Opera’ poster brings $203,150 at Heritage Auctions

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Written by Auction House PR   
Monday, 04 August 2014 09:51
Formerly from the Nicolas Cage Collection, the 1925 'The Phantom of the Opera' poster sold for $203,150. Heritage Auctions image. DALLAS – A scarce original one sheet poster for the 1925 horror classic The Phantom of the Opera – formerly from actor Nicolas Cage’s collection and one of only four known to exist – sold for $203,150 in Heritage Auctions’ Vintage Movie Posters Signature Auction July 19-20.

The $2.3-plus million auction saw strong interest in prewar movie posters as a rare Charlie Chaplin six sheet for Sunnyside, from 1919, sold for $71,700.

“It was very gratifying to watch 10 bidders vie for a chance to own The Phantom of the Opera one sheet,” said Grey Smith, director of movie posters at Heritage. “Collectors know they have to respond when rarities like this come to market and I know it will be heading to a very good home.”

A stunning and highly sought-after insert for the cinema masterpiece Casablanca – a collector favorite from 1942 – sold for $83,650. Another rare survivor from one of the world’s most critically acclaimed films, a German poster for the 1931 unnerving classic M, sold for $50,787 following interest from 18 bidders.

Collectors of classic film images disregarded the $15,000 estimate for an Italian foglio for La Dolce Vita. The gorgeous poster measuring 55 inches by 77 1/5 inches hammered for $47,800. Likewise, a rare, 1941 insert for The Wolf Man quickly cleared $47,800 against a $30,000 estimate.

A stunning Italian 2 foglio for Breakfast at Tiffany’s, depicting what many collectors consider the most fetching image of star Audrey Hepburn, sold for a strong $35,850. Another Italian 2 foglio for The Lady from Shanghai – featuring Rita Hayworth as a blonde femme fatale – sold for $31,070.

The auction’s most valuable half sheet is from the 1953 classic The War of the Worlds; the rare style B version sold for $35,850. A full-bleed, style B one sheet from The Song of Songs, the 1933 Paramount classic, ended at $28,680; and an insert from the incomparable Citizen Kane closed at $26,290. A French grande style A poster for King Kong ended at $25,095.

Additional highlights included:

  • A spectacular six sheet for the 1955 generation-defining Rebel Without a Cause: Realized: $22,705.
  • A previously unknown German magazine advertisement for the 1921 vampire classic Nosferatu: Realized: $20,912 against a $6,000 estimate.
  • A rare World War I propaganda recruitment poster “Destroy This Mad Brute”: Realized: $15,535.
  • The only known 9-foot by 20-foot billboard for Walt Disney’s Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs: Realized: $10,755.

 

 

 

 

 

Last Updated on Monday, 04 August 2014 10:12
 

Christie's to auction acclaimed Manet portrait Nov. 5

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Written by Auction House PR   
Friday, 01 August 2014 12:46
Edouard Manet (1832-1883), 'Le Printemps,' signed and dated ‘manet 1881’ (lower left), oil on canvas, 29 1/8 x 20 1/4 in. (74 x 51.5 cm.). Estimate: $25-35 million. Christie's Images Ltd. 2014. NEW YORK – Christie’s has announced the sale of a celebrated portrait by Edouard Manet as a highlight of its Impressionist and Modern Art auction on Nov 5. The  painting titled Le Printemps has an estimate of $25 million to $35 million.

The 1881 masterwork comes completely fresh to the market, having remained in the same collection for more than a century and been on loan for the last two decades at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

The proceeds from the sale of the oil painting will benefit a private American foundation supporting environmental, public health and other charitable causes.

From the mid-1860s, Manet (1832-1883) had established his reputation as the leading master of portraiture among the practitioners of “New Painting.”

Actress Jeanne Demarsy is cast as an allegory of spring, a theme artists embraced since antiquity, yet executed in the artist’s ground-breaking painterly style and in a vanguard setting.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Edouard Manet (1832-1883), 'Le Printemps,' signed and dated ‘manet 1881’ (lower left), oil on canvas, 29 1/8 x 20 1/4 in. (74 x 51.5 cm.). Estimate: $25-35 million. Christie's Images Ltd. 2014.
Last Updated on Friday, 01 August 2014 13:09
 

Morphy's acquires Vegas-based Victorian Casino Antiques

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Written by Auction House PR   
Friday, 01 August 2014 10:45

DENVER, Pa. – Dan Morphy, president and founder of Morphy Auctions in Lancaster County, Pa., today confirmed his company’s acquisition of Victorian Casino Antiques (VCA), a Las Vegas-based auction house renowned for its sales of vintage gambling/coin-op machines and antique advertising. The purchase adds the Western-states presence Morphy has long felt was essential to solidifying his firm’s reputation as a national auction house.

“We are now a coast-to-coast business,” Morphy said. “Las Vegas is California’s playground and is only a 4-hour drive from Los Angeles. It will be a convenient destination for both consignors and bidders from the West Coast.”

Victorian Casino Antiques’ long-established corporate name will be retained, with the new tagline “a Morphy Auctions company.” VCA’s current staff of 15 employees will continue in their present roles. Additional staff will be hired as the Las Vegas operation expands.

“Morphy’s is a full-service auction house. We sell everything, including fine and decorative art, furniture, antique guns and now, with opening of our newest division, classic cars. Las Vegas needs an experienced auction house that can handle all types of antiques and estate goods in addition to the specialty categories that Victorian Casino and Morphy’s share in common. We will be fulfilling a need in the local community, while at the same time serving consignors from surrounding states,” Morphy said.

Peter Sidlow, 77, has served as president of VCA since 2002 and will continue in that role. Sidlow said the sale of his company to Morphy’s has reinvigorated him.

“I will be working for Morphy’s, now, which is a top-notch organization that I’m thrilled to be part of. But instead of being involved with day-to-day operations as I was before, much of my job, now, will consist of representing the company at shows and seeking out and securing consignments,” said Sidlow. “I’ve been a collector for over 70 years, and because of the many contacts I’ve made along the way, I can bring in some great collections. I know where they are.”

Morphy praised Sidlow and his staff, describing them as “a first-class team.”

“I’ve watched Peter Sidlow for years and have had nothing but admiration for him. He has a vast knowledge in so many categories. Before purchasing Victorian Casino, he built one of the country’s premier classic car collections, for example. Also, I like the way Peter runs his sales. He has a great relationship with his employees, who are devoted to him. If ever there were an ideal merger of business models, it’s the one that brings together the teams and ideals of Morphy’s and Victorian Casino. I’m very confident the blending of our two companies will be an easy transition, because we both do business the same way.”

Morphy said his goal will be to “take Peter away from the nuts and bolts of running the back end of the business and put him on the road so he can meet with clients and talk to people at shows,” adding, “That’s how I changed my own role at Morphy’s Pennsylvania headquarters, and it made a very positive and tangible difference.”

Typically, VCA conducts three to four auctions annually, with each containing an eclectic mix of gambling and coin-op machines; antique advertising, jukeboxes, gameroom items and other novelties. These events draw large crowds of bidders to the VCA gallery, a phenomenon that defies the growing trend seen in most other parts of the country.

“Auctions have gravitated more and more toward the Internet, but we’ve continued to attract live audiences because people view Las Vegas as a destination,” said Sidlow. “They come for the auction, but they stay on to enjoy the many other things you can do in Las Vegas.” Bidders who cannot attend in person will be able to participate in all VCA/Morphy auction events by phone, absentee or online through LiveAuctioneers.

The first Victorian Casino auction jointly produced with Morphy Auctions will take place Sept. 19-21, 2014. The 1,700-lot sale will feature approximately 100 antique and vintage gambling machines from the storied collection of the late William F. Harrah (1911-1978), founder of Harrah’s Hotel and Casinos. The collection was retained by Harrah’s corporation after Bill Harrah’s death and later became the property of Caesar’s Entertainment Corporation. Many of the machines were kept in storage, while others were displayed in Caesar’s executive offices. Most recently, the collection was acquired by VCA, specifically for inclusion in the September auction.

“The Harrah collection we will be selling is relatively small, but the excitement value is very large,” said Sidlow. “The Harrah name is legendary.” Among the collection’s highlights is a 1904 Caille roulette floor machine that may fetch $150,000 to $250,000.

Morphy’s is planning a January 24-25 Coin-Op & Advertising sale at the Las Vegas gallery. The company’s first West Coast Classic Car Auction is tentatively scheduled for March of 2015, also at the Las Vegas premises. Other auctions in the immediate pipeline for the Vegas gallery will focus on antique firearms, and fine and decorative art. All will feature Internet live bidding via LiveAuctioneers.

For additional information or to discuss consigning to a future Morphy’s/Victorian Casino auction, contact Dan Morphy by calling 877-968-8880 or emailing This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ; or Peter Sidlow, 702-382-2466 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

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ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

1904 Caille roulette floor machine, mahogany with ornate repousse, nickel-plated embellishments. Provenance: the William F. Harrah collection. Morphy Auctions/Victorian Casino Antiques image 

Top view of 1904 Caille roulette floor machine, mahogany with ornate repousse, nickel-plated embellishments. Provenance: the William F. Harrah collection. Morphy Auctions/Victorian Casino Antiques image 

Last Updated on Friday, 01 August 2014 10:56
 

Heritage to sell art from Watterson-Pastis collaboration Aug. 8

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Written by Auction House PR   
Friday, 25 July 2014 16:18

Bill Watterson and Stephan Pastis 'Pearls Before Swine' daily comic strip original art dated 6-5-2014 (Universal Uclick, 2014).

DALLAS – The original artwork for the recent three comic strip collaboration between Bill Watterson, the reclusive genius behind the much-loved Calvin and Hobbes comic strip, and Pearls Before Swine cartoonist Stephen Pastis – taking place in a three-day run in June 2014 in Pearls – will be sold at Heritage Auctions on Aug. 8. Proceeds from the sale will benefit the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research.

All three comic strips are on display through Sunday at San Diego ComicCon.

“Anytime original Bill Watterson comic art shows up for auction it’s a big deal,” said Todd Hignite, vice president at Heritage Auctions. “His collaboration with Stephan Pastis was an unexpected treat for his millions of fans. Now, thanks to this auction, fans will get to take the original art home while raising money for a great cause.”

The collaboration between the two artists came at the suggestion of Watterson and was immediately embraced by an overwhelmed Pastis, who, like some many modern cartoonists, was greatly influenced by Watterson and Calvin and Hobbes. The trajectory of the three-strip arc follows Pastis’ comic strip alter-ego as he turns the drawing of the comic over to a precocious second-grader named Libby for three days. The results are both wickedly funny and uniquely Watterson, while remaining true to the sharp humor that defines the Pearls Before Swine strip.

At Watterson’s request, the artwork is being sold on behalf of Team Cul de Sac, a nonprofit charity established by editor/designer Chris Sparks on behalf of Cul de Sac cartoonist Richard Thompson, who is battling Parkinson’s Disease – a piece of artwork done by Watterson depicting one of Thompson’s Cul de Sac characters sold in 2012 as part of a charity auction to benefit Team Cul de Sac – and the profits from the sale of the original art (Heritage is waiving the seller’s fee on the artwork and will also contribute half of the buyer’s premium) will be donated to the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

Bill Watterson and Stephan Pastis 'Pearls Before Swine' daily comic strip original art dated 6-5-2014 (Universal Uclick, 2014).  

Last Updated on Friday, 25 July 2014 16:41
 

‘Phantom’ movie poster could top $150,000 at Heritage sale

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Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 15 July 2014 10:46
'The Phantom of the Opera' (Universal, 1925), one sheet (27 x 41 inches). Estimate: $80,000-$160,000. Heritage Auctions image. DALLAS – The haunting one sheet for Carl Laemmle’s 1925 epic The Phantom of The Opera, a landmark film featuring Lon Chaney’s “living skull” makeup (est. $80,000+) highlight’s Heritage Auctions’ Vintage Movie Poster Signature Auction July 19-20.

The rare poster, one of four known to exist, highlights the auction’s epic selection of one sheets, inserts, lobby cards and more, many of which were previously unknown to collectors and movie memorabilia experts.

“This auction holds a number of never-before-seen rarities from history’s finest films,” said Grey Smith, director of movie posters at Heritage. “Numerous one sheet and large format examples haven’t seen the light of day for decades and horror collectors will be very pleased to see the discoveries.”

Universal’s The Wolf Man, another monster from the golden age of horror flicks, graces a rare insert from 1941. The stunningly preserved insert shows the films’ main characters and Lon Chaney Jr. in full wolf makeup (est. $30,000+). Collector’s seeking a collection-defining piece can look no further than a half sheet for the 1932 RKO classic The Most Dangerous Game (est. $20,000+) – one of the rarest and most coveted half sheets from the 1930s horror genre.

A rare style B half sheet from Paramount’s 1953 shocker The War of the Worlds depicts the remarkable special effects made famous during the film’s harrowing Martian invasion (est. $15,000+). Another scarce, sci-fi rarity based on a novel by H.G. Wells is a rare insert for the 1936 film Things to Come by United Artists (est. $8,000+).

The auction’s rare discoveries include the iconic 1942 insert for Casablanca, Warner Brothers’ masterpiece wartime tale (est. $20,000+), as well as a remarkable 1948 Italian 2 foglio for The Lady from Shanghai (est. $20,000+).



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
'The Phantom of the Opera' (Universal, 1925), one sheet (27 x 41 inches). Estimate: $80,000-$160,000. Heritage Auctions image.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 15 July 2014 11:13
 

Sotheby's to auction property of the late Rachel Lambert Mellon

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Written by Catherine Saunders-Watson   
Tuesday, 01 July 2014 08:24
Paul Mellon and Rachel Lambert Mellon. Image provided by Sotheby's

NEW YORK - Bill Ruprecht, Sotheby's President, Chairman and CEO, today announced that Sotheby's will offer exceptional fine art, jewelry, furniture and decoration from the collection of Rachel Lambert Mellon, who died earlier this year at the age of 103. The collection, which was acquired over a lifetime, is drawn from the Mellons' residences in the United States and abroad.

The more than 2,000 individual items together have an estimated value in excess of $100 million.

Proceeds from the sales will benefit The Gerard B. Lambert Foundation, a charitable entity established by Mrs. Mellon in memory of her father. The Foundation supports horticultural and educational endeavors.

Bill Ruprecht commented: "Sotheby's is immensely honored to offer collectors a rare glimpse into the life of Mrs. Mellon, whose personal collections reflect the taste and style for which she was long admired."

Mrs. Mellon's collection will join those in a long line of iconic American women whose estates have been presented by Sotheby's, including that of her close friend Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.

About Mrs. Paul Mellon:

Rachel Lambert Mellon (1910-2014) was a renowned horticulturist and collector, whose marriage to Paul Mellon in 1948, the only son of financier Andrew Mellon, united two of America’s most affluent families. Throughout her life, she pursued a love of gardening, both at her own homes as well for a number of friends, including Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, who asked her to redesign the White House Rose Garden in 1961. The Oak Spring Garden Library, Mrs. Mellon’s celebrated collection of rare books, manuscripts, works of art and artifacts relating to gardening, landscape design, horticulture, botany, natural history and travels, is world-renowned and among the finest of its kind.

Passionate about art, Mr. and Mrs. Mellon built an extraordinary collection, while generously supporting the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. and establishing the Yale Center for British Art. Equally ardent about horses, the couple bred and raised race horses, including the 1993 Kentucky Derby winner, Sea Hero.

Visit Sotheby's online at www.sothebys.com.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Paul Mellon and Rachel Lambert Mellon. Image provided by Sotheby's
Last Updated on Tuesday, 01 July 2014 09:12
 

1942 Oscar sells for $79,200 at Rhode Island auction

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Written by Associated Press   
Wednesday, 25 June 2014 09:43
Joseph C. Wright also won an Oscar for the 1942 wartime film 'This Above All.' Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com archive. EAST GREENWICH, R.I. (AP) – A rare auction of an Oscar statuette brought a total of $79,200, well more than expected, at its sale Monday by a Rhode Island auction house.

Nanci Thompson of Briarbrook Auctions said the total included a 20 percent buyer's premium for the 1942 Oscar. She declined to disclose the name of the buyer, but said “you would recognize the name.”

The auctioneer had estimated the golden statuette would sell for $5,000 to $30,000.

The statue was awarded to Joseph C. Wright at the 15th Academy Awards for color art direction for his work on My Gal Sal, starring Rita Hayworth and Victor Mature.

Prior to the auction, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences was investigating the sale of the statuette. Since 1950, the academy has prohibited Oscar recipients and their heirs from selling the statues without first offering them back to the academy for $1. But the auction house said the restriction does not apply because the Oscar was awarded before 1950.

Wright died in 1985, and his nephew inherited the statue. It weighs around 6 pounds and is 13 inches high. The auctioneer said it is in good condition, with just a little wear at the back.

Wright received 12 Academy Award nominations and won twice, both in 1942 and both shared with Richard Day. The other award was for black-and-white art direction for This Above All, starring Tyrone Power and Joan Fontaine.

Wright also was nominated for his work on movies including Days of Wine and Roses, Guys and Dolls and the Man With the Golden Arm.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Joseph C. Wright also won an Oscar for the 1942 wartime film 'This Above All.' Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com archive.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 25 June 2014 10:11
 

Helen Beling sculptures selling at Gray’s Auctioneers

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Written by Auction House PR   
Wednesday, 18 June 2014 15:15
'Remember some of the greatest geniuses in any field have broken all the rules to achieve their vision. But breaking rules isn’t what made them geniuses.' – Helen Beling. Gray's Auctioneers LLC image. CLEVELAND – The artist Helen Beling (New York, 1914-2001) was once prolific on the art scene, working with sculptors such as Jacques Lipchitz, exhibiting at the Metropolitan and Whitney museums in New York, and finding home for her works in some of the most established collections in the country. She worked in a variety of media including clay, stone, bronze, stainless steel and a material she called Belplast, revolutionizing the medium with her forms and process.

“Remember some of the greatest geniuses in any field have broken all the rules to achieve their vision. But breaking rules isn’t what made them geniuses.” – Helen Beling

However, after her death, her works went into storage and without a champion to her name, her fame faded and her works all disappeared into the collections of private owners.

This past year has seen a resurgence in the Beling name, with the recent “rediscovery” of her works by The Gallery at Gray’s. The gallery, which is now working closely with the Beling family, represents the estate of the artist and is working vigorously to introduce her works to the 21st century art collector.

This year works by Beling were featured in the 17th edition of the ArtPalmBeach fair in West Palm Beach where there were several successful private sales. She also made her first appearance at auction in two years this past month. Beling’s Business is Bad, a bronze from her early career, sold for $6,000 (including’s buyer’s premium) at Gray’s Auctioneers in Cleveland.

Gray’s Auctioneers will host the next auction of Beling’s work this fall, featuring a group of large to life-size works that were recently found by the Beling family in the artist’s storage unit in upstate New York.

For more information on the artist, sales and upcoming auctions, contact Kate Stamm, gallery director, The Gallery at Gray’s, by email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or by phone: 216-226-3300.



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE
'Remember some of the greatest geniuses in any field have broken all the rules to achieve their vision. But breaking rules isn’t what made them geniuses.' – Helen Beling. Gray's Auctioneers LLC image. 'Enigma,' bronze and wood, edition of 20, 10.5 inches x 8 inches x 5 inches. Gray's Auctioneers LLC image. 'Seated Man,' bronze, edition of 20, 11 inches x 7 inches x 6 inches. Gray's Auctioneers LLC image.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 18 June 2014 15:46
 

Buffalo Bill's gun, necklace, fetch $81K at Heritage Auctions

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Written by Associated Press   
Wednesday, 18 June 2014 09:00
This necklace was given to 'Buffalo Bill' Cody by Chief Sitting Bull. It sold for $40,625 Saturday in Dallas. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions. DALLAS (AP) – A necklace made from the claws of a grizzly bear and a Colt .45 six-shooter once owned by Western scout and showman “Buffalo Bill” Cody sold at auction in Dallas for more than $40,000 each.

Heritage Auctions says both sold Saturday for the same sale price: $40,625.

The Dallas-based auction house sold the two pieces during its “Legends of the West Signature Auction,” which featured nearly 400 collectible items including guns, photos, badges and books.

Heritage spokesman Tom Slater says Sioux warrior chief Sitting Bull gave Cody the grizzly bear-claw necklace.

Slater says Cody bought the 1873 Frontier revolver from the New York City firearms dealer Hartley & Graham in January 1883.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
This necklace was given to 'Buffalo Bill' Cody by Chief Sitting Bull. It sold for $40,625 Saturday in Dallas. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 18 June 2014 09:15
 

Historic Va. estate to be sold at auction

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Written by Associated Press   
Friday, 13 June 2014 09:25
The estate manor at Four Mile Tree, circa 1940. Historic American Buildings Survey image,  courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

SPRING GROVE, Va. (AP) – A historic estate in Surry County is going on the auction block.

The 309-acre Four Mile Tree is scheduled to be sold at auction on June 26. The estate's manor home and a caretaker's cottage are both on the National Register of Historic Places.

Bill Londrey with auction company Tranzon Fox tells the Richmond Times-Dispatch that the highest bid is subject to approval of the estate.

The property was claimed in a 1625 land grant. The manor home was built around 1745.

Information from: Richmond Times-Dispatch, ttp://www.timesdispatch.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
The estate manor at Four Mile Tree, circa 1940. Historic American Buildings Survey image,  courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
Last Updated on Friday, 13 June 2014 09:31
 
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