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Art in the News

Geologist finds site of idyllic 1833 Jacob Eichholtz painting

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Written by AD CRABLE, LNP   
Thursday, 20 November 2014 11:00
Pennsylvania artist Jacob Eichholtz (1776-1842) painted this scene of the Conestoga River with Lancaster in the background in 1833. Courtesy of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts LANCASTER, Pa. (AP) – In 1833, well-known early American painter Jacob Eichholtz finished an idyllic scene of an oxbow bend in Conestoga Creek with the many-steepled outline of Lancaster city in the distance.

It was a reminder of home for the artist's eldest daughter, who had recently moved to Philadelphia.

Last week, East Petersburg resident Jay Parrish stood at the head of a ravine in a nook of woods just off the fairway of the fourth hole on the course of the Meadia Heights Golf Club.

The mother in her plump day dress was no longer there holding one arm of her gesturing daughter. The stone house that once stood on the creek bank is now a flattened green. Two men are no longer admiring the view from the jagged limestone rocks, which now have been filled in by soil and sport two sand traps off to their side.

Trees block a lot of the Lancaster skyline now. But the luminescent white steeple of Trinity Lutheran Church is just visible through a sycamore tree, just as it was in the autumn scene that Eichholtz painted.

“This is it,” says Parrish, former Pennsylvania state geologist, with an unmistakable air of satisfaction.

This is where the artist, known throughout much of the early republic for his portraits, stood with his easel 181 years ago, putting the finishing touches on his sweeping painting. He had waited until a killing frost had dropped the leaves and Eichholtz could get distant objects right.

How did Parrish know where the painter stood?

It wasn't easy and Parrish had to play detective, piecing together clues taken from the modern marvels of radar topography and digital visualization, along with gumshoe sleuth methods of hoofing it to knolls and looking for himself.

Solving the artistic mystery began 11 years ago when Thomas R. Ryan, president and CEO of LancasterHistory.org, was curating an exhibit of Eichholtz's collected works at three locations in Lancaster.

Parrish, who was friends with Ryan's wife, saw the 1833 painting and heard Ryan mention that no one knew where the artist had set up.

Parrish, who was working for the state Bureau of Topographic and Geologic Survey, ventured that he thought he could figure it out.

First, Parrish and Ryan deduced from the church spires, Furnace Hills in the background and bend in Conestoga Creek (now river) that the spot was somewhere south of the city.

Then, using radar imagery of topography, the two looked at 3D views on a computer and selected three possible sites.

Parrish drew lines directly north from each of the candidate sites to one of the church steeples in the painting. Digital visualization, confirmed by on-site visits, ruled out two of the sites because the views did not match that of the painting.

That led Parrish and Ryan to a knoll and ravine just south of a peninsula that now holds part of Greenwood Cemetery. It may once have been known as Kreider's Hill.

“It was an extraordinary moment,” says Ryan, who did his doctorate thesis on Eichholtz.

The river peninsula is still mostly farmed, just as it was in Eichholtz's time.

They also found the distinguished rock outcropping in the painting, though the rocks have been much filled in over time. “Back in the 1800s, everything was clear-cut for firewood and there was a lot of erosion,” Parrish explains.

Parrish found the little stone cottage in the center foreground of the painting on the 1864 Atlas of Lancaster County. At the time, it was known as the Elias Herr homestead.

“It all matched up beautifully,” recalled Parrish, who is now a Geographic Information Systems and geospatial data consultant. “Lancaster painters were pretty accurate about what they saw and you could rely on them for the view.”

Parrish does say the artist took some liberties with the Furnace Hills in the distance but notes that Eichholtz did not have the aid of binoculars at the time.

He believes the scene now isn't quite as grand as Eichholtz made it seem on canvas. But he finds it ironic that after the passage of 181 years it's the growth of trees, rather than development, that have altered what the artist saw.

“I felt pretty good that I had found the exact spot where he was standing when he did it,” Parrish says.

So good, in fact, that three years later, he made a presentation to the Geological Society of America, using the Eichholtz connection as an example of the practical uses of digital visualization.

___

Online:

http://bit.ly/1A9n5Uq

___

Information from: LNP, http://lancasteronline.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-11-18-14 1819GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Pennsylvania artist Jacob Eichholtz (1776-1842) painted this scene of the Conestoga River with Lancaster in the background in 1833. Courtesy of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts
Last Updated on Thursday, 20 November 2014 11:05
 

Never a fan of heights, Paris rejects Triangle skyscraper

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Written by STEPHANIE LEROUGE   
Monday, 17 November 2014 16:06
The present Paris skyline with the Tour Montparnasse, as seen from the Arc de Triomphe. Image by Ввласенко. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license. PARIS (AFP) – Wary of a public that has never really forgiven them for blighting their view with a skyscraper 40 years ago, Paris authorities narrowly rejected plans for a 43-story triangular-shaped building on Monday.

The 180-meter (590-foot) Tour Triangle was supposed to go up in the southwestern corner of the city by 2017, but local lawmakers blocked the proposal by an 83-78 vote in heated scenes at City Hall.

Mayor Anne Hidalgo said she would launch a legal appeal against the vote, accusing councilors of displaying their voting cards in what was supposed to be a secret ballot.

"The law has not been respected," she said.

Her deputy in charge of urban architecture, Jean-Louis Missika, said either the votes that were displayed publicly would be declared void, or the entire vote would have to be redone.

The Triangle tower project was supposed to create 5,000 jobs with construction costs put at 535 million euros ($670 million) in 2011.

But many lawmakers will have been thinking of the scorn that is still directed toward the Tour Montparnasse – a brown carbuncle opened in 1973 that remains the only skyscraper in the city center and has made it all but impossible for developers to win approval for future high-rises.

Paris imposed a height limit of 37 meters in the wake of the uproar over the 210-meter tower in Montparnasse – which was accused of ruining both the view and a once-beloved artist district.

City developers later struck a compromise with critics by quarantining high-rise buildings in the La Defense business sector just outside the center.

But the rules changed in 2010 when the city decided to allow apartment blocks up to 50 meters and offices up to 180 meters in areas near the ring road.

In July 2013, it gave initial approval to the Tour Triangle in the Parc des Expositions. Environmentalists and aesthetes were immediately up in arms.

They had formidable support, including from Norman Foster, the celebrated British architect behind several skyscrapers including London's "Gherkin."

"I don't see what Paris needs with a skyscraper," he said at the time.

The UN's cultural body UNESCO also waded in, warning that new towers would threaten the landscape of "one of the few remaining horizontal cities."

The prestigious Swiss team behind the project, Herzog and De Meuron, rejected the criticism, saying the Triangle was "beautiful."

Mayor Hidalgo backed the scheme despite polls showing a majority of Parisians opposed it.

Her deputy, Missika, called it one of the "future centers of Greater Paris" and a dynamic symbol of its ability to revitalize itself.

"It's not a tower, it's a pyramidal monument," he said.

But Michel Carmona, an expert in the Haussmann style in which Paris was designed in the 1800s, said that such sudden breaks with the past were "a

taboo" for Parisians.

"The unity of the Paris landscape is the envy of the world. It's a test of talent for an architect to work within the Parisian template without breaking it," he told AFP. "Will the Tour Triangle attract foreigners? Not a chance."



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
The present Paris skyline with the Tour Montparnasse, as seen from the Arc de Triomphe. Image by Ввласенко. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license.
Last Updated on Monday, 17 November 2014 17:56
 

One World Trade Center fills hole in Manhattan skyline

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Written by BRIGITTE DUSSEAU   
Monday, 17 November 2014 11:04
One World Trade Center viewed from the Hudson River. Image by Joe Mabel. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic license. NEW YORK (AFP) – The jewel of the New York skyline, the pride of a whole nation, is back.

The opening of One World Trade Center, on the site of the Twin Towers that were destroyed on Sept. 11, 2001, signals a long-awaited return to normal in the Big Apple.

Since Nov. 3, with little fanfare, some 500 employees of the media group Conde Nast moved in. They are due to be joined by another 3,000 in early 2015.

There are also support staff on site – brought into sharp relief this week by the spectacular rescue of two window washers suspended from the 69th floor.

The symbolic 1,776-foot (541-meter) tower – including its antenna – is the tallest in the United States and in the Western hemisphere.

Its tapered glass silhouette overlooks the Sept. 11 Memorial, dedicated to the 2,753 victims of the New York attacks, along with six victims of a first attack on the Twin Towers in 1993, and sits next to the museum focused on the drama.

The $3.9 billion, 104-story tower "is the most secure office building any place in the world," said Patrick Foye, executive director of the Port Authority of N.Y. and N.J., which owns the site.

The monumental lobby, with soaring ceilings some 47 feet high and white marble throughout, is protected by a special wall that can withstand explosions.

Its concrete foundation is 185 feet tall. A staircase is dedicated to emergency responders, and concrete protects the elevators and stairways. The communications system was designed in collaboration with police, the FBI, the Department of Homeland Security as well as private experts, Foye said.

 

360-degree vistas

 

From high up in the tower, the 360-degree view offers glimpses of the Statue of Liberty to the south and the Empire State Building and Central Park to the north.

For Big Apple visitors looking to orient themselves within Manhattan, One World Trade Center is a clear landmark at the southern end of the urban island.

For New Yorkers, it's a long-awaited sign of the determination to rebuild, slowed for years by political negotiations over just what should be done on "Ground Zero," and then by a hurting economy.

Initially dubbed "Freedom Tower," before its name was changed in 2009, One World Trade Center finally broke ground in 2006. Construction was completed at the end of 2013.

Some 65 percent of the space has already been rented out, Foye said during a visit to the 61st floor, rejecting the idea that some were afraid to move there because of the site's history.

Among the new tenants – aside from Conde Nast, which will occupy floors 20 to 44 – are online gamemaker Hi5, publicity group Kids Creative and the China Center, which fosters cultural exchanges between the United States and China.

In all, about 5,000 people will be working in the new tower. And by next spring, the observatory, on the 100th, 101st and 102nd floors, will open to the public, with entry fees set at $32.

 

Return to normal

 

The opening of the new tower "represents a return to normalcy down here," Foye said, emphasizing that the people will be working there, eating in the nearby restaurants, using the subway stop that should be ready early next year, and shopping in the hundreds of thousands of square feet of shops that continue to open.

When the Twin Towers still stood, the neighborhood was mainly used as offices, and was nearly deserted by evening. But thanks to new residential construction, the population of lower Manhattan has tripled, from 20,000 to 60,000.

"This is a sign of the revitalization of downtown New York city," said Foye, of "the city and state and region and nation's response to 9/11."

The memorial and museum "will for ever commemorate what happened here," and the nearly 3,000 people who died, he said.

"We will never forget that, but I think that we want to do now is to look forward, and the site is a site of progress."



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
One World Trade Center viewed from the Hudson River. Image by Joe Mabel. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic license.
Last Updated on Monday, 17 November 2014 11:19
 

Iowa micro-home builder hopes to find niche in marketplace

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Written by MIKE KILEN, The Des Moines Register   
Tuesday, 11 November 2014 11:27

For something a bit bigger and more substantial, there's a modernist Z Glass house clad in hot-rolled steel or corrugated metal, made by market leader Tumbleweed Tiny House. Its interior is lined in pine plywood. Image courtesy of Tumbleweed Tiny House.

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) – Sean Spain is selling a house for $10,500, about the price of a used car with a sleepable back seat.

Granted, it's 100 square feet. But the home is a charming little rebuttal to America's obsession with big living. The average home square footage in the U.S. continues to climb – 1,525 square feet in 1973 to 2,598 last year – while an underground trend toward “micro” living has emerged, The Des Moines Register reported.

Most people's master baths are bigger than Spain's cottage. It sits on an old trailer and is made of reclaimed materials and features a living room, kitchen and sleeping loft all in one room and a tiny toilet closet.

Iowans were at the forefront of the tiny-house trend a dozen years ago, but it has taken off in coastal states, Colorado and among the popular press. Just how many tiny houses of fewer than 300 square feet exist is not known because they're often out of view on private land or rolled into recreational vehicle parks, too small to meet city zoning and building code requirements.

The small homes hit at a philosophy, which often sounds good on paper but more difficult in reality: Let's get rid of all this stuff and live simply. The young want them for affordability, the empty nesters because they are tired of tending to large homes filled with rooms they never go in. Others want them because the Earth is warming and the environment matters to them.

Or maybe they just always wanted a fort.

“I have friends in Colorado who told me there is a huge market for these out there,” said Spain, who works in construction.

So at age 52, with his kids grown, he decided it was time to pursue a passion, assembling a work of rustic art making little abodes from materials gathered at auctions, farm yards and garage sales.

Let's take a home tour. You can stand in one place.

It starts with the trailer, which costs 50 bucks to pull off a farmer's property. Spain wanted to build the home on a mobile platform, so its 2,900 pounds could be pulled anywhere by a sturdy truck. It currently sits by the Raccoon River on his son's property in West Des Moines' Commerce neighborhood.

Its mobility serves a larger purpose. Most cities, including Des Moines, have a building code requirement that adheres to international codes for a dwelling, requiring at least one room with 120 square feet and other rooms not less than 70 square feet. If it's mobile you don't need a building permit. Although West Des Moines has no minimum square footage requirements, there are lot-size requirements and zoning regulations that could prohibit it.

Spain envisions a country acreage owner who wants a temporary cabin or getaway as his primary customer, although in some states the tiny homes are serving as year-round residences.

The roof and windows are new to prevent leaks. It's insulated, and a steel beam structure makes it lightweight so it can be pulled easier. Most of the rest is made of used material that Spain hunted down. The exterior is former cedar deck and tin from an old barn, as is a small front deck on hinges that can be plopped down to enjoy the day or pulled up for transport. A headlight from an antique car lights the entrance and a tractor fender serves as an entry overhang.

Inside the front door made of reclaimed wood and an antique knob from a house in Des Moines, is a warm little room with a vaulted ceiling. The walls are quarter-inch cedar and the cabinets for storage are made of old barn wood. A bench seat with a cushion is what you have to sit on.

There is a counter with a sink along the “far” wall, a space for a tiny propane stove and cubby for a compact refrigerator. On the opposite wall, a custom-made furniture stand can serve as place for electronics or eating or anything you don't have place for, which may be a bit of everything.

A ladder leads to a loft with just enough clearance to sit up in bed and fit two snugly.

A room smaller than a closet fits the toilet and your legs. Hookups for septic and a breaker box allow you to be on the grid, while a wall-mounted propane heater supplies heat. With today's compact entertainment options, if you have a tablet you have an entertainment center and a library.

That's it. 14 feet by 7 feet.

“Some people can live in here,” said Spain, who lives in Johnston. “My tools alone wouldn't fit.”

The Small House Society was launched in Iowa City. Jay Shafer, a former university art professor, built a 130-square foot home in Iowa City and word got around. By 2002, he joined Greg Johnson and others to form the Small House Society (www.smallhousesociety.net) that fosters the development of smaller, sustainable living spaces.

“There are quite a few in Iowa City,” said Johnson, who works in the University of Iowa's IT department. “Part of the challenge is to track how popular it is. They are not building these publicly because they are concerned about zoning. But when you put it on wheels it becomes more like an RV and falls under more lenient categories of regulations.”

Some tiny homes are becoming extravagant, well-appointed cottages with French doors and fireplaces.

Johnson lived in what was essentially a sleeping cabin, 10 feet by 7 feet, from 2003 to 2009. “I'd wake up in the morning and go to the gym to take a shower.”

He said people are waking up to the low cost of ownership and upkeep on a tiny house. He's also talked to plenty of folks who tried to sell a 4,000-square-foot house that sat on the market for two years while smaller homes sold in days.

The micro trend also comes out of fear that the climate is changing and huge investments in a home can be wiped out by volatile weather, he said, or are an answer to affordable housing shortages for the poor.

While Shafer moved to California and owns a company that builds tiny homes, Johnson has stayed in Iowa City, although in a little larger home, because “at some point in life it isn't practical to live in something the size of a garden shed.”

In fact, some tiny homes are converted garden sheds. The standard building cost of $150 per square foot can be reduced by using old materials or turning a shed into a little home.

“I build anything from an 8 by 8 to a 14 by 24,” said Shawn Van Wyk of Van Wyk Wood Builders in Grinnell, Iowa, which sells storage sheds and little cabins. “They have a front porch on one end. Some will have a loft and others without. They use them for a vacation cabin or others will live in them.”

Spain doesn't want his homes to look like sheds or a camper. It's about the creative process, building custom furniture and now homes that inspire him.

“I've gone back to the stuff I love,” he said.

That's no small thing.

Sean Spain is starting to build another tiny house, which will include a shower, and has ideas for others. If you're interested, contact him at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

To see more small homes, lists of manufacturers and other tips, go to smallhousesociety.net

___

Information from: The Des Moines Register, http://www.desmoinesregister.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-11-08-14 1602GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

For something a bit bigger and more substantial, there's a modernist Z Glass house clad in hot-rolled steel or corrugated metal, made by market leader Tumbleweed Tiny House. Its interior is lined in pine plywood. Image courtesy of Tumbleweed Tiny House.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 11 November 2014 17:03
 

Repairs to Indianapolis monument to take months

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Written by Associated Press   
Monday, 10 November 2014 11:02
Early 1900s postcard view published by the Detroit Photographic Company of the Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument in downtown Indianapolis. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. INDIANAPOLIS (AP) – Repairs to the Soldiers and Sailors Monument in downtown Indianapolis are going to take months longer to complete than first thought, an official said.

Crews erected scaffolding along the lower levels of two sides of the 112-year-old tower late week. They planned to repair leaks in the limestone and the monument's bronze figures by late November, but the damage was more extensive than first thought, Indiana War Memorial Commission director Stewart Goodwin told WISH-TV.

“It's something that does have a safety consideration,” he said. “Something could fall off of there – a piece of bronze or piece of stone.”

Goodwin said electrical workers will still be able to string thousands of lights on the monument for the city's annual Circle of Lights festivities for the Christmas season that starts Nov. 28.

At least some scaffolding is expected to remain up through the Christmas season, since it cost $50,000 to construct the sections now in place. Goodwin said contractors will put more scaffolding up after Christmas around all four sides of the monument to look for additional damage.

“Right now, we're in the investigative mode and we're trying to solve what needs to be done and how we're going to take care of that,” he said. “So there's no way to know for a few months how much fixing the monument will cost.”

The observation deck of the 284-foot-tall tower and its gift shop were closed once crews started putting up scaffolding on Oct. 27.

Numerous repairs have been made to the monument in recent years, most notably in 2011, when the 38-foot-tall bronze sculpture named Victory atop the tower was taken down for about five months of restoration work.

The tower was completed in 1902 as a monument to Indiana's military veterans, including more than 200,000 who served in Union forces during the Civil War.

Goodwin said the new goal is to have the monument repairs finished before next May's Indy 500 activities start.

“It's the kind of thing where you think you've got a home project that you can do on one Saturday afternoon and three weekends later you're still working on it,” he said.

___

Information from: WISH-TV, http://www.wishtv.com/

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-11-07-14 1848GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE
Early 1900s postcard view published by the Detroit Photographic Company of the Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument in downtown Indianapolis. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
Last Updated on Monday, 10 November 2014 11:43
 

Indianapolis museum exhibits celebrate American Modernism

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Written by Museum PR   
Friday, 07 November 2014 11:22
Man Ray (American, 1890–1976), 'Mime,' 1926, pochoir, Indianapolis Museum of Art, Emma Harter Sweetser Fund, 75.733.1. © Man Ray Trust / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY / ADAGP, Paris 2014 INDIANAPOLIS – From the colorful pochoirs of Man Ray to the iconic flowers of Georgia O’Keeffe, the Indianapolis Museum of Art is celebrating American Modernism this fall with three new exhibitions reflecting the styles, influences and artists of this 20th century avant-garde movement.

For a more personal look at the movement, visitors can explore the unconventional art collection of an Indiana native in “The Onya La Tour Collection: Modernism in Indiana” in the IMA Alliance Gallery. The free exhibition showcases 30 works acquired by Onya La Tour, a Hoosier who befriended many artists while working for the Works Progress Administration in New York in the 1930s. When La Tour moved back to Indiana in 1940, she transformed her Brown County farmhouse into the Indiana Museum for Modern Art and opened her collection to the public. In 1972, she donated many of these works to the IMA. This exhibition, on view through April 12, is the first time these paintings, drawings and prints have been brought together in a single show since their days in Brown County.

“The Rise of American Modernism,” in the Susan and Charles Golden Gallery, highlights the impact that European modernists had on their American counterparts. Featuring 29 prints, drawings, watercolors and photographs from the IMA’s permanent collection, the exhibition showcases the work of American and European modernists such as Alfred Stieglitz, Man Ray, Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Paul Cézanne, Milton Avery and Katherine Dreier. The exhibition offers a rare opportunity to view works that are not often on view at the museum due to their sensitivity to light. “The Rise of American Modernism” will be on view through July 26.

The IMA’s feature exhibition this fall, “Georgia O’Keeffe and the Southwestern Still Life,” opened Nov. 2 in the Allen Whitehill Clowes Special Exhibition Gallery. Organized by Joseph S. Czestochowski and produced by International Arts®, the exhibit includes more than 50 works by Georgia O’Keeffe and her contemporaries – artists who were inspired by the dynamic culture, unique landscapes and natural beauty of the American Southwest. “Georgia O’Keeffe and the Southwestern Still Life” is curated by Dr. Charles C. Eldredge and features works drawn from numerous museums and private collections across the country. A highlight of the show will be the IMA’s great masterpiece by O’Keeffe, Jimson Weed (1936). Tickets are $20 for adults (Fri.-Sun.), $15 adults (Tue.-Thu.), $12 students and children 7-17, and free for children 6 and under. The exhibition is free for members.

For more information visit www.imamuseum.org .



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE
Man Ray (American, 1890–1976), 'Mime,' 1926, pochoir, Indianapolis Museum of Art, Emma Harter Sweetser Fund, 75.733.1. © Man Ray Trust / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY / ADAGP, Paris 2014 John Marin (American, 1870–1953), 'Brooklyn Bridge, No. 6 (Swaying),' 1913, etching on ivory woven paper, 13-3/4 x 10-7/8 in. Indianapolis Museum of Art, Gift of Joan and Walter Wolf, 2008.799. © Estate of John Marin / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Last Updated on Friday, 07 November 2014 11:53
 

Miami’s priciest pad: here’s what you get for $65M

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Written by Outside Media Source   
Thursday, 06 November 2014 11:01
Miami's most expensive property, La Brisa, is located in Coconut Grove and is listed at $65 million. Image provided by toptenrealestatedeals.com MIAMI – Coconut Grove, just minutes from downtown Miami, was first inhabited in 1825 when the lighthouse on Key Biscayne began operating. A small village at the edge of Biscayne Bay, it developed slowly until 1886 when Charles and Isabella Peacock settled there and opened Bay View House, which later was renamed the Peacock Inn. Now with accommodations for visitors, “The Grove,” as locals call it, began to draw many interesting visitors, like scientists, artists, authors and even royalty, for the warm climate and bay location. Eventually, wealthy northerners arrived and built their winter mansions on the water’s edge in the midst of lush hammocks of live oaks and tropical vegetation, which still exist today. Notables who built their winter or permanent homes in The Grove include James and William Deering (John Deere), William Jennings Bryan (Secretary of State), Marjorie Stoneman Douglas (author and environmentalist) and Sepy Dobronyi (sculptor).

In the 1950s, Coconut Grove turned into an art colony when artists flocked there to paint its natural beauty. It began to take on a bohemian atmosphere, which, even today with all of its quaint shops and sidewalk cafes, still lies just below the surface. Treasured by the residents for the annual Coconut Grove Arts Festival, the Great Grove Bed Race and King Mango Strut, or just sitting on a bench at Dinner Key enjoying the sailboats, Coconut Grove has a colorful history and a no less colorful presence today. Newer residents include Sylvester Stallone and Madonna.

Now with luxury Florida condominiums overlooking Dinner Key Marina where elegant old Florida mansions used to stand, South Grove homes and mansions are still surrounded in privacy by manicured jungle and original coral rock walls. One of the most famous and historic bayfront residences is now for sale.

La Brisa (Spanish for “The Breeze”) is on a very rare 6.9-acre tract of waterfront land that has never been subdivided since it was created in 1886. La Brisa was built in the 1920s, owned over the years by Kirk Munroe, an author of children’s novels and books about Florida, and Henry Field, a grandnephew of the founder of the Chicago Marshall Field’s Department Store chain. It was the home where Howard Hughes recuperated after his 1946 California plane crash.

Just blocks to Dinner Key, La Brisa is only steps from restaurants and shops, though total privacy is ensured by the tall coral rock wall, wrought iron entry gates and winding road leading to the home. With 207 feet of waterfront on Biscayne Bay, the home is built atop an ancient coral reef approximately 23 feet above sea level. The home has been extensively restored with views of Biscayne Bay and the Atlantic across an expanse of well-manicured lawn stretching toward the mangrove-lined waterfront. Accessible by an elevated walkway leading to an octagonal viewing deck over the bay, a protected 536-foot long canal borders the northern side of the property and leads to a comfortable private port constructed by the current owner. The port accommodates a 70-foot yacht and offers direct ocean access.

The interior of the home measures 13,803 square feet with nine bedrooms and eleven baths. There are many balconies and covered porches encompassing an additional 3,338 square feet of year-round outdoor living space. All rooms are large and airy with some of the original beams, large fireplace and large eat-in kitchen, library, sauna and swimming pool and formal rooms, completely restored and updated. The Mediterranean-style home retains its original details of arched doors and windows, intricate keystones, and wrought iron. Gardens planted in Canary date palms, royal palms, royal poincianas, mahogany, oak and gumbo limbo trees, most of which are older than the house itself. There is also a rare spring-fed pond surrounded by tropical foliage.

La Brisa in historic Coconut Grove, home to artists, scientists, authors, celebrities and an astronaut, is now offered for sale at $65 million.

Read more at www.toptenrealestatedeals.com

# # #



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Miami's most expensive property, La Brisa, is located in Coconut Grove and is listed at $65 million. Image provided by toptenrealestatedeals.com
Last Updated on Thursday, 06 November 2014 11:25
 

Hunk of steel falls off new London skyscraper

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Written by AFP wire service   
Thursday, 06 November 2014 11:00
The Leadenhall Building, or 'The Cheesegrater,' (122 Leadenhall St.) and, to the right, 'The Gherkin' (30 St. Mary Axe). Image by Colin. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license. LONDON (AFP) – An area around one of London's tallest buildings was cordoned off on Thursday after a hand-sized part of a steel bolt from the skyscraper's frame broke off and plunged to the ground.

No one was hurt and the owners of the 224-meter-high Leadenhall Building in London, said there is no risk to its structural integrity.

But tests are being carried out on an estimated 3,000 steel bolts on the "megaframe" of the building, which is known as the "Cheesegrater" because of its shape.

Two of the bolts – each about the size of a human arm – broke, one on the 19th floor and another on the fifth floor, according to a spokeswoman for British Land.

Part of the lower bolt – a piece of metal about the size of a hand – fell onto the ground, into a construction area that is not currently open to the public.

Many offices are occupied in the building, although the structure has not been completed.

"Visual checks have been carried on all the bolts and we are carrying out other tests" similar to ultrasound tests to determine the soundness of the structure, the spokeswoman told AFP.

British Land revealed the problem in a statement to the London Stock Exchange on Wednesday, which insisted: "There is no risk to the structural integrity of the building."

It is not the first time London's new skyscrapers have hit the headlines for the wrong reasons.

Last year, several drivers parked near a tower at 20 Fenchurch St. complained that the sun rays reflected from the building had melted parts of their cars.

The building has been nicknamed the Walkie Talkie but was briefly dubbed the "Walkie Scorchie" or "Death Ray Skyscraper" in the ensuing flurry of tabloid reports.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
The Leadenhall Building, or 'The Cheesegrater,' (122 Leadenhall St.) and, to the right, 'The Gherkin' (30 St. Mary Axe). Image by Colin. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license.
Last Updated on Thursday, 06 November 2014 11:06
 

432 Park Avenue tower casts shadow over Midtown

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Written by JENNIE MATTHEW   
Tuesday, 04 November 2014 11:39
View of 432 Park Avenue under construction from the Citigroup Center in August. Image by Louis B. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. NEW YORK (AFP) – It's a $95-million view from the tallest residential tower in the Americas. But the newest addition to Manhattan's iconic skyline has attracted a cloud of controversy.

Still under construction and with U.S. flags pinned patriotically to its shell, 432 Park Avenue soars above Midtown, casting a shadow over Central Park and designer boutiques on Madison Avenue.

At 1,396 feet (425.5 meters) the tower by Uruguayan "starchitect" Rafael Vinoly is higher than the 1,250-foot Empire State Building – but eclipsed by One World Trade Center, which rises to 1,776 feet including a 408-foot antenna.

The Los Angeles-based developers CIM Group have already sold the top penthouse for $95 million and 50 percent of the apartments, which start at $17 million, before opening in Spring 2015.

The view – marketed as a helicopter view – offers vistas that stretch from Central Park to the Atlantic Ocean and Connecticut.

And it's not alone.

A string of super-tall, super-luxury buildings have sprung up and are still in development changing the city sky scape forever.

"They appeal to a very specific buyer pool and that buyer pool has proven to be very aggressive and very deep," said Robert Knakal, one of New York's top real estate brokers and chairman of Massey Knakal Realty Services.

But not everyone's happy.

A recent op-ed in the New York Observer complained about "hellish experience," "dynamite blasts" and "incessant screeching" endured by residents and office workers from mega projects in development.

 

'Ghost ships'

 

Opponents complain that city regulations provide no public review process in Midtown, that historic buildings are being demolished in their wake and that billionaires squeeze everyone else out.

"I think it's very controversial," said Alex Herrera, director of technical services at The New York Landmarks Conservancy. "We have never seen anything like this before."

The 1920s Drake Hotel, where Frank Sinatra, Muhammed Ali, Judy Garland and Jimi Hendrix stayed, was torn down to make way for 432 Park Avenue.

Herrera calls mega towers "ghost ships" – bought as investments by international billionaires, who visit only a couple of weeks a year and so tall that they cast shadows across Central Park.

In a few years, 432 Park Avenue will be eclipsed as work progresses on a taller tower being built by developers Extell round the corner on West 57th Street.

Extell has already built a 90-storey condo designed by famed French architect Christian de Portzamparc on the same street.

Master piano makers Steinway and Sons are leaving West 57th Street next year after selling their 1925 flagship showroom, where Rachmaninoff practiced, to JDS Development Group for $46 million.

"It's definitely changing our skyline and it's certainly changing the character of 57th Street, which used to be a very quaint street of art galleries and piano stores," said Herrera.

"Now, it's a street of billionaires who don't really live there."

City voters last year elected Democrat mayor Bill de Blasio on a ticket of greater equality after income gaps widened during the 12-year tenure of billionaire-philanthropist Michael Bloomberg.

 

Fuels local economy

 

De Blasio has an ambitious affordable housing plan in the wake of middle class professionals leaving Manhattan and while an estimated 21 percent of New York city residents live in poverty.

Neither is New York a capital city and while historic buildings are preserved, it's a business city driven by profits.

Herrera wants 57th Street landmarked to protect the other historic buildings. "What we're looking for is a balance," he said.

But Knakal insists there is a balance and credits the city planning commission with doing an "excellent job" on zoning.

And even if billionaire residents, don't stay all year, they still pay real estate taxes and don't consume public services, he says.

"Folks who are residing in those apartments probably spend more money and inject more dollars into the local economy than the average New Yorker does in the whole year."

But members of the public are at best divided over the expansion. Many say the super rich have earned their right to live and buy whatever they want, seeing the skyscrapers as a status symbol.

Others feel alienated by the overt display of wealth pushing out public sector workers and creative workers on tighter budgets.

"I think it's absolutely ridiculous to spend that kind of money to live there," said wealth advisor Lawrence Bogar, who works in the city but lives across the river in New Jersey.

"You could spend the money on far better properties."



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
View of 432 Park Avenue under construction from the Citigroup Center in August. Image by Louis B. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 04 November 2014 13:00
 

Nov. 5 art auction benefits animal welfare group Mercy For Animals

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Written by Outside Media Source   
Wednesday, 29 October 2014 09:40

J J Manford, 'Moogles Fauna,' acrylic , oil, spray paint and collage on canvas; 18 x 12in, est. $3,000. Image courtesy Paddle 8 / Mercy For Animals

NEW YORK – Art and animals will come together for a common goal on Wednesday, November 5 as Mercy For Animals conducts its Art of Compassion benefit auction. Proceeds from the online auction of more than 75 artworks will benefit Mercy For Animals’ many animal welfare programs in North America.

The auction features original pieces by dozens of artists, including Moby, Jo-Anne McArthur, Al Jackson, Donald Baechler, Ross Bleckner and William Wegman. The selection has been curated and organized by Nick Lawrence, founder and curator of Freight+Volume gallery in New York City.

Bidding is on now and closes at 9 p.m. Eastern time on November 5. All auction artworks will be on view that same evening from 6-10 p.m. at a special Mercy For Animals fundraiser at Freight+Volume. The gallery is located at 530 W. 24th St., New York, NY 10011. To purchase tickets to the festive fundraiser, which are $100 apiece, or to make a donation to Mercy For Animals, visit https://www.charity-pay.com/e/event.asp?cid=22&eid=44.

To browse or bid on the art being sold in the online auction, click here: http://paddle8.com/auctions/mercyforanimals

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ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

 J J Manford, 'Moogles Fauna,' acrylic , oil, spray paint and collage on canvas; 18 x 12in, est. $3,000. Image courtesy Paddle 8 / Mercy For Animals

 John Newsom, 'Wonderland,' screenprint, 48 of 60, framed, 16.25 x 27in, est. $1,600. Image courtesy Paddle 8 / Mercy For Animals

William Wegman, 'The Wave,' pigment print, 17 of 30, framed, 11 x 8.5in, est. $850. Image courtesy Paddle 8 / Mercy For Animals

Katherine Bradford, 'Dueling Supermen,' acrylic on canvas, 12 x 9 in, est. $1,900. Image courtesy Paddle 8 / Mercy For Animals

Moby, 'Receiving,' giclee print on exhibition mat, framed, 13 x 19in, est. $295. Image courtesy Paddle 8 / Mercy For Animals

Joe Heaps Nelson, 'Ferdinando,' gouache, charcoal and acrylic on paper; framed, 11.5 x 12.5in, est. $450. Image courtesy Paddle 8 / Mercy For Animals

Bryan Osburn, 'Untitled,' 2013, oil on paper, framed, 8 x 10in, est. $950. Image courtesy Paddle 8 / Mercy For Animals

Last Updated on Wednesday, 29 October 2014 10:12
 

Exhibitions in US honor El Greco 400 years after his death

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Written by AFP wire service   
Tuesday, 28 October 2014 16:17
El Greco's 'View of Toledo,' circa 1596-1600, oil on canvas. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. WASHINGTON (AFP) – The United States, home to a rich collection of works by El Greco, is paying homage to the Spanish artist with major exhibitions opening soon in Washington and New York.

From Nov. 2, the National Gallery of Art in the U.S. capital will spotlight its seven El Greco canvases alongside four on loan from the Phillips Collection and Dumbarton Oaks in Washington and the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore.

In New York, exhibitions dedicated to the Renaissance painter will open on Nov. 4 at the Metropolitan Museum and the Frick Collection.

Born Domenikos Theotokopoulos on the Greek island of Crete, El Greco worked in Venice and Rome before settling in Spain, notably in Toledo, where he adopted his now-famous nickname.

Virtually forgotten after his death in 1614, he was rediscovered at the end of the 19th century. His work appeared in the Louvre in Paris, and he was embraced by such modern artists as Picasso, Cezanne and the German expressionists.

His profile in the United States was due in good part to a buying frenzy among rich American collectors, said David Alan Brown, curator of the Washington exhibition.

"They competed with each other, all these millionaires," he added. "There was a kind of Greco craze. That is one reason why they are so many Grecos in the United States."

All told, about 50 works by El Greco are held by museums in about 20 cities around the country.

Famous for his elongated silhouettes, the artist "was not always successful," Brown said.

"His work was so extreme that some people did not respond to it, and other people responded strongly," he said.

"He's an artist that always provokes strong reactions. No one can be indifferent to El Greco."

Brown added: "It's a very personal, visionary style."

"El Greco's art was never simple; it has the spiritual intensity of the counter-Reformation but also pictorially a very complicated vision. That's what appeals to us today."

To accompany the exhibition, the National Gallery has produced a 30-minute documentary.

In Spain, dozens of events have been taking place this year to mark the 400th anniversary of El Greco's death.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
El Greco's 'View of Toledo,' circa 1596-1600, oil on canvas. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 28 October 2014 16:34
 

Landmark GE sign's fate still up in the air in Fort Wayne

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Written by PAUL WYCHE, The Journal Gazette   
Tuesday, 28 October 2014 09:42
The iconic General Electric sign in Fort Wayne, Ind. Image by Momoneymoproblemz. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license. FORT WAYNE, Ind. (AP) – So far, GE hasn't brought anything good to light.

But Fort Wayne preservationists haven't given up on the idea that the familiar General Electric sign – and the building it sits atop – can have some type of presence in the city.

Councilman Geoff Paddock, D-5th, knows that ultimately, the fate of the sign – and GE's campus southwest of downtown – is up to the company whose history in the city dates back to 1911.

“I want to make that clear,” he told The Journal Gazette. “But we think something can be done.”

Something was done this month, but probably not what local historians wanted to see. GE, which is shutting down its 32-acre property on Broadway, auctioned off hardware, office equipment and scrap.

In late March, the company confirmed plans to close its two Fort Wayne operations, eliminating about 90 jobs in one year as it shifts work to Mexico. The business employs about 28 people at a local motor-testing lab and about 60 at its executive center on Coliseum Boulevard.

The future of the 13 largely vacant buildings along Broadway hasn't been decided.

GE spokesman Matt Cronkrite said the company is continuing to wind down operations in Fort Wayne but has made no decisions about its property, including the sign.

“Nothing has changed at this point,” Cronkrite said. “We know there are some city officials interested in the property.”

Some ideas may have been tossed around, but nothing GE considers worth elaborating on, he said.

At least two other cities have inquired about the company's iconic sign. In June, it was learned that officials at GE's Louisville, Ky., plant asked about relocating the towering emblem.

And boosters in Cincinnati, where the company also has operations and is home to the American Sign Museum, inquired about the sign.

“I haven't heard anything about it since (June),” said Tod Swormstedt, founder of the museum. “I know the sign is huge and, for a lot of people, is probably a symbol of better times.”

Paddock said there is momentum in the downtown area for restoring landmark buildings, which holds out hope for not only the GE sign but perhaps for at least some of the firm's buildings.

“I'll be meeting with the mayor next week and will bring it up,” Paddock said. “It would seem that something could work out there. Look at the Randall Building, for example.”

Randall Lofts is a mixed-use, $7.5 million five-story complex, where renovations were completed this summer. It took root inside a historic building at South Harrison and Pearl streets and includes 44 one- and two-bedroom apartments.

The Indiana Housing and Community Development Authority awarded Randall Lofts nearly $675,000 annually for 10 years in rental housing tax credits.

The city of Fort Wayne contributed $600,000 in federal Neighborhood Stabilization Program money, of which $450,000 is a loan and $150,000 is a forgivable loan. Are similar funds available for parts of the GE campus?

“We'd like to see what could be done,” Paddock said. “It's worth exploring.”

___

Information from: The Journal Gazette, http://www.journalgazette.net

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-10-26-14 1757GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE
The iconic General Electric sign in Fort Wayne, Ind. Image by Momoneymoproblemz. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license. The former General Electric Plant, Fort Wayne, Indiana. Image by Momoneymoproblemz. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 28 October 2014 10:03
 

Work closes Indianapolis monument observation deck

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Written by Associated Press   
Tuesday, 28 October 2014 08:23
Early 1900s postcard view published by the Detroit Photographic Company of the Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument in downtown Indianapolis. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. INDIANAPOLIS (AP) – The observation deck of the Soldiers and Sailors Monument in downtown Indianapolis is being closed as crews make repairs to sections of the 112-year-old limestone tower.

Crews erected scaffolding at the monument on Monday. The Indiana War Memorial Commission says workers will inspect and complete minor limestone and bronze repairs as part of regular maintenance.

The monument's observation deck and gift shop will be closed during the work, although its Col. Eli Lilly Civil War Museum will remain open.

Officials say the repair work will be completed in time for electrical workers to install the thousands of lights on the monument for the annual Circle of Lights festivities on Nov. 28.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-10-27-14 1053GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE
Early 1900s postcard view published by the Detroit Photographic Company of the Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument in downtown Indianapolis. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. The Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument is decorated with Christmas lights during the holidays. Image by Serge Melki. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 28 October 2014 08:42
 

Prune Nourry’s ‘Terracotta Daughters’ in Mexico City

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Written by Museum PR   
Monday, 27 October 2014 16:36
The 'Terracotta Daughters' at Museo Diego Rivera Anahuacalli. Image by Marisa Velez, courtesy of Prune Nourry. MEXICO CITY – After Shanghai, Paris, Zurich and New York, Prune Nourry’s army of girls continues its trip around the world with the final North American showing of “Terracotta Daughters,” a monumental exhibition of 108 life-size and individually crafted clay sculptures that recall China’s famous Terracotta Soldiers. Created by New York-based French artist Prune Nourry, with expert craftsmen in X’ian, this installation is a powerful investigation of the impact of gender selection in Asia and beyond.

The Museo Diego Rivera-Anahuacalli will be the army's last stop in its grand world tour before the burial in China. The figures will be on display Oct. 30-Nov. 30

Nourry has chosen Mexico as the main stop on the international tour for its strong archeological history similarly linked to Chinese culture. The Museo Diego Rivera Anahuacalli, where artist Diego Rivera reappropriated an ancient symbol and built a contemporary version of an Aztec pyramid to present his collection of Pre-Hispanic artifacts, immediately caught Nourry’s attention. The artist will bring her faux Chinese archeological site to Diego’s one, mixing past and new – reflecting on the links between the two cultures.

The show attracted more than 5,000 people in its recent three-week stay in New York.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
The 'Terracotta Daughters' at Museo Diego Rivera Anahuacalli. Image by Marisa Velez, courtesy of Prune Nourry.
Last Updated on Monday, 27 October 2014 16:47
 

Global call goes out for Battersea Power Station retail tenants

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Written by AFP Wire Service   
Monday, 27 October 2014 13:12
This is a scan of the cover of the record album 'Animals' by Pink Floyd, which features an image of Battersea Power Station in London. The cover art copyright is believed to belong to Pink Floyd Music, Ltd. Fair use of low-resolution image under terms of US Copyright Law. PARIS (AFP) - Developers behind the transformation of London's Battersea Power Station will this week launch a worldwide tour of 13 cities to drum up retail tenants for the $12 billion project.

The tour will be inaugurated in Paris on Wednesday evening with an event hosted by British Ambassador to France Peter Ricketts followed by a sales fair from Friday.

"The aim is to find the most exciting UK and global brands, businesses and restaurants to bring alive Britain's newest high street," the Battersea Power Station Development Company (BPSDC) said in a statement.

Built in the 1930s, the vast red-brick former power station with its four giant white chimney stacks is a London landmark that also achieved worldwide fame when it featured on the cover of Pink Floyd's 1977 album "Animals."

The tour will also offer an opportunity to purchase over 500 of some 1,300 homes designed by renowned architects Norman Foster and Frank Gehry included in the project's third phase.

The available properties are in the development's Prospect Place and the Battersea Roof Gardens' building.

In addition to London and Paris, the October and November tour will take in Beijing, Doha, Dubai, Hong Kong, Kuala Lumpur, Los Angeles, Milan, New York, Shanghai, Singapore and Tokyo.

After lying disused for 30 years, a Malaysian consortium made up of Sime Darby, SP Setia, and the Employees Provident Fund (EPF) bought the former coal-powered station and surrounding land for 512 million euros in July 2012.

The project will see the 17-hectare- (42-acre-) site on the south bank of the River Thames transformed into a new neighbourhood comprising homes, shops, restaurants and offices as well as leisure and cultural facilities. There will also be a public park.

The site will also house the new US embassy building designed by Kieran Timberlake which is due to open in 2017.

After years of false dawns and changes in ownership, work officially started on the project on July 4, 2013 -- the building's 80th anniversary -- with the entire project expected to be completed by 2015.

The power station itself is expected to open to the public in 2019.

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Last Updated on Monday, 27 October 2014 13:23
 

Such a scary deal: Dracula's Bran Castle listed for sale

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Written by Outside Media Source   
Monday, 27 October 2014 08:37
Dracula's Bran Castle in Romania, currently offered for sale for $78 million. Image courtesy of www.toptenrealestatedeals.com.

BRAN, Romania - Bran Castle in Transylvania isn’t a high-end European retreat where health seekers can go to get a dose of vitamins and fiber in their diet. No, the legend of this nightmare palace, which has been listed for sale, is much more sinister in fiction than in reality. Bran Castle was home to one of the most notorious monsters in literary history: Count Dracula. No other name elicits more fear and respect in the world of horror than Dracula. His dark powers and blood lust are legendary. On par with the count himself is the castle Bram Stoker reportedly based the Lord of the Night’s home after.

Bran Castle is nestled in the heart of the mountains in Romania, formerly Transylvania. Carved from the rock of the mountains, Bran raises like a dark monolith above the sweeping verdant valleys below. Home to queens, kings and knights, the castle’s history is rich and storied. The most infamous character, and what draws over half a million visitors a year to see this horror home, is Vlad Tepes or “Vlad the Impaler” as he is more commonly known.

Vlad was known to be a vicious and vindictive ruler. To the enemies that he defeated in defense of the Wallachia border and those who broke laws under his rule, he was the impaler. Known to put his enemies on sharpened spikes as a “message” to others, his name struck fear in the hearts of all around him because nothing says, “doesn’t play well with others” than putting them on sharpened spikes.

The truth be told, Vlad’s actual residence is a couple of miles from Bran and in ruins. His connection to the castle is that he reportedly was a guest there in the dungeons. Though there were many bloody battles surrounding it, the castle was actually a customs post, home and museum for much of its history. It’s traded hands many times even being stolen from the royal family when communism took hold in Romania and they were given only 24hours to flee the country. Fortunately, the castle is now back in the hands of the heirs and they’ve painstakingly and lovingly restored the property. Now they are looking to sell to a private buyer with intentions of investing in this major tourist attraction and “taking it to the next level.”

This one of a kind estate is on the market now for forty-seven million pounds ($78 million US dollars). It may bleed your bank account dry but, “Looook into my eyes…you VANT to buy this castle!”

Read more about it at http://www.toptenrealestatedeals.com/homes/featured/2014/haunted-homes-you-can-buy/1/

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ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE
Dracula's Bran Castle in Romania, currently offered for sale for $78 million. Image courtesy of www.toptenrealestatedeals.com. Dracula's Bran Castle in Romania, currently offered for sale for $78 million. Image courtesy of www.toptenrealestatedeals.com. Dracula's Bran Castle in Romania, currently offered for sale for $78 million. Image courtesy of www.toptenrealestatedeals.com. Dracula's Bran Castle in Romania, currently offered for sale for $78 million. Image courtesy of www.toptenrealestatedeals.com.
Last Updated on Monday, 27 October 2014 09:18
 
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