Payday Loans
payday loans
ADVERTISEMENTS
Banner
Banner

Get Free ACN Daily Headlines

LiveAuctioneers

Search Auction Central News

ADVERTISEMENTS
Banner
Banner
Bookmark and Share
Art in the News

Sinatra's Manhattan penthouse sells for $4.9 million

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Outside Media Source   
Wednesday, 28 January 2015 16:32
Manhattan penthouse where Frank Sinatra and Mia Farrow once lived, sold through Douglas Elliman Real Estate for $4.9 million. Image courtesy of TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

NEW YORK - In the 1940s, Frank Sinatra was the #1 New Yorker. Born and raised in an Italian family in nearby Hoboken, New Jersey, Frank's singing career began with his Hoboken high school glee club which led to his job as lead singer with the Hoboken Four and night club gigs throughout the New York area. His band won the “Major Bowes Original Amateur Hour” on New York's CBS Radio in 1935 which led to more radio performances that were broadcast throughout the metropolitan area.

By the early 1940s, Frank had been the lead singer with both the Harry James and Tommy Dorsey Orchestras and a frequent performer at New York's Paramount Theater and the New York based “Lucky Strike Hit Parade” radio show. In 1943, Frank's teenage girl fans turned out in droves to see his performance at New York's City College with the New York Philharmonic. That same year, he went solo with his debut performance at New York's Madison Square Gardens. An October, 1944 encore concert at the Paramount drew 35,000 fans causing the Columbus Day Riot that was quelled by New York City police. Between 1940 and 1943, Frank recorded 23 “Billboard Top 10” hit songs. He was the most popular singer in America; the biggest star in New York City.

In the 1950s, Frank was doing television and movies in Hollywood and leading the Rat Pack in Las Vegas. By the 1960s, Frank owned his own film company, a record company, a private airline, a missile-parts firm, had real-estate holdings across the country and a personal staff of seventy-five. Although he was spending less time in New York, he still wanted a place to live there that identified with the energy of the city. In 1961, Frank moved into a brand new 3,200-square-foot Manhattan triplex penthouse with East River views. He was able to design the apartment his own way with 18ft ceilings and 2,000 square feet of wrap-around balconies where Sammy Davis, Jr. used to enjoy tossing champagne glasses down onto FDR Drive.

In 1966, 21-year old Mia Farrow married the 50-year old Sinatra and moved into his bachelor apartment as a full time wife. They were the “it couple” of New York, grandly entertaining East Coast and West Coast royalty. Frank’s Rat Pack buddies were joined in the partying by the likes of President John F. Kennedy, Andy Warhol and Marilyn Monroe. Warhol called it the “glittering grotto in the sky.”

However Mia soon became bored and returned to her acting career. When Mia’s movie “Rosemary’s Baby” production time ran over and she refused to quit the film to be in Sinatra’s film “The Detective,” Frank threw a temper tantrum, handing Mia divorce papers in front of her cast crew. Sinatra sold the apartment in 1972 to Andy Warhol's doctor. In 1979, Frank recorded the song he made popular celebrating the city, “New York, New York.”

Now totally updated, the home has glass walls, four bedrooms, six baths, putting green and a replica of the floating glass staircase in New York City's Apple Store. It went on the market in late 2013 at $5.6 million and just sold through Douglas Elliman Real Estate for $4.9 million.

#   #   #



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Manhattan penthouse where Frank Sinatra and Mia Farrow once lived, sold through Douglas Elliman Real Estate for $4.9 million. Image courtesy of TopTenRealEstateDeals.com
Last Updated on Wednesday, 28 January 2015 16:48
 

Miami museum to open Antoni Tàpies retrospective

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Museum PR   
Tuesday, 27 January 2015 13:22
Antoni Tàpies, ‘Composició amb figures’ (Composition with Figures), 1945,
 oil on canvas,
 24 x 24 inches. Fundació Antoni Tàpies
© Fundació Antoni Tàpies/VEGAP, 2013

MIAMI – On Feb. 6, Pérez Art Museum Miami will open a major historical survey of Catalan master Antoni Tàpies. The first major survey since the artist’s death in 2012, the exhibition is composed of 50 works, including paintings, assemblages and drawings. “Tàpies: From Within” features work from the mid-1940s up through 2011, with notable examples from every decade of the artist’s 70-year-long career.

All the works were drawn from the artist’s own collection, or that of the Fundació Antoni Tàpies in Barcelona. These pieces, which had personal resonance for Tàpies and remained in the artist’s control throughout his lifetime, offer a unique perspective on his creative process. Many of the works selected have rarely been seen prior to this exhibition, providing an intimate glimpse into Tàpies’ relationship with his practice.

This retrospective was organized jointly by the Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya and the Fundació Antoni Tàpies, and curated by former Tate Director Vincente Todolí. PAMM’s chief curator, Tobias Ostrander, worked closely with the Fundació and Todoli to choose the 50 works included in PAMM’s focused presentation of “Tàpies: From Within,” which is the sole U.S. presentation of the show. The artist’s early “matter paintings” from the 1950s, up through his recent works, emphasize the materials from which they are made – oil paint mixed with dirt and stones, covered with gestural markings.

Their emphasis on “poor” materials contrast with the gleaming surfaces of Miami, creating a critical dialogue with the museum and its surrounding context. Ostander also emphasizes Tàpies’ influence on a new generation of contemporary artists also interested in discarded materials and rich surfaces. PAMM will open a commissioned project by Argentinian artist Diego Bianchi on Feb. 19, whose appropriation of worn and found materials highlights the link between Tapies’ work and that of many of today’s contemporary artists.

“Tàpies’ emphasis on matter, earth and humble materials, creates an interesting counterpoint to our increasingly digital world,” said Ostrander. “His works were a response to the atomic age and new relationships understood between humans and matter. Today we see many artists increasingly interested in surface textures, density and weight, in physicality and the unique art object; all as a critique of the nonmateriality of the digital world. In this context Tàpies’ alchemical works become a dynamic reference.”

The survey offers a window into the most important artistic and social developments of the postwar world, as seen through the eyes of one of the most successful abstract painters of his generation. Displayed chronologically, the works reveal the influence of major movements in the art world on Tàpies, from surrealism to abstract expressionism, to conceptual art. The impact of pivotal cultural shifts and world events are also evident, such as the explosion of the atomic bomb, ethnic violence and the AIDS epidemic. At the same time, Tàpies steadfast interest in “poor” materials – such as clay, dirt and detritus – remains evident throughout the retrospective. His characteristically bold techniques are on full display, such as his groundbreaking method of “carving” into his canvases by mixing paint with found materials.

Highlights from “Tàpies: From Within” include:

  • Fils sobre cartó (Threads on Cardboard), 1946 – a delicate collage represents an early exploration of two materials that would later become established aspects of his practice.
  • Gris amb dues taques negres. N. oXCII (Gray with Two Black Marks, No. XCII), 1959 – textured, mixed-media on canvas interpretation of the rebellious New York School style, which was transforming the art world at the time.
  • Tela encolada (Glued Fabric), 1961, – a bold reinvention of a sailcloth accented with paint and folded into a compelling geometric design atop a canvas.
  • Cadira i roba (Chair and Clothes), 1970 – an elegant yet simple object assemblage that anticipates the arte povera movement.
  • Díptic amb dues formes corbes (Diptych with Two Curved Forms), 1988 – a dream-like mixed media reponse to the figurative resurgence of the 1980s.
  • Atman, 1996 – displays the strong influence of Asian art on his practice, particularly Japanese calligraphy and the structure of folding screens.
  • Sóc terra (I Am Earth), 2004 – a mixture of graffiti-like marks with spray-painted sections, this piece speaks to both the artist’s ecological and spiritual concerns.


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE
Antoni Tàpies, ‘Composició amb figures’ (Composition with Figures), 1945,
 oil on canvas,
 24 x 24 inches. Fundació Antoni Tàpies
© Fundació Antoni Tàpies/VEGAP, 2013 Antoni Tàpies, ‘Verd-blau palla’ (Green-Blue Straw), 1968, mixed media on wood,
35 x 46 inches.
Fundació Antoni Tàpies © Fundació Antoni Tàpies/VEGAP, 2013 Antoni Tàpies, ‘Embolcall’ (Wrapping), 1994,
 mixed media and assemblage on wood, 98 x 118 inches.
 Fundació Antoni Tàpies
© Fundació Antoni Tàpies/VEGAP, 2013
Last Updated on Tuesday, 27 January 2015 14:07
 

Tribute to Nebraska Capitol's designer to go up in Lincoln

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Associated Press   
Monday, 26 January 2015 10:33
The Nebraska Capitol in Lincoln. Image by Mawhamba. This image is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic license. LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) – A monument honoring the architect of the Nebraska Capitol has been approved to go up in a Lincoln neighborhood.

The Lincoln Journal Star reports that the Capitol Environs Commission approved the monument to recognize Bertram Goodhue on Thursday.

The Near South Neighborhood Association in Lincoln plans to install it before May 10.

The concrete monument will be placed at Goodhue Boulevard and A Street in honor of the New York architect. The association plans to use a $2,500 grant it received from NeighborWorks Lincoln to pay for it.

Ed Zimmer, the city's historic preservation planner, says the language for an engraved plaque still needs to be approved.

Goodhue Boulevard is one of the four axial streets that radiate out from the Capitol.

___

Information from: Lincoln Journal Star, http://www.journalstar.com

Copyright 2015 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-01-24-15 1946GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
The Nebraska Capitol in Lincoln. Image by Mawhamba. This image is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic license.
Last Updated on Monday, 26 January 2015 10:44
 

Van Dyck self-portait goes on display in UK with tour to follow

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Art Gallery PR   
Wednesday, 21 January 2015 12:26

Self-portrait by Sir Anthony van Dyck, 1640-1. Copyright National Portrait Gallery, London

MARGATE, UK - The National Portrait Gallery’s recently acquired self-portrait of Sir Anthony van Dyck was today displayed at Turner Contemporary, Margate, the first venue in its nationwide tour. It is set to be one of the star attractions of the Kent gallery’s new exhibition Self: Image and identity - self-portraiture from Van Dyck to Louise Bourgeois which opens to visitors on Saturday, January 24, 2015.

The portrait will be on public view for the first time since August 2014 when it was on display at the National Portrait Gallery prior to a period of conservation which is detailed in specially commissioned films on the Gallery’s website www.npg.org.uk/vandyck.

The Gallery is lending the portrait as part of a nationwide tour Van Dyck: A Masterpiece for Everyone which after Turner Contemporary, Margate (January 24-May 10, 2015) continues to Manchester Art Gallery in May; followed by Dulwich Picture Gallery and Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery in 2016; and Laing Art Gallery, Newcastle-upon-Tyne and the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, Edinburgh in 2017. The tour is supported by the Art Fund and Heritage Lottery Fund.

The three-year tour of the painting will also include themed displays at the National Portrait Gallery when the portrait returns to London in between periods of display at the six museums and galleries throughout Britain. In London, visitors will be able to see Sir Anthony van Dyck’s last Self-portrait in three displays which highlight the work’s importance in the context of five centuries of portrait painting from the 1550s to today.

In the first display at the National Portrait Gallery from September 2015, the work will be shown alongside paintings by van Dyck of his friends and patrons, from the Gallery’s Collection, as well as portraits by other artists at the court of Charles I. On returning to the Gallery in 2016 it will be shown alongside some of the great self-portraits of all periods from the Collection and in 2017 a third display at the Gallery will feature the portrait in the context of work by living artists.

The displays are intended to show how the new acquisition enriches the Gallery’s present holding of three works by van Dyck but also how it makes a significant addition to the National Portrait Gallery’s striking collection of self-portraits. These include works by Reynolds, Zoffany and Stubbs and, amongst twentieth-century and contemporary artists, Gwen John, Barbara Hepworth, Frank Auerbach, L S Lowry, Julian Opie, Gillian Wearing, Chris Ofili, Lucian Freud and David Hockney.

Van Dyck’s last Self-portrait (1640-1) was acquired by the National Portrait Gallery through a major fundraising appeal with the Art Fund, and with thanks to a major grant of £6,343,500 from the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF), on 1 May 2014. It is one of three known self-portraits painted by van Dyck when he was in England, and it probably dates from the last years of his life. The artist shows himself fashionably dressed but apparently in the act of painting, the line of his right shoulder and sleeve suggesting his hand raised in the process of applying paint to a canvas just out of sight. The broad handling of the paint in the costume, compared with the face, may indicate that this area of the painting is unfinished, or it may be that this is simply a more experimental work than his formal court portraits. The frame of this painting, crested with the sunflower motif associated with the artist, is of outstanding importance and is likely to have been designed with van Dyck's involvement.

Born in Antwerp in 1599, Anthony van Dyck was an artistic prodigy who worked as an assistant to Peter Paul Rubens. He came to Britain in 1632 at the invitation of King Charles I, making London his home until his death in 1641. Charles I was van Dyck’s most famous patron, rewarding him with a knighthood and the title of Principal Painter. Van Dyck established himself at the heart of the English court, producing magnificent portraits of the royal family and many courtiers. However, beneath the shimmering surface of the court was a sense of growing unease. The late 1630s were a time of political upheaval and by the end of 1642 civil war had broken out in Scotland and England. Within a year of producing this portrait van Dyck was dead, buried in Old St Paul’s Cathedral with the epitaph: ‘Anthony Van Dyck – who, while he lived, gave to many immortal life.’

PUBLICATION:

A new booklet on the Van Dyck Self-portrait to coincide with the tour is available from the National Portrait Gallery Shops, online (npg.org.uk/shop) and at the tour venues for £5 (paperback). There is also a full range of products supporting the tour available.

#   #   #



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

Self-portrait by Sir Anthony van Dyck, 1640-1. Copyright National Portrait Gallery, London

Last Updated on Wednesday, 21 January 2015 12:38
 

China chides cadres: No more calligraphy clubs

PDF Print E-mail
Written by AFP Wire Service   
Wednesday, 21 January 2015 10:18

Pan Tianshou (Chinese, 1897-1971), 'Chicken with Bamboo,' woodcut with calligraphy, auctioned for 260,000 Euros on Dec. 12, 2014. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Auctionata, Berlin, Germany

BEIJING (AFP) - The writing is on the wall for Chinese officials caught up in the latest hotbed of graft and corruption: calligraphy associations.

The written form has long been revered as an art in China, and it was part of the civil service examinations in Imperial times.

More recently, inscriptions by Communist China's founding father Mao Zedong can be found at sites across the country and the masthead of the People's Daily, the ruling party's official mouthpiece, is still printed in his bold, vigorous style.

Even official workplaces are sometimes adorned with senior bureaucrats' characters.

But in a warning posted on its website on Tuesday, the ruling Communist Party's internal watchdog, the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection (CCDI), urged officials not to seek positions atop provincial art associations.

By doing so, the CCDI warns, leading cadres are "stealing the meat off artists' plates" -- and potentially opening themselves up to investigation by anti-graft inspectors.

"In some places, you will see dozens of vice presidents sitting atop the provincial calligraphy association," the CCDI wrote in its notice. "It is enough to make one wide-eyed and dumbfounded."

"What kind of behind-the-scenes profit is motivating officials to use their authority to grab literary laurels? And what kind of secrets are they keeping?" it asks.

The CCDI did not give any specific figures, but positions in calligraphy associations have often been viewed as a particularly lucrative honor for officials -- whether or not they actually have the talent to succeed at the painstaking art -- as higher ranks are associated with higher prices.

Since President Xi Jinping took power in 2012, China has been in the midst of a much-publiciZed anti-corruption drive, although critics say the Communist Party has failed to introduce systemic reforms to prevent graft, such as public disclosure of assets.

In addition to targeting high-level "tigers" and low-level "flies," the campaign also has sought to curtail extravagant gift-giving, banquets and other excesses within the state sector.

"Wise choices should begin now, with cadres deciding on their own to resolutely retire at the peak of their career," the CCDI said.

"Why wait until it is too late to exit the artists' associations, once the anti-corruption sword is already hanging over your head and the spring breeze of reform has swept away the filth?" it added, adopting an almost poetic tone.

#   #   #



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

Pan Tianshou (Chinese, 1897-1971), 'Chicken with Bamboo,' woodcut with calligraphy, auctioned for 260,000 Euros on Dec. 12, 2014. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Auctionata, Berlin, Germany

Last Updated on Wednesday, 21 January 2015 10:52
 

Hong Kong Phooey takes his revenge at Sotheby's

PDF Print E-mail
Written by AFP Wire Service   
Wednesday, 21 January 2015 09:18

Invader, Alias HK_58, Hong Kong Phooey, executed in 2014, ceramic tiles on glass panel, 132.6 x 208.5 cm., 52 1/4  x 82 1/8  inches. The work is accompanied by a signed and dated identity card with a photo of the original work in situ. Est. HKD 1/1.5 million. Sold for HKD 1,960,000. Image courtesy of Sotheby's

HONG KONG (AFP) - A popular piece of street art destroyed by Hong Kong authorities and later re-made has fetched almost HK$2 million ($258,000) at a Sotheby's auction, a new record for its French creator.

The ceramic mosaic of 1970s American cartoon character Hong Kong Phooey -- a mask-wearing dog who is an expert in kung fu -- was recreated by high-profile French street artist Invader after being removed from a city wall last year.

It was expected to sell for HK$1.5 million but exceeded that at Tuesday night's auction in Hong Kong when it went for $HK1.96 million.

That set a world record at auction for the artist, according to Sotheby's, who said it had been bought by a European private collector.

"We have seen strong market interests for cutting-edge contemporary works, both Asian and Western," said Isaure de Viel Castel, Sotheby's head of mid-season sales for contemporary and modern fine arts, adding that collectors had responded "enthusiastically."

The mosaic sold alongside the first ever work to be auctioned in Hong Kong  by British artist Tracey Emin -- a turquoise neon sign that reads "Trust Me" -- which fetched HK$562,500, far exceeding its HK$350,000 price tag.

Castel said there was a "deep pool" of new, young collectors driving sales of edgier works.

Invader's Hong Kong Phooey mosaic, entitled "Alias_HK 58," first went up on a wall in a quiet street in the upmarket Happy Valley neighborhood in January last year.

But the artwork, which measures 1.3 meters x 2.1 meters (52 inches x 82 inches), was taken down within weeks by Hong Kong authorities, sparking outrage from residents.

The French artist recreated the piece -- which has the character performing his signature flying kick -- after expressing his deep disappointment over its removal.

"What message would you send to your citizens? What modern cultural heritage do you want to leave them?" Invader said in a statement published by the South China Morning Post in February.

Hong Kong has emerged as one of the world's major auction hubs in art and wine thanks to cash-rich mainland Chinese buyers with an appetite for luxury items.

The government is also developing a new art and culture district on the Kowloon waterfront where contemporary art museum "M+" is expected to boast a world-class collection.

But the city authorities are also frequently criticized for failing to preserve Hong Kong's cultural heritage, with the rapid pace of development leading to the demolition of historic buildings, and iconic graffiti scrubbed from walls.

#   #   #



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

Invader, Alias HK_58, Hong Kong Phooey, executed in 2014, ceramic tiles on glass panel, 132.6 x 208.5 cm., 52 1/4  x 82 1/8  inches. The work is accompanied by a signed and dated identity card with a photo of the original work in situ. Est. HKD 1/1.5 million. Sold for HKD 1,960,000. Image courtesy of Sotheby's

Last Updated on Wednesday, 21 January 2015 10:20
 

Turkish president to change palace name, add religious connotation

PDF Print E-mail
Written by AFP Wire Service   
Friday, 16 January 2015 12:05
The new presidential compound (Ak Saray) in Ankara, Turkey. Photographed in 2014 by Ex13, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license. ANKARA (AFP) - Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Friday said he would soon re-name his controversial new presidential palace, adopting the name of the complexes surrounding imperial mosques.

Erdogan said in a speech in Ankara that the Presidential Palace would, in the future, be known as the Presidential Kulliye and will contain a mosque, convention centre and a gigantic new national library.

"Thinking big is not the work of dwarves," said Erdogan in his characteristically earthy language. "Which is not to offend dwarves, I love them too," he added.

A kulliye is traditionally a complex including schools, kitchens, guest houses and bath houses which surrounds a mosque and is managed by the mosque.

Erdogan, a pious Muslim who has dominated Turkish politics for over a decade, has been accused by opponents of imposing a creeping Islamisation on Turkey's officially secular society.

Some of Ottoman Turkey's greatest imperial mosques in Istanbul and elsewhere have hugely impressive kulliyes and it is this tradition that Erdogan appears to be harking back to.

Erdogan recalled that Russian President Vladimir Putin had expressed admiration for the palace during his visit in December, saying "it was a work befitting a great state."

He seemed to raise the idea that the palace (or kulliye) will become a tourist attraction in the future.

"You see tens of thousands of tourists going to the Kremlin," he said. "They go in Istanbul to the Topkapi Palace, the Dolmabahche palace," he added, referring to the great Ottoman palaces of Istanbul.

Erdogan opened his hugely controversial new presidential palace on the outskirts of Ankara in October. It has 1,150 rooms and was built at a cost of around 490 million euros ($615 million).

He says that the palace is a symbol of a resurgent Turkey which he is building. But opponents decry it as an extravagance in an increasingly authoritarian state.

#   #   #



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
The new presidential compound (Ak Saray) in Ankara, Turkey. Photographed in 2014 by Ex13, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.
Last Updated on Friday, 16 January 2015 12:22
 

Charleston marks 50 years since church steeple fire

PDF Print E-mail
Written by DIANE KNICH, The Post and Courier of Charleston   
Friday, 16 January 2015 10:24
St. Matthew's Lutheran Church in Charleston, S.C. Image by Cadetgray. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license. CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) – Nancy Kruger still recalls the collective gasp from onlookers 50 years after the massive steeple from St. Matthew's Lutheran Church on King Street plummeted to the ground in flames.

It hit with such force that the spire's tip was buried 18 feet in the ground.

This month marks the 50th anniversary of the fire that destroyed the roof and steeple of the historic church at 405 King Street, which was incorporated in 1840 and moved into the King Street location in 1872. At 255 feet, it's the tallest building in Charleston, and in 1965 was the tallest building in South Carolina.

Last week, the church held a ceremony in its courtyard on King Street in honor of the Charleston Fire Department, which fought the blaze and ultimately saved the church from total ruin, said Liane Ziel, the parish administrator.

“It was a horrible gasp,” said Kruger, 75, a lifelong member of St. Matthew's and the church archivist. “I still find it hard to talk about.”

According to church records, the fire started about 6:50 p.m., on Jan. 13, 1965, after an incandescent light ignited some painting materials in the church. Flames then engulfed the roof. The fire appeared to be under control by 8:45 p.m. But then wind spread it to the steeple, which fell around 10 p.m.

It took about 18 months to repair the roof and rebuild the steeple, Kruger said.

Biemann Othersen, 84, a retired physician and lifelong member of the church, said he was in Boston pursuing medical training in 1965, but he got a call from someone telling him his beloved church was on fire. He remembers the call, he said, but not who called him.

“It was as if someone was calling me about a dear friend who was on his deathbed,” Othersen said.

Ted Mappus, 88, another lifelong member and a former state representative, said he was at home in West Ashley when he got a call about the church fire.

He rushed downtown and joined many others who had gathered to see what was going on. He got there in time to watch the steeple fall, he said. “It was spectacular,” he said. “And it was horrible.”

Mappus said he joined the church council that night in a meeting at a nearby police station. The group decided to rebuild before the fire was extinguished, he said.

Charleston Fire Chief Karen Brack said she greatly appreciates the church recognizing the fire department. “What a great thing for them to do,” she said.

The St. Matthew's fire was significant, Brack said, as is any fire that involves a church steeple. Those structures are unstable, she said.

Kruger said that even though the event was horrible, the outpouring of help and support from the community was beautiful. One donation even came from a child who sold golf balls to raise extra money, she said.

Ziel said it's important for the church to mark the event. “We want to take a moment to pause and pray and be grateful we're still here 50 years later.”

___

Information from: The Post and Courier, http://www.postandcourier.com

Copyright 2015 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-01-14-15 2241GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
St. Matthew's Lutheran Church in Charleston, S.C. Image by Cadetgray. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license.
Last Updated on Friday, 16 January 2015 10:35
 

UK gallery exhibits William Gear’s postwar paintings

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Art gallery PR   
Wednesday, 14 January 2015 11:09
'Blue Veritcal' (1967). The Fosse Gallery STOW-ON-THE-WOLD, UK – A centenary exhibition of works on paper from 1947-1996 by Scottish painter William Gear (1915-1997) is taking place Feb. 1-21 at the Fosse Gallery, The Manor House, The Square, Stow-on-the- Wold, Gloucestershire. William Gear's son David has been involved in the planning of the exhibition. The works have been carefully chosen and have never been seen by the public before.

This exhibition is devoted to his herculean output of works on paper, the third in a trilogy at the Fosse Gallery, following those which concentrated on the periods 1966-96 (2011) and 1945-65 (2012). The current show of 48 abstract compositions sampled from across half a century is capable of giving only a glimpse into a huge and richly varied oeuvre.

Many of the abstracted elements found in these works are ultimately derived from the observable world. The Fife coast of the 1920s, where William Gear spent his early years in the mining village of East Wemyss, was where some local sights became indelibly lodged in his boyhood memory. These included the massive and imposing twin pit heads of the Michael Colliery, where his father Porteous worked, echoed in Study (1968) and Black Trap No. 1 (1990), the thundering surf of winter storms pounding the coal waste blackened beach, and the beckoning caves punctuating the low red cliffs surmounted by the stark and forlorn ruins of Macduff Castle. A feature that impinged strongly was his shortcut to school - the towing verticality inherent in a copse of local trees, perhaps re-imagined in such works as Black-Green Verticals (1953) and Black Verticals (1974).

Gear attended Edinburgh College of Art (1932-37), which helped shape his future course studying under William Giles, John Maxwell and McTaggart. It was about this time that other imagery contributed to the mental reservoir that helped form the source for his artistic imagination, mostly notably the massive grid-like structures of the Forth Railway Bridge – crossed regularly on journeys between Fife and Edinburgh including Linear Study (1948) and Fine Structure on Green (1953).

He went on to win a traveling scholarship to Paris, where he studied at the Académie Colarossi under Fernand Léger. On the strength of his scholarship he traveled to Italy, Greece and the Balkans, and the gleaming tessarae of Ravenna's byzantine mosaics contribute to Jostling Shards (1975).

Although Surrealism was all the rage in Paris at that time with large exhibitions of Dali and Magritte, Léger would not tolerate any of it among his students. Léger's approach to Gear's art, as much as its content, was to become a self-acknowledged life-long influence on the young Scot.

World War II disrupted these formative years and by 1940 Gear had joined the Royal Corps of Signals. Following the war, the years of Gear's second Parisian sojourn (1947-50) were to play a strong pivotal role in his development, when he became absorbed by the Continental artistic maelstroms – rubbing shoulders with many of the leading Ecole de Paris artists, and being recruited into the north European avant-garde CoBrA group (1948-51) through the auspices of Constant Nieuwenhuys, Asger Jorn and Corneille Beverloo. However, it was simultaneously a time of relatively grim postwar privations, the austere zeitgeist of which seems to be evoked in such monochrome sketches as Barrier 1949. The same year he heard from the Betty Parsons Gallery in New York that he was to co-exhibit with an American artist, whose name and work were unfamiliar to him – Jackson Pollock.

In 1950, and now with his American wife Charlotte and baby David in tow, he “emigrated” from his attic studio overlooking Notre Dame Cathedral to a rural Buckinghamshire cottage. The contrasting bucolic surroundings of the rolling Chilterns, with its patchwork of fields, woods and hedgerows, were to be a significant influence on much of his work both then (Tree Study, 1952) and later on (Twig Structure, 1970). During his years as curator of Eastbourne's Towner Art Gallery from 1958 to 1964, the sea's proximity became an intermittent visual stimulus, manifested in such works as Marine Impact and Marine Encounter (both 1959) which hum with the pervading spirit of CoBrA, known for the vigor and spontaneity of its artists' works.

He would periodically experiment using different media, generally ink and acrylic, applied by unconventional means such as differently contoured bathroom sponges and a discarded 4-inch decorator’s brush with missing tufts of bristles. For the subsequent three and a half decades, such examples of experimentation continued as a leitmotif throughout William Gear's works on paper, which resulted in plenty to intrigue, surprise and admire.

The complete exhibition can be viewed on-line at www.fossegallery.com . Opening hours are Monday through Saturday, 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. For details of the exhibition contact Sharon Wheaton at 01451 831319 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE
'Blue Veritcal' (1967). The Fosse Gallery 'Black-Green Verticals,' (1953). The Fosse Gallery William Gear working in his studio. The Fosse Gallery
Last Updated on Wednesday, 14 January 2015 11:49
 

France's star architect snubs his concert hall opening

PDF Print E-mail
Written by AFP wire service   
Wednesday, 14 January 2015 10:44
French architect Jean Nouvel, pictured in 2009, the year after winning the Pritzker Prize. Image by Christopher Ohmeyer of Vienna, Austria. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic license. PARIS (AFP) – A huge – and hugely expensive – new Paris concert hall will get its VIP opening late Wednesday, but its star architect, Jean Nouvel, is snubbing the event because he says it is not yet ready.

"The Philharmonie is opening too early," Nouvel, who in 2008 won architecture's top global award, the Pritzker Prize, stormed in a long complaint printed by Le Monde newspaper.

The gala opening, in a once gritty district of northeast Paris that is rapidly gentrifying, is to attract a Who's Who of France's political and cultural elite, including President Francois Hollande.

The Philharmonie, a multilevel concert complex whose main hall seats 2,400 on sweeping balconies surrounding the center stage, took eight years and 386

million euros ($455 million) of public money to build – a budget three times its initial estimate.

Nouvel, who rejects blame for the budget blowout, railed against the decision to open the complex on its Wednesday deadline while workers are still frantically drilling and hammering, and before musicians have had sufficient time to practice in it.

"The building is being open according to a timeline that does not respect architectural and technical requirements," he wrote.

"The Philharmonie has shot itself in each foot."

The Philharmonie's director, Laurent Bayle, explained in a separate interview with Le Parisien newspaper that it would have been too costly to delay the inauguration.

"We already pushed back the opening once by six months. A new delay would have cost a lot of money and posed problems because the (orchestral) program was finalized a year and a half ago," he said.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
French architect Jean Nouvel, pictured in 2009, the year after winning the Pritzker Prize. Image by Christopher Ohmeyer of Vienna, Austria. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic license.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 14 January 2015 10:57
 

Ultramodern concert hall in Paris nearly ready for tuning

PDF Print E-mail
Written by MARIE-PIERRE FEREY   
Tuesday, 13 January 2015 14:43
Grande salle. © Philharmonie de Paris – Didier Ghislain PARIS (AFP) – Paris is known for its many Belle Epoque cultural landmarks – ornate museums, gilded theatres, the stately Eiffel Tower. But its brand-new concert hall opening Wednesday undoubtedly comes from a different era.

The ultramodern, multilayered, crested structure, designed by leading French architect Jean Nouvel and planted in the northeast of the French capital, would not look amiss in a glittering, modern desert city like Doha or Dubai.

The stage of its main, 2,400-seat concert hall is enveloped by the audience, with sweeping, curved balconies surrounding it on all sides, designed to give concertgoers both better views and acoustics.

This is La Philharmonie, Paris's new, bigger home for orchestral events.

It's an ambitious bid to retain the city's standing in a world where emerging nations are increasingly building their own massive temples to culture.

"It's utterly right that Paris should have a big auditorium for classical music," the director of the Paris Opera, Stephane Lissner, said.

Wednesday will see its opening with a gala concert attended by French President Francois Hollande. His presence after last week's carnage by Islamist gunmen in Paris and resulting massive weekend rally is a testament to the importance of the concert hall, both financially and in terms of prestige.

The project took eight years and 386 million euros ($455 million) to build – a budget blown out to three times its initial estimate by inflation, its inherent complexity and a desire to make it a lasting monument like the capital's 37-year-old Pompidou Centre or France's National Library (Bibliotheque Nationale) opened in 1996.

Yet even now, despite the efforts of 600 workers toiling day and night to meet the government deadline, La Philharmonie is not entirely finished.

Nouvel said "several months" would be needed for the final touches to be complete. But once they were, "it will be one of the most remarkable symphonic buildings existing."

The rush to get the concert hall operational has meant everything might not be quite the way it should be for the VIP opening-night crowd.

"You must not judge the acoustics from the first concert," warned Paris Orchestra director Bruno Hamard. "Even a Stradivarius must be tamed."

He added: "Most probably, the result will be very good. But it will become exceptional with time."

The main hall's acoustics were designed by two masters in the field: New Zealand's Harold Marshall and Japan's Yasuhisa Toyota.

The idea to have the stage surrounded by seats, like in Berlin's Philharmonie, is to have the farthest spectator just 32 meters (105 feet) from the orchestra conductor instead of 47 meters in Paris's Salle Pleyel, located on the other side of the city near the Champs-Elysees and until now the premier concert hall in Paris.

The decision to put the new Philharmonie in Paris's northeast 19th arrondissement, a still largely working-class area rapidly becoming a trendy neighborhood, was for various reasons.

Space – a rare commodity in Paris – was available in the Villette park there, where it will be part of the existing Cite de la Musique complex, and

it is close to Paris's top Conservatory of music training future talent.

Perhaps more importantly, though, is the geographical outreach to younger French people who feel excluded from concerts by the elite, much older crowd that usually attend.

To that end, Philharmonia tickets are to be sold much cheaper than had been the case when orchestras played at the previous halls in central Paris. The building was also designed so people could walk up on its roof.

Next weekend the public will be able to discover the new Philharmonie on free open days.

"To be honest, Paris had some grand, historic concert halls. But the Philharmonie promises a peerless live experience in terms of acoustics," said Douglas Boyd, the British conductor who in July will take up the baton over Paris's Chamber Orchestra at the Philharmonie.



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE
Grande salle. © Philharmonie de Paris – Didier Ghislain Exterior view of the concert hall. ©  Philharmonie de Paris – Ateliers Jean Nouvel
Last Updated on Tuesday, 13 January 2015 15:19
 

De Buck Gallery presents Dion Johnson: ‘Chromatic Momentum’

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Art gallery PR   
Tuesday, 13 January 2015 14:11
Dion Johnson, 'Exchange,' acrylic on canvas, 32 x 36 inches, 81 x 91 cm - 2014. De Buck Gallery image. NEW YORK – De Buck Gallery presents an exhibition by Los Angeles-based painter Dion Johnson, titled “Chromatic Momentum.” The exhibition will be on view at the gallery through Feb. 14. An opening reception in the presence of the artist will be held Thursday, Jan. 15, from 6-8 p.m.

There's a sharpness to Johnson's spectrum, whose astringent kick gets echoed in the crisp edges of the snuggly abutted shapes his colors take. Their sizzling intensity is similarly keyed up by the lovely weirdness Johnson generates with their out-of-whack juxtapositions, which somehow come off as even more gorgeous for their oddball precision.

Despite the evocative heat that radiates from Johnson's radically saturated paintings, there's an implacable cool to their bands and swoops of color. The razor-sharp lines pin-stripers apply to customized low-riders also lie behind Johnson's compositions, in which the thinnest sliver of some strange tertiary expands gradually to become a kind of slender penmanship that then morphs into an aerodynamic shape with so much muscularity that it seems to be three-dimensional.

Johnson's new paintings have been described as the high-def version of So-Cal abstraction. The pleasures Johnson brings to paint on canvas and paper have a lot in common with those that high-def technology brings to movies and monitors and photographs and billboards and phones: imagery sharper and more vivid and optically stimulating than previous versions. In Johnson's hands color gets souped up and super-charged.

For sales inquiries, contact the gallery at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or phone 212-255-5735.

De Buck Gallery is located at 545 W. 23rd St., New York, NY 10011.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Dion Johnson, 'Exchange,' acrylic on canvas, 32 x 36 inches, 81 x 91 cm - 2014. De Buck Gallery image.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 13 January 2015 14:28
 

Damien Hirst's 'Cathedral' jewelry collection to be shown at LA Art Show

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Outside Media Source   
Monday, 12 January 2015 09:44
Damien Hirst, 'Pill Ring.' Image courtesy of HOORSENBUHS®

LOS ANGELES - The LA Art Show, taking place January 15-18 at the Los Angeles Convention Center, South Hall, will showcase limited edition jewelry pieces designed by renowned British artist Damien Hirst and Californian jewelers HOORSENBUHS. The Cathedral Collection combines HOORSENBUHS signature tri-link design with Hirst’s iconic "pharmaceutical religion," which follows from Hirst’s previous jewelry collections in its use of medical symbology.

The collection consists of two pieces; a Pill Ring and Pill Rosary with each item limited to a 25-piece run. Made of golden Valium, Vicodin & Viagra pills, the Pill Ring and Pill Rosary can be customized to individual specifications including size, precious metal, and stone preference. Retailing from $25,000-$60,000, every stamped and numbered piece in the collection comes in a specially created pill vial, the seal of which can only be broken once. This is encased within an exclusively made red HIRST X HOORSENBUHS box.

“You can pray to your pills. They are like a cure,” said Hirst. The collection is an extension of Hirst’s previous series that have explored, religion, art, love, and medicine turning contemporary art into wearable pieces. The Cathedral Collection will be presented by London-based gallery Other Criteria.

“We are thrilled to feature this new collection by Damien Hirst. We hosted the California debut of his Butterfly Print Series “The Souls” in 2012 and his work has always resonated very well with our audience. It is an honor for us to continue to showcase such exclusive and exceptional work by one of the most internationally recognized and respected artists alive today,” stated LA Art Show Producer, Kim Martindal.

#   #   #


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Damien Hirst, 'Pill Ring.' Image courtesy of HOORSENBUHS®
Last Updated on Monday, 12 January 2015 09:58
 

SMU’s Pollock Gallery to present artworks by Kristen Cochran

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Art gallery PR   
Friday, 09 January 2015 15:00
'Soaked (indigo),' hand dyed paper, 30x22 inches, 2014. Image courtesy of Pollock Gallery, SMU DALLAS – The Pollock Gallery of the Division of Art at SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts will present the exhibition “soak stain bleed bloom” from Jan. 31 through March 21.

This exhibition by Meadows School alumna Kristen Cochran (M.F.A. ’10) features a series of lush mixed media drawings on paper and a site-specific soft sculptural intervention. The installation includes physical traces of a fluid studio process, and Cochran considers its symbolic implications. For instance, actions such as soaking, staining, bleeding and blooming were a part of the process that produced the art objects included in the exhibition, but these actions also imply bodies, objects or architecture in a state of abjection.

“Kristen has been producing some really powerful work since she graduated from SMU. She has this amazing ability to push a material and a site to its limits to reveal strange and wondrous visual qualities,” said Noah Simblist, chair of the Meadows Division of Art. “She has also been incredibly active, showing both locally and nationally. After a studio visit this summer I saw a great opportunity to showcase one of our outstanding alumni.”

The opening reception of “soak stain bleed bloom” will be held Saturday, Jan. 31 from 6-8 p.m. with the artist in attendance.

The artist Kristen Cochran is from the Pacific Northwest. She moved to Texas to complete her M.F.A. at the Meadows School of the Arts at Southern Methodist University in 2010. She has exhibited her work in Texas, Arizona, the Pacific Northwest and New York, and has works in private collections in Italy and London. In Texas, Cochran has exhibited at the Dallas Contemporary art museum, Talley Dunn Gallery, Blue Star Contemporary, Central Trak, Oliver Francis Gallery, Barry Whistler Gallery, Eastfield College, the University of Texas at Dallas and WAAS Gallery and has participated in the 2011 and 2013 Texas Biennials in Austin and San Antonio. She has been awarded residencies in Long Island City, N.Y., and Mittersill, Austria, and more recently received a Jentel residency in Wyoming. Cochran presently teaches drawing and sculpture at the University of Texas at Dallas and has taught at SMU, the Nasher Sculpture Center and the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth.

The Pollock Gallery is located on the first floor of the Hughes-Trigg Student Center, 3140 Dyer St. on the Southern Methodist University campus in Dallas. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday, and 1-5 p.m. Saturday. Admission is free. For more information, call 214-768-4439 or visit www.smu.edu/Meadows/AreasOfStudy/Art/PollockGallery



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE
'Soaked (indigo),' hand dyed paper, 30x22 inches, 2014. Image courtesy of Pollock Gallery, SMU 'Seeped (green),' dye and dry pigment on paper, 7x10 inches, 2014. Image courtesy of Pollock Gallery, SMU 'Coat (davis street),' urethane and pigment on glass and windows, dimensions variable, 2014 Image courtesy of Pollock Gallery, SMU
Last Updated on Friday, 09 January 2015 15:23
 

Punk rockers discover stolen Rodrigue artworks, turn them over to police

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Associated Press   
Thursday, 08 January 2015 12:26
George Rodrigue's (American, 1944-2013) painting titled 'Wendy and Me' has been recovered and returned to the late artist's New Orleans gallery from which it was stolen. Handout photo

NEW ORLEANS (AP) - Members of a New Orleans punk rock band called Stereo Fire Empire have found and turned over to police two stolen artworks by the late Cajun artist George Rodrigue. The works were discovered by bandmembers on Tuesday night, leaning against a wall of the Omni Royal Hotel in New Orleans' French Quarter.

The painter's son, Jacques Rodrigue, said one of the works, a "Blue Dog" painting valued at $250,000, had been taken from the Rodrigue Gallery on Royal Street on Tuesday, in a brazen daylight heist.

The second artwork, a print, is believed to have been sold years ago through the George Rodrigue Founmdation of the Arts. Police are attempting to locate the owner.

The painting stolen from the Rodrigue Gallery, titled Wendy and Me,  is valued at $250,000. The theft was recorded on security video, which is being reviewed by New Orleans police.

George Rodrigue (1944-2013) already had a following for his paintings of Acadian life when he gained fame for his depictions of a small blue dog with pointy ears and yellow eyes. The painting Wendy and Me shows a tuxedo-clad blue dog standing next to the late artist's wife, Wendy, in her wedding gown.

After the recovery of the painting, Jacques Rodrigue commented: "We are so thankful for the Good Samaritans that saved this special artwork. Dad painted 'Wendy and Me' for his wedding to Wendy, so this is an irreplaceable piece to my family. We are overjoyed to have it returned undamaged."

#   #   #

Auction Central News contributed to this report.

Copyright 2015 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This information may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
George Rodrigue's (American, 1944-2013) painting titled 'Wendy and Me' has been recovered and returned to the late artist's New Orleans gallery from which it was stolen. Handout photo
Last Updated on Thursday, 08 January 2015 17:40
 

Cartoonists use art to express outrage over terrorist attack in Paris

PDF Print E-mail
Written by ACNI Staff   
Thursday, 08 January 2015 11:04
The website for French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo reflects a national day of mourning in France following the terrorist attack that left 12 people dead and 11 more wounded. The uniting motto heard around the world in reaction to the heinous murders is 'Je suis Charlie' (I am Charlie). NEW YORK (ACNI) – Political cartoonists around the world have reacted in solidarity to Wednesday’s terrorist attack on the French satirical newspaper “Charlie Hebdo,” using their art to express their outrage and refusal to be silenced.

Among the victims of the attack – in which masked gunmen stormed the magazine’s offices brandishing AK-47s and shouting “Allahu Akbar” – were a prominent economist and some of France’s most revered cartoonists.:

• Bernard Maris, 58, economist and journalist, university lecturer, weekly columnist in Charlie Hebdo

• Jean Cabut, 76, one of France’s best-known cartoonists, with a career spanning 60 years

• Georges Wolinski, 80, respected veteran cartoonist with Charlie Hebdo

• Bernard Verlhac, who drew under the name “Tignous,” a cartoonist since 1980 and a member of Cartoonists for Peace

• Philippe Honore, the cartoonist who drew the cartoon tweeted by the magazine shortly before Wednesday’s attack

• Stephane “Charb” Charbonnier, former editor and publishing director

Others who died during the murderous rampage included police officer Ahmed Merabet, Charbonnier’s police bodyguard Franck Brinsolaro, Frederic Boisseau, Elsa Cayat, Mustapha Ourrad and Michel Renaud.

Following is a selection of editorial cartoons that appeared in newspapers yesterday and today following the attack.



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE
The website for French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo reflects a national day of mourning in France following the terrorist attack that left 12 people dead and 11 more wounded. The uniting motto heard around the world in reaction to the heinous murders is 'Je suis Charlie' (I am Charlie). Cartoon by David Pope, Canberra Times, Australia, @davpope Cartoon by Dave Brown accompanying a letter from The Independent's deputy editor, UK Cartoon by Ruben L. Oppenheimer, Netherlands, @RLOppenheimer Cartoon by Satish Acharya, India, @satishacharya Cartoon by Steve Bell, The Guardian, UK, @guardian Cartoon by Matt Davies, Newsday, USA, @NewsdayOpinion
Last Updated on Thursday, 08 January 2015 12:03
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Page 1 of 73
ADVERTISEMENTS

Banner Banner