Payday Loans
payday loans
ADVERTISEMENTS
Banner
Banner

Get Free ACN Daily Headlines

LiveAuctioneers

Search Auction Central News

ADVERTISEMENTS
Banner
Banner
Bookmark and Share
Art in the News

Sotheby’s to auction finest van Gogh still life to appear in decades

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Auction House PR   
Monday, 29 September 2014 09:41
Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-1890), 'Still Life, Vase with Daisies and Poppies,' oil on linen, 26 by 20⅛ in. 66 by 51 cm. Painted on June 16-17, 1890. Est. $30/50 million. Image courtesy of Sotheby's NEW YORK – Sotheby’s will offer Vincent van Gogh’s Still Life, Vase with Daisies and Poppies in its Evening Sale of Impressionist & Modern Art in New York on November 4, 2014. Painted at the home of Dr. Paul Gachet just weeks before the end of Van Gogh’s life, the artist uses the richly-colored bouquet of wildflowers to convey his psychological state at the time – a hallmark of the Expressionist icon. The resulting composition teems with the intense energy, emotion and sensitivity of this creative genius at the height of his short but renowned career. Still Life is one of the few works that Van Gogh sold during his lifetime, and is one of only a handful of great works by the artist to appear at auction in recent decades. The painting comes to auction this November with a pre-sale estimate of $30/50 million.

Simon Shaw, Co-Head of Sotheby’s Worldwide Impressionist & Modern Art Department, commented: “Still Life, Vase with Daisies and Poppies radiates the exuberance and passion found in Van Gogh’s greatest and most coveted works. The vibrant composition captures in sharp relief the intensity of the artist at the height of his mania, only weeks before his tragic end. Still Life has remained in the same private collection for more than two decades, which adds again to its appeal for today’s market. We are privileged to present it to collectors across the globe this autumn.”

Still Life will be on view in the Hong Kong Convention & Exhibition Centre from October 2-5 and in Sotheby’s London galleries from October 12–18, before returning to New York for exhibition in Sotheby’s York Avenue galleries beginning October 31.

Vincent van Gogh painted the present work in June of 1890 in Auvers-sur Oise, the town where he settled following his release from the asylum at St-Rémy that May. Renting a room at the local Ravoux Inn, he spent his days setting up his easel in the fields to paint the scenes of the lush countryside, as well as visiting with his physician, Dr. Gachet.

Still Life was painted at Dr. Gachet's house and presumably came immediately into his possession upon completion. The viewer can imagine Van Gogh walking through the fields on his way to Gachet's, gathering up armfuls of poppies, daisies, cornflowers and sheaves of wheat to squeeze into one of the doctor’s modest vases. In comparison with the more reserved and academic still-lifes that he had completed in Paris in the mid-1880s, the present work evinces a dramatic shift in Van Gogh’s painterly style, characterized by a frenetic energy. The artist was flooded with anxiety in Auvers, and this agitation spilled over onto even his most optimistic canvases. It is in these same fields that Van Gogh would attempt to take his own life, only weeks after painting this work.

Whether Van Gogh gave Still Life to Dr. Gachet in exchange for medical consultation is unknown, but he was certainly dependent upon his brother Theo for money and art supplies at the end of his life. Van Gogh was eager to show his brother – an art dealer – that he could support himself, and he believed that his still lifes would be the most saleable of his compositions.

Still Life is one of the very few paintings sold during Van Gogh’s lifetime. It was acquired by Gaston Alexandre Camentron, a noted collector of Impressionist pictures, who eventually sold it to Paul Cassirer Gallery in 1911. Still Life remained with a series of private collectors in Germany until the mid-1920s, when it made its way to London and eventually to New York – one of the earliest works by the artist to enter the United States – where it was sold by the Knoedler Gallery in 1928 to A. Conger Goodyear. Known as one of the principle founders of the Museum of Modern Art, Goodyear kept this work in his family's private collection. It was eventually gifted in part by the Goodyears to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, where it was on display for over 30 years before it was sold at the request of the family.

#   #   #



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-1890), 'Still Life, Vase with Daisies and Poppies,' oil on linen, 26 by 20⅛ in. 66 by 51 cm. Painted on June 16-17, 1890. Est. $30/50 million. Image courtesy of Sotheby's
Last Updated on Monday, 29 September 2014 09:50
 

Vibrations prompt evacuation of Tenn. state office building

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Associated Press   
Friday, 26 September 2014 09:45
The James K. Polk State Office Building was completed in 1981. Each floor of the 24-story building hangs from a central steel core. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – About 500 people were evacuated on Wednesday from a state office building in downtown Nashville where vibrations were reported.

Tennessee Emergency Management spokesman Jeremy Heidt said the employees left the James K. Polk building as a precautionary measure.

Tennessee Department of General Services spokeswoman Kelly Smith told The Associated Press in an email that professional engineers examined the area of concern and determined that there were “no structural concerns.” She said workers would return on Thursday.

The building is uniquely built in that the floors and glass walls of the tower are suspended from a central concrete core.

“In heavily loaded structural steel facilities like the Polk Building, movement and vibrations occasionally occur,” Smith wrote. “We are putting monitoring devices in place.”

The building houses the bulk of the Tennessee Department of Transportation's headquarters, as well as other state institutions, such as the Tennessee Performing Arts Center and Tennessee State Museum.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-09-25-14 0029GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
The James K. Polk State Office Building was completed in 1981. Each floor of the 24-story building hangs from a central steel core. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
Last Updated on Friday, 26 September 2014 09:59
 

Photographer Andre Plessel has NYC debut at Lilac Gallery, Oct. 17

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Art gallery PR   
Thursday, 25 September 2014 11:12
'Cigar Lady No. 4, San Marino 1995' - 20 X 24 inch silver gelatin print, framed, signed. $5,000. New York Series 2014. Image courtesy of The Lilac Gallery.

New YORK – International art photographer Andre Plessel will present his debut New York City exhibit “Andre Plessel: Visions” at the Lilac Gallery at 144 Fifth Ave. in Manhattan’s Flatiron District opening on Friday, Oct. 17, and running through Thursday, Nov. 6.

Plessel’s exhibit will feature his signature dramatic, erotic art photographs in black and white, along with a series of his unique new color processed photographs, which garnered a huge amount of attention at his recent “Processed Photographs” exhibit at the Monika Mohr Gallery in Hamburg, Germany.

As Lilac Gallery co-owner Cindy Shaoul explains, "Lilac Gallery is honored to have Andre Plessel presenting his art with us for the very first time in New York City. As an artist, he not only captures the true beauty in women, but breaths beauty into each and every one of his subjects. His outstanding vision and deep sense of connection with his subjects is what creates these exquisite pieces of art."

His “processed photographs” feature Plessel’s own unique process of adding color to the black and white images by hand, which are then exposed by a developer liquid applied with a brush, thus creating a dramatic new aesthetic look. Each of these photographs is uniquely “one-of-kind” making them even more desirable.

All shows feature his signature black and white silver gelatin photographs that are hand-printed and signed, along with his color-processed black and white prints, also signed. For over 22 years now, Plessel has been driven by his ultimate passion, that of black and white photography. His artwork creates dramatic, romantic and delicate images with great attention to his own style of lighting. It has been said that his artistic photographs convey and play upon sensual tension, as opposed to blatant sexuality.

For many years Plessel has lived simultaneously in Munich, Germany and Miami, Fla., while also traveling the world. Over the years, he has worked extensively in London, Milan, Paris, Barcelona, New York, Los Angeles and Miami. As many art world insiders know, Plessel’s work has often been compared to that of his longtime friend and collaborator Helmut Newton, with whom he traveled and worked with in Europe and the U.S.

New York City’s Lilac Gallery, along with showcasing some of America’s finest artists, looks to distinguish a reputation as "the new frontier gallery" assimilating Leo Castelli's approach to the discovery of new art styles and art forms. Working with a roster of both established and up and coming artists, Lilac Gallery is taking its place among top art connoisseurs, collectors, artists and dealers in New York City's ever-growing art market.



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE
'Cigar Lady No. 4, San Marino 1995' - 20 X 24 inch silver gelatin print, framed, signed. $5,000. New York Series 2014. Image courtesy of The Lilac Gallery. 'La Famiglia, Naples 1995' - 20 X 24 inch silver gelatin print, framed, signed. $5,000. New York Series 2014. Image courtesy of The Lilac Gallery. 'Stranded Alone No. 1, Lanzarotte 2006' - 20 X 24 inch silver gelatin print, framed, signed. $5,000. New York Series 2014. Image courtesy of The Lilac Gallery. Protected Women, Naples 1995 - 20 X 24 inch silver gelatin print, framed, signed. $5,000. New York Series 2014. Image courtesy of The Lilac Gallery.
Last Updated on Thursday, 25 September 2014 12:26
 

WWII sailor kissing nurse sculpture lands in Normandy

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Associated Press   
Thursday, 25 September 2014 10:09
The Alfred Eisenstaedt photograph that inspired the Seward Johnson's 'Unconditional Surrender' sculpture. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com archive and Westlicht Photographica Auctions. CAEN, France (AP) – A sculpture honoring a photograph of a kiss in Times Square that captured New York's celebration as World War II ended has gone up in Normandy for a one-year visit.

Cranes and construction crews in the French city of Caen on Tuesday hoisted and locked together pieces of Unconditional Surrender, a 25-foot cast-bronze sculpture in color of a sailor and a nurse in a lip-locked embrace.

The sculpture by Seward Johnson is based on a U.S. Navy photographer's black-and-white snapshot taken Aug. 15, 1945, according to the Sculpture Foundation, a U.S.-based nonprofit that owns the work. It also resembles a famous photo taken by Life magazine's Alfred Eisenstaedt on that day.

The sculpture is to spend a year outside the Caen Memorial, a museum focusing on World War II.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-09-23-14 1930GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
The Alfred Eisenstaedt photograph that inspired the Seward Johnson's 'Unconditional Surrender' sculpture. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com archive and Westlicht Photographica Auctions.
Last Updated on Thursday, 25 September 2014 10:38
 

Charioteer removed from Minn. Capitol to be restored

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Associated Press   
Wednesday, 24 September 2014 10:46
Golden quadriga above the south entrance to the Minnesota Capitol. Image by Harvardton. This image is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license.

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) – The golden sculpture atop Minnesota's Capitol is temporarily losing a defining feature.

Crews used a crane Tuesday to remove the charioteer that is symbolically steering the golden horses. The figure that is part of the Quadriga sculpture is being sent off during repairs that will take about three months. It will be returned as weather permits.

The Quadriga has been a prominent fixture in front of the marble dome for more than 100 years. It has been refurbished at various points, but the charioteer figure is being removed so crews can fix corrosion at the base of the sculpture. While it's down, the charioteer figure will be regilded.

Minnesota's Capitol is several months into a $270 million renovation that will last until 2017.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-09-23-14 0903GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Golden quadriga above the south entrance to the Minnesota Capitol. Image by Harvardton. This image is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 24 September 2014 10:55
 

Da Vinci's unfinished masterpiece emerging in all its beauty

PDF Print E-mail
Written by AFP wire service   
Wednesday, 24 September 2014 10:16
Da Vinci's unfinished 'Adoration of the Magi' prior to restoration. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. FLORENCE, Italy – The Adoration of the Magi, an unfinished masterpiece by Leonardo Da Vinci, is beginning to reveal its full beauty after years hidden under layers of grime.

Restorers working on the giant painting issued an update this week and revealed that they were three quarters of the way toward completing the cleaning of the huge (2.46 meters x 2.43 meters) tableau.

"The typical aerial perspective and atmosphere of Leonardo is already very obvious," said Marco Ciatti, one of the officials overseeing the restoration.

The painting was the work of the young Leonardo and he abandoned it when he left for Milan in 1481. It has been in the hands of a Florentine laboratory since 2011 awaiting the start of restoration work that was preceded by a year of preparatory research.

"Elements that could only be seen via infrared are now visible to the naked eye," said Ciatti, adding that the restorers were now much better able to understand how the artist had composed the work.

After the restoration of the painting is finished, the team will start work on the cracked frame with the aim of having it hanging in Florence's Galleria degli Uffizi by the end of 2015.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Da Vinci's unfinished 'Adoration of the Magi' prior to restoration. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 24 September 2014 10:28
 

Artists hope to turn Maine State House copper into art

PDF Print E-mail
Written by ALANNA DURKIN, Associated Press   
Tuesday, 23 September 2014 10:52
Maine State House as it looked prior to renovation. Photo by Albany NY. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) - To some, the weathered green copper sheets that have been removed from the Maine Statehouse dome may just look like scrap. But to the artists in Maine who are clamoring to get a piece, it looks like opportunity.

The state had planned to recycle most of the 100-year-old metal that's being replaced with shiny new copper. But lawmakers are now considering whether to sell or give some of it to jewelers and artists for sculptures or keepsakes so that the public can share a piece of the historical copper.

For artists, like Andreas von Heune, it's a no brainer.

"Why would we melt this down when we have this wonderful material that carries so much culture with it, so much history with it?'' said von Huene, a 58-year-old sculptor who lives in Arrowsic.

One part of the plan, which the bi-partisan panel of legislative leaders that's overseeing the dome restoration could vote on this week, includes selling some of the copper directly to jewelers and artisans to create art pieces.

The state would also hold a design competition to create souvenirs, which would be sold to the public. Other pieces of the copper would be used to create a public art piece for the Statehouse Capitol Complex.

Von Huene wants to use the green copper panels to create a sculpture within the plants and trees at the Viles Aboretum -- or somewhere else with a view of the Statehouse dome -- so that viewers' eyes will be drawn from the art piece to where the copper laid for more than a century.

"So much of our lives are set on a book or computer monitor. When do we pick our heads up and look into the distance?'' he said. If the sculpture makes that connection, "you're going to pick your head up and look at the dome,'' he said.

Much of the copper on the dome has already been replaced and the entire $1.3 million project is on schedule to be done in November.

But lawmakers are still grappling with how much the art proposal would cost and whether the state can afford it. The original plan to recycle most of the material was expected to produce around $15,000.

"Clearly, we don't want to spend a million of taxpayer dollars in order to do something fancy with the roof,'' said Senate Democratic Leader Anne Haskell of Portland. "The whole idea is to be able to allow people in the state of Maine to share the artistic and historical value of that copper.''

The Bangor Public Library, which completed a $3 million replacement of its own century-old copper roof last year, brought in around $10,000 by auctioning off pieces of the copper and jewelry crafted from the material, said Barbara McDade, the library's director.

Several Maine artists have express interest in using the Statehouse copper for a variety of projects, said Julie Richard, executive director of the Maine Arts Commission, which is helping lawmakers with the art proposals.

Von Huene said that even if the plan doesn't move forward, lawmakers' interest in helping Maine's art community is encouraging.

"Even if nothing comes from it, the idea that people in state government are willing to do something like this, that's a very happy and healthy sign.''

___

Follow Alanna Durkin at http://www.twitter.com/aedurkin

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Maine State House as it looked prior to renovation. Photo by Albany NY. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons
Last Updated on Tuesday, 23 September 2014 11:24
 

Sotheby's to auction Jasper Johns' iconic 'Flag,' Nov. 11

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 23 September 2014 09:24
Jasper Johns, 'Flag,' signed and dated 1983 on the reverse, encaustic on silk flag on canvas, 11 5/8  x 17 1/2in (29.5 x 44.4 cm). To be auctioned at Sotheby's New York, Nov. 11, 2014, with a $15 million to $20 million estimate. Image courtesy of Sotheby's.

NEW YORK - On Nov. 11, 2014 Sotheby’s will present Jasper John’s Flag, one of the most recognizable works of American art which will feature in the Contemporary Art Evening sale.

This late example was acquired from the artist in 1983, the year it was made, and has remained in the same private collection since. The Flags are executed in encaustic, a painstaking process where pigment is mixed with hot wax, and meticulously applied in a laborious process. Estimated to fetch between $15 and $20 million, Flag is on view today, Sept. 23, at Sotheby’s Los Angeles galleries, with future exhibitions scheduled for Hong Kong, London and New York.

Anthony Grant, Sotheby’s Vice Chairman, Americas commented: “I have known this painting for 30 years, yet even now I am struck anew by its power. Jasper’s Flag paintings recast this most potent of symbols in unprecedented terms of abstracted composition. Already virtually universally recognized and revered, Jasper Johns has made our flag one of the keynotes of twentieth century art history.”

John’s Flags are in the collections of many of the most distinguished American institutions including the Museum Of Modern Art, New York, The Metropolitan Museum, Whitney Museum of American Art, Kunstmuseum Basel, Museum Ludwig in Cologne, and the Museum Moderner Kunst Stiftung Ludwig in Vienna. The present example has been on loan most recently at the Philadelphia Museum of Art (from 2007 to 2014) and before that the Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design (2002-2007) and Yale University Art Gallery (1999-2002).

Exhibition Dates and Details:

Sept. 22-23 Sotheby’s Los Angeles, 9200 W Sunset Boulevard, Suite 170, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Oct. 3-5 Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre

Oct. 11-18 Sotheby's, 34-35 New Bond Street, London W1A 2AA UK

Visit Sotheby's online at www.sothebys.com .

#   #   #



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Jasper Johns, 'Flag,' signed and dated 1983 on the reverse, encaustic on silk flag on canvas, 11 5/8  x 17 1/2in (29.5 x 44.4 cm). To be auctioned at Sotheby's New York, Nov. 11, 2014, with a $15 million to $20 million estimate. Image courtesy of Sotheby's.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 23 September 2014 09:34
 

'Vincent: the musical' to mark 125 years since Van Gogh's death

PDF Print E-mail
Written by AFP Wire Service   
Tuesday, 23 September 2014 09:13
'Vincent van Gogh - Self-Portrait - Google Art Project (454045)' by Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-1890). Image courtesy Google Cultural Institute THE HAGUE (AFP) - The tragic life of Vincent van Gogh will be brought to the stage as a musical to mark 125 from the death of one of theworld's greatest artists, organizers said Tuesday.

Simply called "Vincent", the musical will open late next year along with several other events commemorating the Dutch Post-Impressionist painter's death in July 1890.

The production aims to "bring Vincent van Gogh's works to life in a non-traditional way," Martine Willekens, spokeswoman for the Van Gogh Europe Foundation, told AFP.

Known for his bold colors and rough, vibrant painting style, Van Gogh was one of the most revolutionary painters of the 19th century.

He only sold one painting in his own short lifetime, which was wracked with bouts of mental illness and depression, including one famous episode where he sliced off part of his ear.

The role of Van Gogh himself has not yet been cast but the production will be directed by Dutch producer Albert Verlinde.

It is commonly believed that Van Gogh shot himself aged 37 in a small village near Paris, although researchers have also put forward theories that he may have been the victim of an accidental shooting.

"It's perhaps a little odd to celebrate his death," Amsterdam's Van Gogh Museum director Axel Rueger told the Dutch news agency ANP. "But over the years the artist has become a global celebrity, a kind of rock star," he said.

Next year's celebration, called "125 Years of Inspiration," will also include an exhibition of Van Gogh's paintings in Amsterdam and that of Norway's Edvard Munch, best known for his painting The Scream.

#   #   #



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
'Vincent van Gogh - Self-Portrait - Google Art Project (454045)' by Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-1890). Image courtesy Google Cultural Institute
Last Updated on Tuesday, 23 September 2014 09:23
 

Trove of Great Depression photographs a click away

PDF Print E-mail
Written by JOHN SOWELL, Idaho Statesman   
Friday, 19 September 2014 13:51
 Russell Lee (American, 1903-1986) photograph of Mrs. Bill Stagg with states quilt, Pie Town, New Mexico. Russell photographed Japanese-American citizens sent to internment camps during World War II. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. BOISE, Idaho (AP) – When Dorothea Lange drove through Emmett on her way to Ola in northern Gem County one day in October 1939, the San Francisco woman was arguably the most famous photographer in the nation.

Three years earlier, Lange had shot a series of photographs of Florence Owens Thompson and her children that became known as the “Migrant Mother” series. One of the photos shows Thompson with a baby in her arm, two other children beside her facing away from the camera, and their mother looking into the distance without hope.

That photograph was printed in newspapers across the country and became the iconic photo of the Great Depression.

In 1939, Lange was sent by the federal Farm Security Administration to document the Ola Self-Help Sawmill, a cooperative established by Ola residents. The mill was seeded with a $1,500 loan from the FSA.

Lange shot 58 photos during her time in Ola. (I doubt my mother, Io Blessinger Sowell, ever realized who the photographer was who took a photo of her and her classmates in front of the Ola school.)

Those photos are among 170,000 now available for viewing via an online map created by Yale University. The photographs, taken between 1935 and 1944, can be accessed by clicking on a particular county or by searching under Lange or 131 other photographers who fanned out across the country to document government relief programs.

All but six Idaho counties – Bear Lake, Benewah, Caribou, Elmore, Kootenai and Owyhee – are represented.

Malheur County, just across the state line in Oregon, has nearly 800 photos, more than any Idaho county. Lange went there after she left Ola.

The photo project was part of a massive propaganda effort meant to build support for President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal programs. It came after courts had dealt the president a massive blow by repealing many of his early programs designed to lift the country out of the Depression.

While in Ola, Lange wrote that the owners of the Ola lumber mill needed a way to sustain themselves after several years of severe conditions that caused a deterioration of farming and grazing.

“The nearest supply of lumber available is at Emmett, which makes its cost, delivered to the farmer, prohibitive,” Lange wrote. “Their own valley is bordered on the east by a forest that could develop an unlimited supply of yellow pine and Douglas fir.”

Lange's photos showed members of the cooperative sawing logs, and posing individually and in groups. There are also photos of the kids outside the school, co-op members farming and some home scenes.

“It's amazing,” longtime Ola resident and music teacher Gloria Sutton said. “It's just interesting to see those photos.”

Three other heavyweight photographers – Russell Lee, Arthur Rothstein and John Vachon – also took pictures in Idaho.

Lee became famous for his color shots of people in Pie Hole, N.M., in 1940. It turned out he also shot 942 of the 1,215 Depression-era photos taken in Idaho, including one of a car coming down what's known today as Old Freezeout Hill south of Emmett.

Rothstein shot 37 photos in Oneida County in southeastern Idaho in 1936, when he was 21. He documented farm families whose land was too poor to support them.

Earlier that year, he shot his most famous photograph in Cimarron County, Okla. It showed farmer Art Coble and his two sons struggling to walk in front of their house during a dust storm.

Vachon started work maintaining the FSA's photo collection. He later became a photographer himself and shot nine photos in Idaho Falls in April 1942. Eventually, he worked as a staff photographer for Life and Look magazines.

When President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed an executive order on Feb. 19, 1942, more than 120,000 people of Japanese heritage – two-thirds of them United States citizens – were uprooted from their homes in Washington, Oregon and California and sent to prison camps in several states.

Single men were recruited before they left the horse barns that served as a temporary holding center in Portland to work the sugar beet crop in Nyssa, Ore.

“They were so hard up for help over here and the reason they were hard up for help, everybody was in the Army,” said Yasu Teramura, in an interview with the organizers of a photo exhibit that debuts Friday at the Four Rivers Cultural Center in Ontario. “The sugar company got an OK that we could come over here ... but we had to be under strict restrictions that you could only stay up (until) 8 o'clock at night and you know you couldn't roam around all over unless you went with some guard ... to go to the show and stuff.”

The laborers were allowed to live without the barbed-wire fences that kept inmates inside the World War II prison camps where many of their friends and relatives were sent in Hunt, north of Twin Falls, and in other states. Yet they were forced to live in tents that provided little shelter and, later, in meager barracks.

“This was still internment,” said Matthew Stringer, executive director of the Four Rivers center. “They had a curfew and they could only go into town twice a week (never on Saturday) and under constant supervision.”

The photo exhibit, “Uprooted: Japanese American Farm Labor Camps During World War II,” features a series of photographs taken by Farm Security Administration photographer Russell Lee in Nyssa and at later farm camps that opened in Idaho in Rupert, Shelley and Twin Falls.

Many of the photos, available for viewing online from Yale University's Photogrammar site, have never been part of a public exhibit before.

Organized by the Oregon Cultural Heritage Commission, the exhibit opens with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m. on Friday. From 3 to 5 p.m. Saturday, curator Morgen Young will present a history of the Nyssa farm camp. Several of the camp workers and others who had friends and family members work at the camp are expected to take part in a question-and-answer session during the lecture.

The exhibit runs through Dec. 12. It will then be on display from Jan. 16 to March 16 at the Minidoka County Historical Society in Rupert, followed by exhibitions in Portland and in Los Angeles.

___

Information from: Idaho Statesman, http://www.idahostatesman.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, and redistributed.

AP-WF-09-18-14 1726GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
 Russell Lee (American, 1903-1986) photograph of Mrs. Bill Stagg with states quilt, Pie Town, New Mexico. Russell photographed Japanese-American citizens sent to internment camps during World War II. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
Last Updated on Friday, 19 September 2014 14:42
 

Eisenhower Memorial panel puts off vote on Gehry's design

PDF Print E-mail
Written by BRETT ZONGKER, Associated Press   
Thursday, 18 September 2014 11:16

Model of the proposed Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial. Eisenhower Memorial Commission image, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

WASHINGTON (AP) – A federal commission working to build a memorial honoring President Dwight D. Eisenhower near the National Mall was considering Wednesday whether to move forward with architect Frank Gehry's design after years of controversy over the project.

No votes were taken, however, because the commission lacked a quorum. Seven lawmakers did not attend the meeting on Capitol Hill, including Kansas Sen. Pat Roberts and Kansas Sen. Jerry Moran, who have championed the project in the past. Instead the panel will hold an electronic vote by Sept. 24 on how to proceed.

Earlier in September, Gehry's team presented a revised design for a proposed memorial park in response to objections from critics and Eisenhower's family who said the earlier design was too big and extravagant. The Eisenhower Memorial Commission is scheduled to meet Wednesday for the first time in more than a year to consider Gehry's changes or whether to move the 15-year-old project in a different direction.

In the revised design, Gehry's Los Angeles-based team eliminated two large, metal tapestries on the sides of the memorial park, along with some large columns. One long, stainless steel tapestry would remain as a backdrop, depicting the Kansas landscape of Ike's boyhood home. The park would also include statues of Eisenhower as president and World War II general and inscriptions from some famous speeches.

But in a letter to the commission this week, Eisenhower's family said the revised design still does not address their concerns. They said the project is at a “crossroads” and should pursue a simpler design without any tapestries or columns – or be completely redesigned.

“Our family is ready to help move this memorial to completion under conditions that can re-energize this effort,” wrote the 34th president's granddaughters, Anne Eisenhower and Susan Eisenhower.

As an alternative, the Eisenhower commission will consider building only the “core of the Gehry design without any tapestries or columns,” as suggested by the family and by California Rep. Darrell Issa, who has weighed in on the project. In that case, Gehry would likely withdraw from the project if his trademark tapestries are eliminated.

“Gehry Partners has indicated that it will not present or associate its name with a design that does not include the tapestry and column elements and will withdraw from the project,” wrote Brig. Gen. Carl Reddel, the commission's director, in a letter Monday.

Dan Feil, the executive architect for the project, will present both alternatives to the commission, which includes Democratic and Republican lawmakers and presidential appointees.

The Eisenhower memorial would be Gehry's first major project in Washington. The famed architect's designs include the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain, and the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles, among others.

Project estimates have put the memorial's total cost at $142 million. The cost has become a primary concern, resulting in Congress' decision not to approve any additional funding until the design dispute is resolved, according to Issa, who is chairman of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform.

“All the project's stakeholders recognize the importance of creating an enduring memorial that honors President Eisenhower's legacy,” he wrote to the commission last week, “but these controversies have clouded the decision-making process and prevented the project from moving forward.”

___

Eisenhower Memorial Commission: http://eisenhowermemorial.gov

___

Follow Brett Zongker on Twitter at https://twitter.com/DCArtBeat .

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-09-17-14 1407GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

Model of the proposed Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial. Eisenhower Memorial Commission image, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. 

Last Updated on Thursday, 18 September 2014 11:26
 

Tenant vacating Grant Wood's 'American Gothic' house

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Associated Press   
Thursday, 18 September 2014 09:33

Grant Wood's masterpiece 'American Gothic.'  Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

ELDON, Iowa (AP) – The rural Iowa house that helped inspire the famous American Gothic painting is empty and could be up for rent.

The home in the southeast Iowa town of Eldon has had the same tenant for the past four years. But Monday marked Beth Howard's last day in the house, the Des Moines Register reported.

“There should be a statute of limitations for how long one can live in a tourist attraction,” she told the newspaper Tuesday.

The 700-square-foot home was made famous by Grant Wood, a native Iowa artist who spotted the house while traveling through the area. He used it as the backdrop to his 1930 painting of a farmer holding a pitchfork next to his daughter.

The house, now owned by the State Historical Society of Iowa, was rented to Howard for just $250 a month. Officials reasoned it would help offset the tenant's patience for dealing with curious tourists walking on the property and peeking inside.

Jerome Thompson, the society's historic site administrator, said the group is weighing its options on what to do next. They may rent it out again or they may offer an artist-in-residence program. They may also allow the next-door visitors' center, which is run by the city and county, to use it.

Eldon is located about 100 miles southeast of Des Moines.

___

Information from: The Des Moines Register, http://www.desmoinesregister.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-09-16-14 2121GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

Grant Wood's masterpiece 'American Gothic.'  Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons. 

The State Historical Society of Iowa owns the 1881-82 house, which was built in the Carpenter Gothic architectural style. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
Last Updated on Thursday, 18 September 2014 10:57
 

Indianapolis museum to present works by video pioneer Bill Viola

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Museum PR   
Wednesday, 17 September 2014 16:10
Bill Viola (American, b. 1951-), The Crossing (detail), 1996, Dallas Museum of Art, Lay Family Acquisition Fund, General Acquisitions Fund, and gifts from an anonymous donor, Howard E. Rachofsky, Gayle Stoffel, Mr. and Mrs. William T. Solomon, Catherine and Will Rose, and Emily and Steve Summers, in honor of Deedie Rose, © Bill Viola, Long Beach, California. Photo by Kira Perov. INDIANAPOLIS — The Indianapolis Museum of Art announced today an exhibition of works by the world-renowned video pioneer Bill Viola.

Bill Viola: Capturing Spectacle and Passion will feature two works by the acclaimed video artist. On loan from the Dallas Museum of Art, The Crossing (1996) consists of a double-sided screen with two videos simultaneously projected—one featuring a man being engulfed in flames, the other a man consumed by water. The 12-minute spectacle confronts the eternal cycle of life, death and the hope of rebirth.

Also on display is The Quintet of the Silent (2001), a work from the IMA’s contemporary collection. The video shows five men depicting various emotions in slow motion, allowing the viewer to witness the evolution and complexity of each feeling.

"I am thrilled to have The Crossing on loan from my former museum to share with Indianapolis,” Venable said. “When I first saw the video I was totally astounded. The imagery of fire and water glowing in the darkness and the sound of destruction rumbling through the space produces a truly transformative experience. Visitors will be mesmerized by the power of it all."

A pioneer of video art, Viola has been working with the medium since the early 1970s. His brilliant video installations explore timeless themes of human existence with his signature slow motion style. Describing his work as a"slowly unfolding ballet,” Viola reveals the hidden beauty found in moments, allowing viewers to carefully examine and reflect on the action occurring.

"Viola’s impact on the development of video art is immeasurable," said Tricia Y. Paik, the IMA’s curator of contemporary art. "He continues to expand new media practices in engaging and innovative ways while staying firmly committed to exploring what it means to be human, by tackling timeless and complex themes such as life and death, joy and sorrow."

The exhibit opens Sept. 26 in the June M. McCormack Forefront Galleries.

About the Indianapolis Museum of Art:

Founded in 1883, the Indianapolis Museum of Art serves the creative interests of its communities by fostering exploration of arts, design and the natural environment. Encompassing 152 acres of gardens and grounds, the IMA is among the 10 oldest and 10 largest encyclopedic art museums in the United States and features significant collections of African, American, Asian, European, contemporary art and design arts that spans 5,000 years of history. Additionally, art, design, and nature are featured at The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park: 100 Acres, Oldfields–Lilly House and Gardens, a historic Country-Place-Era estate and National Historic Landmark on the IMA grounds and the Miller House and Garden in Columbus, Indiana, one of the country’s most highly regarded examples of mid-century Modernist residences. For more information visit www.imamuseum.org .

#   #   #

Last Updated on Wednesday, 17 September 2014 16:54
 

Converting lighthouses for private use can be tall order

PDF Print E-mail
Written by CHRIS TOGNERI, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review   
Tuesday, 16 September 2014 09:52
U.S. Coast Guard photo from 1900 picturing the Borden Flats Lighthouse at Fall River, Mass. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. PITTSBURGH (AP) – Sheila Consaul's front yard is the largest natural sand beach in Ohio.

Her walkway is a stone jetty that extends a half-mile into Lake Erie. Her front steps are the rungs of a ladder, and the light atop her three-story home can be seen for miles. It comes with the benefit of helping boaters navigate at night.

“So yeah, I bought a lighthouse,” Consaul said recently while trekking along the jetty to her summer home in northeast Ohio. “I heard about these lighthouses coming up for auction, and I thought, ‘Well, that would be interesting.’”

Since 2000, the federal government has sold more than 100 lighthouses to private buyers, many of whom are turning them into livable spaces.

Consaul and others bought their lighthouses through the National Historic Lighthouse Preservation Act, under which the government sells unneeded properties.

“Advancements in navigation technology have reduced the Coast Guard's requirement to own and operate light stations,” Cat Langel, a spokeswoman for the General Services Administration, wrote in an email.

Although the lighthouses continue to operate, they are run by computers, she said, meaning the “structures themselves are often no longer critical to the (Coast Guard's) mission needs.”

The government offers lighthouses first to local government agencies or certified nonprofits. If they're not interested, the lighthouses are sold through public auction.

The GSA has sold more than 100 lighthouses at prices ranging from $10,000 to $933,000, Langel said. Proceeds – $4 million to date – go to the Coast Guard's aid to navigation fund.

Consaul paid $72,010 for the Fairport Harbor lighthouse in 2011. She spent the following summers renovating and repairing. On the ground floor where boats once were stored is a new kitchen. The second floor, formerly the lighthouse keepers' living space, now holds three bedrooms.

“It was not occupied since 1948 when the last keeper moved out, but basically, it's in very good shape,” said Consaul, 56, of Reston, Va. “I have just about everything painted inside, the hardwood floors have all been redone, the furniture is moved in and in place. ... It's pretty much livable now, except that there's no running water yet. It's really nice camping, is what it is.”

Nick Korstad turned the Borden Flats Lighthouse in Fall River, Mass., into a unique bed-and-breakfast. Built in 1881 at the mouth of the Taunton River, outside Mt. Hope Bay, the cylindrical lighthouse is half a mile from shore.

“This was my dream since I was kid: To be a lighthouse keeper,” said Korstad, 33, of Fall River. “It's just something I always wanted to do. I have no idea why, but it started when I was like 7. The only thing I can say is possibly in a past life, if that exists, I was a lighthouse keeper.”

Wisconsin painter John Burhani bought the Kenosha Lighthouse and turned it into his art studio.

“It's a good place to work,” said Burhani, who grew up in Kenosha and as a kid fished from the pier where his lighthouse stands. “It gets hot in the summer and cold in the winter, but it's good for my art.”

For many people, lighthouses hold a certain mystique, a romantic aura. Owners find lighthouses to be a lot of work.

“It's constant,” Korstad said. “There's always something to fix or cleanup. You don't get to relax.”

It's also expensive.

For starters, lighthouse owners must buy costly insurance policies.

“It's pretty hefty. The minimum liability policy in my case was $2 million,” Consaul said. “And you can't just call your average State Farm agent. I did, but obviously, our conversation didn't go very far.”

Plus, there's maintenance. Though the Coast Guard retains the right to enter the property to maintain the beacon, lighthouse owners are responsible for everything else.

“It's a lot of work,” Consaul said. “There are many challenges. The biggest has been dealing with the water situation. I have a composting toilet, which works for sewage. But for things like showers, that water needs to be treated. I'm still working on a solution for that.”

Still, buying a lighthouse means owning an iconic piece of property, thick with history.

In Korstad's case, the history is difficult to ignore: The Borden Flats Lighthouse, he said, is haunted by ghosts, including the former keeper, his 10-year-old son who died after a tumble down the lighthouse stairs, and a little girl who drowned in the bay.

“My brother was outside working, and a woman came up and started talking into his ear,” he said. “It gave us goosebumps.”

The haunting has not kept visitors away. From June to August, he had 100 percent overnight occupancy rates.

“There is definitely this cool factor to it,” Consaul said of owning a lighthouse. “I get out here, and you can see 360 degrees, and the view is phenomenal. The sunrises and sunsets, just watching the boat traffic, especially the sailboats ... it's hard to beat.”

___

Online:

http://bit.ly/1m7Wq4W

___

Information from: Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, http://pghtrib.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-09-15-14 1417GMT



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
U.S. Coast Guard photo from 1900 picturing the Borden Flats Lighthouse at Fall River, Mass. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 16 September 2014 10:08
 

Unseen Picasso letter, with doodles, on display in France

PDF Print E-mail
Written by AFP Wire Service   
Monday, 15 September 2014 12:21

Photographic portrait of Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973), taken 1908-1909, anonymous photographer, Musée Picasso, Paris. Fair use of copyrighted material in the context of Pablo Picasso via Wikipedia.

QUIMPER, France (AFP) - A previously unseen letter written by Pablo Picasso, complete with sketches, has gone on display in western France.

The letter, to his friend the French poet Max Jacob, comes from a private collection and is displayed at the fine arts museum in the western city of Quimper.

Beginning "my dear Max" and signed "your brother Picasso," the letter shows the close bond between the Spanish artist and Jacob, who was "his best friend at the time and the person who really discovered him," according to museum director Ambroise Guillaume.

It was written in 1903 when Picasso was in Barcelona and offers details of his life there and also his wish to come back to Paris.

"If I can work here, I'll stay here, but if I see I can't do anything here, I'll bugger off back to Paris," wrote the artist in broken French.

The letter is extremely rare given that only 10 or so letters from Picasso to Jacob have ever been found, the museum noted.

The sketches show a women appearing to comfort a seated man, an outstretched hand, what appears to be a child kneeling next to a man while animals look on, and a couple deep in conversation.

They are typical of the artist's "blue period" which dominated his output around this time.

The letter is displayed at the Quimper museum of fine art until September 21, to mark the 70th anniversary of Jacob's death.

#   #   #



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

Photographic portrait of Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973), taken 1908-1909, anonymous photographer, Musée Picasso, Paris. Fair use of copyrighted material in the context of Pablo Picasso via Wikipedia.

Last Updated on Monday, 15 September 2014 12:36
 

O'Keeffe Museum to auction Jimson Weed, 2 other paintings

PDF Print E-mail
Written by SUSAN MONTOYA BRYAN, Associated Press   
Friday, 12 September 2014 14:59

Georgia O'Keeffe (American, 1887-1986), 'Jimson Weed/White Flower No. 1,' to be auctioned at Sotheby's New York gallery on Nov. 20, 2014 to benefit the Acquisitions Fund of the Georgia O'Keeffe Museum, consignor of the painting. Estimate: $10 million to $15 million. Image courtesy of Sotheby's

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The Georgia O'Keeffe Museum said Friday it will sell three works by the American modernist painter to benefit its acquisitions fund.

Going on the auction block is one of O'Keeffe's most well-known flower paintings — Jimson Weed/White Flower No. 1. The painting is expected to fetch as much as $15 million when Sotheby's offers it as the centerpiece of its American art sale in New York in November.

The other two works are "On the Old Santa Fe Road" and "Untitled (Skunk Cabbage)." Those paintings are expected to bring in $3.7 million combined.

The larger-than-life image of the white bloom of the jimson weed will be on view in Los Angeles and Hong Kong before returning to New York for the auction.

"It's a difficult sacrifice to let it go, but that's part of the reason it was selected," said Cody Hartley, the museum's director of curatorial affairs. "We tried to select the ones that have strong appeal in the market so we could get the best result possible."

The current auction record for an O'Keeffe work is $6.2 million, set at Christie's New York in May 2001.

Museum officials said the decision to put the works up for auction included a thoughtful process that has taken more than a year. The auction is supported by the donor and was unanimously approved by the museum's board of directors.

Hartley explained that auctioning the pieces will substantially boost the museum's acquisitions endowment as well as the museum's ability to be more competitive when pursuing iconic O'Keeffe works that aren't already part of the collection.

___

Follow Susan Montoya Bryan on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/susanmbryanNM

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

Georgia O'Keeffe (American, 1887-1986), 'Jimson Weed/White Flower No. 1,' to be auctioned at Sotheby's New York gallery on Nov. 20, 2014 to benefit the Acquisitions Fund of the Georgia O'Keeffe Museum, consignor of the painting. Estimate: $10 million to $15 million. Image courtesy of Sotheby's 

Last Updated on Friday, 12 September 2014 16:41
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Page 1 of 70
ADVERTISEMENTS

Banner Banner