Payday Loans
payday loans
ADVERTISEMENTS
Banner
Banner

Get Free ACN Daily Headlines

LiveAuctioneers

Search Auction Central News

ADVERTISEMENTS
Banner
Banner
Bookmark and Share
Reading the Streets

Reading the Streets: 21st Precinct Show

PDF Print E-mail
Written by ILANA NOVICK, Auction Central News International   
Monday, 25 August 2014 13:22
Ivanorama at the 21st Precinct Show, New York. Photo by Ilana Novick.

NEW YORK – The irony of a graffiti show in a police station was too delicious to ignore entirely, but it was the sheer variety of styles, colors and the excitement of meeting new favorite pieces that made August’s “21st Precinct Show,” curated by Outlaw Art’s Robert Aloia, one of my favorites of the year. It was proof that even in our detached age, a clever concept is no match for witnessing the results of artists given the freedom to go joyfully crazy.

The former police station on East 22nd Street was most recently a shelter, and is soon to be pricey condos (the most luxurious holding cells in history?). For a beautiful, brief moment, however, it was tagged, spray painted, wheatpasted and stickered by an all star cast of artists including Elle, Matt Siren, Adam Dare, Sheryo and the Yok, Bunny M, RAE, Icy and Sot, and so many more.

In one corner was Ivanorama’s stark black and white wheatpaste of a young girl, pigtailed and wide eyed, screaming with her hands at the sides of her face in that classic Macaulay Culkin in Home Alone pose, with the words “NYC will eat you if you let it” written underneath. Even the children know the rent is too damn high.

On the wall of a room that once fingerprinted gangsters and prostitutes were Dali and Picasso, spray-painted into a boxing ring, with the command to “make art” written above. The piece gave no indication of who would win this particular match.

Reading the Streets favorites Icy and Sot contributed a stencil of a boy, faced obscured by a bandana, carrying a Coke tray filled with Molotov cocktails in the shape of soda bottles.

Upstairs, photographer Jesper Haynes recreated his ’90s era darkroom, complete with red lights, red drapes, and photos of the East Village in the late 80s and early ’90s. The Velvet Underground played in the background, as the people next to me chatted about nightclubs and friends and artists who moved on. I may or may not have teared up, but if anyone asks, I blame the heat.

Composure regained, I ended my trip with a visit to Queen Andrea’s room, all abstract neon shapes, including what looked like a sun who decided that yellow was just too limiting, and pink and blue and green and orange were much more appropriate for its special rays.

NYC may eat you if you let it, if you don’t, it just might give you some thrilling art.



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE
Ivanorama at the 21st Precinct Show, New York. Photo by Ilana Novick. Icy and Sot at the 21st Precinct Show, New York. Photo by llana Novick. Jesper Haynes at the 21st Precinct Show, New York. Photo by Ilana Novick. Savior El Mundo at the 21st Precinct Show, New York. Photo by Ilana Novick.
Last Updated on Monday, 25 August 2014 13:47
 

Reading the Streets: 'Las Bicicletas' in New York

PDF Print E-mail
Written by ILANA NOVICK, Auction Central News International   
Monday, 11 August 2014 12:59

‘Las Bicicletas’ by Gabriel Aceves Navarro, New York City, photo via http://www.nycbikemaps.com/spokes/las-bicicletas-public-bike-art-exhibit/

NEW YORK – Suddenly New York City is crawling with bikes. It was a slow trend, but cycling in the city went from the domain of the original “Fast and the Furious” crew, the all- powerful and much feared (by me) bike messengers to that of health and environmentally conscious residents looking for an MTA alternative. They’ve become a living street art all on their own, plain or fancy, Citibike blue or simply silver, with endless varieties of gear and helmets on their riders.

Mexican artist Gilberto Aceves Navarro was way ahead of New York. He sees as a solution to Mexico City’s famous traffic and crowded subways. His sculpture series, “Las Bicicletas,” first installed in Mexico City in 2008, is spending the summer in New York City, with some help with the New York City Department of Transportation’s Art Program, and NYC Parks’ Arts in the Park program.

More than 120 cheerful red and white bikes are installed in ten locations around Manhattan and Brooklyn. They are clustered together on black platforms, and all include riders of varying shapes and sizes, some with long, Gumby-like arms, others hunched over, with shorted limbs, looking a little bit tired in posture, but still resolutely biking away.

For reasons beyond the reach of my own arm-chair psycho-analysis, I find street art makes animals, concepts, or objects that make me nervous, into something thought provoking, approachable, even, in the case of my much-discussed birds, adorable. Navarro’s bikes, in their own small way, take the edge of my fear of two-wheeled vehicles and the people who ride them.



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

‘Las Bicicletas’ by Gabriel Aceves Navarro, New York City, photo via http://www.nycbikemaps.com/spokes/las-bicicletas-public-bike-art-exhibit/

‘Las Bicicletas’ by Gabriel Aceves Navarro, New York City, photo via http://www.nycbikemaps.com/spokes/las-bicicletas-public-bike-art-exhibit/

‘Las Bicicletas’ by Gabriel Aceves Navarro, New York City, photo via https://www.facebook.com/lasbicicletas

Last Updated on Monday, 11 August 2014 14:37
 

Reading the Streets: Joe Iurato

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Ilana Novick   
Wednesday, 09 July 2014 10:11
Joe Iurato at the Bushwick Collective, New York City. Photo via downtowntraveler.com

NEW YORK - Joe Iurato captures children in a way that balances wonder and mischief. In his hands, kids are not entirely "The Bad Seed," or complete sweetness and light. I saw his work for the first time at the Centre-Fuge Public Art project, which involved a meeting between a toddler-size boy and a bird, increasing my appreciation for both. They’re looking at each other a bit suspiciously, but more out of curiosity than malice.

Iurato’s pieces are small, spray-painted wood cutouts that often reference skateboarding, or art, or other interests he’s had throughout his life. Over the July 4th weekend I spotted one at the Bushwick Collective, on Troutman Street. A boy, his face in a downward gaze and hidden by a baseball cap, crouches down on the street.

He’s outlined so clearly and vividly in blacks, with such accurate shadowing, he looks like a still from an animated movie, like he would soon get up and flicker across the wall, a movie for passersby. And then there’s the action coming from a tiny spray can in his hand, out of which flow the words, “Never let go,” in blue spray paint.

He’s a little bit mischievous, as one might imagine his parents would not approve of his graffiti, but I bet they’d also impressed at his initiative. I wondered if the boy was a graffiti artist in training, if maybe one day he’ll not only be hanging out by the wall, but also creating pieces of his own.

#   #   #



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE
Joe Iurato at the Bushwick Collective, New York City. Photo via downtowntraveler.com Joe Iurato at the Bushwick Collective, New York City. Photo by Ilana Novick Joe Iurato at the Bushwick Collective, New York City. Photo by Ilana Novick Joe Iurato at the Bushwick Collective, New York City. Photo by Nora Nussbaum
Last Updated on Wednesday, 09 July 2014 10:40
 

Reading the Streets: Top street artists 'go green' to benefit inmates

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Ilana Novick   
Monday, 07 July 2014 11:19

KAWS, Santa Cruz, California, photo via graffiti.org

NEW YORK - Turhan Gumersere is the warden at Rikers Island, and a respected graffiti artist. As Trike 1 aka LP 36 aka Turk 1, his bubble letter tags and careful, colorful recreations of cartoon characters like Felix the Cat and Mickey Mouse brightened subway train walls from his first tag on the IRT line in 1972. He created these intricate pieces without formal training and climbed fences and ran through tunnels with the strength and stamina of a skilled basketball player to protect his turf from other aspiring writers, who were warned not to enter without his or his crew’s permission. Based on the skill involved in his work, I think competitors were wise to tread carefully.

The two worlds collided OM June at the Horticultural Society’s annual Block Party and Silent Auction to benefit GreenHouse, a Horticultural Society program that works with inmates on Rikers Island, using horticultural therapy as a tool to prepare for reentry, and gardening skills as a source of employment to reduce recidivism. Graduates can join the Green Team, a vocational internship program, following release.

Gumersere was one of several street artists participating in the silent auction. KAWS, Barry McGee aka Twist, Shepherd Fairey, Dondi White, and Todd James garnered some of the highest bids of the night. Another Reading the Streets subject, Steve Powers, aka ESPO also donated a piece.

It was a good year for both the Horticultural Society and Gummersere. This was the most successful auction yet, and Gummersere was appointed last month to head the 2,298 bed Anna M. Kross Center at GreenHouse.

#   #   #



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

KAWS, Santa Cruz, California, photo via graffiti.org

Steve Powers, Love Letter to Brooklyn, New York City, photo by Abby Fentress Swanson for WNYC via wnyc.org

Trike1, New York City, photo via 12ozprophet.com

Rooftop soiree to benefit the GreenHouse Program, New York, photo via thehort.org

Last Updated on Monday, 07 July 2014 16:55
 

Reading the Streets: Mechanics Alley mystery baby

PDF Print E-mail
Written by ILANA NOVICK, Auction Central News International   
Friday, 27 June 2014 16:43

Baby, artist unknown, Mechanics Alley, New York City. Photo by Ilana Novick.

NEW YORK – Mechanics Alley sits quietly unmarked and unassuming behind the Manhattan Bridge, stretching between Madison Street to the south and Henry Street to the north, with the only street sign visible on Monroe Street. Ships were built and repaired on this street in the 19th century, but now it’s not even acknowledged by the almighty Google Maps. More than a source of art, I thought it was an invitation to a mugging. That is until a friend tipped me off to a mysterious, unsigned mural of a baby's upper body, with a clenched fist, small but mighty.

The sense of wonder in the baby’s eyes, and its cherubic cheeks made it seem friendly and accepting at first, but there was always a new, unsettling detail that revealed itself after a closer look. Those cheeks only briefly lessened the blow of the baby’s paleness, especially against a plain black wall. It looked like an infant ghost than a human baby, initially sweet and huggable, but then mysterious and scary. Plus, it’s just a head. Where’s the rest of it? And what’s with the fist? Does the baby want to punch me?

So much of what I write about for this column is at least signed, if not hash-tagged, Google-mapped and press-released. With so many legal walls, and even real estate developers using street art as a marketing tool for new properties, it’s easier than ever to at least track the name of the artist, if not their biography. The only other similar piece I have seen was another baby face at graffiti mecca 190 Bowery, by artist Mactruk, but I don’t think the babies are the same. Much like the mysterious East River piano, however, this baby is destined to remain anonymous and peaceful, with a hint of sinister mystery, much like the alley where it resides.



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

 Baby, artist unknown, Mechanics Alley, New York City. Photo by Ilana Novick.

Baby, artist unknown, Mechanics Alley, New York City. Photo by Ilana Novick. 

 Baby, Mactruk, 190 Bowery, New York City. Photo via globalgraphica.com.

Mechanics Alley, New York City. Photo by Kevin Walsh via forgotten-ny.com. 

Last Updated on Friday, 27 June 2014 16:58
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Page 1 of 26
ADVERTISEMENTS

Banner Banner