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Live Auction Talk | Rosemary McKittrick

Live Auction Talk: Popeye the Sailor

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Written by ROSEMARY McKITTRICK   
Friday, 27 June 2014 15:58

Popeye Floor Puncher, Chein, lithographed tin, clockwork driven: $1,121. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

SANTA FE, N.M. – “I’m strong to the finish, ’cause I eats me spinach, I’m Popeye the sailor man!”

All seriousness aside, if you grew up in the 1950s you probably remember this character and his cartoons. Popeye, Olive Oyl, Bluto, Wimpy, and Swee’pee lived in that simple world where simple values ruled.

Popeye wasn’t all that smart, good looking or buff, but he won the hearts of fans anyway. He was the underdog who stood up for himself and didn’t get creamed.

“Tha’s all I can stands, ’cause I can’t stands no more,” is a famous Popeye one-liner.

How often have you been there in life? Popeye’s sense of fair play was noble. Despite all odds, this spinach-obsessed half-pint was willing to take on the brute.

And then there’s his beloved Olive Oyl. Olive Oyl is the antithesis of the voluptuous beauty as we define it in this culture. Skinny as a rail, she looks like she hasn't eaten in months. And fickle as all get out. Still, she managed to capture the little guy’s heart with a simple kiss on the cheek.

Popeye actually made his first debut on Jan. 17, 1929 in Elzie Segar’s carton strip Thimble Theatre. The strip originally revolved around Olive Oyl’s family, but Popeye soon eclipsed his love as star of the show.

He then moved to the big screen in 1933 in the Betty Boop cartoon Popeye the Sailor.

Talk about art reflecting life. This one is too good. Spinach growers credited Popeye with a 33 percent increase in U.S. spinach cunsumption in the 1930s, rescuing the spinach industry during the Great Depression. As much as I cherished Popeye as a kid, my eating habits weren’t reflected in those statistics. I hated canned spinach, and had to sit it out at the kitchen table until my plate was clean anyway.

Our hero with the bulging forearms was also a patriot who joined the Navy in 1941, appearing in a number of shorts in his starchy white uniform.

Famous Studios produced the cartoon from 1942 to 1957. In 1960, King Features Syndicate stepped in creating 220 Popeye the Sailor cartoons for television syndication.

From the 1930s to the 1960s Popeye reigned as one of the most popular cartoon characters ever. His cartoon appeared in 638 newspapers around the country.

In 1995 the U.S. Postal Service honored  Popeye with his own stamp. And the whole Popeye crew sailed to Orlando in 1999 to be showcased in the opening of Universal’s “Islands of Adventure” theme park.

How cool is that? The little guy made it in spades. Even artists like Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein and Jeff Koons honored the man on canvas.

As a cartoon, Popeye’s star seems to be fading. He’s appearing in fewer newspapers. But as a collectible, he’s still very much alive.

On May 9-10, Bertoia Auctions, Vineland, N.J., featured a selection of Popeye toys in its toy auction. Here are some current values

– Popeye Playing Basketball, Linemar, lithographed tin, Japan, 9 inches high: $767.

– Popeye wooden figure with Donald Duck wooden figure, spring necks, Linemar, Japan, copr. Walt Disney Productions, box included, each 4 inches high: $767.

– Popeye Floor Puncher, Chein, lithographed tin, clockwork driven, 7 inches high: $1,121.

– Popeye Express, Louis Marx, features tunnels, trestle bridge and Popeye characters, lithographed tin, copr. King Features Syndicate, 10 inches diameter: $1,652.

– Popeye and Olive Oyl Jiggers, Louis Marx, lithographed tin, 9 1/2 inches high, boxed examples: $1,652.



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

Popeye Floor Puncher, Chein, lithographed tin, clockwork driven: $1,121. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Popeye playing basketball, Linemar, Japan: $767. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Popeye with Donald Duck wooden figures, spring necks, Linemar, Japan, copr. Walt Disney Productions: $767. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Popeye Express, Louis Marx, lithographed tin windup: $1,652. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

Popeye and Olive Oyl Jiggers, Louis Marx, lithographed tin: $1,652. Photo courtesy of Bertoia Auctions.

 

Last Updated on Friday, 27 June 2014 16:51
 

Live Auction Talk: The Beatles

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Written by ROSEMARY McKITTRICK   
Thursday, 05 June 2014 14:18

‘Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band,’ fan club poster, Beatles signed, 30 inches by 20 inches: $59,375. Photo courtesy of Heritage Auctions.

SANTA FE, N.M. – “You may say I'm a dreamer, but I'm not the only one. I hope someday you'll join us. And the world will live as one.” – John Lennon

Friendship and a love of music brought the Beatles together in 1957. That spark ignited a firestorm and the world was never the same. It was an era of restlessness. That much was clear. A catalyst was in order. And that’s where the Beatles came in.

No frills, no armor. They simply addressed the world with truth in their lyrics and filled the gap.

“I think people who truly can live a life in music are telling the world, 'You can have my love, you can have my smiles. Forget the bad parts, you don't need them. Just take the music, the goodness, because it's the very best, and it's the part I give most willingly,'" said George Harrison.

The Beatles were the possibility of music going forward. And they were coaxing us to take a closer look at how we actually lived our lives.

They were already the biggest entertainment phenomena the Brits had ever seen. But no English rock band had ever come close to capturing the American music scene.

And on the plane flight to America on that chilly February day in 1964 George Harrison had been the only Beatle who had even visited America.

“They don’t know us,” Harrison said about the trip. “It’s going to be hard.”

Looking out the plane window at Kennedy airport as it landed the Beatles figured all the commotion outside had to be for somebody else. Not them.

The group was in America to appear on the Ed Sullivan Show. Sullivan was paying them half of what normal headliners got. Nothing compared to Elvis.

More than 70 million viewers were on board for the Liverpool boys and their fateful Feb. 9 appearance, 60 percent of all American television viewers. It was the largest audience for a nonnews event in television history. The group was on stage for 13 1/2 minutes performing five songs.

Everything shifted right there. The ’60s movement was on. And the news media mostly missed the point.

“Asexual and homely.” “The anti-barbershop quartet.” “An infestation.” “A fine mass placebo.” On and on went the reviews.

“They’re a passing phase, symptoms of the uncertainty of the times and the confusion about us,” said the Rev. Billy Graham.

Despite all the negative chatter the Beatles went on to become the pre-eminent pop group in the world, a cultural phenomenon of unrivaled scope. The four Brits were leaving their mark on history in a profound way.

“The thing the ’60s did was to show us the possibilities and the responsibility that we all had. It wasn't the answer. It just gave us a glimpse of the possibility,” John Lennon said.

The Beatles were all about possibilities.

“And, in the end, the love you take, is equal to the love you make.” – Paul McCartney, The Beatles Illustrated Lyrics.

On April 26-27, Heritage Auctions a selection of Beatles memorabilia in it Entertainment auction.

Here are some current values:

– Picture sleeve, I Want to Hold Your Hand, Beatles signed, 16 1/2 inches by 16 1/2 inches: $20,000.

Please Please Me album, Beatles signed, obtained by British newspaper on Oct. 31, 1964: $40,625.

Meet the Beatles stereo LP, Beatles signed: $56,250.

Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, fan club poster, Beatles signed, 30 inches by 20 inches: $59,375.

– The Fab Four, inside cover of a foldover photo album, containing early glossy, Beatles signed, Feb. 9, 1964, 12 inches by 10 inches: $125,000.



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

‘Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band,’ fan club poster, Beatles signed, 30 inches by 20 inches: $59,375. Photo courtesy of Heritage Auctions.

Picture sleeve, ‘I Want to Hold Your Hand,’ Beatles signed, 16 1/2 inches by 16 1/2 inches:  $20,000. Photo courtesy of Heritage Auctions.

‘Please Please Me’ album, Beatles signed: $40,625. Photo courtesy of Heritage Auctions.

Meet the Beatles’ stereo LP, Beatles signed: $56,250. Photo courtesy of Heritage Auctions.

The Fab Four, inside cover of a foldover photo album, containing early glossy, Beatles signed: $125,000. Photo courtesy of Heritages.

Last Updated on Friday, 27 June 2014 16:24
 

Live Auction Talk: Coca-Cola

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Written by ROSEMARY McKITTRICK   
Thursday, 01 May 2014 13:15

Tin button sign, ‘Coca-Cola,’ right out of the box,  1950s, pristine condition, 24 inches diameter: $1,560. Photo courtesy of Morphy Auctions.

SANTA FE, N.M. – Guess what the most popular term in the world is after “hello.”  If you said “good-bye,” you’re wrong.

It’s “Coca-Cola.”  That’s how powerful branding is.

When John Pemberton came up with the Coca-Cola formula in 1886 he had no idea the cash cow it would ultimately turn out to be. He just wanted to get rich like the next guy and in the 1880s the fastest way to do that was in a bottle – through patent medicines.

In the 19th century where doctors were few and far between cure-alls took a front seat proclaiming to fix everything from gout and rheumatism to cancer and tuberculosis. Home remedies were everywhere and inventors guarded their “secret formulas” closely.

Most of the secret formulas contained up to 50 percent alcohol and consumers didn’t seem to mind. You no doubt heard the word “snake-oil salesman”

Anyway, it’s in this arena Coca-Cola emerged. Pemberton was injured in one of the last battles of the Civil War and in constant pain. He added coca (cocaine) to his elixir and it seemed to help with his pain.

No one knew at the time how addictive cocaine was. They just knew it took away the pain.

Obviously, Coca-Cola has gone through a huge metamorphosis since then. But those are its humble beginnings.

By 1920, sales of Coca-Cola skyrocketed to more than $4 million in annual net profit. A lot of it had to do with what’s called “aspirational advertising.”

Success in life can be achieved simply by buying the right product. That was the message. And the right product, of course, was Coke. It was the great equalizer. The 6-year-old sipping Coke at the table next to you was drinking the same Coke as the Pope. No better. No worse.

Do things actually go better with Coke?

Like it or not, we’ve all been imprinted with Coke signs. Unless you’re blind. They’re everywhere and you probably grew up with them too.

Plus, I think they’re cool. The logo works for me – I really can’t say why. Maybe it’s because Coke signs have the look and feel of my “growing up” years. Pure nostalgia

Vintage tin and paper signs from products like Coke are some of the most popular collectibles today. Others include trays, calendars and pieces made between 1875 and 1925, which have the brilliant early color lithography.

Vintage items displaying beautiful women, pudgy babies and handsome horsemen abound in these pieces and are the kinds of images calling out to collectors today.

Why you see so many vintage Coke collectibles around now is because the company had a big advertising budget. The same was true of beer, tobacco, whiskey and other soft drink companies of the era.

Mark Twain said it well: “Many a small thing has been made large by the right kind of advertising.”

Coca-Cola pounced on the right kind of advertising.

On April 26 & 27 Morphy Auctions, Denver, Pa., featured its advertising auction. In the sale were a number of Coca-Cola items. Here are some current values:

– Tin button sign, “Coca-Cola,” right out of the box, paper just removed, 1950s, pristine condition, 24 inches diameter: $1,560.

– Serving tray, “Drink Coca-Cola,” pictures a “highbrow” woman, 1906, excellent condition, 13 inches tall: $3,300.

– Tin sign, “Drink Coca-Cola,” 1920s, very good condition, 11 inches by 8 1/4 inches: $4,500.

– Easel sign, cutout cardboard, “Drink Coca-Cola,” 1931, near mint, 23 inches by 15 inches:  $5,700.

– Sports festoon, “Coca-Cola,” 9-piece, wire and plywood, made by Kay Displays, 1930s, largest 16 inches diameter: $6,000.



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

Tin button sign, ‘Coca-Cola,’ right out of the box,  1950s, pristine condition, 24 inches diameter: $1,560. Photo courtesy of Morphy Auctions. 

Serving tray, ‘Drink Coca-Cola,’ 1906, excellent condition, 13 inches tall: $3,300. Photo courtesy of Morphy Auctions.

Tin sign, ‘Drink Coca-Cola,’ 1920s, very good condition, 11 inches by 8 1/4 inches: $4,500. Photo courtesy of Morphy Auctions.

Easel sign, cutout cardboard, ‘Drink Coca-Cola,’ 1931, near mint, 23 inches by 15 inches: $5,700. Photo courtesy of Morphy Auctions.

Sports festoon, ‘Coca-Cola,’ nine-piece, wire and plywood, made by Kay Displays, 1930s, largest 16 inches diameter: $6,000. Photo courtesy of Morphy Auctions.

Last Updated on Thursday, 01 May 2014 13:50
 

Live Auction Talk: Blue Dog artist George Rodrigue

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Written by ROSEMARY McKITTRICK   
Thursday, 03 April 2014 12:24

‘That’s Amore,’ oil on canvas, signed, titled and dated, 1996, 24 inches by 18 inches, $39,360. Photo courtesy of New Orleans Auction Galleries.

SANTA FE, N.M. – How many artists gain fame painting evil guard dogs?

Cajun artist George Rodrigue just might be the only one.

George got his start painting the landscapes and people of Southern Louisiana in the third grade while recovering from polio. He also grew up on local stories about the loup-garou, a French word meaning werewolf.

As a kid his mom teased him that if he didn’t behave himself today the werewolf would get him tonight. Except in her version the evil creature wasn’t quite a werewolf. It was more like a ghost dog or crazy wolf that hung out in cemeteries and sugarcane fields waiting to lunge.

Either way the image stuck.

In 1980 an investment group in Baton Rouge asked George to come up with illustrations for a book about Louisiana ghost stories to be sold at the 1984 World’s Fair in New Orleans.

The artist began researching local myths and legends to evoke imagery. He ended up creating one painting over a three-year period for each of the 40 stories in a book written by Chris Segura.

He completed his illustrations long before the text was actually written and he did it from themes and titles relating to well-known regional legends. Full of colossal oak trees and ghostly characters the text is known as the Bayou collection.

There was one story in the collection “Slaughter House” which stood out for people. It told of an evil dog guarding a house. George remembered the werewolf stories of his youth and painted the loup-garou.

In creating the image George remembered his terrier-spaniel Tiffany who died four years earlier. She had the perfect shape and stance he wanted and that’s where the similarities ended.

The blue-gray demon with piercing yellow eyes George painted for the book sat guarding the front of a red haunted house. He liked the color and strong image and over the next five to six years painted dozens more. His mutts were always in the bayou and always harkened back to the Cajun legend of his childhood and the loup-garou.

It’s an iconic, eerie image people say they rarely forget in his work.

“The yellow eyes are really the soul of the dog,” he said. “He has this piercing stare. People say the dog keeps talking to them with his eyes, always saying something different.”

The dog never changes position, just watches you as you watch him. George said the dog is really about life and about people searching for answers and coming up empty.

“The dog doesn’t know. You can see this longing in his eyes, this longing for love, answers,” he said.

Along with his blue-dog paintings Rodrigue continued painting Louisiana landscapes, outdoor family gatherings and genre scenes of the 19th and early 20th century. He also painted portraits including celebrity chef Paul Prudhomme, Huey Long, Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev.

George Rodrigue died Dec. 14, 2013. He was 69.

On March 15-16 New Orleans Auction Galleries featured a selection of his paintings in its spring auction. Here are some current values:

Oak on the Broussard Farm, oil on canvas, signed, titled and dated, 1989, 8 inches by 10 inches, $13,530.

Lipstick on My Man, acrylic on canvas, signed, titled and dated, 2004, 20 inches by 16 inches, $23,370.

That’s Amore, oil on canvas, signed, titled and dated, 1996, 24 inches by 18 inches, $39,360.

Yellow Rolls of Jolie Blonde, oil on canvas, signed, title and dated, 1989, 24 inches by 30 inches, $46,740.

Untitled, oil on canvas, signed, 53 inches by 84 inches, $67,650.



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

‘That’s Amore,’ oil on canvas, signed, titled and dated, 1996, 24 inches by 18 inches, $39,360. Photo courtesy of New Orleans Auction Galleries.

‘Oak on the Broussard Farm,’ oil on canvas, signed, titled and dated, 1989, 8 inches by 10 inches, $13,530. Photo courtesy of New Orleans Auction Galleries.

‘Lipstick on My Man,’ acrylic on canvas, signed, titled and dated, 2004, 20 inches by 16 inches, $23,370. Photo courtesy of New Orleans Auction Galleries.

‘Yellow Rolls of Jolie Blonde,’ oil on canvas, signed, title and dated, 1989, 24 inches by 30 inches, $46,740. Photo courtesy of New Orleans Auction Galleries.

Untitled, oil on canvas, signed, 53 inches by 84 inches, $67,650. Photo courtesy of New Orleans Auction Galleries.

Last Updated on Thursday, 01 May 2014 13:21
 

Live Auction Talk: Golf champion Bobby Jones

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Written by ROSEMARY McKITTRICK   
Tuesday, 04 March 2014 14:37
Color print, signed and inscribed from Jones, published by the USGA in limited edition in 1954:  $1,020. Photo courtesy of PBA Galleries.

SANTA FE, N.M. – Golf great Bobby Jones said he never won a major championship until he learned to play golf against something instead of against somebody. That something was par. It took years and lots of heartache for Jones to learn the lesson.

It was a way of being on the golf course that allowed him to stay focused, serious and away from the gallery and his opponents. It helped quiet him.

From the first day Jones showed up on the championship stage in 1916 as the 14-year-old sensation from Dixie he wowed them. Here was a true child prodigy.

One of the few regrets Jones had about his competitive golf career was his habit of giving up huge leads only to pull it out far less easily than he thought he should have done.

Jones noted that Ben Hogan didn’t have the problem. Hogan was always good at finishing the job, he said. It was like hitting pure golf shots was an expression of who Hogan was, like an artist or composer. It was a golfing intelligence that translated into pure art and one that Jones admired.

Even so, Jones had it all: a sweet full swing, a nice feel in his fingers and perfect hand action – without ever taking a golf lesson. Here’s the paradox: Even though Jones was more talented than most amateurs, his temper tantrums on the golf course got in the way.

He rarely extended much compassion to himself.

Jones was the chief critic of Bobby Jones. He would be on the course getting more and more upset and playing less and less effectively, notorious for throwing golf clubs at helpless elms.

It's amazing how critical genius can be of itself.

In the final of the 1919 Amateur against Davy Herron, Jones was three down with seven holes to go as he readied himself to play the 12th at Oakmont. At the same moment an official started to screech out directions to the gallery through his megaphone. Jones missed the shot and got so upset he never got back into the match. Stressed out, he lost as much as 18 pounds during any given tournament.

Even with all of his emotional turmoil Bobby Jones turned out to be the most successful amateur golfer to ever compete on the national and international circuit.

Between 1923 and 1930 Jones entered 20 major championships and won 13 of them finishing up with the Grand Slam — the United States Open, British Open, and the United States Amateur and British Amateur championships.

He made his living as an attorney and played golf part-time. He retired at age 28 and came out of retirement in 1934 to play in the Masters on an exhibition basis through 1948.

“It (championship golf) is something like a cage,” Jones said. “First you are expected to get into it and then you are expected to stay there. But of course, nobody can stay there."

On Feb. 27, PBA Galleries, San Francisco, featured a selection of Bobby Jones Items in its Golf auction. Here are some current values:

– Book, Golf is My Game, first edition, pictorial jacket, Doubleday, 1960: $540.

– Color print, signed and inscribed from Jones, published by the USGA in limited edition in 1954: $1,020.

– Presentation album, “The Masters Tournament,” National Golf Club, 1952: $1,560.

– Program, 33rd National Open Golf Championship, Jones won defeating Al Espinosa in 36-hole playoff, Winged Foot Golf Club, 1929: $3,000.

– Silver print, Jones in full swing, earliest known surviving original photograph of Jones, matted and framed, taken Aug. 17, 1916, at age 14, 6 3/4 inches by 4 1/2 inches: $4,800.



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE
Color print, signed and inscribed from Jones, published by the USGA in limited edition in 1954:  $1,020. Photo courtesy of PBA Galleries. ‘Golf is My Game,’ first edition, pictorial jacket, Doubleday, 1960: $540. Photo courtesy of PBA Galleries. Presentation album, ‘The Masters Tournament,’ National Golf Club, 1952: $1,560. Photo courtesy of PBA Galleries. Program, ‘33rd National Open Golf Championship,’ which Jones won defeating Al Espinosa in 36-hole playoff, Winged Foot Golf Club, 1929: $3,000. Photo courtesy of PBA Galleries. Silver print showing Jones in full swing, earliest known surviving original photograph of him, matted and framed, taken Aug. 17, 1916, at age 14, 6 3/4 inches by 4 1/2 inches: $4,800. Photo courtesy of PBA Galleries.
Last Updated on Thursday, 01 May 2014 13:22
 
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