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Kovels - Antiques & Collecting

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of June 24, 2013

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Written by TERRY KOVEL   
Monday, 24 June 2013 09:19
The strange back on this Roycroft chair can be explained by its name,

BEACHWOOD, Ohio Some old chairs have very strange added parts that can confuse today's collectors. A Windsor chair from the 18th century might be made with an added piece at the end of the arm because it is a "writing arm" Windsor. There can be a drawer beneath the seat of a Shaker sewing chair. Many types of chairs were made into rocking chairs with the addition of pieces of curved wood or a bouncy platform with springs. A chair with paddlelike arms and a rectangular wooden piece attached to the back at an angle is known as a "cockfighting chair." It was thought the user sat facing the back of the chair to see the fight, but now it is believed that the wooden piece was meant to hold a book and that the chair is a "reading chair" once used in libraries. A similar chair was made by the Roycroft Colony in East Aurora, N.Y., in about 1905. It had a narrow ledge at the top of the chair back. The user sat facing the back and straddling the chair, with arms leaning on the leather-covered wooden ledge. It is a meditation chair. There is a modern group at the Roycroft Colony today that is interested in art and meditation.

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Q: My 1910 telephone is in excellent shape. A label on it reads, "Property of the American Bell Telephone Co." What is the phone worth?

A: By 1910, telephones were being manufactured as both wall phones and upright "candlestick" phones -and you don't tell us what yours looks like. Some antique phones sell for under $100 and some for thousands. American Bell Telephone Co. was formed in 1880 and acquired a controlling interest in Western Electric Co. in 1881. Western Electric then became the manufacturer of American Bell Telephone Co. phones. In 1899, American Bell was acquired by American Telephone & Telegraph Co., which had been an American Bell subsidiary. Telephones the age of yours sell for about $100 to $200, depending on style and condition.

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Q: I have some Olin Russum Pottery and would like to know something about it. Is it collectible?

A: Olin Lansing Russum Jr. (1918-1998), known as "Russ," was a potter and sculptor who lived and worked in Maryland. In 1951 he and his wife, Jean, built a studio in a converted barn near Gunpowder Falls. Russ made dishes, sculptures and watercolors, but is best known for his tile and bas-relief murals. His murals are in several buildings in the Baltimore area, and some of his work is in museum collections. He also taught a ceramics workshop at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Jean was a woodworker who made sculptures and furniture. They worked together on some projects until her death in 1986. Their work has been sold in several recent auctions and can be found in shops.

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Q: My pottery stein holds a half-liter. It's in the shape of a child wearing a monk's hooded habit. He's holding a couple of radishes or turnips in his left hand and what appears to be a book in his right. His head, the stein's lid, has a pewter rim. Down the front of the child's clothing there's a long bib with the words "Gruss aus Munchen." The only mark on the bottom is "1880." What is the stein worth?

A: You have a "Munich Child" character stein. The "bib" down his front is a scapular, a traditional part of a monk's garb, and the German phrase on the front can be translated roughly as "Regards from Munich." The design is based on the German city's coat of arms. Munich Child mugs, which can be in the traditional stein shape or figural, like yours, were first made in the last half of the 19th century. A mug like yours sold in 2011 for $334.

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Q: I still have the portable Brother typewriter my father bought for me 40 years ago. I have kept it stored in its original carrying case and it still works. I wonder what it's worth.

A: With few exceptions, only very early typewriters -those made and marketed in the late 1800s - sell for much money. Brother Industries, a Japanese corporation that dates back to 1908, still is in business today manufacturing printers, fax machines and other office and industrial equipment. Portable electric typewriters like yours don't excite collectors, but you might be able to sell it online for up to $20.

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Q: I found a funny pair of pins that look old. Each metal pin is in the shape of a man thumbing his nose at the other. One is wearing a hat with the word "Hancock," and the other, a bearded man, has a hat that reads "Garfield." Can you explain what is going on?

A: You have a pair of political lapel pins made for the Winfield Hancock and James Garfield 1880 U.S. presidential campaign. The gold-colored Hancock pin could thumb his nose, and the silver Garfield pin, often found blackened with tarnish today, could thumb his nose while a pointed tail appeared. Similar "nose-thumbers" were used in at least one other presidential election, the one between James Cox and Warren Harding in 1920.

***

Tip: When looking up a pewter mark, don't just check pewter books. Try looking at a list of American silversmiths and

silver-plate makers. Many of these people worked with all three types of metal.

***

Terry Kovel answers as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The volume of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, (Name of this newspaper), King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

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CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

Fan, red sequins, tortoise frame, 13 inches, $10.

Bouquet of pansies print, Patty Thum, chromolithograph, 1894, 11 x 16 inches, $45.

Father's Day Datertag porcelain plate, castle, countryside, 1969, blue, white, Bareuther, 7 inches, $55.

Rose O'Neil calendar, 1977, kewpie dolls, full pad, 8 1/2 x 7 1/2 inches, $80.

Patent model clock driven barometer, enamel clock dial, brass gears, two parts, 18 inches, $235.

Pillin pottery vase, woman, horses, blue ground, marked, c. 1970, 6 inches, $375.

Patchwork quilt New York beauty variation sunburst center red, yellow, white applique vine cotton c. 1850, 107 x 108 inches, $540.

American silver soup ladle, fiddle back, A. Rasch, 13 1/4 inches, $600.

Neoclassical pedestal, giltwood, scrolled capital, fluted column, round base, Italy, 47 x 12 in., pair, $625.

Louis XV slant front desk, fruitwood, carved, stepped interior, drawers, 1700s, 40 x 39 inches, $1,795.

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Spot great costume jewelry faster than anyone and get the buys of a lifetime. "Kovels' Buyers' Guide to Costume Jewelry, Part One" explains how to recognize mid-century costume jewelry, Mexican silver jewelry, modernist jewelry and other European and American pieces. Learn all the names you need to know, from Hobe and Sigi to Ed Wiener and Art Smith, from Coro and Trifari to Los Castillo and Spratling. And we explain how to recognize a good piece of genuine Bakelite. Our exclusive report, 8 1/2 x 5 1/2 inches, 46 pp., is filled with color photos, bios, background and more than 100 marks. It's accurate and comprehensive and includes all of the information in our 2008 report on 20th-century costume jewelry. But it's in a new, smaller and more convenient format. Available only from Kovels. Order by phone at 800-303-1996; online at Kovels.com; or send $25 plus $4.95 postage and handling to Kovels, Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

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(c) 2013 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
The strange back on this Roycroft chair can be explained by its name,
Last Updated on Monday, 12 August 2013 16:37
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of June 17, 2013

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Written by Terry Kovel   
Wednesday, 19 June 2013 08:34

This Uncle Sam was made with googly eyes and a fancy cap, but no beard. This is a German doll made in about 1918, the year World War I ended. He is carrying a U.S. flag. The bisque doll, 14 inches high, sold for $2,350 at a 2012 auction hosted by Theriault's of Annapolis, Md.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio Flag Day is celebrated every June 14 to commemorate the day the flag of the United States was adopted in 1777. Flag Day was officially established in 1916 by President Woodrow Wilson. It became "National Flag Day" by a 1949 Act of Congress. Flags should be flown the whole week of June 14. Collectors of old flags display them framed under glass to protect them because they are such important historic relics and are usually in poor condition. But even a torn flag connected to an important event or person is of value, often worth thousands of dollars. An 1863 35-star U.S flag auctioned this year at Cowan's of Cincinnati for $705. It had scattered holes and stains. One way to celebrate Flag Day is to put a vintage doll with a flag in your window. An "Uncle Sam" bisque doll made about 1918 by Handwerck, a German company, sold at a 2012 Theriault's auction for $2,350. The doll was holding an American flag with 48 stars on it.

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Q: In 1945 I received six place settings of English "fish eaters." They were a wedding gift from my aunt, who had owned the set since she got married. So the set is close to being "antique." They're marked, but I can't read the mark, and they have bone or ivory handles. What do you think the set is worth?

A: A single set of fish eaters (also called "fish feeders") is a matching fish knife and fish fork - utensils designed to use when eating fish. A fish knife's blade is flat and does not have a sharp edge. It's slightly curved on both sides - one side curved inward and the other out. A fish fork has three or four flat unsharpened tines, with the outer tines wider than the inner. A set of stainless-steel fish eaters with plastic handles would sell for under $100. A set made of sterling silver with ivory or bone handles is worth several hundred dollars. Ask someone to try to read the maker's mark for you. That may help determine the value.

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Q: I own a small plastic souvenir snow globe of the New York City skyline. Inside there's the Empire State Building, the Statue of Liberty and the Twin Towers that came down in 2001. It is marked "Made in Hong Kong." Does it have collectible value?

A: New York City's skyline with the Statue of Liberty is probably the world's most widely produced snow globe subject. Plastic globes were introduced in the 1950s, but construction of the Twin Towers wasn't completed until the early 1970s. So your globe isn't more than about 40 years old. While the Towers make your globe a touching souvenir, it would not sell for more than about $10. Too many were made to warrant a high price.

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Q: I just bought a deep cast-iron skillet at an auction. I'm trying to find out what it's worth. The bottom of the pan is stamped "Martin Stove and Range, Florence, Alabama." The lid has an ornate handle and is stamped "No. 9." I'd like to find out something about the maker, too.

A: Brothers W.H. Martin and Charles Martin founded Martin Stove & Range Co. after buying two other stove companies in 1917. The new company made cast-iron hollowware from 1917 until 1952. Skillets, kettles, griddles, pans, sad irons and other items were made. Skillets were made in eight different sizes and sell today for prices based on size and condition. Recent prices go from about $10 to more than $50. Only a few sell for higher prices. Whatever your winning bid was at the auction is probably the wholesale price for the skillet. It probably would sell for more in a shop.

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Q: I have a 1940s Clip-Craft erector set in its original cylindrical box. I can't find any information about the set and hope you can help.

A: Your construction set was made by Clip-Craft Corp. of New York City. It was written up as a new toy in the December 1947 issue of Popular Science magazine. The set includes curves and rods, steel clips, aluminum sheets and wooden wheels. Pieces are held together by the clips rather than by nuts and bolts. The term "Erector Set" is a brand name trademarked by Alfred C. Gilbert, who patented his metal construction set in 1913. Gilbert's sets, made by the A.C. Gilbert Co. of New Haven, Conn., starting in 1916, were assembled with nuts and bolts.

***

Q: My cow creamer has been in our family for decades. Cream in the pitcher pours out of the cow's mouth, and the handle is its tail. The cow, which is in a sitting position, is about 5 inches tall. The bottom is marked "Coventry, Made in U.S.A." and "5540B" in gold-colored ink. What is it worth?

A: Carrie Daum opened an artware business in Barberton, Ohio, in 1932. She called her business Dior Studios until 1936, when she changed its name to Coventry Ware, Inc. In 1940 Daum added ceramic figurines and artware to her earlier lines of composition and plaster products. Your creamer and similar pieces, many made with gold-painted highlights, most likely date from the 1940s. And the creamer probably was designed by artist Elaine Carlock (1915-2012), who worked at Coventry before moving to Michigan in 1952. The 5540B mark is a shape number. Your creamer is collectible, but not rare. Depending on its condition and decoration, it would sell for $25 to $40.

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Tip: Do not use self-adhesive tape, stickers or self-stick labels in a scrapbook. Eventually they will no longer stick to paper, and the old adhesive will leave marks.

***

Terry Kovel answers as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The volume of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, (Name of this newspaper), King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

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CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

Shoe candy container, glass, clear, heal, c. 1960, 2 7/8 inches, $30.

Fenton glass compote, white, ruffled rim, scalloped foot, marked, 7 x 6 inches, $50.

Bracelet, gold filled, enamel, Bambi in heart-shape plaque, stretch, 1940s, 3/4 inches, wide, $85.

Stick barometer, walnut, Hugh Jones, Bettws-Gwerfyl-Goch, Wales, c. 1800, 37 inches, $175.

Canton bowl, blue, white, square, cut corners, c.1860, 4 1/2 x 10 1/4 inches, 265.

Snuff box, papier-mache lacquered, prancing horse, gold-leaf border, octagonal, c. 1900, 4 x 2 1/2 inches, $280.

Lighthouse keeper's cottage doorstop, cast iron, c. 1910, 6 1/4 x 7 1/2 x 8 inch, pair, $840.

Elk head mount, Wyoming 20th century, 78 x 48 inches, $1,445.

Firefighting leather bucket, painted blue, gilt leaf scroll, cartouche, Indian maiden, c. 1810, 12 3/4 x 18 inches, $2,335.

Daum cameo vase, enameled purple violets, green leaves, frosted white ground, rounded, signed, 5 x 4 inches, $3,375.

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New! Contemporary, modern and mid-century ceramics made since 1950 are among the hottest collectibles today. Our special report, "Kovels' Buyers' Guide to Modern Ceramics: Mid-Century to Contemporary," identifies important pottery by American and European makers. Includes more than 65 factories and 70 studio artists, each with a mark and dates. Works by major makers - including Claude Conover, Guido Gambone, Lucie Rie, as well as potteries like Gustavsberg, Metlox and Sascha Brastoff - are shown in color photos. Find the "sleepers" at house sales and flea markets. "Special Report," 2010, 8 1/2 x 5 1/2 inches, 64 pp. Available only from Kovels. Order by phone at 800-303-1996; online at Kovels.com; or send $19.95 plus $4.95 postage and handling to Kovels, Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

***

(c) 2013 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

This Uncle Sam was made with googly eyes and a fancy cap, but no beard. This is a German doll made in about 1918, the year World War I ended. He is carrying a U.S. flag. The bisque doll, 14 inches high, sold for $2,350 at a 2012 auction hosted by Theriault's of Annapolis, Md.

Last Updated on Monday, 12 August 2013 16:37
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of June 10, 2013

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Written by TERRY KOVEL   
Monday, 10 June 2013 12:50
Campaign buttons from the past can be misleading. This McKinley button from the 1900 campaign is about jobs, not pollution. The 2-1/8-inch button made by W&H sold in 2012 for $1,948 at Hake's Americana & Collectibles of York, Pa.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Political slogans and pictures from the past can sometimes be confusing because modern times suggest a different meaning. In the 1900 U.S. presidential campaign, William McKinley used the slogans "Protection and Prosperity" and "Four more years of the full dinner pail." His campaign often pictured a workman's lunchbox as a symbol of jobs.

One of his most famous buttons, if first seen today, would startle a 2013 voter. The button shows a strange boxlike container—the lunch pail of the day. Inside the pail is a building with smoke pouring from the smokestacks and the words: "Do you smoke? Yes, since 1896." The smoking chimneys on the building represent work being done inside, just as the lunch pail means jobs. Today the smoke could be misinterpreted as pollution, and the answer given to "Do you smoke?" would suggest a health problem.

The rare button sold for $1,948 at a recent Hake's Auction. It's a reminder that both language and symbols can change with time and events, so collectors should be careful not to interpret objects or words from the past through modern eyes.

Q: My small electric mantel clock has a metal embossed design under the dial. The design includes a seaplane with a propeller that rotates when the clock is running. There's also a sailing ship, a man standing near a tepee and the words "Polar Bird." The case is Bakelite and like new. I can't find a manufacturer's name. Do you know who made it and what it's worth today?

A: A clock matching yours auctioned last year for $119. Clocks like it, with extra parts that move when the clock is running, are called animated clocks. Yours probably dates from the 1930s, the decade following Adm. Richard Byrd's first flights to both the north and south poles. Some sources say the clock was manufactured by the New Jersey Clock Co. of Newark, N.J., with an electric motor made by the Hammond Clock Co. of Chicago. Others say it's a Chronart clock, which may have been a trade name used by the New Jersey Clock Co.

Q: I inherited a ceramic tile mural made up of 24 4-inch tiles. The tiles are not cemented together, but when laid out they picture a large sailing ship, two smaller sailboats and a lighthouse. One tile is signed "Pillsbury." I think the tiles came from a pottery in Ohio. Any information and present value would be appreciated.

A: Hester W. Pillsbury (1862-1951) was a decorator who worked at Roseville and Weller, both Ohio potteries. Roseville Pottery was organized in Roseville, Ohio, in 1890 and opened a plant in nearby Zanesville in 1898. Roseville made pottery until 1954. Weller Pottery started out in Fultonham, Ohio, moved to Zanesville in 1882 and closed in 1948. Hester Pillsbury began working in about 1904 and worked at Weller after 1918. A tile picture like yours, made up of 24 signed tiles, could be worth $1,000 or more.

Q: I am interested in figuring out the value of a vintage Rolls Razor set called "The Traveler." It includes a travel box and a razor with disassembled handles and other parts. The back of the razor says "Made in England."

A: Rolls Razor, Ltd., of London was in business from the 1920s into the early 1950s. It made several razor models that used "permanent blades" rather than disposables. Rolls Razor sets were sold in the United States until the late 1940s by Charles Levin & Co. of New York City. Your Traveler set was not an early Rolls model. It probably dates from the 1930s. Rolls sets are easy to find at flea markets. But Traveler sets are not as common as some of the other sets. Your set might sell for $40 to $60 if it's complete and in good condition.

Q: I just bought a piece of Brooklin Pottery. I thought it was from New York but I am told it is Canadian. Do you know anything about it? Are there many popular collectibles from Canada that aren't well known in the states?

A: Of course. Collectors in the United States and Canada started looking at their own countries after soldiers saw all the antiques in Europe during World War II. The first books and publications about collecting in the United States concentrated on English porcelains and furniture, Georgian silver, prints, Staffordshire figures and Chippendale furniture that could have been made in many countries. American pieces were wanted by very few. Our trip to Eastern Canada from Ohio in the late 1950s was disappointing because we hoped to see Canadian things in antiques shops. We found a few in Nova Scotia selling early Canadian furniture, but shops in the large cities looked like ours—they were filled with mainly English or Asian pieces. But by the 1970s, Canadians had become interested in their own antiques and history and there were Canadian publications and shows. Brooklin Pottery was founded in 1952 by Theo and Susan Harlander. They had emigrated from Germany. Some of their best-known studio pottery is made with incised pictures of people and geometric designs in pale earthtones. The business was closed by 1987.

Tip: Don't use water on turquoise objects or jewelry because water is destructive to turquoise. Instead, wipe turquoise with a microfiber cloth. Brush jewelry crevices that have become filled with debris.

Sign up for our weekly email, "Kovels Komments." It includes the latest news, tips and questions and is free, if you register on our website. Kovels.com has lists of publications, clubs, appraisers, auction houses, people who sell parts or repair antiques and more. Kovels.com adds to the information in this column and helps you find useful sources needed by collectors. Terry Kovel answers as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The volume of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Cracker Jack toy ocarina, red, plastic, $10.
  • Singer sewing machine trade card, Romeo & Juliet, c.1890, 6 1/4 x 3 3/4 inches, $10.
  • Avon after-shave bottle, Liberty Bell shape, amber, 1971, 4 1/2 x 3 1/2 inches, $25.
  • Elfinware trinket box, piano shape, blue flowers, green moss, Germany, c. 1900, 2 1/2 x 1 x 2 inches, $50.
  • Czechoslovakia glass pitcher, Queen Anne's Lace, 10 x 7 inches, $90.
  • Cookie cutter running horse, tin, signed C.H. Swink, c. 1860, 4 x 7 1/2 inches, $175.
  • Delft plate, woman holding cornucopia and flower stem, 1700s, 8 7/8 inches, $180.
  • Chinese export armorial plate, Renny arms, spearhead flower borders, octagonal, 1770, 8 1/2 inches, $450.
  • Federal chest, cherry, bowfront, banded edge, four graduated drawers, cutout base, French feet, 38 x 41 inches, $2,280.
  • Chandelier glass lamp, six-light, spiral-shaped frame, scrolling arms, grape-cluster drops, Italy, 35 inches, $3,250

Ralph and Terry Kovel, syndicated newspaper columnists, best-selling authors, avid collectors and national authorities on antiques, hosted the HGTV series Flea Market Finds With the Kovels. Enjoy the shows all over again and explore some of the most exciting flea markets in the United States. In each episode, Ralph and Terry share their secrets about when and where to shop, what to look for at shops and flea markets and how to make a good buy. These DVDs include the first season of the series. You'll see rare marbles, antique quilts, European chests and boxes, Satsuma pottery, ceramic tobacco jars, Bakelite jewelry, vintage plastic dime-store toys, Czechoslovakian glass, Big Little Books, can labels, seed packets, old prints and more. Available online at Kovelsonlinestore.com; by phone at 800-303-1996; or send $29.95 plus $4.95 postage to Kovels, P.O. Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2013 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Campaign buttons from the past can be misleading. This McKinley button from the 1900 campaign is about jobs, not pollution. The 2-1/8-inch button made by W&H sold in 2012 for $1,948 at Hake's Americana & Collectibles of York, Pa.
Last Updated on Monday, 12 August 2013 16:37
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of June 3, 2013

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Written by TERRY KOVEL   
Monday, 03 June 2013 10:48

Clothing stores in the 19th century often displayed a sign that looked like a boot. It was a simple shape to make and easy to understand. This 47-inch-high wooden sign with its old paint sold for $911 at a Garth's auction in Ohio.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – A Collectors like advertising signs and packages. In the 1950s when restaurants began decorating with old signs, they wanted material from the 19th century with graphics that featured husky women in period gowns and large hats or scenes with horse and buggies, high-wheel bicycles or old cars and buildings. But collectors and their collections got older, and by the 1980s, a younger group was buying advertising from the 1930s to '50s, with scenes of happy housewives wearing aprons while making cookies with their children or landscapes with new cars, airplanes or trains.

While old advertising was expensive and hard to find, 1950s pieces turned up at garage sales and flea markets for very low prices. Today there are collectors who hunt for recent rock posters, advertisements and packaging by artists like Andy Warhol or Peter Max. It is the design that catches the eye and attracts collectors. Some wonder if ads, packages and shop signs are going to be valuable in the future. Go back to the mid-1800s, when store signs often were simply pictures because many people could not read. A cigar-store figure represented a shop that sold tobacco, and a cutout wooden board shaped like a shoe or a red and white barber pole were instantly recognized by customers. These signs are now classed as folk art, and many sell for thousands of dollars. Great graphics that tell a story, products that represent the past, and nostalgia keep advertising collectibles selling well, even though the ads are getting younger.

Q: I am a retired U.S. Air Force sergeant. Sometime during my 20 years of service, I received a chrome-plated "Camp David" Zippo pocket lighter. The front has a black engraving of the camp's entryway, with a rope-like circle around the image. I understand it has some value. True?

A: Zippo lighters were first made in Bradford, Pa., in 1932. When smoking was more socially acceptable than it is now, lighters were popular souvenirs. The military, as well as U.S. presidents, purchased them to give as souvenirs to servicemen and visiting dignitaries. Camp David was built in the 1930s and was used as a presidential retreat starting in 1942. But it wasn't called "Camp David" until 1953, when President Dwight David Eisenhower renamed the retreat after his grandson, David Eisenhower. Other marks on your lighter may help you date it. A lighter matching yours, made in 1972, is for sale online with its original box and insert. The asking price is $45.

Q: My mother-in-law gave my daughter a vintage dress that has a label inside that says "Harvey Berin, designed by Karen Stark." My mother-in-law was a music instructor at the local high school and put on musicals every year. This dress was donated to her to use in the musicals. When she retired, she gave the dress to my daughter to wear to the prom. Can you tell us anything about the designer and maker of this dress?

A: Harvey Berin started his clothing business in 1921. He is known for his cocktail and evening dresses made from the 1940s until 1970. Berin bought dresses in Paris and had the designs adapted by designer Karen Stark, his sister-in-law. He approved the designs before the dresses were made. First Lady Patricia Nixon wore a gown designed by "Karen Stark for Berin" to the 1969 inaugural balls. The dress is now in the Smithsonian. Berin closed his business in 1970.

Q: I have a blue-and-white ironstone platter with a floral border and a center scene of a horse-drawn stagecoach with several men riding on top. It's marked "Coaching Scenes, Made in England by Johnson Bros., a genuine hand engraving, all decoration under the glaze detergent & acid resisting colour, ironstone, Passing Through." I would like to know what it could be worth.

A: Johnson Brothers was founded in 1883 in Hanley, England, and is still in business. In 1968 it became part of the Wedgwood Group, which became part of WWRD in 2009. The word "detergent" is a clue to age. Although the first detergents were made in the 1930s, they didn't become popular until the 1940s. Johnson Brothers introduced its "Coaching Scenes" series in 1963 and continued producing it until 1999. Dishes were made in blue and white, pink and white and green and white with different center scenes. "Passing Through" is the name of the scene on your plate. Value of your plate: about $35.

Tip: When putting on earrings in front of the bathroom mirror, be sure the sink stopper is closed. Don't risk dropping the jewelry down the drain.

Need prices for collectibles? Find them at Kovels.com, our website for collectors. More than 84,000 prices and 5,000 color pictures have just been added. Now you can find more than 856,000 prices that can help you determine the value of your collectible. Access to the prices is free at Kovels.com/priceguide.

Terry Kovel answers as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The volume of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Shelley porcelain creamer, bridal rose, fluted, 2 1/2 inches, $30.
  • Pewabic Pottery vase, blue, flared rim, 1995, 5 3/4 inches, $40.
  • Red and White Coffee tin, white letters, red ground, key, 3 1/2 x 5 inches, $40.
  • Vinyl "wicker" purse, double-horseshoe leather handles, gold-tone turn clasp & pegged feet, circa 1950, 11 x 6 x 4 inches, $45.
  • Nippon hatpin holder, fluted flared ribbing, berries, leaves, ribbon, 1930s, 4 1/4 inches, $60.
  • Pressed glass sugar and creamer, Heart and Thumbprint, scalloped rim, Tarentum Glass Co., circa 1890, $65.
  • Occupational shaving mug, bicyclist, A.R. Deming, gilt, stamped CFH, 3 1/2 inches, $300.
  • Boneshaker bicycle, wire, miniature, circa 1920, 6 inches, $560.
  • Gothic Revival chair, oak, folding, carved, X-curved legs, upholstered seat, pair, $1,340.
  • Sculling team toy, eight figures, coxswain at helm, cast iron, painted, U.S. Hardware, circa 1910, 14 1/4 inches, $1,900.

Available now: The best book to own if you want to buy, sell or collect—and if you order now, you'll receive a copy with the author's autograph. The new Kovels' Antiques & Collectibles Price Guide, 2013, 45th edition, is your most accurate source for current prices. This large-size paperback has more than 2,500 color photographs and 40,000 up-to-date prices for more than 775 categories of antiques and collectibles. You'll also find hundreds of factory histories and marks, a report on the record prices of the year, plus helpful sidebars and tips about buying, selling, collecting and preserving your treasures. Available online at Kovelsonlinestore.com; by phone at 800-303-1996; at your bookstore; or send $27.95 plus $4.95 postage to Price Book, Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2013 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.




ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

Clothing stores in the 19th century often displayed a sign that looked like a boot. It was a simple shape to make and easy to understand. This 47-inch-high wooden sign with its old paint sold for $911 at a Garth's auction in Ohio.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 04 June 2013 07:58
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of May 27, 2013

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Written by TERRY KOVEL   
Tuesday, 28 May 2013 07:54

This lamp, created from a figure of a bronze woman and an iridescent gold glass shade made by Loetz, is 14 inches high. The signed lamp sold this spring for $3,750 at Rago Arts and Auction Center in Lambertville, N.J.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Electric lights were first marketed to the public about 1880. It is said that Louis Comfort Tiffany's famous lily lamp with glass shades for light bulbs was the first lamp with a shade that projected light down, not up, like a candle flame. Other lamps of the early 1900s were adapted to accept bulbs by removing the older light source, like a candle, then wiring the lamp for electricity and adding a bulb and shade. Others were made in entirely new shapes.

During the Art Nouveau period, sensuous women with curves were part of the designs used for glass, ceramics, bronze figurines and even furniture. So it is not surprising that a variety of lamps designed to feature women also were made. The Loetz glass factory (1840-1940), in what is now the Czech Republic, made art glass. At around the turn of the 20th century, workers there designed a figural lamp with a bronze base shaped like a woman holding an iridescent gold glass shade above her head. The glass resembled Tiffany's, but it was actually made at the Loetz factory. It was signed by Peter Tereszczuk (1875-1963), a well-known Ukrainian sculptor who made bronze figurines and other decorative bronzes.

Bell collectors prize his bronze electric call buttons that look like a small child on a rocky base. The lamp sold for $3,750 at a Rago Arts and Auction sale in 2013.

Q: My old gate-leg table has a label that says it was made by the John D. Raab Chair Co. The finish on the table is a bit worn and marred. I have been considering refinishing or painting it, although I think this would decrease its value. What do you think?

A: The John D. Raab Chair Co. was in business in Grand Rapids, Mich., from 1906 to 1924, when it was taken over by the Furniture Shops of Grand Rapids. If you like the table and plan to use it, go ahead and refinish or paint it. "Brown furniture" pieces like your table are not selling for much money today, and many people are buying them at bargain prices, then refinishing or painting them to either use or resell.

Q: I would like information on a metal toy roller coaster that was given to my son in the early 1970s. It was made by J. Chein & Co., of Burlington, N.J. It's about 20 inches long, and has two cars propelled by an elastic band wound by a key. A ticket booth, hot-dog stand, cotton candy stand and children are pictured around the sides. Is it valuable or collectible?

A: Julius Chein emigrated from Russia in 1893 and opened his toy company in New York City in 1903. The company moved to Burlington in 1949. The roller coaster was one of several amusement park toys made by Chein. It was designed by model-maker Eugene Bosch in 1949 and was made until the late 1960s. The lithographed pictures around the base were changed several times, and different colors were used. A 1950s version pictures a sideshow. Chein stopped making toys in the 1970s. The company was sold in 1987, became Atlantic Cheinco and filed for bankruptcy in 1992. The sideshow version from the 1950s sells for $150 to $400. Your version with a hot-dog stand is less than $100.

Q: I would like to know something about the maker of a platter that has been in my family for years. It's marked "Greenwood China, made for P, JB and Sons, Hotel Department," and "Greenwood China, Trenton, N.J." is impressed on the back. Can you tell me how old this is?

A: Greenwood Pottery was founded in 1868. It began marking pieces "Greenwood China" in 1886. During the early 1900s, Greenwood Pottery and Greenwood China were listed at separate addresses in Trenton, although they were under the same management. Dinnerware, hotel ware, restaurant ware and other items were made. Hotel china was marked with the letter "P" underneath "Greenwood China." The pottery also made porcelain marked "Greenwood Art Pottery." The art pottery ewers and vases can sell for more than $1,000 each. Greenwood Pottery was out of business by about 1933.

Q: We own an Art Nouveau vase signed "Val St. Lambert." It's 16 1/2 inches high. Can you tell us something about it, including what it's worth?

A: Val St. Lambert Cristalleries (glassmaking factory) was founded near Liege, Belgium, in 1826. The only glassmaking company in Belgium, it still operates today (visit Val-Saint-Lambert.com). The company is best known for its Art Nouveau (c. 1895-1905) and Art Deco (c. 1925-1935) glassware. The size and style of your vase may mean that it could sell for more than $1,000. Have an expert in your area take a look at it.

Q: I found a $1,000 certificate from the Bank of the United States among my father's things after he died. It's dated Dec. 15, 1840, and is No. 8894. There are portraits of six men along the sides. The only one I recognize is Benjamin Franklin. Is this certificate valuable?

A: The Bank of the United States was chartered in 1791 in Philadelphia, which was the United States' capital at that time. The men pictured on your note are David Rittenhouse (the first director of the U.S. Mint), William Penn, Thomas Paine, Robert Morris, Benjamin Franklin and Robert Fulton. An original bank note would sell for more than $100, but this particular bank note is a commonly found fake.

Tip: Be careful when handling birdhouses, birdcages and bird feeders, old or new. It is possible to catch pigeon fever (psittacosis) through a cut or even from breathing the dust.

Terry Kovel answers as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The volume of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Kewpie wedding topper, celluloid, wedding dress, holding bouquet, 1930s, $55.
  • Pewter chalice, raised, molded base, concave stem, wedding band knot, tulip cup, flared rim, 9 x 4 1/2 inches, $95.
  • Wedding Ring patchwork quilt, multicolor, scalloped edge, c. 1910, 76 x 95 inches, $120.
  • Lladro bride, groom figurines, No. 4808, 7 1/2 inches, $130.
  • Paper doll set, Wedding of the Paper Dolls, bride, groom, maid of honor, bridesmaid, Merrill, 1935, 10 inches, $150.
  • Sterling silver wedding cup, woman wearing long dress, stamped, 5 inches, $210.
  • Woven bamboo wedding basket, brass mounts, four tiers, handles, Chinese, 39 x 34 inches, $355.
  • Oil wedding lamp, white opaline reservoirs, brass burners, Ripley, E.F. Jones, 1859, 13 3/4 x 9 1/2 inches, $575.
  • Chief Rain-in-the-Face and wife wedding photograph, silver gelatin, 6 x 8 inches, $590.
  • Stove plate, "The Wedding Dance 1746," cast iron, 26 x 22 inches, $1,420.

Special offer. Free gift bag when you buy The Label Made Me Buy It, by Ralph and Terry Kovel. It's a picture history of labels that once decorated products from cigar boxes to orange crates. The 320 full-color labels picture Native Americans, famous people, buildings and symbols. Learn how to identify and date labels, or just enjoy the rare pictured labels (hardcover, 224 pages). Out-of-print but available at KovelsOnlineStore.com. By mail, send $40 plus $5.95 shipping to Kovels, Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122; or call 800-303-1996.

© 2013 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

This lamp, created from a figure of a bronze woman and an iridescent gold glass shade made by Loetz, is 14 inches high. The signed lamp sold this spring for $3,750 at Rago Arts and Auction Center in Lambertville, N.J.

Last Updated on Monday, 03 June 2013 10:58
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of May 20, 2013

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Written by TERRY KOVEL   
Monday, 20 May 2013 13:34

A courting couple is pictured on this Sevres-style porcelain urn. It has gilt metal mounts and a lid. The 17-1/2-inch urn sold for $1,750 at a 2013 Leslie Hindman auction in Chicago.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – French porcelain has been popular since the 18th century, and large urns still sell quickly. While Sevres porcelain is the best-known, there were many other designers and factories.

Large urns were made by the end of the 18th century to be used in large rooms with high ceilings or in gardens. Those that look like a large flower pot on a pedestal held plants or flowers. Most were placed on the floor. Those that narrowed at the top and had a cover and elaborate decorations were strictly ornamental. They were put on a low table or a fireplace mantel to be admired. All of them are called "urns," and the decorated ones often are called "Sevres-style."

Of course, the original old urns made by the Sevres factory are the most desirable and most expensive. But some of the Sevres-style urns by others sell for high prices, too. The quality of the work, the amount of gold trim and the beauty of the decoration set the price. Prices range from a few hundred dollars to more than $10,000. Most popular are pictures of masses of flowers or landscapes that include well-dressed people.

Q: I bought a piece of property that happened to have a mobile home parked on it. Once I bought the property, I owned the mobile home, too. The three-piece bedroom set in the mobile home includes a bed, dresser and chest of drawers. The mark inside a drawer on the dresser and chest is "Henredon Fine Furniture." What can you tell me about the company and the set's value?

A: Henredon Furniture Co. was founded in Morgantown, N.C., in 1945, so the bedroom set was not made before that year. The Henredon brand name has been owned by Furniture Brands Inc., based in St. Louis, since 2001. Henredon furniture is known to be of high quality, but your set would sell as "used furniture," not as "antique furniture." Try to sell it locally—it is expensive to ship furniture a long way.

Q: Our statue of a peasant girl is 25 inches tall. She is sitting on a tree stump and holds a basket of cherries on her lap. On the round base, there's a plaque in the shape of a scroll that says "La Cerises par Cana." Wasn't there a famous 19th-century French sculptor named Cana? How can I find out what it's worth?

A: Louis Emile Cana (1845-1895) was a French sculptor of bronzes, but he specialized in sculpting animals. Another French sculptor, Francois Hippolyte Moreau (1832-1927) created a bronze sculpture titled Les Cerises ("The Cherries") that matches the description of yours. His original bronzes are signed with his name. Known copies signed like yours were made of spelter, a zinc alloy. Still, if yours is one of those and is in excellent condition, it could sell for several hundred dollars. An original Moreau is worth more than $2,000.

Q: I know about Teco pottery and its matte green vases, but I just heard the company also made tiles. Is that true?

A: Yes. A color ad in a 1913 catalog shows a variety of tile murals and single tiles used for trim made by Teco. Other tiles are also pictured. Earlier black-and-white ads show different tiles. Teco advertised that it made "architectural terra cotta, Teco and garden pottery and wall, floor and art tile" until 1917 or later.

Q: Years ago, I took a chance and won a "basket of cheer" at a church bazaar. I still have one of the unopened bottles from that basket. It's a bottle of Benedictine liqueur with a red seal on the front and a label that reads "D.O.M." and "86 proof." I figure it's an antique and would like to sell it, but I don't know how to go about it.

A: Benedictine is an herbal liqueur that has been produced in France since the 1860s. "D.O.M." has been its motto since the beginning and stands for "Deo Optimo Maximo," which can be translated as "Praise be to God, most good, most great." Bacardi owns the brand today. Your bottle is not an antique, since it has to date from after the end of Prohibition in the United States. But it was bottled before the liqueur's alcohol content was lowered to 80 proof. U.S. liquor laws come into play when you want to sell a full bottle of an alcoholic beverage, even a bottle some might consider collectible. Some national auctions hold special whiskey auctions every year. Unless you just spread the word among your friends and acquaintances to sell your bottle, you might try contacting a nationally known auction house. Your bottle might sell for $50 or more.

Q: You mentioned that old glass bottles and insulators and even pressed glass goblets may turn purple if left in the sun a long time. Why?

A: We learned from an article in Antique Bottle & Glass Collector magazine that coloring changes in glass are caused by chemicals in the glass. Arsenic was used in glassmaking before World War II, and when left in the sun, that glass turns yellow. Manganese was used before 1930, and that glass turns pale purple in sunlight. The very dark purple bottles seen at flea markets today are irradiated with modern machines, not by the slow rays of the sun.

Tip: When repairing a table or toy, take digital pictures at each stage. Even photograph the screws and nails so you can put everything back in the same place. The photos in reverse order are a step-by-step guide to what to do.

Take advantage of a free listing for your group to announce events or to find antique shows and other events. Go to Kovels.com/calendar to find and plan your antiquing trips.

Terry Kovel answers as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The volume of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Muncie pottery vase, blue drip glaze, handles, 7 3/4 inches, $50.
  • Pepsi-Cola fountain pen, celluloid, metal bottle-shaped clip, red, white and blue stripes, box, circa 1930, 4 7/8 inches, $100.
  • Staffordshire teapot, cover, Isle of Man sailor, rope, majolica, Wm. Brownfield, 9 inches, $120.
  • Mother's Day Lladro figurine, 9 inches, $235.
  • Bergere leaf-shape earrings, metal, stamped, 3/4 inches, $295.
  • Arts and Crafts electric lamp, pyramid shade, leaded glass, tulips, column standard, 14 x 14 inches, $395.
  • Edwardian-style game table, mahogany, inlay, shaped top, hinged, square legs, circa 1950, 30 x 36 inches, $615.
  • Sevres plate set, center Napoleonic shield, bees, cobalt blue border, 9 1/2 inches, 10 pieces, $690.
  • Firefighting bucket, leather, red paint, handle, circa 1800, 17 inches, pair, $825.
  • Rose Medallion vase, baluster, figures, roses, butterflies, molded lip, gilt foo dog handles, circa 1865, 32 inches, pair, $2,765.

Give yourself or a friend a gift. Kovels' Advertising Collectibles Price List has more than 10,000 current prices of your favorite advertising collectibles, from boxes and bins to trays and tins. More than 400 categories are organized by brand name, company name, product or collectible. Plus 300 photographs, logos and trademarks. A 16-page color insert features important advertising collectibles. Clubs, publications, resources and a full index. Available at your bookstore; online at Kovels.com; by phone at 800-303-1996; or send $16.95 plus $4.95 postage to Kovels, Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2013 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

A courting couple is pictured on this Sevres-style porcelain urn. It has gilt metal mounts and a lid. The 17-1/2-inch urn sold for $1,750 at a 2013 Leslie Hindman auction in Chicago.

Last Updated on Monday, 03 June 2013 10:58
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of May 13, 2013

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Written by TERRY KOVEL   
Monday, 13 May 2013 12:51

This Speaking Dog bank sold last year for more than pennies at RSL Auctions of Oldwick, N.J. The price was $14,280. It was the rare blue-dress variety.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Children's toys often tell us how times have changed. Canada stopped making pennies last year, so saving money a penny at a time will soon be a problem in Canada. The United States also may stop making pennies, since the cost of the copper in a single coin is more than one cent.

But, ironically, the cost of a 19th-century mechanical bank has gone up. A Speaking Dog bank set a record at $63,250 a few years ago. The girl with the dog on that bank was wearing a blue dress. Most of these banks have a girl with a red dress. The bank was sold at Morphy Auctions in Pennsylvania in 2007, before the economic downturn in 2008. And the record bank had almost perfect paint. But the Speaking Dog bank still is very popular. It sells today for prices that range from $150 for one with worn paint and rust to over $14,500 for an excellent example. But watch out; copies have been made.

The cast-iron mechanical bank was made by the J. & E. Stevens Co. of Cromwell, Conn., in about 1895. Place a penny on the tray in the girl's hand. When the lever is pushed down, the dog opens its mouth, swallows the penny and wags its tail.

Q: I have an electric clock that pictures the Trylon and Perisphere and the words "New York World's Fair 1939" in gold on the face. The clock is in the shape of a ship's wheel and is about 11 inches tall. It was made by Sessions Clock Corp. and keeps perfect time. Does it have any value?

A: The New York World's Fair opened on April 30, 1939, the 150th anniversary of George Washington's inauguration as president of the United States. It ran until the end of October that year, reopened in May 1940 and closed on Oct. 27, 1940. Many souvenirs were made for the fair. Items that picture the Trylon and Perisphere are especially wanted by collectors. The three-sided Trylon and spherical Perisphere, symbols of the fair, were temporary structures made of plasterboard over steel frames. Check the website 1939NYWorldsFair.com for more information on the 1939 fair. Value of your clock: about $100.

Q: I inherited an antique Chippendale maple dresser with four drawers. There's a large tag inside one drawer that's titled "Florian Papp." Handwritten information on the card says the dresser is a "genuine antique" made in New England and that it was sold by Florian Papp in 1927. I would like to learn more.

A: Florian Papp (1883-1965) was born in Hungary and immigrated to the United States in about 1900. He worked as a cabinetmaker and furniture restorer before opening a gallery in New York City, where he specialized in selling European antiques. The Florian Papp antiques and art gallery is still in business, now operated by the third generation of the Papp family. It has always been an important gallery, and the provenance on the card is a guarantee that the dresser was made in New England and is not a reproduction.

Q: I found a platter in my mother's china cupboard that doesn't match anything else she had, and I have no idea where it came from. The mark on the bottom is a circle with a crown on top. The word "Celebrate" is inside the circle, and "Made in Germany" is written below. Is this platter old and valuable?

A: The mark you describe was used by Geo. Borgfeldt & Co., a New York City importer. The company was in business from 1881 until about 1976. Geo. Borgfeldt & Co. imported china and earthenware, dolls, toys, glassware, novelty goods and other items from Europe and sold them to retailers in the United States. The mark was used beginning in 1936. "Celebrate" is one of the trademarks owned by Borgfeldt. Your platter probably was made in the late 1930s, before the outbreak of World War II. It is difficult to sell a piece that probably was part of a set. Value: about $40.

Q: I have six issues of Ladies' Home Journal from 1898. They're in pretty good condition. I was thinking they might be worth something to a collector. What do you think?

A: The Ladies' Home Journal was first published in 1883. It's still on newsstands today. Issues as old as yours are especially interesting to collectors because of their old ads and photos. In general, 1898 Ladies' Home Journals sell online and at shows for $40 to $45 each.

Q: I have a small set of Candlewick glass, but three of them are cloudy. I believe this is from being washed in a dishwasher. Is there any way to make them clear again?

A: Cloudiness is caused by deposits of calcium carbonate left by new phosphate-free dishwasher detergents, especially if they're used with hard water. Manufacturers removed phosphate from their dishwashing products in 2010, after several states banned the ingredient because it contributes to the growth of algae in the environment. To clear up cloudy glasses, put a cup of white vinegar on the top rack of the dishwasher and run the glasses through the cleaning cycle without detergent. To prevent it from recurring, clean your dishwasher every six months and use less detergent when you run the dishwasher. You also can add a little citric acid to the detergent.

Tip: Never scrub threaded coral beads. The edges of the coral are so sharp they may cut the bead string.

Terry Kovel answers as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The volume of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Glass fedora candy container, clear, 4 1/2 x 2 x 4 inches, $25.
  • Peters & Reed vase, Moss Aztec, Vestal Virgins, 6 3/4 inches, $35.
  • Still bank, cast iron, child in boat, holding fish, mermaid, gold paint, 4 5/8 x 4 3/8 inches, $210.
  • Student lamp, brass, green glass shade, etched dragons, 24 inches, $235.
  • Roseville vase, Iris pattern, pink, handles, 9 x 15 inches, $305.
  • George Nelson wall clock, "Ball," birch, brass spokes, red second hand, round, Howard Miller, 13 1/4 inches, $425.
  • Match holder, shovel and bucket shape, metal, hanging, 9 x 3 inches, $440.
  • Architectural bracket, eagle, spread wings, giltwood, pinecone finial, serpentine shelf, c. 1885, 18 x 20 inches, pair, $1,600.
  • Renaissance Revival library table, walnut, marble top, demilune ends, drawer, trestle base, 29 x 53 inches, $1,845.
  • Sterling silver water pitcher, mermaid, pearls, flowing hair, repousse, Whiting Mfg. Co., c. 1888, 8 5/8 inches, 4,480.

Contemporary, modern and mid-century ceramics made since 1950 are among the hottest collectibles today. Our special report, "Kovels' Buyers' Guide to Modern Ceramics: Mid-Century to Contemporary," identifies important pottery by American and European makers. Includes more than 65 factories and 70 studio artists, each with a mark and dates. Works by major makers, including Claude Conover, Guido Gambone, Lucie Rie, as well as potteries like Gustavsberg, Metlox and Sascha Brastoff, are shown in color photos. Find the "sleepers" at house sales and flea markets. Special Report, 2010, 8 1/2 x 5 1/2 inches, 64 pp. Available only from Kovels. Order by phone at 800-303-1996; online at Kovels.com; or send $19.95 plus $4.95 postage and handling to Kovels, Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2013 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

This Speaking Dog bank sold last year for more than pennies at RSL Auctions of Oldwick, N.J. The price was $14,280. It was the rare blue-dress variety.

Last Updated on Monday, 03 June 2013 10:58
 
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