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Kovels - Antiques & Collecting

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Nov. 11, 2013

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 11 November 2013 10:57

An Art Deco aquarium caused excitement at a Cottone auction in Geneseo, N.Y., in last month. The 5-foot-high metal and glass lamp and fish bowl sold for $805.

Keeping fish in an aquarium is said to be one of the top hobbies in the United States today. Some enthusiasts search for antique-looking aquariums that fit with room styles from the past.

It was not a hobby for an average householder until the 1830s, when the Wardian case was created as a simple container for live fish. By the opening of the Crystal Palace Exhibition of 1851 in London, aquariums were wonders suitable for a home, and two years later the London Zoo built a large aquarium open to the public. The United States had enough people interested in raising fish indoors to form an "aquarist society" by 1843, and fish became part of a full-blown fad by the 1860s.

Of course, that meant there were things to collect—an aquarium and equipment— like pumps and filters, rocks, small figures and scenery for the fish tank. Decorators planned rooms with planters and aquariums in the prevailing styles of the time, from Victorian to Mission to Art Deco to modern. Old tanks made of wrought iron and glass, tanks bordered by heavy Mission-style oak planks, glass bowls held in wicker stands, and Art Deco designs using plastic instead of glass are sometimes found at antiques sales. And the small glass fishbowl for guppies or goldfish so popular in the 1950s still is available.

Recently, a Deco aquarium made of wrought iron vines and leaves, and a clear, slightly green glass bowl was sold for $805. It had a light at the top and a holder for a large potted plant at the bottom. It's probably the focal point of a room today.

Q: My great aunt gave my mother a pretty porcelain bowl decorated with hand-painted acorns and leaves. It is marked "Elite L France" on the bottom. I'm now 90 years old, so the bowl must be very old. Does it have any value?

A: The mark "Elite L [for Limoges] France" was used by Bawo & Dotter, an importer established in New York City in the mid 1860s. Bawo & Dotter founded a decorating studio in Fischern, Bohemia (presently Rybare, Czech Republic), in 1883 and was manufacturing porcelain in Limoges, France, by 1893. Bawo & Dotter's "Elite" china was exhibited at the 1893 World's Fair in Chicago. The company closed in about 1914. Your bowl, probably made to hold nuts, is worth about $50-$100.

Q: We own two paintings left to us by a friend who was a guard at the World War II POW camp set up at Westover Field in Chicopee, Mass. The paintings are signed "K. Skrobeck, 1945 POW." We can't find any information about the artist, but we would like to know if the paintings have any value.

A: Many World War II POWs tried painting while they were prisoners in the United States. It kept them busy and relieved boredom. Some even discovered they were talented. Biographical information about any one of these "artists" is hard to find. But POW paintings are part of the history of the war, and they can sell for hundreds of dollars if they're in good condition, if the quality of the artwork is decent (no matter what the style) and if you can document their history.

Q: I have a number of chairs, in varying condition, that were once used in the board room of the Bank of Stockton in Stockton, Calif. A paper label on the bottom of the chairs says "Jacob & Josef Kohn, Wien." Can you tell me something about this maker?

A: In 1849 Jacob Kohn and his son, Josef, of Vienna (Wien), Austria, founded a company that made wooden parts for buildings. The company began making furniture in about 1867 and eventually established factories in several cities. The Kohns manufactured bentwood chairs similar to those made by Thonet. The Kohns' company merged with Mundus in 1914 and the name became Kohn-Mundus, so your chairs were probably made before 1914. Kohn-Mundus merged with Thonet in 1922.

Q: We have a Westmoreland milk glass wedding bowl that was given to us on our wedding day in 1954. I have displayed it in a curio cabinet ever since. I also have a set of Milburn Rose sterling silver flatware made by Westmorland Sterling. Is there a connection between the wedding bowl and my sterling?

A: There is no connection between the company that made your milk glass wedding bowl and the company that made your sterling silver. Although the names of the companies are similar, they are spelled differently. Westmoreland Glass Co. was in business in Grapeville, Pa., from 1889 to 1984. Westmorland Sterling Co. was founded in 1940 to provide jobs for former aluminum workers, since most aluminum was needed for the war effort. The silver was made by Wallace Silversmiths, marketed by Wearever Aluminum, and sold by door-to-door salesmen. Milburn Rose is one of five patterns made by Westmorland Sterling Co. In 1966 Wallace took over the marketing the flatware and it became available in retail stores.

Tip: Keep silver, sterling or plated, out of humid storage areas. The ideal humidity for silver is 45 percent to 40 percent. You can keep small pieces in a glassed-in cupboard with anti-tarnish paper or camphor balls (moth balls). Big pieces can be kept in tarnish-preventing bags found at department and jewelry stores or online.

Sign up for our free weekly email, "Kovels Komments." Terry writes about the latest news, tips and questions and her views of the market. If you register on our website, you receive "Kovels Komments" free.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

 

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Hull vase, Wildflower pattern, dusty rose, handles, marked, 5 5/8 inches, $15.
  • Lindy Glider toy airplane, orange, blue paint, cast iron, Hubley, 6 inches, $120.
  • Nancy Lee doll, hard plastic, braided blond wig, blue dress, Arranbee, box, 17 inches, $170.
  • Wall organizer, black plastic, attached containers, D. Becker, I. Maurer, Germany, 1969, 34 x 26 inches, $250.
  • Stool, enameled steel, oak, adjustable, Toledo Metal Furniture Co., 1940s, 41 x 18 inches, $315.
  • Perthshire paperweight, blue and white overlay, central bouquet, clear ground, signed, 2 3/4 inches, $355.
  • Aluminum cocktail set, tray, shaker, six cups, plastic, chrome trim, wood handles, Farberware, 13-in. shaker, 8 pieces, $565.
  • Fireplace fireboard, two panels, carved, applied leaves, green, red paint, 34 x 36 inches, $780.
  • Silver necklace, leaf links, marked Kalo, 14 inches, $875.
  • Pottery vase, brown, black, white, blue, Marguerite Wildenhain, 20th century, 12 x 19 inches, $1,375.

"Kovels' A Diary: How to Settle a Collector's Estate" is our new week-by-week record of the settlement of an estate, from your first days gathering legal papers to the last days when you're dividing antiques among heirs and selling everything else-even the house. How to identify pottery, jewelry and other popular collectibles. Tips on where and how to sell furniture, jewelry, dishes, figurines, record albums, bikes and even clothes. We include lots of pictures and prices and explain the advantages of a house sale, auction, selling to a dealer or donating to a charity. Learn about how to handle the special problems of security and theft. Plus a free current supplement with useful websites, auctions lists and other information. Available only from Kovels for $19.95 plus $4.95 postage and handling. Order by phone at 800-303-1996; online at Kovels.com; or write to Kovels, P.O. Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2013 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.

 



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

An Art Deco aquarium caused excitement at a Cottone auction in Geneseo, N.Y., in last month. The 5-foot-high metal and glass lamp and fish bowl sold for $805. 

Last Updated on Monday, 11 November 2013 11:31
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Nov. 4, 2013

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 04 November 2013 09:06

The two papier-mache and wood figures wrestling with the help of some strings depict 19th-century politicians who couldn't agree on anything. The toy and original box sold for $180 at Jackson's Auctions in Cedar Falls, Iowa. Most people today would not recognize the pair, Disraeli and Gladstone, as famous British politicians during the reign of Queen Victoria.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Political fights among politicians are not new. Today, the rivalries are ridiculed in political cartoons and on TV sitcoms. In the past, political differences were shown in Staffordshire figures, slogans and drawings.

The rivalry in Britain in the last half of the 19th century between the prime ministers Benjamin Disraeli (1804-1881) and William Gladstone (1810-1898) was notable. Both men were skilled politicians, but they hated each other. The two men came from very different backgrounds. Gladstone was a rich and deeply religious upper-middle-class man educated at Eton and Oxford. Disraeli never attended a university and was a wild youth who lived extravagantly. He wrote novels, accumulated debts and then married a rich widow. Gladstone, a liberal (Whig), and Disraeli, a conservative, disagreed on both social and international policies. They called each other names, opposed each other in numerous campaigns and were able to defeat each other at times. The repeal of the Corn Laws, which lowered tariffs, the purchase of stock in the Suez Canal, the favor of Queen Victoria, and other major problems were part of their battles. Political cartoons of the time often showed the two men fighting. There were even toys that pictured the men wrestling. Several versions of the toy have been sold through the years. In 2013, Jackson's Auctions sold a pair of 8 1/2-inch-high Gladstone and Disraeli figures in their original box for $180.

Q: My maple armchair is marked "A Genuine Cushman Colonial Creation made in Bennington, Vt." The words are printed in several typestyles inside an oval. How old is it?

A: H.T. Cushman (1844-1922) was an inventor who created things like the pencil eraser, ink eradicator and some early types of roller skates. He started a mail-order company and soon was making and selling things, including furniture. By 1899 he had incorporated his company and was making Mission furniture. Later he made smoking stands and maple breakfast-room sets. Your chair probably is from one of his breakfast-room sets. By the 1950s, the company was making birch furniture in the Colonial style. The company was later sold and finally closed in 1980.

Q: I have a red, white and blue metal sign that reads "Hudson, Service Station, Essex." There's a blue triangle on the sign that says "Hudson Super Six" and a red hexagon that reads "Essex Motor Cars." The sign is 13 inches high and 27 1/2 inches wide. What is it worth?

A: Hudson Motor Car Co. was founded in 1909. Its Super Six engine was introduced in 1916. The Essex was a less expensive Hudson car introduced in 1919 and made until 1932. Hudson merged with Nash in 1954 and became American Motors Corp. Automobile-related advertising of all kinds is collected. Signs can sell for hundreds or even thousands of dollars, depending on age, rarity and condition. Your sign, from the 1920s, could sell for $500 or more.

Q: I have a McCoy cookie jar that belonged to my grandmother. It's shaped like an apple and is yellow with red highlights. The lid has a stem and leaf on the top. I'd like to know how old it is and what it might be worth.

A: McCoy pottery was made in Roseville, Ohio. The company made cookie jars from about 1940 until the pottery closed in 1990. Its apple cookie jar was made from about 1950 to 1964. It was also made in turquoise, a rare color that sells for more. The value of your apple cookie jar is about $100.

Q: I have a late 19th-century bronzed spelter statue of Hernani. It's just under 2 feet tall. He is holding a sword, dagger and horn, and is in excellent shape. Value?

A: Hernani was the title character in a play by Victor Hugo. It opened in Paris in 1830 and is set in the Spanish court of 1519. Bronzed spelter statues of Hugo's fictional characters were popular in the late 19th century. One the size of yours sold for $140 earlier this year.

Q: I have a picture postcard showing the original photograph of President Franklin Roosevelt signing the Social Security Act on Aug. 14, 1935. It's signed by James Roosevelt, FDR's oldest son. Does it have any value?

A: Thousands of copies of this photograph were sent out by the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare in a mass mailing in 1985, the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Social Security Act into law. The committee was founded by James Roosevelt in 1982. It advocated raising Social Security benefits for the "notch" babies, a term coined by Ann Landers for those born between 1917 and 1921 who received lower benefits than people born between 1910 and 1916 because of a change in the way cost-of-living adjustments were determined. The committee still is in existence and works to prevent cuts to Social Security and Medicare. The mailing was part of a fundraising effort by the committee. The same photograph also was included in a 1990 mailing. So, your picture postcard is a common one and not of much interest to collectors.

Tip: Don't leave anything inside old books - especially pressed flowers, paper clips, newspapers or sticky notes. They will cause stains, crease pages and do other damage.

Need prices for your antiques and collectibles? Find them at Kovels.com, our website for collectors. You can find more than 900,000 prices and more than 11,000 color photos that help you determine the value of your collectibles. Studying prices is free at Kovels.com/priceguide. Kovels.com also has lists of publications, clubs, appraisers, auction houses, people who sell parts or repair antiques, show lists and more. Kovels.com adds to the information in this column.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses and email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Hair clip, bow, pearls, gem center, back comb, Yves Saint Laurent, $60.
  • Political souvenir plate, William Howard Taft and running mate James Sherman, border of past Republican presidential candidates, tin, 1908, 9 1/2 inches, $110.
  • Tramp art watch hutch, house shape, round opening, c. 1890, 15 inches, $120.
  • Leaf pin, silver, berry design, Kalo, 2 1/2 inches, $220.
  • Dominoes set, ebony, bone, box, c. 1850, 7 3/4 in., 28 pieces, $265.
  • Santo monk figure, wood, white glass eyes, gilt rope sash, brown robe, hands raised, Spain, circa 1765, 17 x 9 inches, $275.
  • Pewter box, lid, oval, inset green stone, Liberty & Co., 3 1/2 x 2 inches, $315.
  • Bench, wood frame, black paint, rush seat, Italy, 1950s, 18 x 18 inches, pair, $500.
  • Quilt, appliqued, golden eagle on shield, stars, red, blue, white, c. 1950, 91 x 76 inches, $850.
  • Palmist and clairvoyant trade sign, black, white paint, 50 inches, $5,040.

New! The best book to own if you want to buy or sell or collect - and if you order now, you'll receive a copy with the author's autograph. The new "Kovels' Antiques & Collectibles Price Guide, 2014," 46th edition, is your most accurate source for current prices. This large-size paperback has more than 2,500 color photographs and more than 35,000 up-to-date prices for more than 700 categories of antiques and collectibles. You'll also find hundreds of factory histories and marks, a report on the record prices of the year, plus helpful sidebars and tips about buying, selling, collecting and preserving your treasures. Available for $27.95 plus $4.95 postage, online at Kovelsonlinestore.com; by phone at 800-303-1996; at your local bookstore, or mail to Price Book, Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2013 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.

 



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

 The two papier-mache and wood figures wrestling with the help of some strings depict 19th-century politicians who couldn't agree on anything. The toy and original box sold for $180 at Jackson's Auctions in Cedar Falls, Iowa. Most people today would not recognize the pair, Disraeli and Gladstone, as famous British politicians during the reign of Queen Victoria.

Last Updated on Monday, 04 November 2013 09:24
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Oct. 28, 2013

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 28 October 2013 08:30

This 8-inch-high paper lantern was made in the early 1920s. It was scheduled to sell at a Morphy auction in Denver, Pa., in early October. Presale estimate: $400-$600.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Lanterns are among the earliest Halloween collectibles—and not just jack-o'-lanterns. The early 1900s jack-o'-lantern was made of metal. Within a few years, jack-o'-lanterns were being made of pressed paper with thin paper inserts creating translucent eyes, nose and mouth. That way, a candle inside the paper pumpkin could light a path. But it was dangerous to walk and run with a lit candle in a flammable container.

By the 1920s, special Halloween lampshades were made for display in a front window. You also could buy flat-sided lanterns made in a "stained-glass" style with black cardboard strips and translucent orange paper. These lanterns were made in Germany and the United States until the 1940s. But beware—some were reproduced in the 1990s. Old lanterns usually have round, indented candleholders on the bottom; most reproductions have flat bottoms. A famous 12-panel lantern was made in Germany in the 1920s and sold was by Beistle, an important American company that sold—and still sells—holiday decorations. A vintage example sells for more than $500 today. One recently offered at Morphy Auctions had a presale estimate of $400 to $600.

Q: My mother left me a collection of Kewpie dolls, all in good condition. Please tell me something about them. I'm in my 70s now and probably will give them to my granddaughters rather than sell them. But I'd like to know if they're valuable.

A: Artist Rose O'Neill (1874-1944) drew the first Kewpies, little naked, winged, Cupid-like characters, for a Ladies' Home Journal story that ran in 1909. Within two years, O'Neill's drawings were turned into 3-D designs for Kewpie dolls and figurines. They were made with small blue wings and a red heart as a mark. The dolls were an immediate success, and several companies made Kewpies and Kewpie-related products. Kewpie dolls still are being made. They can be found in bisque, celluloid, composition or hard plastic. Collectors love Kewpies and will pay hundreds, or even thousands, for rare old figurines and dolls.

Q: I have a large Wagner Ware fry pan with cover. It reads "Magnalite No. 4569." The pan is 10 1/2 inches wide and 3 inches deep. I'm wondering what it might be worth.

A: Your fry pan is a chicken fryer. Wagner Manufacturing Co. was founded in Sidney, Ohio, in 1891. After several changes in ownership, the company closed in 1999. Wagner made Magnalite, a cast aluminum cookware, from 1934 to 1999. The value of your fry pan depends on condition. The average price is under $20.

Q: We own an old barber chair with a metal label that reads, "Koken Companies, Manufacturers, St. Louis, U.S.A." How do you suggest we sell it?

A: Ernest Koken, a German immigrant, was selling shaving mugs in St. Louis by 1874, when he was 19 years old. By the 1880s, he was selling barber chairs, and had started filing for patents on improvements to the chairs. His patents eventually included a reclining chair back and a hydraulic lift. His company, Koken Barbers' Supply Co., manufactured chairs until it went bankrupt in the 1950s. (A successor, Koken Manufacturing Co., is in business today; it bought the original company's assets.) Antique Koken barber chairs in excellent shape can sell for thousands.

Q: My child's tea set includes a ceramic teapot, sugar bowl, creamer and four cups and saucers. The dishes are green luster and are decorated with pink and white flowers. I have the original box, too. The top of the box says it's a "Little Hostess Set." Also printed on the box is the phrase, "Nagoya Toy Tea Set, No. 600/424/2, Made in Japan." I think the set has been in our family since the late 1920s. Please tell me what it's worth.

A: Your set may date from the 1920s, or possibly the '30s. If the pattern were more interesting—of Disney or other cartoon characters, for example—the set would be more valuable. Still, your set, with its original box, could sell for $75 or more if the dishes are in excellent condition. The word "Nagoya" on the box may refer to the company that made the set or to the Japanese city where the set was made.

Q: My husband and I found a very old pen-and-ink calligraphic drawing of a bird. It was stuck inside an old family Bible. The Bible dates back to the early 1800s, and the signed drawing is 7 1/2 by 8 1/2 inches. The bird in the center of the drawing is surrounded by lots of flourishes and doodads. I understand this type of drawing was done by students studying calligraphy back then. Can you give us an idea of value?

A: The art of calligraphy flourished in the United States during the 19th century. Elegant penmanship was a sign of refinement and was taught in private academies and writing classes. Drawings like yours were done with quills or steel pens, and typically have repeated cursive flourishes that also could be used in fancy handwriting. If your drawing is original, it could sell for $50 into the low hundreds.

Tip: Paintings displayed in a dining room often are splattered with food and sometimes even pick up food odors. Have an oil painting professionally cleaned.

Take advantage of a free listing for your group to announce events or to find antiques shows, national meetings and flea markets. Go to Kovels.com/calendar to find, publicize and plan your antiquing trips.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICE

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Jugtown Pottery pie plate, orange, scalloped rim, 9 3/4 inches, $20.
  • Cat lantern, papier-mache, orange, handle, 8 inches, $40.
  • Mahjong set, bone, bamboo tiles, pamphlet, cased lacquered box, c. 1910, $130.
  • Witch mask, fangs, painted, rubber, 12 inches, $270.
  • Charlie McCarthy walker, top hat, tin lithograph, Marx, 8 inches, $325.
  • Owl effigy pot, Zuni, c. 1940, 6 inches, $375.
  • Jack-o'-lantern candleholder, hanging, tin, orange paint, electrified, 6 1/2 inches, $450.
  • Jumeau toddler doll, bisque, socket head, brown complexion, paperweight glass eyes, wood-jointed, c. 1884, 16 inches, $590.
  • Pumpkin-head boy candy container, holding accordion, wooden arms and legs, 5 1/2 inches, $720.
  • Pumpkin-head toy, felt, orange, black, 1930s, 20 1/2 inches, $6,000.

"Kovels' A Diary: How to Settle a Collector's Estate." Our new week-by-week record of the settlement of an estate, from your first days gathering legal papers to the last days, when you're dividing antiques among heirs and selling everything else—even the house. How to identify pottery, jewelry and other popular collectibles. Tips on where and how to sell furniture, jewelry, dishes, figurines, record albums, bikes and even clothes. We include lots of pictures and prices, and explain the advantages of a house sale, auction, selling to a dealer or donating to a charity. Learn about how to handle the special problems of security and theft. Plus a free, current supplement with useful websites, auctions lists and other current information. Available only from Kovels for $19.95 plus $4.95 postage and handling. Order by phone at 800-303-1996; online at Kovels.com; or write to Kovels, P.O. Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2013 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

This 8-inch-high paper lantern was made in the early 1920s. It was scheduled to sell at a Morphy auction in Denver, Pa., in early October. Presale estimate: $400-$600.

Last Updated on Monday, 04 November 2013 09:20
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Oct. 21, 2013

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 21 October 2013 08:12

This 7-inch fabric ball, stitched by hand in about 1900, recently sold for $165 at Keepers Antiques in Chichester, N.H.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Our Victorian ancestors made many of the toys their children played with. Inexpensive printed fabrics were designed to be cut out and sewn into dolls, games or toys. The fabric usually pictured all the parts of a colorful toy. There also were printed instructions explaining how to assemble the pieces and, if necessary, how to stuff it. We have seen stuffed Christmas stockings made from prints that featured Santa, evergreens and other Christmas decorations. There were many versions of "Pin the Tail on the Donkey." A similar game made in about 1900, called "The Monkey Donation Party Game," was made from a white fabric with a black printed monkey holding a stitched-on circular piece with the words "Please put a penny in the cap."

During the first quarter of the 20th century, many manufactured fabrics could be made into advertising dolls. Printed fabric was inexpensive to make and to mail. An unusual printed toy of that period is a ball made of six colored oval pieces. Each piece pictures a baby holding a finished ball. It was made in 1900 by Art Fabric Mills, and the fabric included printed instructions and the words and music of a lullaby. A collector recently paid $165 for a homemade ball in unfaded condition, but the uncut pattern sells for more—about $200 to $300. A flat piece of fabric can be framed and displayed on a wall. The assembled ball is less decorative.

Q: I recently acquired a vintage dining room table, one table leaf and five matching chairs. The wood is walnut, and the table is very ornate. We found a paper label on two of the chairs. It reads "Midwest Furniture & Chair Co." I can't find any information about the company. And what could the set be worth?

A: Midwest Furniture & Chair Co. was in business in St. Joseph, Mo., in the 1920s. Your set would be worth more if you had a sixth chair. Sets by the same maker have sold recently for $450 and $675, but both had at least six chairs plus a sideboard or buffet. So your table and five chairs might sell for $200 or less.

Q: I have a letter opener that reads "Pan-American Exposition, 1901" on the blade and a picture of the fair's Electric Tower on the handle. The back has fruit and flower designs. It's silver-colored, but I'm not sure if it's sterling silver. Does it have any value?

A: The Pan-American Exposition was held in Buffalo, N.Y., from May to November 1901. Many souvenir items were made picturing the buildings and other features of the fair. The Electric Tower pictured on your letter opener was the tallest structure at the fair and was often pictured. Most souvenir items are silverplate, not sterling silver. Your letter opener is probably worth about $25. Here's a little history: President William McKinley was shot by anarchist Leon Czolgosz while the president was shaking hands with visitors in the Temple of Music on the fairgrounds on Sept. 6, 1901. He died eight days later. For more information about the 1901 World's Fair, go to PanAm1901.org.

Q: A few years ago, I was at a garage sale and spotted a bronze-colored bust of a classical woman. I instantly fell in love with her. She's imprinted on the back with the artist's signature, "Henri Jacobs," and "copyright 1904 by Napoleon Alliot." I would like to know more about the maker of this bust.

A: Henri Jacobs (1864-1935) has been called the "Father of Belgian Art Nouveau." He was an artist and architect and was also known for his Art Nouveau busts of women. Napoleon Alliot was a sculptor who also had a foundry. Your bust could sell at auction for more than $1,000 even though it is not bronze.

Q: When the floor of our AmVets Post in Perry, Ohio, was replaced, we found a bottle with the words "Fairport Bottling Works, M. Killinen, Prop." in raised letters. The bottle was covered in dirt but is clear glass. The top is broken off, but it will still make a nice vase once the jagged part is cut off or ground down. I don't think it has value, but I'd like to know how old it is and where it's from. Our post meets in an old building that I think was an icehouse around the time of the Civil War, so the bottle may date from the mid- to late-1800s.

A: Matt Killinen, the business proprietor whose name is on the bottle, emigrated from Finland in 1887 and settled in Fairport, Ohio. He founded the Fairport Bottling Works in about 1894 and was in business until at least 1913. The company sold soft drinks throughout northeastern Ohio.

Q: I have come across a "Grimm Cover," which apparently is some sort of commode or potty. It's made of galvanized steel and is embossed "Grimm Cover, Patented July 19, 1804." Have you ever seen another one?

A: You actually have a sap bucket cover, not a commode cover. A patent for a "new and improved sap-spout and cover" was granted to G.H. Grimm in 1904 (not 1804). His newly designed spout and cover made it possible to pour sap without removing the bucket from the hook that attached it to the tree. The covers were made in two sizes, 12 and 14 inches. It's not clear how many years they were made, but they were still in Grimm's catalog in 1912. We have seen several Grimm's Covers advertised online. They sell for under $10 each.

Tip: If you're polishing a wooden-handled copper or silver teapot, be sure to cover the wood so it's not stained by the metal polish.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Hen-on-nest covered dish, amber glass, hobnail rim, Indiana Glass Co., 5 1/4 x 7 x 5 1/2 inches, $15.
  • Tilt-top table, maple, turned pedestal, 3 slipper feet, 26 x 23 inches, $140.
  • Fire chief toy car, tin, friction, Louis Marx, 20 inches, $170.
  • Imari pattern dessert plates, Aynsley China, 8 inches, 12 pieces, $190.
  • Day dress, shot silk, pleated bodice, green, teal fringe, lined, c. 1840, $385.
  • Amos & Andy Fresh Air Taxi, tin lithograph, clockwork, Marx, 8 inches, $650.
  • Shearwater Pottery cat, seated, Walter Anderson, 10 1/2 x 10 3/4 inches, $800.
  • Rooster windmill weight, cast iron, old red paint, Elgin Wind Power & Pump Co., c. 1900, 16 x 16 inches, $805.
  • King Cole Tea & Coffee door push, porcelain, lithographed, 3 x 8 inches, $1,420
  • Rococo-style commode, painted, red & green flowers, yellow ground, two drawers, 35 x 52 inches, $3,440.

The Kovels.com Premium website is up and running. In addition to 900,000 free prices for antiques and collectibles (more that 11,000 with photographs), premium subscribers will find a dictionary of marks for silver and another for ceramics, with pictured marks and company histories. Premium membership also includes a subscription to the digital edition of our newsletter, "Kovels on Antiques and Collectibles," and its archives, where you'll find articles about almost anything you collect. It includes up-to-date information for the savvy collector. Go to Kovels.com and click on "Subscriptions" for more information.

© 2013 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

This 7-inch fabric ball, stitched by hand in about 1900, recently sold for $165 at Keepers Antiques in Chichester, N.H.

Last Updated on Friday, 01 November 2013 14:36
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Oct. 14, 2013

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Written by TERRY KOVEL   
Monday, 14 October 2013 08:23

This Wardian case, 36 inches high, housed indoor plants in about 1850. The case was made in America of painted iron and glass. It sold for $5,795 last month at Neal Auction Co. in New Orleans.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Houseplants were popular with our ancestors, but indoor plants took a lot of work. No bug spray, no packaged topsoil or plant food, not even a good selection of pots was available. In 1829 Dr. Nathaniel Bagshaw Ward of London invented the "Wardian case." His ferns were dying in London's smoke-filled air. Then he noticed that some of the sealed test tubes he was using to germinate seeds also held other seedlings starting to grow. So he created a large glassed-in enclosure to grow his ferns. The Wardian case, named after the doctor, soon became popular not only with botanists, but also with the general public. They were featured in many homes.

At first, ferns were the most popular plant to grow in the cases, but scientists and explorers also used them to bring new plants from other continents. It is said that tea and rubber plants made the ocean trip to new countries in the cases, were planted and started new agricultural industries. The Wardian cases used in homes were made of glass and iron. Some sat on a matching table or stand, and some were made to look like small houses. It was the first terrarium—a closed space to let plants grow—and the condensed moisture kept them from drying out.

Vintage Wardian cases are not easy to find, but they're available. Copies were made, too, and they're still being made. A case made by the well-known American firm of J.W. Fiske, a Victorian maker of iron furniture and garden fountains, sold last fall for $5,795 at Neal Auction Co. in New Orleans.

Q: We have an old wooden dining room set that includes a table with one leaf, four chairs and a china cabinet. The only mark I can find is "Jefferson Woodworking Co." on the table's extension rails. History and value?

A: Jefferson Woodworking Co. was in business in Louisville, Ky., in the late 1910s into at least the early 1920s. It did not make your table. It made table extension rails for various furniture manufacturers. Still, your set is close to 100 years old and could sell for more than $500 if it's in excellent condition.

Q: My Mary Gregory pitcher is titled "A Clear Day for Flying." But it's missing some of the painted artwork that should be on the piece. It has the boy flying a kite, but it's missing the sky and ground art as well as the artist's signature.

A: Your pitcher isn't old. It was made in 2008 by the Fenton Art Glass Co. of Williamstown, W.Va. Fenton was one of several U.S. glassmakers that produced "Mary Gregory" glassware beginning in the late 1950s. Everyone used to think that old Mary Gregory glass was named for an employee at the Sandwich Glass factory in Massachusetts, but researchers have discovered that the style—white paintings of children on clear or colored glass—actually originated in Bohemia in the late 1800s. The style continues to be popular, and Fenton made 1,250 limited-edition pitchers like yours in 2008. We have seen the pitcher for sale at prices ranging from $100 to $125. If the paint on yours has simply worn off, it would sell for less. If it's an early prototype by Sue Jackson, the Fenton artist who designed the limited editions, it might sell for a little more than a limited edition.

Q: I have a General Electric Youth Electronics clock radio. My aunt and uncle gave it to many years ago. The numbers on the clock face have 12 different Disney characters, and there are two dials with characters on them for setting the time and alarm. The radio dial is a big, hard plastic Mickey Mouse face. Below the dial it reads "Walt Disney Productions." Can you give me any information as to age and value?

A: Your Mickey Mouse radio is more than 40 years old. General Electric was licensed to make radios for Disney from 1970 to 1975. The radio sells for less than $20 unless you have the original box. The box adds about $50.

Q: I have a silver tea service that includes a teapot, sugar bowl and creamer marked "Tiffany & Co., quality 925-1000." The set's tray is marked "Dixon & Sons, Sheffield." Can you tell me the value of this tea set?

A: The tray was not originally part of the set, since it was made by a different company. Charles Lewis Tiffany opened a retail store in New York in 1837. The name of the store became Tiffany & Co. in 1853. It's still in business. Tiffany & Co. set the standard for sterling silver in the United States, which is 92.5 percent silver. James Dixon began working in silver in Sheffield, England, in 1806. His company was called "James Dixon & Sons" by 1835. The company made Britannia, nickel silver and silver-plated wares. It was out of business by 1992. The quality numbers on the teapot, sugar and creamer indicate they are sterling silver, but the tray is silver-plated. The name "Tiffany" adds value to just about anything. Your set might be worth close to $1,000.

Q: Through the years, I have collected hundreds of pieces of Blue Willow. The marks on the backs of the dishes include "Royal China," "Allerton's Willow" and "Buffalo Pottery." A few were even made in Japan. Have the dishes increased in value?

A: Willow pattern dishes continue to sell well because so many people collect the traditional pattern, which pictures three figures on a bridge, birds, trees and a Chinese landscape. The pattern, inspired by a Chinese design without the figures, was introduced in England in 1780. Since then, it has been copied by pottery companies in England, the United States, Japan and other countries. Values depend on age, quality and maker.

Tip: For every 24 inches of horizontal shelving in your bedroom, den or library, fill the space with about 20 books. Books need air.

Sign up for our weekly email, "Kovels Komments." It includes the latest news, tips and questions, and it's free if you register on our website. Kovels.com has lists of publications, clubs, appraisers, auction houses, people who sell parts or repair antiques, and more. Kovels.com adds to the information in this column and helps you find useful sources needed by collectors.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Pressed glass bowl, Barberry pattern, 3 3/4 inches, $10.
  • Cigar box label, Los Inmortales, Washington, Lincoln, Grant, eagle, 5 x 4 1/2 inches, $30.
  • Occupational shaving mug, man in touring car, sportsman series, 1953, 3 3/4 inches, $60.
  • Zenith radio, wooden, table model 6D-525, surround tube, 1941, 11 1/2 x 7 x 7 3/4 inches, $75.
  • Gulf service station panel sign, plastic, orange, white, blue, 48-inch square, $96.
  • Abbot & Costello movie poster, "Lost in Alaska," Belgium, frame, c. 1950, 26 x 21 inches, $120.
  • Peking glass cups, green, gilt-leaf frame, 4 x 3 1/2 inches, pair, $130.
  • Royal Doulton character jug, Bootmaker, D6572, 1960s, 7 1/2 inches, $175.
  • Monark bicycle, tank model, lime green, Firestone balloon tires, girl's, c. 1957, $374.
  • Earrings, Cartier, 14K gold, two colors, round, clip, 3/4 inches, $470.

Keep up with changes in the collectibles world. Send for a free sample issue of our 12-page, full-color newsletter, "Kovels on Antiques and Collectibles," filled with prices, news, information and photos, plus major news about the world of collecting. To subscribe at a bargain $27 for 12 issues, write Kovels, PO Box 8534, Big Sandy, TX 75755; call 800-829-9158; or subscribe online at Kovelsonlinestore.com.

© 2013 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

This Wardian case, 36 inches high, housed indoor plants in about 1850. The case was made in America of painted iron and glass. It sold for $5,795 last month at Neal Auction Co. in New Orleans.

Last Updated on Friday, 01 November 2013 14:35
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Oct. 7, 2013

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Written by TERRY KOVEL   
Monday, 07 October 2013 08:23

Look online or in an antiques shop for a porcelain cup like this advertising premium for Armour bouillon. It was made in about 1915 and sells for $20-$25.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Look in your grandmother's china cabinet for unusual glass and china. You may find some special pieces originally given away as product premiums during the early 20th century. There was no television, and radio was just getting developed, so "ads" often were objects that would be kept by the family.

Colorful trade cards, sets of pressed glass or Depression glass, dishes of all kinds, souvenir spoons, printed handkerchiefs and even furniture were available. A small cup we inherited puzzled us for many years. The 3-3/8-inch-high porcelain cup is decorated with bright pink carnations and gold trim. But inside the rim of the cup, where you see it when finished drinking, are the words "Armour's Bouillon Cubes." The underside of the cup says "C.T. Altwasser." The maker was easy to identify. We list a few pieces of its china in each edition of Kovels' Antiques & Collectibles Price Guide. C. Tielsch & Co. of Altwasser, Germany, was in business in Silesia, Germany, from 1845 to 1945. Armour & Co. was founded in Chicago in 1867 as a meat-packing plant. It also made buttons, glue, fertilizer, margarine and other items from by-products. The Armour brand name still is used in the United States for meat and other products. Bouillon cubes were originally used to turn hot water into a tasty drink that aided digestion. Bouillon was also used in cooking, just as it is today. The Armour cup must have been a popular premium, because many are still available at flea markets and shops. They sell for $20 to $25 each.

Q: I found a 25-piece set of Golden Wheat dishes in my mother's attic. The mark on each dish include the words "Golden Wheat, Made in USA, 22K Gold, Oven Proof," with a sheaf of wheat on each side. The set includes six dinner plates, six salad plates and a few serving pieces, but only a couple cups, saucers and soup bowls. What is the set worth?

A: Golden Wheat dishes were premiums first inserted in boxes of Duz detergent during the 1950s. Each month, a different packaged dish was inserted in a box of detergent. The pattern is a realistic image of five standing sheaves of wheat, and the rim of each dish was edged in gold. There is disagreement about the company that made the dishes, because the very same mark was used by Scio Pottery of Scio, Ohio; Homer Laughlin China Co. of Newell, W.Va.; and French Saxon China Co. of Sebring, Ohio. It is possible all three pottery companies made dishes for Duz. Because so many dishes were made and so many people saved them, they are not rare and prices are low. Another problem is that defining a "set" is impossible because many of the dishes made it into homes one at a time. We have seen a 22-piece set offered for $35.

Q: We were left a large figural owl by my wife's grandparents. It's about 3 feet tall and weighs 40-50 pounds. It appears to be made of fired clay. The base looks like tile used for roofing or old piping. It's marked "Evens & Howard, St. Louis, Mo." We don't intend to sell it, but we're interested in the background.

A: Evens & Howard Fire Brick Co. was incorporated in 1867, but a brickworks had been operating at the company's location since 1837. Fire bricks were used to line fireplaces, furnaces, fireboxes, ovens, etc. The bricks were made from clay dug from mines in St. Louis and Glencoe, Mo. The clay was weathered for at least six months before it was made into bricks. The company began making sewer pipe in 1858. It also made fire-clay chimney tops, hot-air flues and floor tiles. Evidently the company also made figures like yours. Evens & Howard remained in business until at least the second decade of the 20th century.

Q: While cleaning out my brother's home, I found seven gold-rimmed clear glass luncheon plates decorated on the bottom with "wall-to-wall" cigar bands. The bands apparently were glued to the bottom of the plates, then covered with felt. One plate has a center portrait of Rudolph Valentino, another a portrait of a woman, and still another a picture of a cherub. Are these plates collectible?

A: Your plates were popular craft projects in the early 1900s. Today, some people refer to these "reverse collages on glass" as a form of folk art. Single plates like yours sell online for $25 to $40.

Q: I have a set of old metal ice tongs marked "Gifford Wood Co." I bought them at an estate sale more than 50 years ago. Can you estimate age and value?

A: Any tool marked "Gifford Wood Co." was not made earlier than 1905, the year Gifford Brothers of Hudson, N.Y., merged with William T. Wood & Co. of Arlington, Mass. The company specialized in tools to carry and handle ice. Gifford Wood Co. ice tongs often are offered for sale online. Prices range from $20 to $50, depending on size, quality and condition.

Tip: Do not put wax on a wooden toy to preserve it. The wax may yellow and disturb any markings or paper decoration.

Need prices for collectibles? Find them at Kovels.com, our website for collectors. You can find more than 900,000 prices and more than 11,000 color pictures that can help you determine the value of your collectibles. Access to the prices is free at Kovels.com/priceguide.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

 

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Hull vase, Woodland pattern, green, pink, handles, footed, 11 inches, $15.
  • Dairy Queen tumbler, frosted, red-and-blue design, 1970s, 8-inch pair, $25
  • Bell bottle opener, Biltmore Hotel, Los Angeles, copper plate, 3 1/4 inches, $32.
  • Bitters bottle, Doyles Hop, amber, 1872, $45.
  • Netsuke Buddha, laughing, seated, open robe, boxwood, 1800s, 2 inches, $60.
  • Tole document box, painted green, stenciled, flowers, leaves, c. 1890, 9 3/4 inches, $115.
  • Pewter teapot, bulbous, wood handle, marked "A. Porter," c. 1830, 12 inches, $130.
  • Table, Pembroke, George III style, mahogany, 28 x 20 inches, $280.
  • Mail Pouch Tobacco thermometer, porcelain, 39 x 8 inches, $485.
  • Howdy Doody & Bob Smith toy piano, tin lithograph, Unique Art, 5 inches, $1,650

New! The best book to own if you want to buy, sell or collect—and if you order now, you'll receive a copy with the author's autograph. The new Kovels' Antiques & Collectibles Price Guide, 2014, 46th edition, is your most accurate source for current prices. This large-size paperback has more than 2,500 color photographs and more than 35,000 up-to-date prices for more than 700 categories of antiques and collectibles. You'll also find hundreds of factory histories and marks, a report on the record prices of the year, plus helpful sidebars and tips about buying, selling, collecting and preserving your treasures. Available online at Kovelsonlinestore.com; by phone at 800-303-1996; at your bookstore; or send $27.95 plus $4.95 postage to Price Book, Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2013 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

Look online or in an antiques shop for a porcelain cup like this advertising premium for Armour bouillon. It was made in about 1915 and sells for $20-$25.

Last Updated on Friday, 01 November 2013 14:35
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Sept. 30, 2013

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Written by TERRY KOVEL   
Monday, 30 September 2013 08:18

An elephant that could ring a bell was the feature of this antique toy. The clever toy, rare and entertaining but with minor paint loss, sold for $1,230 at a Skinner auction in Boston last fall.

Old toys are very different from those made today. Toymakers of long ago did not try to encourage creativity. A toy was made to resemble a known part of life—a house, car or pet—or perhaps a fantasy—a rocket ship or robot. Or they were puzzles meant to teach the alphabet or arithmetic, or character dolls from stories that told of good behavior or gave lessons from the Bible.

In the late-19th century, a group of cast-iron bell-ringer toys became popular. These were pull toys with a platform and four wheels. The figures on the platform moved when the toy's wheels turned. The "Trick Elephant Bell Ringer," with its name in raised letters on the side, was made by the Gong Bell Manufacturing Co. of East Hampton, Conn. When the toy was pulled, the wheels moved and the elephant turned and hit the bell. The elephant stands on a pierced and painted platform, suggesting that he is a circus performer. The painted iron toy, about 5 inches high and 8 inches long, sold for $1,230 at a Skinner auction in Boston.

Q: My wife bought what our family refers to as our "dog chair" at a garage sale for $9. It was in a great deal of disrepair and we had it professionally redone. It's made of walnut, upholstered in leather, and has carved dog's heads at the end of each arm. The dogs' faces and collars are slightly different from one another. We were told that one is a female and the other male. I'm not sure if that makes sense. What can you tell me about this chair?

A: Chairs with arms that end in animal heads were popular in Victorian times and later. Dog heads are the ones most often found. Your chair is unusual because the heads are slightly different, but whether or not they represent a male and female dog is something only the maker would know. It's not possible to give an accurate value for your chair since the maker and age are unknown, but you can be sure that your wife got a good value for $9 and an interesting conversation piece after it was refurbished. Value: about $200.

Q: We have a Marx metal dollhouse, purchased in 1956 that's still in its original, unopened carton. Please tell us what it's worth today.

A: Louis Marx and Co. was founded in New York City in 1919 and closed in 1978. In the early 1950s, it was the largest toy company in the world. Marx introduced its first metal dollhouses in 1949 and continued to sell a variety of dollhouses into the 1970s. Most sets included plastic furniture and dollhouse-size plastic dolls. The value of your unopened dollhouse set depends on the house's design and size. It could sell for $200 to $350. (A furnished house that has been played with would sell for only about $25 to $50.)

Q: I have a perfect set of dishes, marked "Monarch China, Made in Occupied Japan, Montana Rose." The pieces are decorated with roses and trimmed in gold. There are 96 pieces in the set, which includes 12 place settings and various serving pieces. Can you tell me something about the dishes and how much they're worth?

A: Your dishes were made between 1947 and 1952, when Allied forces occupied Japan after World War II. They were made specifically for export. Sets of Monarch China's "Montana Rose" pattern dishes have sold recently for $120 to $250.

Q: My aunt gave me a silver tea set that includes a coffeepot, teapot, sugar, creamer and tray. The coffeepot has a mark on the bottom that says "1883" with a crown in the middle of the number. It also says "F.B. Rogers Silver Co." I know it's old, but I'd like to know if it's considered an antique, if it's real silver and if it has any value.

A: F.B. Rogers Silver Co. was founded in Shelburne Falls, Mass., in 1883. It moved to Taunton, Mass., in 1886 and became a division of National Silver in 1955. The mark on your coffeepot was used for several years after 1886. F.B. Rogers made silver-plated tea sets in different styles and sizes. The largest sets include a waste bowl with a lid and a coffee urn. The company also made silver-plated flatware and sterling-silver flatware. The value for your tea set depends on its condition, style and the total number of pieces in the set. A five-piece set that included a waste bowl sold for $175 earlier this year.

Q: My grandfather gave me a beautiful little cup about 50 years ago, when I was a little girl. I don't remember ever hearing any history about it. It's made of some type of metal and stands about 8 inches high. It's embossed with birds and cattails, and is on a pedestal base that's engraved "Third Swiss Festival N.Y., July 18th, 1875." It is marked "Meriden Company." Can you tell me anything about this curiosity?

A: The Third Swiss Festival was held at Jones' Woods, a picnic grounds and resort in Manhattan, in 1875. The event included competitions in bowling, equestrian movements, gymnastics, marksmanship, wrestling, singing and dramatic presentations. A silver cup was awarded as first and second prizes in the singing competition. Meriden was a silver-plate manufacturer in Meriden, Conn. The silver plating may have worn off your cup, leaving the base metal exposed, or it may be a metal replica sold as a souvenir of the event.

Tip: Watercolors and sketches should be kept out of sunlight. Hang framed works on a wall that is shaded.

Terry Kovel answers as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The volume of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Sioux pottery vase, bulbous, pinched neck, purple, yellow, blue, geometric designs, 6 inches, $20.
  • Coca-Cola ice pick, wood handle, red letters, 8 5/8 inches, pair, $25.
  • Insulator, Hemingray No. 16, dark-olive, amber tones, toll style, $30.
  • Pressed-glass cake stand, milk glass, Atterbury, $50.
  • Royal Doulton character mug, Albert Einstein, 1995, 7 inches, $85.
  • Bellows, Regency, brass, mahogany, England, 24 inches, $235.
  • Northwood carnival glass plate, Rose Show, amethyst, scalloped rim, c. 1925, 1 7/8 x 9 1/2 inches, $750.
  • hest, painted flowers, white ground, two drawers, 29 1/2 x 24 inches, pair, $1,065.
  • Lalique caviar bowl, frosted, 3 dolphin-shape feet, domed cover, dolphin knop, 10 x 8 inches, $1,230.
  • Tiffany bookends, cat, arched back, bronze, stamped, c. 1915, 6 inches, $1,770.

New! Kovels.com's Premium Plus access to our website is up and running. In addition to 750,000 free prices for antiques and collectibles, many with photographs, Premium Plus subscribers will find a dictionary of marks for silver and another for ceramics, with pictured marks and company histories. Premium Plus membership also includes a subscription to the digital edition of our newsletter, "Kovels on Antiques and Collectibles," and its archives, where you'll find articles about almost anything you might collect. Up-to-date information for the savvy collector. Go to Kovels.com and click on "Subscriptions" for more information.

© 2013 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.

 



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

An elephant that could ring a bell was the feature of this antique toy. The clever toy, rare and entertaining but with minor paint loss, sold for $1,230 at a Skinner auction in Boston last fall. 

Last Updated on Monday, 30 September 2013 08:32
 
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