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Kovels - Antiques & Collecting

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Sept. 30, 2013

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Written by TERRY KOVEL   
Monday, 30 September 2013 08:18

An elephant that could ring a bell was the feature of this antique toy. The clever toy, rare and entertaining but with minor paint loss, sold for $1,230 at a Skinner auction in Boston last fall.

Old toys are very different from those made today. Toymakers of long ago did not try to encourage creativity. A toy was made to resemble a known part of life—a house, car or pet—or perhaps a fantasy—a rocket ship or robot. Or they were puzzles meant to teach the alphabet or arithmetic, or character dolls from stories that told of good behavior or gave lessons from the Bible.

In the late-19th century, a group of cast-iron bell-ringer toys became popular. These were pull toys with a platform and four wheels. The figures on the platform moved when the toy's wheels turned. The "Trick Elephant Bell Ringer," with its name in raised letters on the side, was made by the Gong Bell Manufacturing Co. of East Hampton, Conn. When the toy was pulled, the wheels moved and the elephant turned and hit the bell. The elephant stands on a pierced and painted platform, suggesting that he is a circus performer. The painted iron toy, about 5 inches high and 8 inches long, sold for $1,230 at a Skinner auction in Boston.

Q: My wife bought what our family refers to as our "dog chair" at a garage sale for $9. It was in a great deal of disrepair and we had it professionally redone. It's made of walnut, upholstered in leather, and has carved dog's heads at the end of each arm. The dogs' faces and collars are slightly different from one another. We were told that one is a female and the other male. I'm not sure if that makes sense. What can you tell me about this chair?

A: Chairs with arms that end in animal heads were popular in Victorian times and later. Dog heads are the ones most often found. Your chair is unusual because the heads are slightly different, but whether or not they represent a male and female dog is something only the maker would know. It's not possible to give an accurate value for your chair since the maker and age are unknown, but you can be sure that your wife got a good value for $9 and an interesting conversation piece after it was refurbished. Value: about $200.

Q: We have a Marx metal dollhouse, purchased in 1956 that's still in its original, unopened carton. Please tell us what it's worth today.

A: Louis Marx and Co. was founded in New York City in 1919 and closed in 1978. In the early 1950s, it was the largest toy company in the world. Marx introduced its first metal dollhouses in 1949 and continued to sell a variety of dollhouses into the 1970s. Most sets included plastic furniture and dollhouse-size plastic dolls. The value of your unopened dollhouse set depends on the house's design and size. It could sell for $200 to $350. (A furnished house that has been played with would sell for only about $25 to $50.)

Q: I have a perfect set of dishes, marked "Monarch China, Made in Occupied Japan, Montana Rose." The pieces are decorated with roses and trimmed in gold. There are 96 pieces in the set, which includes 12 place settings and various serving pieces. Can you tell me something about the dishes and how much they're worth?

A: Your dishes were made between 1947 and 1952, when Allied forces occupied Japan after World War II. They were made specifically for export. Sets of Monarch China's "Montana Rose" pattern dishes have sold recently for $120 to $250.

Q: My aunt gave me a silver tea set that includes a coffeepot, teapot, sugar, creamer and tray. The coffeepot has a mark on the bottom that says "1883" with a crown in the middle of the number. It also says "F.B. Rogers Silver Co." I know it's old, but I'd like to know if it's considered an antique, if it's real silver and if it has any value.

A: F.B. Rogers Silver Co. was founded in Shelburne Falls, Mass., in 1883. It moved to Taunton, Mass., in 1886 and became a division of National Silver in 1955. The mark on your coffeepot was used for several years after 1886. F.B. Rogers made silver-plated tea sets in different styles and sizes. The largest sets include a waste bowl with a lid and a coffee urn. The company also made silver-plated flatware and sterling-silver flatware. The value for your tea set depends on its condition, style and the total number of pieces in the set. A five-piece set that included a waste bowl sold for $175 earlier this year.

Q: My grandfather gave me a beautiful little cup about 50 years ago, when I was a little girl. I don't remember ever hearing any history about it. It's made of some type of metal and stands about 8 inches high. It's embossed with birds and cattails, and is on a pedestal base that's engraved "Third Swiss Festival N.Y., July 18th, 1875." It is marked "Meriden Company." Can you tell me anything about this curiosity?

A: The Third Swiss Festival was held at Jones' Woods, a picnic grounds and resort in Manhattan, in 1875. The event included competitions in bowling, equestrian movements, gymnastics, marksmanship, wrestling, singing and dramatic presentations. A silver cup was awarded as first and second prizes in the singing competition. Meriden was a silver-plate manufacturer in Meriden, Conn. The silver plating may have worn off your cup, leaving the base metal exposed, or it may be a metal replica sold as a souvenir of the event.

Tip: Watercolors and sketches should be kept out of sunlight. Hang framed works on a wall that is shaded.

Terry Kovel answers as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The volume of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Sioux pottery vase, bulbous, pinched neck, purple, yellow, blue, geometric designs, 6 inches, $20.
  • Coca-Cola ice pick, wood handle, red letters, 8 5/8 inches, pair, $25.
  • Insulator, Hemingray No. 16, dark-olive, amber tones, toll style, $30.
  • Pressed-glass cake stand, milk glass, Atterbury, $50.
  • Royal Doulton character mug, Albert Einstein, 1995, 7 inches, $85.
  • Bellows, Regency, brass, mahogany, England, 24 inches, $235.
  • Northwood carnival glass plate, Rose Show, amethyst, scalloped rim, c. 1925, 1 7/8 x 9 1/2 inches, $750.
  • hest, painted flowers, white ground, two drawers, 29 1/2 x 24 inches, pair, $1,065.
  • Lalique caviar bowl, frosted, 3 dolphin-shape feet, domed cover, dolphin knop, 10 x 8 inches, $1,230.
  • Tiffany bookends, cat, arched back, bronze, stamped, c. 1915, 6 inches, $1,770.

New! Kovels.com's Premium Plus access to our website is up and running. In addition to 750,000 free prices for antiques and collectibles, many with photographs, Premium Plus subscribers will find a dictionary of marks for silver and another for ceramics, with pictured marks and company histories. Premium Plus membership also includes a subscription to the digital edition of our newsletter, "Kovels on Antiques and Collectibles," and its archives, where you'll find articles about almost anything you might collect. Up-to-date information for the savvy collector. Go to Kovels.com and click on "Subscriptions" for more information.

© 2013 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.

 



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

An elephant that could ring a bell was the feature of this antique toy. The clever toy, rare and entertaining but with minor paint loss, sold for $1,230 at a Skinner auction in Boston last fall. 

Last Updated on Monday, 30 September 2013 08:32
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Sept. 23, 2013

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Written by TERRY KOVEL   
Monday, 23 September 2013 08:17

The colored leaves of autumn have inspired artists for centuries. This Daum Nancy cameo glass vase is decorated with an autumn scene. The 4 3/4-inch-high vase sold at a DuMouchelles auction in Detroit for $3,900.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – The first day of autumn this year was Sept. 22. It is the day of the autumnal equinox, a term based on the journey of Earth around the sun. On that day, day and night are each almost 12 hours long. It marks the days when air cools in the north and leaves on trees begin to change colors. Artists for centuries have pictured colorful fall landscapes. Cameo glass artists often carved decorations from layers of glass made in the fall seasonal colors of orange and red. A Daum Nancy vase made in France between about 1895 and 1920 pictures a lake scene with birch trees. The rectangular vase auctioned last year for almost $4,000.

Q: Please tell me the value of a Martha Washington sewing cabinet that belonged to my great-grandmother in the 1880s. It has four long legs and three drawers in the front. There is a semicircular wooden storage compartment with a hinged lid on each side. And why is it named after George Washington's wife?

A: Martha Washington (1731-1802) enjoyed knitting and used a similar type of sewing table, without drawers, at Mount Vernon. The style you describe, along with its name, was not introduced until the 1920s. The First Lady's name was used to market the style, which became especially popular during the Depression. In other words, your great-grandmother's table is not as old as you think it is. But depending on its quality and condition, it could sell for about $200.

Q: When cleaning out a cupboard, I found an Old Plantation wooden cigar box about 7 1/2 inches long and 5 1/2 inches wide. The outside and inside labels picture plantation scenes. There's a 1901 IRS stamp on it. Please tell me something about the box.

A: The value of old wooden cigar boxes varies considerably depending on condition. The Old Plantation brand name dates from around the turn of the 20th century. Some Old Plantation boxes have impressed labels, while others have paper labels. A box with inside and outside paper labels in excellent condition recently auctioned for nearly $500.

Q: In the summer of 1972, I was traveling in Europe and read that Paul McCartney and Wings were to appear at the Montreux Pavilion in Montreux, Switzerland. So off I went. The streets were lined with posters for the concert, so I pried one loose, and today it's framed and hanging on a wall in my basement. Any idea what it's worth?

A: McCartney's stop in Montreux was part of his new group's "Wings over Europe" tour. Your poster, obviously an original, is not as valuable as an original Beatles poster. Still, it could sell for up to $70.

Q: In 1950, on my fifth birthday, I was given an Empire toy stove. It was made by Metal Ware Corp. I still have the little stove and it is still working, 63 years later. If you could give me any information on it, I would appreciate it.

A: Metal Ware Corp. has been operating in Two Rivers, Wis., for more than 90 years. It has made steam engines, driving accessories, popcorn poppers, roasters, hotdog warmers and other electric cooking appliances. In 1921 Metal Ware Corp. bought patent rights to the Empire toy line from Hughes Electric Co. of Chicago and began to make toy stoves. The stoves worked and would probably horrify today's safety-conscious parents. Your 1940s toy stove sells today for $10 to $35, depending on condition. Older Empire stoves from the 1920s and 1930s sell for more. The company still makes and imports small electrical appliances.

Q: I inherited a 12-inch white pitcher and small covered dish from my grandmother, who was born in 1880. The pieces are white with gold trim and are decorated with blue and yellow flowers. Inside the dish is a disc with a hole. The bottom of each piece is stamped "Wheeling Pottery Co." inside a wreath. Can you tell me their value?

A: Wheeling Pottery Co. of Wheeling, W.Va., was in business from 1879 until about 1923. The firm went through a number of mergers and name changes during that time. It made decorative and utilitarian pottery, semiporcelain, art ware and sanitary ware. Your pitcher, from a toilet set, is worth $25 to $50; if you had the matching washbowl, the set would be worth about $125. The small dish is a soap dish worth $15. Wheeling's Flow Blue pieces sell for more.

Q: Fifty years ago, my uncle gave me an old adding machine in a wooden travel chest. It's labeled "Brunsviga, No. 25102, Midget" on the front and "Patented in the U.S.A., 12 June 1906" on the back. What is it worth today?

A: Your machine is a calculator made by Grimme, Natalis & Co. of Braunschweig, Germany. The serial number indicates it was made between 1910 and 1920. A 1913 ad calls it a "multiplying and dividing machine." It also does addition and subtraction, but doesn't print. Calculations are done by drums that revolve in one direction for addition and multiplication and in the opposite direction for subtraction and division. This type of machine is known as a "pinwheel calculator." It was invented in 1874 by Willgodt Odhner, who sold the patent to Grimme, Natalis & Co. in 1892. The company changed its name to Brunsviga in 1927. These calculators are hard to sell because there are so few collectors of old calculators. Value: $100-$200.

Tip: Green-colored corrosion is sometimes found on old costume jewelry. It will spread if not removed. Clean with a mixture of a tablespoon of vinegar, a tablespoon of salt and a cup of hot water. Rub with an old toothbrush or a nylon scouring pad. Dry completely with towels and a hair dryer set on cool.

Terry Kovel answers as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The volume of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Comical History of America board game, Parker Brothers, box, 1924, 7 1/2 x 4 3/4 inches, $40.
  • Effanbee Fluffy doll, Girl Scout, blond hair, c. 1965, 8 1/2 inches, $45.
  • Abingdon Pottery dish, shell shape, cream, flowers, gilt trim, 12 x 8 inches, $50.
  • McCoy Pottery basket, leaves, berries, green ground, 9 1/2 inches, $55.
  • Barometer, cast iron, inscribed "S.C. Bowen," N.Y., c. 1890, 37 inches, $90.
  • Hatpin holder, glass, iridescent, dark blue, stylized butterfly, c. 1910, 2 x 1 1/2 x 10 inches, $125.
  • Carousel horse, carved, painted, tan, brown, glass eyes, c. 1960, 50 1/2 x 42 inches, $175.
  • Derby porcelain mug, orange and blue flowers, gilt scrollwork, c. 1835, 6 3/4 inches, $185.
  • Miniature bookstand, walnut, carved leaves, acorns, Jabbar Kahn & Son, c. 1900, 14 x 11 inches, $205.
  • Buster Brown bank, standing horse, horseshoe, Buster & Tige, Arcade Manufacturing Co., c. 1908, 7 inches, $395.

New! The best book to own if you want to buy, sell or collect—and if you order now, you'll receive a copy with the author's autograph. The new Kovels' Antiques & Collectibles Price Guide, 2014, 46th edition, is your most accurate source for current prices. This large-size paperback has more than 2,500 color photographs and more than 35,000 up-to-date prices for more than 700 categories of antiques and collectibles. You'll also find hundreds of factory histories and marks, a report on the record prices of the year, plus helpful sidebars and tips about buying, selling, collecting and preserving your treasures. Available online at Kovelsonlinestore.com; by phone at 800-303-1996; at your bookstore; or send $27.95 plus $4.95 postage to Price Book, P.O. Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2013 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

The colored leaves of autumn have inspired artists for centuries. This Daum Nancy cameo glass vase is decorated with an autumn scene. The 4 3/4-inch-high vase sold at a DuMouchelles auction in Detroit for $3,900.

Last Updated on Friday, 01 November 2013 14:35
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Sept. 16, 2013

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Written by TERRY KOVEL   
Monday, 16 September 2013 12:11

Garden stools have become popular again, and buyers use them indoors or outdoors. This blue porcelain antique Chinese stool sold for $1,210 at a Leland Little auction in Hillsborough, N.C.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Garden seats shaped like a barrel are being made today from porcelain, pottery, plastic, rattan and even plaster. They are used in a living room as a coffee table, in a powder room as a pedestal to hold towels, or inside or outside as a seat.

The original antique "zuodun," a Chinese barrel seat, was a drum made with stretched skin tops held by nails and trimmed with nail heads. Many modern barrel seats have a row of round bumps that imitate old nail heads. Most common are white porcelain "barrels" decorated with blue designs, often hand-painted. A 19-inch-high porcelain garden stool made in about 1900 sold for $1,210 at a Leland Little auction last December. The porcelain is blue with white flowers and birds. The stool has pierced decorations and bumps that resemble nail heads.

Q: When I lived in the north woods, I came across a pile of half-buried old bottles along a logging road. One of them was a Dr Pepper bottle. There is no label on it, only raised letters and numbers. It reads "Dr Pepper, Good for Life." On the back is a circle with the numbers 10, 2 and 4. The bottom reads "Fairmont, Minn." Can you tell me something about it and if it's worth anything?

A: The Dr Pepper soft drink was first served in Waco, Texas, in 1885 and marketed nationally in 1904. The period after "Dr" was used on and off in logos, then removed entirely in the 1950s. Your Dr Pepper bottle dates from between 1927 and 1934. During this time period, embossed or "raised" logos and letters were used on the brand's bottles, along with the bottling city's name on the bottom. The 10-2-4 marketing idea for Dr Pepper was introduced in 1926 and stands for "Drink a Bite to Eat at 10, 2 and 4 o'Clock." The circle represents a clock dial. Dr Pepper bottles with raised letters like yours can sell for up to $50.

Q: I have a leaf-shaped brooch that belonged to my mother. It's marked "McClelland Barclay." Can you tell me when it was made and what it's worth?

A: McClelland Barclay (1891-1942) worked in New York City as a commercial artist and magazine illustrator. He started designing jewelry in the late 1930s. His designs were made by the Rice-Weiner Co. from 1939 to 1943. They ranged from gilt-metal Art Moderne pieces in 1939 to sterling-silver stylized animal designs in 1943. Pieces usually were marked with Barclay's name. He also designed metal bookends, ashtrays, desk sets and lamps signed with his name. Barclay was a U.S. Navy officer during World War II. He died when his ship was torpedoed near the Solomon Islands. After Barclay's death, Rice-Weiner made a line of jewelry called "Barclay" that was influenced by his earlier designs. A McClelland Barclay pin sells for about $200.

Q: I would like help in placing a value on a tea set marked "Phoenix Ware, Made in England, T.F. & S. Ltd." I have the tray, six dessert plates, six cups and saucers, the cream pitcher and the sugar bowl. Two cups are broken, but I have the pieces.

A: The mark on your tea set was used by Thomas Forester & Sons Ltd. at the Phoenix Works in Longton, Staffordshire, England. Thomas Forester opened a pottery in Longton in 1877 and built the Phoenix Works in 1879. The name of the company became Thomas Forester & Sons after his sons joined the business in 1883. The pottery closed in 1959. Even if the set were perfect, the 21 pieces would sell for less than $100.

Q: I have a set of 14-inch-square cardboard cards titled "Your Planned Conditioning Program." They're at least 60 years old. Each card pictures an athlete or sports star explaining how to do a conditioning exercise. Mickey Mantle, Yogi Berra and Whitey Lockman are among the baseball players. What is the set worth?

A: A complete set of the cards, including its accompanying brochure, was up for auction a few years ago with a minimum bid of $50. It didn't sell. But don't throw away your set—someone out there might be interested in buying it. But you won't get a lot of money for it.

Q: I have had a Hummel wall plaque of an angel and two children since the 1950s. It has the Goebel full-bee mark and the word "Germany" on the back. A wide crown mark with "WG" also is stamped on it. I learned from a Hummel price guide that the design never went into production. The book said that there are "no specimens known." Value?

A: Your plaque is thought to be a prototype of a Hummel design called "Angel with Two Children at Feet." Factory records say it was designed in 1938 by Reinhold Unger, but it may not have been approved for regular production. A similar production model is listed in a 1950 Goebel catalog, but not as a Hummel. Talk to an auction house or shop that specializes in Hummels. Your plaque may be a very exciting find—or it may be a variation, or even a fake. Let us know what happens.

Tip: If you are buying a safe to store coins, jewelry, valuable papers, money, rare sports cards or other valuables, don't forget that a thief can just carry a safe away if it is lightweight and not bolted to a wall or floor. We laughed at the full-page ad in our local newspaper that showed a mailman carrying a boxed new safe to the buyer's front door. A large safe, however, may be too heavy to put anywhere but in the garage or basement and too big to fit through a standard door.

Take advantage of a free listing for your group to announce events or to find antique shows and other events. Go to Kovels.com/calendar to find and plan your antiquing trips.

Terry Kovel answers as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The volume of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Land O'Lakes cheese box, wooden, blue letters, printed on all four sides, 10 x 3 x 3 inches, $20.
  • Star of David pin, mother-of-pearl, c. 1955, 2-inch square, $40.
  • Milk glass sugar shaker, owl shape, 6 1/4 inches, $45.
  • Tonic bottle, Ackers English remedy, cobalt blue, W.H. Hooker & Co., 2 x 5 1/2 inches, $70.
  • Dedham Pottery creamer, rabbits, blue and white, handle, 3 1/3 inches, $130.
  • Masonic ring, 10K gold, "YOD" emblem inside black triangle, 14th degree, Scottish Rite, size 11, $300.
  • Mrs. Beasley doll, vinyl and cloth, blue polka dot dress, apron, glasses, pull-cord voice, Mattel, box, 1967, 22 inches, $385.
  • Howdy Doody wristwatch, Howdy's portrait, metal case, green vinyl band, c. 1950, 3 3/4 x 6 3/4 inches, $410.
  • Banjo clock, federal style, mahogany, giltwood, eagle finial, aurora enamel panel, Philip Stolze, Pleasantville, N.Y., 44 1/2 inches, $2,610.
  • Chippendale sofa, mahogany, pine, camel back, scrolled arms, molded legs, silk upholstery, c. 1790, 36 x 77 inches, $5,170.

Kovels' Advertising Collectibles Price List has more than 10,000 current prices of your favorite advertising collectibles, from boxes and bins to trays and tins. More than 400 categories are organized by brand name, company name, product or collectible. Plus 300 photographs, logos and trademarks. A 16-page color insert features important advertising collectibles. Clubs, publications, resources and a full index. Available at your bookstore; online at Kovels.com; by phone at 800-303-1996; or send $16.95 plus $4.95 postage to Kovels, P.O. Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2013 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

Garden stools have become popular again, and buyers use them indoors or outdoors. This blue porcelain antique Chinese stool sold for $1,210 at a Leland Little auction in Hillsborough, N.C.

Last Updated on Friday, 01 November 2013 14:36
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Sept. 9, 2013

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Written by TERRY KOVEL   
Monday, 09 September 2013 09:49
This cane has no hidden features. It's a folk art cane with a handle carved in the shape of a pig and a pig's foot. It sold for $240 at a Cowan's auction in Cincinnati in July.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – The first cane probably was just a strong stick, but by the 19th century a cane was a fashion accessory and sometimes hid a tool.

The heads of canes were made of wood, ivory, gold or silver, leather, pewter or porcelain, sometimes with inlay and precious gems.  At recent antiques sales, there have been some very unusual canes. Some hid weapons. Sword canes are familiar because of movies. But few know there are canes that held parts of a gun, including ammunition—a hidden arsenal. Another was a blow gun that could "shoot" bullets. A woman's cane had a short knife blade to use for protection. A "flicker" cane was made so a short blade could pop out of the handle. Most deadly was the Diabolique, a cane outlawed in France. If someone tried to pull the cane, a set of spikes popped out of the shaft wounding the attacker's hand. Tap the cane on the ground and the spikes disappeared.

Most canes are less threatening. There is a cane handle covered in carved grapes that unscrews to reveal a corkscrew. Another, a bamboo cane, has a horse-measuring ruler inside. One held supplies for a writer—pens, paper, inkwell, penknife, eraser, pencil, sealing wax, a candle and matches. Another held a woman's accessories, including tweezers, nail picks, buttonhook, crochet needle, bottles and fan. But that is not all. Imagine a cane that held a long, thin working violin and bow. An artist could get a cane that held an easel, palette and paints. Some canes are amusing. A peephole let the owner look at a picture of a bathing beauty, while another held a whiskey bottle. Strangest is a Chinese "spitter" cane with a silver handle shaped like a man's head. Press his pigtail, point and the head spits water at a victim. Any of these canes sell for thousands of dollars today.

Q: I'm looking for information about a W. Goebel figurine of a little boy and girl. It's titled "Rosi & Rolf" and the number on the bottom is 17 603 11.

A: Your figurine was made in 1981 by the W. Goebel Porcelain Factory of Rodental, Germany. Its full name is "Rosi & Rolf, The Hikers." It is sometimes advertised online as a Hummel figurine because Goebel also made Hummels, but it's not a Hummel. We have seen Rosi & Rolf offered online for $20 and up.

Q: Going through piles of my stuff, I found my teen collection of 24 silly arcade cards called "Licenses to Do Anything." I remember buying them from coin-operated machines in the late 1930s or early '40s. Each one is postcard size, 3 1/4 by 5 1/2 inches, and is printed on heavy stock with green lettering and a fancy green border. Mine include a Back Seat Driver's License, a Bachelor's Permit and a Spendthrift Permit. What are they worth?

A: Your cards were issued by the Exhibit Supply Co. of Chicago. The copyright date on the ones we have seen is 1941. A set of 30 mint examples is being offered online for $30. So your smaller set would sell for less than that

Q: I understand that antique typewriters are popular again. I have a 1935 Remington typewriter that's in good condition. It's 10 by 11 inches and is in a black case. What is my typewriter worth?

A: Arms manufacturer E. Remington & Sons of Ilion, N.Y., made the first successful typewriter for Sholes & Glidden in 1874. It typed capital letters only. Remington made the typewriter in its sewing machine division. It sold its typewriter business and the rights to the Remington name to the Standard Typewriter Manufacturing Co. in 1886. Standard changed its name to Remington Typewriter Co. in 1902 and became Remington Rand in 1927. Remington portable typewriters were introduced in 1920. Typewriter sales fell in the 1990s as more people started using computers. Vintage typewriters have recently become popular with people who like the touch and enjoy seeing words appear on paper as they are typed. Value of your typewriter: about $145.

Q: Moving to a smaller place, I must sell or give away my collector plates. I have an Edna Hibel Mother's Day plate called "Erica and Jamie" made in 1985. Is it worth anything? Are people collecting Edna Hibel plates?

A: Edna Hibel (b. 1917) is an artist known for her paintings of mothers and children. A series of Edna Hibel Mother's Day plates was made by Edwin M. Knowles China Co. from 1984 to 1991. Collector plates have gone down in value during the past 10 years, and your plate currently sells for under $15.

Q: In the 1960s, I bought my daughter a large plush Cat in the Hat stuffed toy. She doesn't want it, but I hear it's collectible. What do you think?

A: Dr. Seuss' "The Cat in the Hat" storybook was published in 1957, and plush Cat in the Hat toys soon followed—and are still being made. Early versions in "like new" condition might sell for more than newer toys. But don't expect to get more than about $20 for it.

Tip: To remove stains from a glass vase, fill it with warm water and drop in a denture-cleaning tablet.

Sign up for our weekly email, "Kovels Komments." It includes the latest news, tips and questions and is free if you register on our website. Kovels.com has lists of publications, clubs, appraisers, auction houses, people who sell parts or repair antiques and more. Kovels.com adds to the information in this column and helps you find useful sources needed by collectors.

Terry Kovel answers as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The volume of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Wooden recipe box, two roosters, hinged, Japan, 1950s, 5 1/2 x 4 1/2 inches, $5.
  • Riviera Pottery creamer, ivory, $20.
  • Candle snuffer, silver plate, baroque, Wallace, circa 1941, 8 inches, $25
  • Pressed-glass cake stand, Roman rosette, 10 1/4 inches, $55.
  • Hawaiian hula girl nodder, grass skirt, circa 1940, 5 1/2 inches, $80.
  • Slip burner lamp, green swirl iridescent shade, brass shoulder, c. 1920, 6 3/4 x 3 inches, $130.
  • Weather vane, eagle, copper, arrow directional, stand, c. 1910, 76 x 23 1/2 inches, $235.
  • Toy milk truck, rack, bottles, wood, Buddy L, 13 1/2 inches, $360.
  • Staffordshire spaniel, seated, red, white, c. 1860, 7 1/4 inches, pair, $360.
  • U.S. flag, wool, 45 stars, stamped "Vernon," 1896-1907, 72 x 120 inches, $800.

The Kovels have navigated flea markets for decades. Learn from the best. Kovels Flea Market Strategies: How to Shop, Buy and Bargain the 21st-Century Way, by Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel, tells you about the latest smartphone apps and websites to help you shop, share and ship, as well as what to wear, what to bring and, most important, how to negotiate your way to a bargain. Also find tips on spotting fakes, advice about paying for your purchases, and shipping suggestions. Full-color booklet, 17 pages, 8 1/2 by 5 1/2 inches. Available only from Kovels. Order by phone at 800-303-1996; online at Kovels.com; or mail $7.95 plus $4.95 postage and handling to Kovels, P.O. Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2013 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
This cane has no hidden features. It's a folk art cane with a handle carved in the shape of a pig and a pig's foot. It sold for $240 at a Cowan's auction in Cincinnati in July.
Last Updated on Friday, 01 November 2013 14:36
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Sept. 2, 2013

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Written by TERRY KOVEL   
Tuesday, 03 September 2013 12:02

A live monkey in the living room would be a shock, but this monkey is bronze. He is holding a leather-bound book that serves as a tabletop. The whimsical table sold for $1,342 at Neal Auction Co. in New Orleans in July.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – About 20 years ago, two antiques experts wrote a book titled Fantasy Furniture. It spawned a new style based on past ones. Pedestals shaped like blackamoors, chairs with seats that look like huge shells, Victorian furniture that seems to be made from plumbing pipes, and carved wooden chairs and tables that have full-size carved bears holding up tabletops or climbing on chair backs were pictured in the book. Dogs are carved as figures beneath a Victorian-style table. Lifelike figures of women with flowing hair are part of Art Nouveau pieces. Furniture pieces of any age selected for the book were not traditional.

The idea persists today. Modern artists have made tables that look like piles of books, and crouching men form the base of a modern cocktail table. Best-known of all is the work of Italian artist Piero Fornasetti, who made a cube-shaped table painted to look like a building, and an umbrella stand painted to look like a live cat sitting on a pile of books. Decorating magazines often show rooms with tables piled with real books to hold a lamp.

A table made from a bronze life-size monkey sitting on a leather-bound book and holding another large book over his head sold recently. The 27-inch-high table adds humor to a room at a cost of $1,342. To add to the joke, the book held by the monkey is titled "History of Furniture."

Q: Awhile ago, Charlie Sheen appeared on The Tonight Show wearing Babe Ruth's 1927 World Series ring. What is that ring worth, anyway?

A: Experts think that if the Babe's 1927 World Series ring were put up for auction, it could sell for close to $500,000. But the "if" is a big one. Sheen bought the ring in a private sale, and the ring's history is murky. At one time it was owned by Barry Halper (1939-2005), a well-known baseball collector. But no one knows exactly how Halper got the ring—and some of the sports memorabilia he owned has been found to be fake.

Q: I bought a porcelain child's cup at an estate sale. It's white with a band of blue and white rabbits and gold trim. It's marked "Favorite Bavaria" and signed "Marie Frances, 1916." I would like to know its value.

A: Your porcelain cup was made from an undecorated piece (a blank) by the Hutschenreuther Porcelain Factory of Bavaria, Germany, an area famous for porcelain production. "Favorite Bavaria" was a mark used by Hutschenreuther on pieces made for sale in the U.S. market. Some pieces also were marked "UNO." Blanks were sold to professional art studios, china-painting schools and retail stores for amateur artists to buy and paint. Burley & Tyrrell Co. of Chicago was the U.S. importer of these items. Burley & Tyrrell also owned a decorating studio, but we don't know if "Marie Frances" painted your cup there or someplace else. Value of your cup: $50.

Q: I recently discovered a 1939 World's Fair silver souvenir spoon in my attic. The top of the handle has an embossed image of the fair's EME Building (the engineering building), and the bowl has an etching of the Administration Building. It's marked "Rogers Mfg. Co." on the back. Is it worth much?

A: The 1939 New York World's Fair is a favorite among World's Fair collectors. Spoons like yours originally were sold in sets of 12 and picture various fair buildings. An individual spoon is not worth a lot. We have seen single spoons selling for $15 to $40.

Q: I would like to know the value of two brass grain probes I have. One is 62 1/2 inches long and the other is 50 1/2 inches long. They are marked "Burrows Equipment Company, Evanston, Illinois." They came from an old feed mill that opened in 1886. Members of my family worked there for years. The mill closed and was later destroyed in a fire.

A: Burrows Equipment Co. was founded by Parke W. Burrows in Evanston in 1947. It sold equipment for seed and grain farming. Grain probes are used to test samples of grain being brought to a grain elevator by truck, barge or other means. After Burrows died in 1979, the company was sold to Seedburo of Chicago. That company is still in business in Des Plaines, Ill. Your grain probes were made between 1947 and 1979. New brass grain probes sell today for more than $300 each. A 51-inch probe sells for $319, and a 63-inch probe for $336. Old ones are worth a little less.

Q: My friend asked me if I still had my Roy Rogers and Dale Evans Hartland figures because she read that they were worth a lot of money. I not only have Roy Rogers and Dale Evans, but also Hartland's Lone Ranger and Tonto. They are on their original horses and all of the accessories—hats, saddles, reins, guns and rifles—are in excellent condition. Please let me know how much they are worth. I have not decided if I want to give them to my grandnieces or not.

A: Your Roy Rogers, Dale Evans, Bullet (their dog), Lone Ranger and Tonto figurines on horses were made by Hartland Plastics of Hartland, Wis. In 1953 Hartland introduced a series of miniature military and Western figures depicting real and fictional American heroes, wranglers and gunfighters, many mounted on their horses. Early figures were generic cowboys, cowgirls, palominos and pintos. In 1954, stars of early TV Westerns were created. They were made until 1963. In good condition, each of these figures sells for about $50 to $350, and even more if they are in their original boxes. Hartland also is known for its more famous—and more expensive—baseball players, made from 1958 until 1993.

Tip: Don't put plastic covers on upholstered furniture or the top of a dining room table. Eventually the plastic could stick to the furniture and ruin the finish.

Need prices for collectibles? Find them at Kovels.com, our website for collectors. More than 84,000 prices and 5,000 color pictures have just been added. Now you can find more than 856,000 prices that can help you determine the value of your collectible. Access to the prices is free at Kovels.com/priceguide.

Terry Kovel answers as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The volume of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Cracker Jack toy, "Lift to Erase" tablet, "3 in a Row," $10.
  • Donald Duck push puppet, plastic, Kohner Brothers, 1960, 2 1/2 inches, $20.
  • Mr. Peanut charm, celluloid, brown and green paint, 2 1/8 x 3/4 inches, $25.
  • Betty Crocker's party book, hardcover, retro drawing, metal spiral binding, 500 recipes, 1st edition, 1960, $25.
  • Camark salt and pepper, S & P letter shapes, pink, cork, 1 1/2 inches, $25.
  • Heisey bowl, Pineapple and fan pattern, oval, 12 inches, $40.
  • Boehm Porcelain floral piece, "Royal Blessing," pink rose, baby's breath, 4 x 5 inches, $80.
  • Barnum & Bailey Circus poster, elephant, 1945, 28 x 41 inches, $225.
  • Slat-back chair, ash, black paint, New England, early 1700s, 43 inches, $840.
  • Tea caddy, fruitwood, apple shape, c. 1810, 5 inches, $3,070.

New! The best book to own if you want to buy, or sell or collect—and if you order now, you'll receive a copy with the author's autograph. The new Kovels' Antiques & Collectibles Price Guide, 2014, 46th edition, is your most accurate source for current prices. This large-size paperback has more than 2,500 color photographs and more than 35,000 up-to-date prices for more than 700 categories of antiques and collectibles. You'll also find hundreds of factory histories and marks, a report on the record prices of the year, plus helpful sidebars and tips about buying, selling, collecting and preserving your treasures. Available online at Kovelsonlinestore.com; by phone at 800-303-1996; at your bookstore; or send $27.95 plus $4.95 postage to Price Book, P.O. Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2013 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

A live monkey in the living room would be a shock, but this monkey is bronze. He is holding a leather-bound book that serves as a tabletop. The whimsical table sold for $1,342 at Neal Auction Co. in New Orleans in July.

Last Updated on Monday, 16 September 2013 13:59
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Aug. 26, 2013

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Written by TERRY KOVEL   
Monday, 26 August 2013 12:32
Why an ice stand would be decorated with stag heads and wolves is a mystery, but this 14-inch-high piece of majolica, used to serve dessert, sold for $8,610 at Neal Auction Co. in New Orleans.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – A Minton majolica centerpiece was auctioned in May as an "ice stand." Minton & Polson was established in 1793 in Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, England. The company started making majolica in about 1850. Some of these early pieces, marked "Minton," inspired majolica made after 1873, when the company often used the mark "Mintons." Ice stands were pictured in the company's 1851 catalog. They were tall pieces meant to be used as spectacular centerpieces on a dining table. Each was a tall pedestal with a vase or dish-shaped piece at the top, a large "stem" and a group of small bowls or plates surrounding the pedestal, sometimes at two levels. The stands held ice or ice shavings and sauces for dessert. But as one expert has said, they were "more ornamental than functional." An 1865 Minton ice stand decorated with stag heads, wolves and pine cones sold for $8,610 at a May 2013 Neal auction in New Orleans.

Q: For years my family has owned an antique spool bed (the kind with spool-turned head and foot boards). Everyone always called it a "Jenny Lind bed." Please tell me why.

A: Jenny Lind (1820-1887) was a world-famous opera singer known as the "Swedish Nightingale." She became a huge celebrity in the United States when she toured here in 1850-'52 at the invitation of P.T. Barnum, a master promoter. American advertisers used her to promote everything from hats and gloves to pianos and beds. Lind is said to have slept in a spool-turned bed while on the tour—so furniture makers started calling the popular style a "Jenny Lind bed." The style still is often advertised that way.

Q: I have inherited a picture of what looks like an oil painting. There are two buildings in it, one with a "Morton Salt" sign. The picture is signed "H. Hargrove" and has a round seal on the back with a number and the phrase, "Collectors Corner, Inc., Certificate of Authenticity." Is it worth much?

A: "H. Hargrove" is a name used by painter Nicolo Sturiano. He was born in Italy in 1941 and came to the United States in 1964. He worked as a winemaker at a New York State vineyard while he began painting as a hobby. When his nostalgic American landscapes became popular, he left the vineyard and moved to Greenwich Village in New York City. Collectors Corner of Indianapolis sold Hargrove prints in the 1980s through a home party plan. Hargrove is still working and has a studio in Toms River, N.J. Your limited-edition print sells for $25 or less.

Q: My father-in-law died in 1962 and left a bottle of Chivas Regal 12 Year Old blend. It has never been opened and has all the stamps required at the time. Does it have any value other than the normal price today?

A: James and John Chivas began making blended whiskey in Aberdeen, Scotland, in the mid-19th century. The Chivas Regal 12 Year Old Blend was introduced in 1938. The Chivas Regal brand was bought by Pernod Ricard, a French group, in 2001. Full bottles of liquor should be kept in a cool, dark place, but even with proper storage, the liquor may deteriorate after a few years. Full bottles can't be sold privately in some states. You could open the bottle and drink the whiskey, although if it was stored in a hot or sunny place, the taste may have changed. Modern liquor bottles have very little resale value.

Q: I have a hanging scale marked "Patented Aug. 19, 1884, makers of balances and scales of every description, John Chatillon & Sons, New York." It also reads "Butcher's scale," and has numbers from zero to nine on the dial. Can you give me any information about this?

A: John Chatillon & Sons was founded in New York City in 1835. The company made spring balances for butchers. By 1883 it was making balances, scales, cutlery and other goods. The Chatillon brand is now owned by Ametek Inc., based in Berwyn, Pa. It still makes springs and scales, as well as other force-measuring instruments for industry. Value of your scale is about $50 to $75.

Q: In late 1982, my husband bought a small Timex personal computer for $105 (including taxes). We still have the computer, without its box, and the original receipt. He used it exactly once. Should I keep it or toss it?

A: You have a "Timex Sinclair 1000" computer. It was the first computer produced by Timex Sinclair, a joint venture of Timex Corp., a U.S. company, and Sinclair Research of England. The computer was sold as "the first computer under $100." Timex lost out to competitors like Commodore, Atari and Apple, and dropped out of the computer market in early 1984. Timex Sinclair 1000s frequently are offered for sale online. Prices range from about $40 to well over $200. So, rather than tossing the computer, you might want to recoup some of your money by selling it. You can learn more about Timex Sinclair computers at OldComputers.net, a site dedicated to obsolete technology.

Tip: Never wrap a painting in bubble wrap so that the wrap touches the painted surface. In time, the plastic will leave marks.

Terry Kovel answers as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The volume of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Hummel figurine, boy with toothache, missing bee mark, no. 217/2, 5 1/2 inches, $50.
  • Consolidated Glass vase, blue, impressed tropical fish, 8 1/2 x 6 3/4 inches, $75.
  • Shelley cup and saucer, Rock Garden pattern, gilt handle and foot, c. 1940, $125.
  • Pressed glass cake stand, Holly pattern, 9 inches, $145.
  • Meissen figurine, cupid forging heart with anvil, 7 x 3 inches, $295.
  • Sewer tile, figural lion, molded, unglazed, oval base, Mogadore, Ohio, 9 x 15 inches, $380.
  • Porcelain plate, Sevres style, aristocratic woman, rose garland in hair, cobalt border, reserves, 10 1/2 inches, $875.
  • Newcomb bowl, Japanese quince, relief carved, blue, green, pink, Anna Frances Simpson, 1919, 5 7/8 inches, $895.
  • Monastery doorbell, cast iron, figural monk ringer, c. 1850, 35 1/2 inches, $1,540.
  • Fireplace fender, cast iron, brass, arches, paw feet, England, 1800s, 9 x 38 1/2 inches, $4,480.

The best book to own if you want to buy, sell or collect—and if you order now, you'll receive a copy with the author's autograph. The new Kovels' Antiques & Collectibles Price Guide, 2014, 46th edition, is your most accurate source for current prices. This large-size paperback has more than 2,500 color photographs and more than 35,000 up-to-date prices for more than 700 categories of antiques and collectibles. You'll also find hundreds of factory histories and marks and a report on the record prices of the year, plus helpful sidebars and tips about buying, selling, collecting and preserving your treasures. Available online at Kovelsonlinestore.com; by phone at 800-303-1996; at your bookstore; or send $27.95 plus $4.95 postage to Price Book, P.O. Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2013 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.




ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Why an ice stand would be decorated with stag heads and wolves is a mystery, but this 14-inch-high piece of majolica, used to serve dessert, sold for $8,610 at Neal Auction Co. in New Orleans.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 03 September 2013 12:11
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Aug. 19, 2013

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Written by TERRY KOVEL   
Monday, 19 August 2013 13:07

Piero Fornasetti (1913-1988) created this life-size bronze foot to be used as an ornament. It sold for $393 at Humler & Nolan, an auction gallery in Cincinnati.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – A realistic replica of a full-size foot in a sandal seems like a strange choice of ornament for the average home. But feet and shoes have been popular ornaments for centuries.

The foot of an ancient black man wearing a two-strap gold sandal was made by the modern artist Piero Fornasetti to be placed on a table in a modern house. The 3 1/2-by-9-inch foot is life-size. A 19th-century bronze candleholder was made in the shape of a foot in a sandal with an extended large toe topped by a cup to hold a candle. One 20th-century advertisement for a foot powder was a plaster replica of an oversized bare foot. A wooden bare foot, a little smaller than life-size, was carved by a 1920s folk artist as a gift for his podiatrist; it was to be used as a paperweight. A sleek modern bronze bare foot paired with a bronze hand was made by a 1970s Danish artist.

Victorians seem to have preferred feet wearing shoes as ornaments. Some shoes were padded to be pincushions, and pressed glass shoes with no special use are easy to find at antiques shows. A podiatrist we know has a famous collection of shoe-shaped objects in his office—more than 100 items.

Collecting by shape is just one way to organize a hobby. Most popular are cats, dogs, lady's heads, angels, buildings and, of course, hands and feet.

Q: We have four Hitchcock-style chairs made by the Boling Chair Co. of Siler City, N.C. We have been unable to find any information about this company. Can you help?

A: Boling Chair Co. started out in 1901 as Siler City Bending Co. One of the company's founders, Mal Boling, rounded up new investors in 1904 and reorganized the company as High Point Bending and Chair Co. It made bentwood parts for other companies before producing its own bentwood furniture. It later expanded its furniture lines. The company's name became Boling Chair Co. in 1956 or '57, and then Boling Co. in 1979. Today it's based in Mount Olive, N.C., and is called Boling Furniture Co. If your chairs are marked "Boling Chair Co.," they were made between 1956 and 1979. Chairs like it sell online for about $50 apiece.

Q: I have a solid-brass Batman belt buckle I think is from the 1940s. It's marked "National Periodical Publications, Inc." and has the number 0016 on the back. Can you tell me what year it was made?

A: Your Batman belt buckle was made in the early 1940s. National Periodical Publications published the first comic books that included original material, not reprints of comic strips. The company started out in 1934 as National Allied Publications. It has operated under various names, including Detective Comics and DC Comics. The company published the first Batman comic in 1939. Your Batman belt buckle probably is worth less than $100.

Q: I have an antique grip machine that was used in my grandparents' tavern a century ago. The machine is red metal and works with a penny. It was manufactured by D. Gottlieb & Co. of Chicago. A bell rings when you get the meter so high. There is a chart on the front that has different ages and grip numbers for men and women. How much is it worth?

A: Your grip machine is not quite as old as you think. D. Gottlieb & Co. was founded by David Gottlieb in 1927. Originally the company made pinball machines. Gottlieb's countertop grip tester was first made in 1928. The machine tested grip and arm strength and was a moneymaker for stores, taverns, barbershops and other retail businesses. Keys were needed to open up the back and get the money out. The grip tester was in and out of production until at least the late 1940s. Gottlieb made hundreds of different games. A couple of years ago, a D. Gottlieb & Co. grip tester with keys sold for $480.

Q: Several years ago, I received a six-piece set of little antique crystal bowls and matching tiny shovels. The set probably dates from the late 19th or early 20th century. Each little bowl is about 2 inches tall and 4 inches in diameter. What were the bowls and shovels used for? And what is the set worth?

A: Your little bowls were used to hold salt. They're called "open salts," "standing salts" or "salt cellars." An open salt with a shovel-like spoon and a little pepper shaker were set next to each place-setting at the dining table. Instead of shaking salt, diners used the shovel to sprinkle salt on their food. Sets like yours don't sell for high prices today. We have seen six-piece sets sell online for $25 to $50.

Q: Years ago I donated many valuable toys and games to various charities. Is there any way to get these sentimental items back?

A: Once things are given away, you can't get them back. Charities usually sell the items at resale shops and use the money to support their programs. Toys in good condition also may have been distributed to children in need. You could have taken a tax deduction for the value of the toys at the time you donated them, but now you can be happy that your donation helped the charities you chose.

Tip: When repairing antique jewelry, never eliminate any marks or inscriptions. For example, when sizing a ring, keep the carat marks and hallmarks. If the shank can't be cut, use a ring guard instead.

Take advantage of a free listing for your group to announce events or to find antique shows and other events. Go to Kovels.com/calendar to find and plan your antiquing trips.

Terry Kovel answers as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The volume of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

Cracker Jack toy, magnifier, round, red, $5.

Blenko bookends, cobalt glass, shell shape, 6 1/2 inches, $25.

Pressed glass vase, Thousand Eye pattern, fan shape, octagonal pedestal, 7 3/4 x 10 x 3 1/2 inches, $50.

Pewter chocolate pot, cover, sailboat, church, red and gilt paint, brass stand, Dutch, 17 1/2 inches, $175.

1920 calendar, two children, spinning wheel, multicolor, full pad, 21 1/2 x 12 inches, $230.

Chippendale mirror, tiger maple, carved crest, c. 1800, 33 x 18 inches, $235.

Cane, fruitwood, boar's tusk handle, sterling collar, embossed design, tapered shaft, steel ferrule, 34 3/4 inches, $345.

Tiffany silver bowl, chrysanthemum pattern, 2 x 9 inches, $425.

Currier & Ives print, "Husking," lithograph, hand-colored, oak frame, 1861, large folio, 26 x 31 1/4 inches, $1,440.

Gasolier lamp, two-light, cut and etched glass shade, ruby-cut to clear glass globe, gilt bronze, 1800s, 30 x 24 inches, $5,080.

Contemporary, modern and mid-century ceramics made since 1950 are among the hottest collectibles today. Our special report, "Kovels' Buyers' Guide to Modern Ceramics, Mid-Century to Contemporary" identifies important pottery by American and European makers. Includes more than 65 factories and 70 studio artists, each with a mark and dates. Works by major makers, including Claude Conover, Guido Gambone and Lucie Rie, as well as potteries like Gustavsberg, Metlox and Sascha Brastoff, are shown in color photos. Find the sleepers at house sales and flea markets. Special Report, 2010, 8 1/2 x 5 1/2 inches, 64 pages. Available only from Kovels. Order by phone at 800-303-1996; online at Kovels.com; or send $19.95 plus $4.95 postage and handling to Kovels, P.O. Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2013 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

Piero Fornasetti (1913-1988) created this life-size bronze foot to be used as an ornament. It sold for $393 at Humler & Nolan, an auction gallery in Cincinnati.

Last Updated on Friday, 23 August 2013 10:42
 
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