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Kovels - Antiques & Collecting

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of March 17, 2014

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 17 March 2014 12:22
This wistful boy with the blue googly eyes is a dresser box. The 1920s German porcelain box, 8 inches high, sold for $171 at a Theriault's auction held in Newport Beach, Calif.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – "Googly eyes" is a term that can mean two slightly different things. The meaning online refers to small, plastic pieces that look like round sandwiches with clear tops and a small, loose, round black piece inside. They are used to represent moving eyes in toys, dolls and puzzles. But to a collector of vintage dolls, toys and figurines, googly eyes means oversized, side-glancing eyes painted onto the piece. Or it can be the name for a doll with the googly eyes. The eyes give the face a comic look, and since most dolls with googly eyes have chubby cheeks and tiny mouths, the dolls seem friendly, even lovable. They were made starting in about 1912, and most were made in Germany. The bulk of them date from 1915 to 1925.

Grace Drayton's drawings of children with googly eyes were published earlier and were used in cartoons, comic strips and children's books. Doorstops, dolls, figurines and tableware also pictured her googly-eyed children. Her most famous characters with big, round eyes are Dolly Dimple, a paper doll, and the Campbell Kids.

Googly-eye dolls started to go up in price in the late 1990s, and kept rising in the early 2000s. A few bargains can be found today.

Q: I saw a large wooden storage cupboard labeled "Rare, Hornbeam" at an antique show. No one was nearby to tell me what that meant.

A: Hornbeam is the name of a tree that grows in England and central Europe. Similar trees grow in North America and Japan. United States hornbeam is sometimes called ironwood, musclewood or blue beech. But 40 types are grown in East Asia. They grow slowly, up to 75 feet high. The wood is light-colored, almost white, and has a patterned grain with flecks. Because it is so hard, it is rarely used for furniture. Instead, it's used to make wheels, carving boards, tool handles and sometimes pegs, screws and even parquet flooring. The bark can be boiled and used as a medicine to relieve pain. Furniture made from hornbeam is expensive because the wood is rare, difficult to work with and has an attractive grain.

Q: I bought a set of 21 Hummel spice jars. They have a Hummel picture and the name of a spice on the front and a legend about the spice on the back. The bottom of each jar is marked "M.I. Hummel, ARS AG, Cham, Switzerland, 1987." Below that is a symbol that looks like a lowercase "d" over "m" and "Made in Japan." What is their value?

A: Danbury Mint sold Hummel spice sets from 1987 to 1992. The "d over m" mark is the Danbury Mint mark. The jars were made in Japan using designs by ARS AG, a Swiss company that holds rights to Sister Maria Innocentia Hummel's original pictures and to illustrations of the figurines. The complete spice set includes 24 spice jars and a wooden spice rack. Danbury Mint sold the jars by mail on a subscription basis. The customer received one or two jars per month, and the spice rack was included with the set. In 1991 the company offered the jars for $19.75 each. A set is very difficult to sell, especially if some jars are missing. A complete set might bring $50. Your partial set would be worth less.

Q: My Parker 51 pen-and-pencil set is in its original black box. The caps are 14K gold. The set is in good condition. How old is it?

A: George Safford Parker founded the Parker Pen Co. in Janesville, Wis., in 1888. The Parker 51 pen was developed in 1939, the company's 51st year. After testing it in other countries, it was introduced in the United States in 1941. The pen has a Lucite body and 14K gold nib. It was made in several colors, with slight design changes throughout the years. The Parker 51 was made until about 1972, and became the best-selling pen in the world. The company was bought by Gillette in 1993 and became part of Newell Rubbermaid in 2000.

Q: Is there a market for old used jeans? My sentimental mother kept the jeans I wore when I was a toddler, and I'm now 64 years old. They have an 18-inch waist and 14-inch inseam. The Levi's tag is red, not orange, so I wonder if these are the real thing.

A: Jeans were first made in 1873 by Levi Strauss & Co. Most Levi's have a red tab, or tag. The orange tab was used on a line of Levi's made from 1969 into the 1970s, and recently was re-introduced as a retro line. Levi Strauss established a wholesale dry-goods business in San Francisco in 1853. He and Jacob Davis were granted a patent on a method of fastening pocket openings with rivets in 1873, and they began making denim "waist overalls" (jeans) with copper rivets. If the name "Levi's" on the tab on your jeans is in all caps, your jeans were made before 1971. This is known as the "Big E" tab. Some vintage jeans have sold for high prices in the past, especially in Japan, but there is not as much interest in children's jeans.

Tip: Wash your hands or wear cotton gloves before handling books, textiles or paper artifacts.

Take advantage of a free listing for your group to announce events or to find antiques shows, national meetings and other events. Go to the Calendar at Kovels.com to find, publicize and plan your antiquing trips.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

 

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Gathering basket, woven splint, white oak, round, ribbed, bentwood handle, patina, 9 1/2 x 10 1/2 inches, $70.
  • Fire helmet, aluminum, high eagle, blue, red painted metal front shield, Ladder 1, lieutenant, Cairn's, circa 1897, $315.
  • KPM lithophane lampshade, five panels, embossed women, children, black, white, circa 1890, 6 1/2 inches, $355.
  • Irish silver ladle, scalloped shell-shape bowl, circa 1762, 13 3/4 inches, $500.
  • Carpenter's plane, walnut block, whalebone inlay, 10 1/2 inches, $560.
  • Hilda baby doll, Kestner 245, bisque head, sleep eyes, teeth, composition, white lace bonnet, dress, 16 inches, $790.
  • Kalo silver bracelet, flowers, three green stones, 6 inches, $815.
  • St. Patrick's Day candy container, composition, standing man, red hair, top hat, pipe, suit, cane, 10 inches, $950.
  • Umbrella stand, iron, standing man, top hat, holding shillelagh, Ireland, circa 1865, 29 x 16 inches, $2,090.
  • Music cabinet, lift top, carved front, hinged handles, green interior, C. Rohlf, 36 x 11 inches, $9,375.

"Kovels' A Diary: How to Settle a Collector's Estate" is our new week-by-week record of the settlement of an estate, from your first days gathering legal papers to the last days when you're dividing antiques among heirs and selling everything else. How to identify pottery, jewelry and other popular collectibles. Tips on where and how to sell furniture, jewelry, dishes, figurines, record albums, bikes and even clothes. We include lots of pictures and prices, and explain the advantages of a house sale, auction, selling to a dealer and donating to a charity. Learn about how to handle the special problems of security and theft. Plus a free current supplement with useful websites, auction lists and other current information. Available only from the Kovels for $19.95, plus $4.95 postage and handling. Order by phone at 800-303-1996; online at www.kovels.com; or write to Kovels, P.O. Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
This wistful boy with the blue googly eyes is a dresser box. The 1920s German porcelain box, 8 inches high, sold for $171 at a Theriault's auction held in Newport Beach, Calif.
Last Updated on Monday, 31 March 2014 12:49
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of March 10, 2014

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 10 March 2014 14:14

A gladiator and a maiden surrounded by a design of columns and drapes are shown on this Burgen, Schverer & Cie vase. The 9-inch vase was offered at a 2013 James Julia auction in Fairfield, Maine.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Cameo glass is popular with collectors. Galle, Thomas Webb, Mount Washington and Daum are well known, but some smaller companies that worked at the same time are almost unknown. Burgun, Schverer & Cie (son) was founded in 1711 in Meisenthal, France.

The company always made top-quality glass and survived by changing methods and designs to attract new customers. It made blown glass, watch glass, eyeglass lenses and tableware. By the 1860s, it was famous for its understanding of glassmaking. Emile Galle was an apprentice there before he left for his father's company, and the two companies had a working arrangement for about 10 years. In 1895 Burgun, Schverer & Cie produced cameo glass by the new and less expensive method of painting layers of colored and clear glass and then carving them. It also made other art glass, including enameled and gilt vases, often with silver mounts. Burgun, Schverer & Cie won many awards for its glass, and in 1901 it became a public company.

It is now called Verrerie de Meisenthal. Its glass has long been marked with a hard-to-understand emblem that includes the Cross of Lorraine, a thistle and the letters BS & C on a banner. Look for cameo glass by Burgun, Schverer & Cie. It may be overlooked by those with less information about the glass's quality and mark.

Q: I have four bentwood chairs that came from an old seminary. Underneath the seats there is a label that reads "J.S. Ford Johnson Co., New York, N.Y., 33 E. 47th St., Chicago, Ill., San Francisco, Calif." They were patented in March 1910 and are in good solid condition. Can you tell me something about the history?

A: J.S. Ford Johnson Co. was founded in 1867 by John S. Ford and Henry W. Johnson. The company started out in Columbus, Ohio, moved to Indiana a year later and moved to Chicago in 1872. The company made Mission furniture, including some pieces similar to Stickley furniture. It was one of the largest manufacturers of chairs in the United States. The company went bankrupt in 1913 and was sold. Your set of bentwood chairs is worth about $600 if the chairs are in excellent condition.

Q: Is a rectangular yellow planter marked "Cookson 923" of any value?

A: Gerald Cookson founded Cookson Pottery Co. in Roseville, Ohio, in 1945. Garden ware, planters, vases and florist ware were produced. Cookson's molds were made by Ungemach Pottery, another Roseville company, and the glazes were applied at Cookson Pottery. Cookson's son took over the business in 1966. The business was sold in 1982 but continued to operate until 1995. Value of your planter: about $20.

Q: I have a pewter stein marked "F & M" over "N." It's 11 inches tall and has raised decorations of classical figures picking grapes from a vine. Can you tell me who made it and what it's worth?

A: The mark was used by Felsenstein & Mainzer, a pewterer in Nuremberg, Germany. The company was founded by Simon Felsenstein and Sigmund Mainzer in 1886. Gebruder Bing bought the company in 1918 and made Felsenstein & Mainzer products until the 1930s. Felsenstein & Mainzer steins have sold at auction recently for $85.

Q: My Brownie Target Six-20 camera is in excellent condition, never used, with the original box it came in. The camera is metal and the front is black and white with vertical lines. I'd like to find out how old it is and if film still is available. And how much is the camera worth?

A: Eastman Kodak Co. made the Brownie Target Six-20 from July 1946 until May 1952. The front of your camera is known as the Art Deco face. The camera originally came with a roll of 620 film. The film was discontinued in 1995, but rolls may be available from sources for out-of-production film. You can also use a roll of 120 film rewound onto a 620 spool, which is larger than a 120 spool. It takes two 620 spools to do this and must be done in a darkroom or darkbox so that no light touches the film. You can buy spare 620 spools online. The camera originally sold for $3.50. Today it sells online for $10-$25 without a box and $15-$40 with the original box.

Q: When I was rehabbing our garage, which was built in about 1917, I found a large piece of colorful cardboard in the old insulation. It looks like it was an advertising sign or perhaps the side of a breakfast food box of some kind. There's a child's face on it with the phrase "Toddy builds health and strength." Can you help identify the ad? Does it have any value?

A: Toddy was a brand name for a "meal in a glass" sold by a Buffalo, N.Y., company named Maltop Inc. The milk-based drink, apparently meant for children, was heavily marketed in the eastern United States and Canada in the late 1920s, so your garage may not be quite as old as you think it is – or it was insulated a decade after it was built. The drink was sold in cans in grocery stores. Your cardboard piece may have been the side of a carton that once held Toddy cans. The most common Toddy-related collectible is a mixer-style drinking glass embossed with the brand name and a child's face. The glasses sell for $10 to $20 online. Your ad would sell for only a few dollars. Why not frame it and hang it in your garage or kitchen as part of your house's history?

Tip: Don't wear jewelry while in a swimming pool. Chlorine makes it dull. If you are in the ocean, the glimmer of metal may attract unwanted fish.

Sign up for our free weekly email, "Kovels Komments." Terry writes about the latest news, tips and questions and her views of the market. If you register on our website, there is no charge.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • The Mike Roy Cookbook, No. 2, Los Angeles radio host & chef, "Everyday Recipes," 147 pages, 1969. $10.
  • Coca-Cola bottle opener, 50th anniversary, 3 3/4 inches, $85.
  • Fishing hook display, folding, various sizes, Mustad & Son, Norway, 69 1/2 inches, $195.
  • Folk art spirit house, stand, red removable pediment roof, gold-painted house, baskets, circa 1910, 51 x 26 inches, $240.
  • Barometer, Admiral Fitzroy's, oak, mercury tube thermometer, atmospheric gauge, 1800s, 40 1/2 inches, $295.
  • Tiffany glass bowl, cobalt blue iridescence, lobed, scalloped rim, marked L.C.T., 3 x 8 inches, $325.
  • Satsuma vase, women in garden, embossed gold, cylindrical, 36 inches, $450.
  • Bucket bench, blue paint, arched apron, cutout slab ends, New York, 1800s, 23 x 44 inches, $815.
  • Danish silver tankard, embossed flowers, Jacob G. Fabritius, 8 1/2 inches, $960.
  • Milliner's head, papier-mache, blue eyes, black, cream paint, circa 1850, 15 inches, $1,070.

New! The Kovels.com Premium website is up and running. In addition to 900,000 free prices of antiques and collectibles, more than 11,000 with photographs, premium subscribers will find a dictionary of marks for silver and another for ceramics, with pictured marks and company histories. Premium membership also includes a subscription to the digital edition of our newsletter, "Kovels on Antiques and Collectibles," and its archives, where you'll find hundreds of articles about almost anything you might collect. Up-to-date information for the savvy collector. Go to Kovels.com and click on "Subscription" for more information.

© 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

A gladiator and a maiden surrounded by a design of columns and drapes are shown on this Burgen, Schverer & Cie vase. The 9-inch vase was offered at a 2013 James Julia auction in Fairfield, Maine.

Last Updated on Monday, 31 March 2014 12:49
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of March 3, 2014

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 03 March 2014 11:45
In the 19th century, this wooden cart was used on a farm. The goat wagon has iron-banded wooden wheels. It is 21 inches wide and 40 inches long. The cart sold for $236 at Conestoga Auction Co. in Manheim, Pa.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Energy use and cost are big problems today, but our ancestors found some simple solutions. Conestoga Auction Co. in Pennsylvania sold a goat cart in 2013 for $236. Was it a toy? A farm tool?

Animal power was important in past years. Of course, there were horse-drawn plows and wagons. But there were also dog- and sheep-powered treadmills used to help churn butter. Donkeys, mules – and, in other countries, elephants and camels – furnished power for farm work and transportation. But goat carts have been popular not only for pulling wagons of farm products, but also as entertainment for children.

From the late 19th century into the 1930s, traveling photographers took goat cart pictures. A child sat in the cart and the photographer took the cute picture and printed a photograph or a postcard. Dozens of these vintage goat cart pictures, most from Midwestern towns, can be found on the Internet. Iron and tin toys made from about 1890 to 1940 are replicas of children or men in goat carts.

This old idea may be coming back. There is now a dog-powered wheelchair for injured veterans.

Q: My dresser belonged to my mother. She gave it to me many years ago. One drawer is marked "Kroehler, world's largest furniture manufacturer, Permanized furniture." I would like to sell it, but I don't know how to go about it and how much to ask for it.

A: Peter E. Kroehler started out as a clerk at the Naperville Lounge Co. in 1893 and bought the company in 1903. He founded P.E. Kroehler Manufacturing Co. in Kankakee, Ill., in 1911. He merged the two companies with two other furniture manufacturers in 1915 to form Kroehler Manufacturing Co. The "Permanized" finish was advertised as moisture-proof. The company was sold in 1981. A new Kroehler double dresser and mirror sold for about $175 in 1957. Value today, if it's in great condition, is about $200.

Q: I have a vase that my mother owned for many years. The top edge is gilt and scalloped and the vase has two handles. The mark on the bottom is "Usona" over a standing dragon with "Goodwin" underneath it. Unfortunately, one of the handles broke off so I'm sure it isn't worth much, but I'd like to know who made it and how old it is.

A: The dragon mark was used from about 1906 to 1913 by Goodwin Pottery Co. of East Liverpool, Ohio. The company was in business from 1893 to 1913. You are right – the missing handle destroys the value.

Q: I have a battery-operated roller-skating monkey called Clancy that was one of my favorite childhood toys. It's hard plastic and is about 22 inches tall. Batteries fit into one of his shoes. His head moves from side to side and he moves forward when you put a coin in his hand or into his hat, which can be attached to his hand. What is Clancy worth today?

A: Clancy the Great, a roller-skating monkey, was made by Ideal Toy Co. in 1963. It was designed by Marvin Glass & Associates, a toy design company in Chicago. The toy came with two metal "coins." If it's in good working condition and you have the original box, the toy sells for about $100 today.

Q: My mother bought me an Elvis Presley overnight case in 1956. The copyright date of 1956 is on the bottom. The case has pictures of Elvis and his autograph on the cover and sides, blue trim and a blue handle. She paid $7 for it at W.E. Walker 5 & 10 cent store, where she worked. Can you tell me the value of it now?

A: Elvis Presley's first records were produced by Sun Studio in Memphis, Tenn., in 1954. His rock ’n’ roll-style and suggestive moves made him a popular but controversial figure back then. In 1956 he began recording for RCA and appeared in his first movie. Although he died in 1977, he remains one of the most popular recording stars of all time, with more than a billion records sold. The overnight case was made with blue or brown trim and handles. They have sold at auction for $200 to more than $400

Q: I have an 11-inch frosted glass wine bottle with a music box built into the bottle's recessed bottom. The bottle is marked "Bols" around the bottom, but the wooden bottom of the music box is marked "Bottle made in France, Musical unit made in Switzerland." When the bottle is picked up, the music box plays. There's a little pin on the bottom that winds the music box and stops the music when the bottle is set down. What is the history and value of this bottle?

A: The Lucas Bols company, based in Amsterdam, is the oldest distillery in the world. It traces its history back to 1575. But its glass music-box bottles, including examples with a dancing ballerina inside, date from the middle of the 20th century. They usually sell for $20 to $50.

Q: I inherited my grandmother's set of china. The dishes are decorated with red and yellow roses. Each one has an octagonal mark with "Semi W.M. Co. Porcelain" inside it. Can you tell me who made this china and how old it is?

A: Willets Manufacturing Co. of Trenton, N.J., made your dishes. The pottery was in business from 1879 to about 1912. It used the octagonal mark on semi-porcelain made between 1879 and 1909.

Tip: To clean an old teddy bear, cover it with cheesecloth and vacuum it on the low setting. Use a small amount of foam carpet cleaner or foam from Woolite and water. Rinse. Let it dry out of sunlight. Vacuum again. Do not soak the bear in water. The stuffing will be ruined.

Need prices for your antiques and collectibles? Find them at Kovels.com, our website for collectors. You can find more than 900,000 prices and more than 11,000 color photographs that help you determine the value of your collectibles. Study the prices. Go to the free Price Guide at Kovels.com. The website also lists publications, clubs, appraisers, auction houses, people who sell parts or repair antiques, show lists and more. Kovels.com adds to the information in this column.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Black jockey hitching post, cast metal, red and cream paint, circa 1910, 35 3/4 inches, $75.
  • Bread slicer, cast iron, wood, circa 1920, 9 x 15 inches, $80.
  • Pewter coffee urn, brass spigot, Roswell Gleason, Mass., 1822-1871, 16 3/4 inches, $120.
  • Dancing bears pull toy, tin, black, yellow paint, wheel platform, Germany, 6 inches, $355.
  • Atwater Kent radio, No. 246, table model, wood, six tubes, knobs, circa 1933, 18 inches, $360.
  • Hooked rug, diamonds, sawtooth design, red, blue, tan, 37 x 23 inches, $540.
  • Sewing box, pine, three tiers, pincushion on top, spool pegs, painted designs, salmon ground, 8 x 8 inches, $590.
  • Bohemian glass compote, roses, violets, cranberry overlay, gilt high waist, bell-shape base, circa 1910, 14 inches, $1,065.
  • Staffordshire lion figurine, standing, red brown, gilt, 11 1/2 x 12 1/2 inches, $1,600.
  • Georgian secretary, mahogany, fretwork, drop front, two glass doors, four drawers, circa 1800, 90 x 38 inches, $2,500.

New! The best book to own if you want to buy or sell or collect – and if you order now, you'll receive a copy with the author's autograph. The new Kovels' Antiques & Collectibles Price Guide, 2014, 46th edition, is your most accurate source for current prices. This large-size paperback has more than 2,500 color photographs and more than 35,000 up-to-date prices for 700-plus categories of antiques and collectibles. You'll also find hundreds of factory histories and marks, a report on the record prices of the year, plus helpful sidebars and tips about buying, selling, collecting and preserving your treasures. Available for $27.95 plus $4.95 postage. Purchase online at KovelsOnlineStore.com; by phone at 800-303-1996; at your local bookstore; or send by mail to Price Book, P.O. Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

 

© 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
In the 19th century, this wooden cart was used on a farm. The goat wagon has iron-banded wooden wheels. It is 21 inches wide and 40 inches long. The cart sold for $236 at Conestoga Auction Co. in Manheim, Pa.
Last Updated on Monday, 31 March 2014 12:49
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Feb. 24, 2014

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 24 February 2014 13:14

‘Arizona’ is the name of this unusual side table made in 1986. It sold for $23,750 at an auction of 20th-century art and antiques held at Rago Arts & Auction Center in 2012. The table is made of painted wood, granite and copper. It is marked

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Collectors and collections are getting younger. So the old 1950s favorite, Chippendale furniture, has now been replaced by 1950s Eames pieces. And 18th-century English Staffordshire ceramics are not as wanted as much as Ohio-made 20th-century Rookwood pottery. Many auction galleries are holding special auctions that feature furniture, glass, pottery, jewelry and even toys made after 1950.

A unique table made by Judy Kensley McKie (b. 1944) sold at a 2012 Rago auction for $23,750. The artist started making furniture soon after she graduated from Rhode Island School of Design in 1966. She wanted to furnish her home, so she taught herself how to make one-of-a-kind pieces. By the 1980s, she was receiving national awards for her work. Her tables were made of carved and painted wood, bronze, marble and even plastic. Many resembled animals, including horses, bears and rhinoceroses. They are imaginative, often humorous and very usable. McKie is one of many studio artists who have been working since the 1950s and whose works are now included in museum collections. Collectors should look for quality in the almost-new as well as the old when going to sales.

Q: I have a sterling-silver bracelet and earrings that were made in Denmark. Each earring is shaped like two leaves, and the bracelet is made of links of two leaves each. The back is marked "Sterling A8K Denmark." Can you tell me who made it and what it's worth?

A: The mark actually is "A&K." It was used by Aarre & Krogh of Rander, Jutland, Denmark. The company was in business from 1949 to 1990. It's known for modernist designs of stylized leaves and flowers. Your set could sell for $200 to $250.

Q: My wife's estate included a 1-liter Lalique perfume bottle that has two birds on the stopper. It is 9 inches tall and 6 inches wide and still is filled with perfume. Can you give me a value?

A: The perfume bottle was designed in 1947 by Marc Lalique for Nina Ricci's fragrance "L'Air du Temps." The clear glass bottle has fluted sides and a frosted stopper with the fragrance's iconic figural doves in flight. This 9-inch bottle is a "factice," a store display bottle. A few L'Air du Temps perfume bottles the size of yours have sold at auction for $200 to more than $500.

Q: I inherited a large neon clock from my uncle, who was a meat inspector in Los Angeles in the 1950s. It was made by the Glo-Dial Corp. and has the words "Hungarian Salami" around the dial. It has green neon lighting and is 32 inches across. The patent number is 1994950. Can you tell me the history and value of this clock?

A: The Glo-Dial Corp. was in business from the 1930s until the 1950s or later. Charles Hoffritz, who founded Glo-Dial in Los Angeles, was granted a patent for an illuminated clock dial in 1934. The dial had a black background, beveled white hands, white numerals and a neon tube concealed behind the dial. The white surfaces diffused the light, which reflected off the glass covering the dial and illuminated the numbers and hands. Advertising clocks are collectible. Your clock is worth about $400 to $500.

Q: Years ago, I bought a box of dinnerware made with rice carefully imbedded and baked into the porcelain. The rice pieces are translucent when the piece is held toward the light. The dishes are white with blue designs and blue dragons in the middle. The bottom of the dishes are marked "Made in China," and there are Chinese characters above the mark. Can you tell me something about these dishes?

A: Although this type of porcelain is sometimes called "rice" porcelain, it's not made with rice. The porcelain is pierced to make rice-shaped holes before the first firing. Later the holes are filled with glaze and the piece is refired, creating the translucent rice-like appearance. "Rice porcelain" was first made in China in the 1300s, but the technique may have originated in Persia more than 1,000 years ago. Rice porcelain also has been made in modern times. The words "Made in" on your dinnerware indicate that your dishes were made after 1915. A 20th-century rice porcelain dinner plate sells for about $10 to $15.

Q: I own an Orphan Annie child's plate with drawings of Annie in each of the three sections. It's marked on the back, "Copyright 1935 King Features Syndicate Inc., Made in Japan." I'm a little confused, though, because Annie and her dog are identified in one drawing as "Little Annie Rooney and Zero," not "Little Orphan Annie and Sandy." She has straight brown hair, not red curly hair, and her dog is white, not light brown.

A: No wonder you're confused. The comic character pictured on your plate is not Orphan Annie, the famous "star" of a Chicago Tribune comic strip that ran from 1894 to 1968. Annie Rooney was the main character in a different comic strip titled "Little Annie Rooney" and syndicated by King Features. The Annie Rooney strip, based on a song and movie character but obviously meant to compete with the Orphan Annie strip, ran from 1927 to 1966 – but it never became as well-known as Orphan Annie. Japanese manufacturers exported countless children's dishes to the United States during the 1920s and '30s. Those that feature Disney characters are probably the most valuable. Your sectional plate, called a grill plate, would sell for about $25.

Tip: Do not store scrapbooks or other paper items on unlined wooden shelves. The acid in wood is harmful to paper, textiles and many plastics. Line the shelves with acid-free paper.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Powder flask, brass, embossed running rabbit scene, 1800s, 7 inches, $35.
  • Topsy doorstop, cast-iron, black paint, 6 inches, $95.
  • Globe bank, cast iron, red paint, 5 inches, $120.
  • Fire screen, brass, three panels, flower band, circa 1900, 30 x 53 inches, $125.
  • Wagon toy, horse-drawn, driver, cast iron, painted, 14 inches, $245.
  • Silver salver, George II, round, scroll, shell-engraved rim, three-footed, English, circa 1750, 9 1/4 inches, $415.
  • Teddy bear, Steiff, jointed, hump back, white, ear button, 3 1/2 inches, $445.
  • Grueby Pottery bowl, green, carved stylized leaves, round stamp, circa 1905, 2 x 6 inches, $875.
  • Campaign chest, mahogany, walnut, five drawers, circa 1850, 44 x 42 inches, $1,534.
  • Folk art eagle, spread-wing, arrows shield talons, giltwood, painted, circa 1950, 22 x 76 inches, $2,242.

Ralph and Terry Kovel, syndicated newspaper columnists, best-selling authors, avid collectors and national authorities on antiques, hosted the HGTV series Flea Market Finds with the Kovels. Watch the Kovels' HGTV shows to become an expert on almost anything you see at a flea market. DVD sets of Seasons 1 and 2 (12 episodes each, plus a DVD of the final episodes of Seasons 1-4.) are available online at KovelsOnlineStore.com for $59.90 plus $4.95 postage; by phone at 800-303-1996; or by mail sent to Kovels, P.O. Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

‘Arizona’ is the name of this unusual side table made in 1986. It sold for $23,750 at an auction of 20th-century art and antiques held at Rago Arts & Auction Center in 2012. The table is made of painted wood, granite and copper. It is marked

Last Updated on Monday, 31 March 2014 12:49
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Feb. 17, 2014

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 17 February 2014 14:50

This 1884 badge is a valuable memento honoring President Abraham Lincoln. The picture of the president is a ferrotype (a photograph, often called a tintype, made on a thin sheet of iron) mounted in a 5/8-by-1/2-inch brass frame hung on an eagle-shaped hanger. The badge could be pinned on a suit or a dress. Heritage Auctions of Dallas sold it for $1,375 in November 2013.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Presidents' Day this year is Feb. 17. It's set by law as the third Monday of February. But it's officially called "Washington's Birthday" by the federal government. George Washington's Birthday, a national holiday, used to be celebrated on Feb. 22. Abraham Lincoln's birthday was Feb. 12 and was not a federal holiday. Washington's Birthday celebration was moved as part of 1971's Uniform Monday Holiday Act, an attempt to add more three-day weekends to the annual calendar. The holiday was not officially renamed Presidents' Day because Congress could not agree on changing the name, but the day was said to also honor Lincoln and other presidents. While some states still celebrate individual holidays honoring the birthdays of Washington and Lincoln, most states stick with Presidents' Day even though that's not the holiday's legal name. For many people, the holiday becomes a day off work and one with great sales, especially of new cars. While there are virtually no souvenirs of Presidents' Day, there are many pictures, pieces of pottery, textiles, pieces of furniture, medals, coins, signs and other advertising, sheet music, toys and much more to collect if the memory of George Washington or Abraham Lincoln is your focus.

Q: I have two birthday greeting notes mailed to my father-in-law by President Dwight Eisenhower. They shared the same birthday, Oct. 14. I have one of the franked envelopes the greeting was mailed in, too. The envelope, postmarked Oct. 17, 1967, was mailed from Gettysburg, Pa. Do the greetings have any monetary value? What bothers me is that the Eisenhower signatures on the notes are identical.

A: President Eisenhower sometimes used an autopen to sign his name before, during and after his presidency (1953-1961). If you have two signatures exactly alike, they were no doubt signed by autopen. After Ike left Washington, D.C., he retired to a farm in Gettysburg. If the note with the franked envelope had Eisenhower's real signature, it could be worth more than $400. A note signed by autopen is a nice family souvenir.

Q: We have a wooden filing cabinet that has a flat work surface with two cupboard doors below and drawers above. There are 15 small drawers over six larger drawers with brass plates for labels and a horizontal glass door on top. There is a brass plate on top that says "Yawman & Erbe Mfg. Co., Rochester, N.Y." The drawer pulls have a logo with "Y and E" on them. Can you give me an idea of the value of this piece?

A: Philip H. Yawman and Gustav Erbe started working in partnership in 1880. At first they made microscopes, but they soon began manufacturing specialty equipment for other companies. In 1898 they began making and selling office equipment under the name Yawman & Erbe Manufacturing Co. The company held several patents for filing systems and other office equipment and was one of the largest producers of office furniture and equipment in the world in the early 1900s. Your filing cabinet would sell for $500 to $800.

Q: While cleaning out a storage area in the home where my husband and his brothers were raised, we found a box of old board games dating back to the 1930s and early '40s. Most are in good shape with all of their pieces. We wonder if they have any value. The games include Monopoly, Dog Race, Touring Auto, Game of Football and Baseball, and some card games like Pit and Rook.

A: Since the games are in good condition and have all their pieces, you have to take a look at their copyright dates and editions – an early date and edition is usually more valuable than later ones. Some games are scarcer than others, too, and a game that relates to football and baseball also appeals to sports collectors. You can find books on collectible games at your library and bookstore. You also can find prices and some photos of collectible games online, including on our website, Kovels.com. And you can join the Association of Game & Puzzle Collectors, AGPC.org, which publishes a quarterly newsletter for collectors.

Q: I have an antique chandelier with lots of glass prisms. It is dusty and I am afraid to clean it. Any suggestions?

A: If you are worried about electric shock, turn off the power at the fuse box or breaker panel. A hairdryer set on low heat can sometimes be used to blow away any dust. There are some liquid sprays on the market that are made to clean glass chandeliers. Look for one at a nearby home improvement or hardware store. Follow the directions carefully. The spray drip-dries the glass, and the dirt is gone. If you are brave, you could take a picture of the chandelier, then remove all the prisms and other drops, as well as larger glass globes and parts and carefully load them into the dishwasher to be cleaned on gentle cycle. Use the picture as a guide to putting it all back together. We like to do jobs like this as part of a team because you will need help taking things apart while standing on a ladder. Good luck.

Tip: Bakelite jewelry was cast, not molded, so there are never seams or mold lines.

Take advantage of a free listing for your group to announce events or to find antique shows, national meetings and other events. Go to Kovels.com to find, publicize and plan your antiquing trips.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019

 

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Depression glass cup, Jane Ray, Fire-King, Jade-ite, $5.
  • Owens Pottery bud vase, gun metal, dimpled, long neck, squat base, 5 3/4 inches, $50.
  • Birdcage, mahogany, green paint, wire, dome top, acorn finial, square, turnip feet, feeders, c. 1820, 14 x 21 inches, $145.
  • Cane, entwined snake, carved, black paint, c. 1890, 35 inches, $150.
  • Pewter porringer, pierced handle, William Calder, 5 inches, $575.
  • Sign, Pontiac Goodwill Used Cars, feather Indian logo, round, two-sided, tin, die cut, 42 inches, $765.
  • Fan, ivory, ladies holding doves, oval cartouche, c. 1800, 10 inches, $770.
  • Alabaster lamp, domed top, removable shade, spiral finial, stepped acanthus base, electrified, 70 inches, $1,700.
  • Baroque chest, walnut, inlay, 3 drawers, pilasters, bracket feet, Italy, c. 1690, 42 x 45 inches, $1,875
  • Water sprinkler, Loetz, Phanomen genre, gold, pulled silver designs, 4 1/2 x 9 inches, $3,750.

"Kovels' A Diary: How to Settle a Collector's Estate" is our new week-by-week record of the settlement of an estate, from your first days gathering legal papers to the last days when you're dividing antiques among heirs and selling everything else – even the house. How to identify pottery, jewelry and other popular collectibles. Tips on where and how to sell furniture, jewelry, dishes, figurines, record albums, bikes and even clothes. We include lots of pictures and prices and explain the advantages of a house sale, auction, selling to a dealer or donating to a charity. Learn about how to handle the special problems of security and theft. Plus a free current supplement with useful websites, auctions lists and other current information. Available only from Kovels for $19.95 plus $4.95 postage and handling. Order by phone at 800-303-1996; online at Kovels.com; or write to Kovels, P.O. Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

This 1884 badge is a valuable memento honoring President Abraham Lincoln. The picture of the president is a ferrotype (a photograph, often called a tintype, made on a thin sheet of iron) mounted in a 5/8-by-1/2-inch brass frame hung on an eagle-shaped hanger. The badge could be pinned on a suit or a dress. Heritage Auctions of Dallas sold it for $1,375 in November 2013.

Last Updated on Monday, 31 March 2014 12:50
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Feb. 10, 2014

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 10 February 2014 14:31

This inexpensive valentine was made in the 1920s. The words and the clothing are clues to its date. It is printed on a thin piece of paper 6 1/2 by 5 inches, not a size that would fit in today's standard envelope.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – The history of valentines can be traced back to St. Valentine, who died a martyr. A feast was named for him by the Catholic Church in the year 496. Other historical or legendary sources to the holiday mention two other men named Valentine, a suggestion that the holiday descended from a Roman fertility fest, and references to the Duke of Orleans' letter in the 15th century that is considered the first valentine.

Then in the 14th century, Geoffrey Chaucer wrote the first mention of love and Valentine's Day. The oldest surviving valentine dates from 1477.

Now skip forward to the modern holiday and verifiable facts. By 1797, valentine cards were being homemade of paper, ribbons and lace. In 1874, Esther Howland (1824-1904) of Worcester, Mass., was the first American to make valentines to sell commercially. Soon valentines – some of them comic – were being mass-produced by companies in the style of the day, although handmade folk art cards remained popular. Very lacey, fancy valentines were favored by the 1880s.

"Vinegar Valentines" with insulting verses, also known as "Penny Dreadfuls," were popular by 1900. And from 1900 to 1930, postcards, pop-ups and mechanical valentines were fashionable. The 1930s to 1980s saw sets of printed cards to be cut out and given to each child in a classroom. And by 1975, there were cards that could play music. Save any clever cards you get this year and start a collection of old ones. Good examples still can be found.

Q: I inherited my grandmother's doll-size rocking chair, which has been in our family for years. It's made of a dark wood and is just 16 inches high. The back and seat are made of one continuous piece of thin wood attached to the frame with brass tacks. The back has a punched-hole design that includes the word "Pet" in capital letters and the letter "Y." The seat has a punched square with a star in a circle inside it. Can you tell me who made this chair and how old it is?

A: Your chair was made by Gardner & Co., which was founded in Clarksville, N.J., in 1863. Gardner was granted several patents for improvements to chair seats and frames. Chairs with perforated plywood seats were made in full size, child size and doll size. The "Pet" chair also was made in a nonrocking version. The company was in business until about 1888, when the factory burned down. Your chair was made between 1871 and 1888. The value of your doll-size chair is $100 to $125.

Q: Back in the early 1940s, my in-laws received two prints of hummingbirds as a wedding gift. They left the prints to us and I would like to learn more about them. The words on the back of each print are in French, but I can translate some of the words. They include the names of the pictured birds (one is a bearded hummingbird and the other has a forked tail) and the name of the publisher, Arthus-Bertrand. What can you tell us about the prints?

A: Arthus-Bertrand, which still is in business in Paris, was founded by Claude Arthus-Bertrand in 1803. Today it sells all sorts of jewelry, medals and decorations. Back in the early 1830s, however, Arthus-Bertrand published a book titled The Natural History of Hummingbirds, by Rene Primevere Lesson, a French ornithologist and naturalist. The book included engraved prints of hummingbirds. The book's prints are identified on the bottom of each page, not on the back like your prints. So it is likely your prints are later copies of the prints in the book.

Q: I have a Simmons Wonder ice-cream maker that has been in my family for years. It makes one cup of ice cream. In 1924, when my mother was 6 years old, she was run over by a Model T and was in a body cast for a few weeks. During her recovery, her grandmother made ice cream for her in this ice-cream maker. Can you tell me anything about it?

A: Edward Simmons was a hardware salesman who started his own wholesale hardware company in St. Louis in 1872. The company was incorporated as Simmons Hardware Co. in 1874. Simmons sold thousands of tools and hardware items through catalog sales and was the first to issue catalogs with color photos. Wonder was one of the lines carried by the company. Its best-known brand was Keen Kutter, a name still in use. Simmons Hardware was bought by A.F. Shapleigh Hardware Co. in 1940. The value of your ice-cream maker is about $200.

Q: I recently found my grandfather's old autograph book. He was good friends with the comedians Lou Costello and Bud Abbott. The book includes their autographs as well as those of several sports figures, including Babe Ruth, Jack Dempsey, Jimmy Braddock, Joe DiMaggio and several others. I think some of them go back to the early 1920s. What do you think these are worth?

A: The value of an autograph depends on how famous the person is and how rare the autograph is. If the celebrity or sports star rarely signed autographs, they will be harder to find today and worth more. Autographs can sell for only a few dollars or for hundreds of dollars or more. A Babe Ruth autograph sold at auction recently for more than $1,000. Autographs of famous sports stars appeal to collectors of sports memorabilia as well as to autograph collectors. If you are thinking of selling your grandfather's autograph book, you should contact auction houses that specialize in autographs or sports memorabilia to learn more about pricing.

Tip: The edges of a cut glass piece should be of even thickness, and smooth rims should be polished if the piece has not been repaired by grinding off any damaged section.

Sign up for our free weekly email, "Kovels Komments." Terry Kovel writes about the latest news, tips and questions and her views of the market. If you register on our website, Kovels.com, you receive Terry's email for free every week.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Cut glass bowl, branch and leaf, engraved, Sinclaire, American brilliant, 8 3/4 inches, $50.
  • Donald Duck riding trike, "Mickey's Delivery" cart, tin litho, friction, Linemar, 6 inches, $180.
  • Grueby vase, green matte glaze, buds, tapered, circa 1900, 4 x 3 1/2 inches, $190.
  • Scrimshaw, whale's tooth, flowering plant, 1800s, 5 inches, $265.
  • American Indian vase, Acoma, brown, white, geometrics, double strap handle, 8 inches, $265.
  • Gaudy Dutch cup plate, double rose, circa 1820, 3 1/2 inches, $295.
  • Coffee mill, Star Mill, cast iron, red paint, commercial, 32 x 19 3/4 inches, $345.
  • Sterling-silver dish, hammered, scalloped petal shape, Galt and Bro., circa 1965, 10 inches, $415.
  • Currier & Ives print, The American fireman, always ready, hand-colored, frame, 1858, medium folio, $780.
  • Arts & Crafts table, oak, paneled base, dentil border top, circa 1920, 33 x 34 inches, $1,750.

Keep up with changes in the collectibles world. Send for a free sample issue of our 12-page, color-illustrated newsletter, "Kovels on Antiques and Collectibles," filled with prices, news, information and photos, plus major articles and opinions about the world of collecting. An important tool for anyone who buys or sells antiques and collectibles. To subscribe at a bargain $27 for 12 issues, write Kovels, P.O. Box 8534, Big Sandy, TX 75755; call 800-829-9158; or subscribe online at KovelsOnlineStore.com.

© 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

This inexpensive valentine was made in the 1920s. The words and the clothing are clues to its date. It is printed on a thin piece of paper 6 1/2 by 5 inches, not a size that would fit in today's standard envelope.

Last Updated on Monday, 31 March 2014 12:50
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Feb. 3, 2014

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 03 February 2014 11:06
Cadette Borated Baby Talc was sold in this 7 3/8-inch-tall tin. The yellow and gray tin was used by Cadette Products Co. of Rutherford, N.J. It sold for $184 at a 2013 auction held by William Morford of Cazenovia, N.Y.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Hunting for treasures seems to be an inborn trait. Perhaps it's from the need of the caveman to search, find food and store some for later use. For centuries, the very rich surrounded themselves with expensive art and artifacts to impress each other and "the peasants."

Today, many people enjoy collecting a variety of things, like costume jewelry, bottles, tools, prints, pottery, 1950s furniture, advertising and sports and political items. Sometimes the best information about collections comes from the clubs and publications devoted to the subject.

One subcategory of advertising we recently noticed are talcum powder tins, since lawsuits related to talcum powder have been in the news recently. Talc is a mineral. It absorbs moisture, and in powdered form it has been used for centuries to keep skin dry. Some natural talc contains asbestos, which can be dangerous to health, so since the 1970s the talcum powder sold in stores has been processed to be asbestos-free.

Collectors like old talcum powder tins because of their clever designs made to attract buyers. Tins were decorated with images of babies, flowers, nursery-rhyme figures and clever graphics. Egyptian talcum powder made by Palmolive was in a tin that looks like an Egyptian column. Mennen's early tins feature a seated baby that we are told was actually the brand owner's child. A 1964 can of Beatles "Margo of Mayfair" talc has a drawing of the four Beatles. Look for tins by Watkins, Colgate, Johnson, Caswell-Massey and other major brands, and also brands from other countries or long-gone companies. Prices range from $10 to about $150 for most tins offered online, but the rarest and most beautiful may cost as much at $800.

Q: About 40 years ago, I bought an oak lawyer's rotary desk at auction. It was in awful condition, having been used in the office of a grain elevator for many years. I refinished it and used it as my office desk for many years. One side section of the desk swivels and the other side has a large drawer for files. Pasted inside one of the small drawers is a form for ordering accessory items from the E.H. Stafford Desk Co. of Muskegon, Mich. Any history?

A: The E.H. Stafford Co. was founded in 1890 and was reincorporated as E.H. Stafford Manufacturing Co. in 1904. The company made school, church and office furniture as well as opera chairs. It was in business until at least the 1920s. Because it's an interesting desk, it probably would sell for $500 to $700.

Q: I'm trying to find information about my old copper barrel. It's stamped "Lippincott, 8 gal." and "916 Filbert St." It also has an eagle on it and the abbreviation "Phila." Can you tell me who made the barrel and how old it might be?

A: Several members of the Lippincott family ran a business at this Filbert Street address from 1832 until about 1911. John and Charles Lippincott of Philadelphia made special copper machinery before expanding into the production of soda water, syrups and equipment for carbonating water. Charles took over the business from John, his older brother, in 1865. He made ornate soda fountains with multiple spigots for different flavors. Charles Lippincott & Co. joined with three other companies to form the American Soda Fountain Co., a trust designed to monopolize soda fountain manufacturing, in 1891. When Charles retired, his sons A.H. and F.H. Lippincott took over the business. They withdrew from the American Soda Fountain Co. in 1907 and moved to a different address in about 1911. By 1916 the company was no longer making soda fountains. Your copper bucket was made before 1911.

Q: I have about 100 different-colored airplane cards that were packaged in Wings cigarettes during World War II. They picture U.S. and Royal Air Force warplanes with identification and other information on the back. The cards are 2 by 2 1/2 inches. What are they worth?

A: Wings cigarettes were first made by Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. of Louisville, Ky., in 1929. The company sponsored a radio show called "Wings of Destiny" from 1940 to 1942, and the cards were issued as premiums in cigarette packs during those years. They are part of a series called "Modern American Airplanes." There were three sets of cards with 50 cards in each set. The company originally intended to issue just one set, but later decided to issue two more. The sets are labeled A, B or C, although not all of the first set had a letter code. Cards from the first set are harder to find than those from later sets. The cards, in good condition, sell for about $1 to $2 each today.

Q: I have a leather card case marked "Wilro Shop." Can you tell me something about the maker and possible age of the case?

A: The Wilro Shop was founded in 1902 by sisters Rose and Minnie Dolese of Chicago. They made leather and metal goods, dower and wardrobe chests, pottery and other items. Tooled purses, card cases, desk sets and illuminated leather book covers were decorated in the Arts and Crafts style popular at the time.

Tip: Don't ignore vintage transistor radios (1955-1963) if you see them at house sales or flea markets. Collector interest in all kinds of radios is growing and the supply of old radios is shrinking.

Need prices for your antiques and collectibles? Find them at Kovels.com, our website for collectors. You can find more than 900,000 prices and more than 11,000 color photos that help you determine the value of your collectibles. Study the prices. It's free at Kovels.com. Our website also lists publications, clubs, appraisers, auction houses, people who sell parts or repair antiques, antique shows and more. Kovels.com adds to the information in this column.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Sterling-silver ladle, Mechanic Sterling Co., 8 3/4 inches, $180.
  • Federal stand, cherry, maple, drawer, scrolled legs, 28 x 19 inches, $180.
  • B.O. Plenty walker toy, holding baby and gift, tin lithograph, clockwork, 9 inches, $210.
  • Redware pitcher, applied hearts, scrolls, Pennsylvania, 1800s, 5 1/4 inches, $595.
  • Madame Alexander Wendy bride doll, plastic, walker, garter, veil, white gown, box, 18 inches, $225.
  • Sampler, alphabet, urn, flowers, butterflies, strawberry border, silk, linen, Caroline Malilda, age 8, 1835, frame, 19 x 13 1/2 inches, $300.
  • Dog doorstop, seated, leash, collar, locket, stoneware, brown mottled, Albany slip glaze, circa 1890, 9 1/2 inches, $430.
  • Bohemian pottery vase, amethyst, iridescent, wavy rim, bulbous base, Rindskopf, 7 x 14 inches, $440.
  • Magnifier, tabletop, figural, nude girl, kneeling, reflecting pool, bronze, 3 1/2 x 5 3/4 inches, $525.
  • Empire-style table, mahogany, gilt metal mounts, round, tri-part base, 18 3/4 x 33 inches, $1,000.

Keep up with changes in the collectibles world. Send for a free sample issue of our 12-page, color-illustrated newsletter, "Kovels on Antiques and Collectibles," filled with prices, news, information and photos, plus major articles and opinions about the world of collecting. An important tool for anyone who buys or sells antiques and collectibles. To subscribe at a bargain $27 for 12 issues, write Kovels, P.O. Box 8534, Big Sandy, TX 75755; call 800-829-9158; or subscribe online at KovelsOnlineStore.com.

© 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Cadette Borated Baby Talc was sold in this 7 3/8-inch-tall tin. The yellow and gray tin was used by Cadette Products Co. of Rutherford, N.J. It sold for $184 at a 2013 auction held by William Morford of Cazenovia, N.Y.
Last Updated on Monday, 31 March 2014 12:50
 
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