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Kovels - Antiques & Collecting

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of May 26, 2014

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Tuesday, 27 May 2014 11:17
Did the auction bidder want this toy because it was made by an American Indian, or made from a collectible blanket, or just because it was a colorful toy? Whatever the reason, it sold for $115 at an Allard auction held last month in Mesa, Ariz.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – One-of-a-kind collectibles are interesting and often not expensive. In the 1980s, a Navaho Indian decided to make a stuffed toy from a Pendleton wool blanket. Today, a vintage Pendleton wool blanket in good condition can sell for hundreds of dollars. But 30 years ago, a worn Pendleton blanket had a lower value, so it was cut up and turned into a toy. The result was a plush toucan bird that looks like the Toucan Sam logo for Froot Loops cereal. The finished bird measures 16 by 11 inches. Allard Auctions of St. Ignatius, Mont., sold it for $115 at a March 2014 auction held in Mesa, Ariz. There were 11 bids.

Q: I have a glass quart jar that's embossed "1776" above the Liberty Bell and "1976" below it. The other side of the jar is embossed "Mason's." Is it worth anything?

A: Canning jars like yours were made by Anchor Hocking of Lancaster, Ohio, to celebrate the 1976 Bicentennial of the United States. The jars often are found today and sell for $5 to $10.

Q: My husband was a cartoonist and sometimes corresponded with Charles Schulz, famous for his Peanuts comic strip. When my husband had heart surgery, Schulz sent him two of his original Peanuts strips. Each one is about 30 inches long and 6 inches high and is signed "Schulz." My husband has since died and the strips now belong to me and our children. One strip features Charlie Brown and Snoopy, and the other Lucy and Schroeder. Please tell me what the strips are worth.

A: If the strips are indeed original works by Charles Schulz, they're valuable. Some have sold at auction for $15,000. The first thing you want to do is make sure you are storing them safely by using archival papers and boxes. Keep them away from direct light. Insure them. If the strips are not marked with a date, try to find out when they first ran. If you want to sell, contact a reputable auction house that deals in comic art.

Q: I am thinking about selling a set of Sascha Brastoff dishes. The dishes are pink and gold and include service for eight. I think the dishes date from 1949. What is the set worth?

A: Sascha Brastoff (1918-1993), born Samuel Brostofsky, was raised in Cleveland but moved to New York City when he was 17. After serving in the armed forces during World War II, he settled in Los Angeles and worked as a costume designer for 20th Century Fox before starting his own small ceramic business in 1947. His company, Sascha Brastoff Products, opened in 1952. Brastoff's earliest china and earthenware dinner services date from 1954, so your set is not as old as you think. His best-known pink-and-gold pattern is "Surf Ballet." Check the mark on the bottom of your dishes; it can help determine when they were made. Brastoff's earliest mark was his first name, hand-painted. When a new Brastoff factory opened in 1953, a stamped mark was used that includes a rooster and Brastoff's full name. After 1963, the year Brastoff retired, the circled-R registration number was added to the mark. An early complete set of Sascha Brastoff dishes could sell for several hundred dollars.

Q: My grandmother gave us a silver bowl that she got as a gift in the 1950s or '60s. It's 8 1/2 inches in diameter. The bottom is marked with the lion, anchor and old English letter "G" mark used by Gorham. The sides of the bowl are engraved with three initials and the years 1854 and 1904. We're thinking of selling it or recycling it for scrap value. Can you tell us what it's worth?

A: The dates and monogrammed initials on your bowl indicate it probably was made to mark some event, perhaps a 50th anniversary. Silver is always worth at least its meltdown value. If a piece of silver also has sentimental value, families often keep it regardless of the meltdown value. Take the bowl to a jeweler or dealer in gold and silver to find out its minimum value. The price of silver fluctuates, and the value will depend upon the current price of silver, the weight of the bowl, and whether it's solid silver or silver plate. You should get at least meltdown price from an antiques dealer or auction.

Q: I have a complete set of six Gorham silver-plated bronze figural bells. They date from the late 1970s and were sold as limited editions by the Hamilton Collection. The series is titled "Women Who Changed the Course of History." The set includes Catherine the Great, Marie de Medici, Marie Antoinette, Isabella I, Elizabeth I and Mary, Queen of Scots. Please tell me the current value of the set.

A: Your bells were part of the fad of limited edition plates, figurines and bells so popular in the 1970s. Each bell sold back then for $75, and 5,000 sets were made. Today you would be lucky to get $200 for the set.

Tip: Put a piece of plastic jewelry under hot water. When the plastic gets warm, smell it. Bakelite smells like formaldehyde, celluloid smells like camphor (mothballs), and Galalith, a 1920s plastic, smells like burnt milk. Lucite does not smell.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Radicon toy bus, antenna, bronze green, remote control, Modern Toys, Japan, box, 1950s, 16 x 9 inches, $210.
  • Donald Duck creamer, lid, ceramic, painted, arms form handle, sailor hat, long-bill spout, c. 1930, 4 inches, 230.
  • Octant, bronze frame, brass scales, triangular, wood case, c. 1865, $355.
  • Trunk, wooden, grain painted, dovetail construction, domed lid, hinged, wrought-iron lock plate, 1800s, 11 x 24 inches, $370.
  • North Dakota School of Mines vase, pottery, green glaze, wheat stalks, incised, Frieda L. Hammers, 1927, 6 x 3 inches, $530.
  • Odd Fellows staff, owl terminal, carved, c. 1830, 71 1/2 inches, $652.
  • Bronze sculpture, Cheyenne warrior charging on horseback, marble base, 22 x 24 inches, $690.
  • Staffordshire platter, America and Independence, castle in center, state banners border, blue transfer, 14 x 16 inches, $1,560.
  • World War I photo album, aviators, planes, barracks, squadrons, 120 photographs, c. 1918, $1,650.
  • Hepplewhite sideboard, mahogany, string inlay, five drawers, three doors, raised legs, c. 1790, 41 x 73 inches, $15,340.

New! Contemporary, modern and midcentury ceramics made since 1950 are among the hottest collectibles today. Our special report, "Kovels' Buyers' Guide to Modern Ceramics: Mid-Century to Contemporary," identifies important pottery by American and European makers. Includes more than 65 factories and 70 studio artists, each with a mark and dates. Works by major makers, including Claude Conover, Guido Gambone, Lucie Rie, as well as potteries like Gustavsberg, Metlox and Sascha Brastoff, are shown in color photos. Find the "sleepers" at house sales and flea markets. Special Report, 8 1/2 x 5 1/2 inches, 64 pages. Available only from Kovels for $19.95 plus $4.95 postage and handling. Order by phone at 800-303-1996; online at www.Kovels.com; or mail to Kovels, Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Did the auction bidder want this toy because it was made by an American Indian, or made from a collectible blanket, or just because it was a colorful toy? Whatever the reason, it sold for $115 at an Allard auction held last month in Mesa, Ariz.
Last Updated on Monday, 14 July 2014 08:53
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of May 19, 2014

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 19 May 2014 10:56
A lithographed poster showing two baseball players competing in an 1884 championship game in Boston sold for $15,000 at an Bonhams auction in New York City last month.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Baseball may have been first mentioned in the United States in 1791, when city officials in Pittsfield, Mass., banned playing the game near the town meeting house. Years later, a group of "experts" decided that the game was invented by Abner Doubleday – a decision that is now considered a myth.

Organized baseball started in the United States in 1857, with the formation of the National Association of Base Ball Players – 16 teams from New York – but the first professional teams were listed in 1869.

Any baseball memorabilia from the 19th century is rare. Last month a poster for a championship game in Boston between the Philadelphia Keystones and the Boston Unions in 1884 was auctioned by Bonhams in New York. The poster shows a batter and catcher in proper uniforms as they played on a site that is now Copley Square in downtown Boston. It sold for $15,000.

Q: I own a Victorian gentleman's dresser that's about 70 inches high and 42 inches wide. It has a tall dressing mirror on one side and a smaller shaving mirror on the other side. The dressing mirror pulls out about 9 inches on an extension mount and rotates about 70 degrees in either direction. "Peerless Adjustable Mirror" is stenciled on the back, where there's also a label with six 1890 patent numbers. One of the brackets is embossed "Pat'd Jan. 14, 1890." Can you give me any information about this piece?

A: A dresser like yours was pictured in an ad in an 1891 newspaper. It didn't have the shaving mirror, and was advertised as a "lady's dresser." The ad claimed that the Peerless Adjustable Mirror was the only adjustable mirror made, and it could be adjusted to 16 different positions. A Jan. 14, 1890, patent was one of several patents granted for adjustable mirror supports in 1890. It was granted to David Heald and Charles H. French for "new and useful improvements in mirror supporting and adjusting devices." The tall dresser with the unusual mirrors has very little storage space. The 21st-century buyer wants drawers. Because of its limited usefulness, your dresser is not worth more than $400.

Q: I have a Lalique "Champs Elysees" bowl shaped like two oak leaves. The leaves are frosted, and the base and connecting part are clear. The bowl is 7 1/2 inches high and 18 inches wide, and weighs 21 pounds. How much is it worth?

A: Rene Lalique (1860-1945) began making Art Nouveau glass in Paris in the 1890s. Lalique glass still is being made. Pieces made by Rene were marked with the signature "R. Lalique." Those made from 1945 until 1977 are marked "Lalique France." Newer pieces include the letter "R" in a circle. Your bowl is worth about $1,000 to $2,000. The pattern still is being made.

Q: I have a complete 65-piece set of dinnerware that includes place settings for eight and several serving pieces. The dishes have a wheat pattern in the center and a wide yellow border with gold trim. They're marked "Century Service Corporation, Alliance, Ohio" around a triangle. The words "Semi vitreous dinnerware" are written inside the triangle. Underneath the mark are the words "Autumn Gold." Many people tell me the set of dishes I have is worth money. What do you think?

A: Autumn Gold is the name of your dinnerware's pattern. The dishes were made by Homer Laughlin China Co. and distributed by Century Service Corp., one of several companies owned by Cunningham and Pickett of Alliance, Ohio. Cunningham and Pickett was founded in 1935. It distributed china, glassware, silverware and other items made by other companies. Homer Laughlin made dinnerware for Cunningham and Pickett from 1938 until 1969. You often can find dishes in your pattern for sale online. A five-piece place setting of Autumn Gold sells for about $30, a vegetable bowl for about $20.

Q: I have a teapot that reads "Made in Occupied Japan" on the bottom. Other marks on the bottom look like the letter "G" surrounded by the letters "C" and "U." I have been unable to find any information about the teapot or its marks. I would like to know who made the teapot and what it's worth.

A: The mark on your teapot stands for "UCAGCO." It was used by the United China & Glass Co., an importer located in New York and New Orleans. The company was founded by Abe Mayer in 1850 and originally was called Abe Mayer & Co. The "UCAGCO" mark was first used in the 1930s. UCAGCO was the first company allowed to import goods from Japan after the end of World War II. Items marked "Made in Occupied Japan" were made between 1947 and 1952. The company was later sold to Sammons Enterprises. Your teapot is worth $20 to $30.

Tip: Rhinestone jewelry can be gently cleaned. Use a makeup brush or a cotton swab to remove dust from any crevices. Be careful not loosen the stones. Spray some glass cleaner or denatured alcohol on a soft cloth, not on the jewelry. Rub gently. Do not rinse. Water damages the backing on rhinestones.

Take advantage of a free listing for your group to announce events or to find antique shows, national meetings and other events. Go to the Calendar at Kovels.com to find, publicize and plan your antiquing trips.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Coalbrookdale platter, flowers, gilt scrolls, rococo scalloped rim, lobed, footed, circa 1825, 8 1/2 inches, $80.
  • Royal Bayreuth toothpick holder, shell shape, footed, 3 inches, $150.
  • Baseball pennant, Brooklyn Dodgers, batter, felt, cranberry, yellow, 1940s, 22 inches, $165.
  • Bronze pen rest, tiger head, two wells, Continental, 7 x 4 1/2 inches, $290.
  • Komical Kop toy car, "Beat It," cop at wheel, tin lithograph, windup, Marx, 1920s, 7 3/4 inches, $325.
  • Tiffany Favrile glass vase, green, gold, long neck, leaf-and-vine design, 6 inches, $430.
  • Venetian glass sculpture, aquarium block, two fish, suspended seaweed, Gino Cenedese, 1960s, 6 3/4 x 9 1/4 inches, $440.
  • Elephant toy, carved teak, articulated, signed Kay Bojesen, Denmark, circa 1950, 5 x 2 inches, pair, $530.
  • Apothecary cabinet, pine, 18 drawers, black knobs, Continental, circa 1900, 20 x 52 inches, $885.
  • Currier & Ives print, "A Good Chance," two men in canoe, frame, 29 x 35 inches, $3,075.

Ralph and Terry Kovel, syndicated newspaper columnists, best-selling authors, avid collectors and national authorities on antiques, hosted the HGTV series "Flea Market Finds with the Kovels." Watch the Kovels' HGTV shows to become an expert on almost anything you see at a flea market. DVD sets of Seasons 1 and 2 (12 episodes each, plus a DVD of the final episodes of Seasons 1-4) are available online at Kovelsonlinestore.com for $59.90 plus $4.95 postage; by phone at 800-303-1996; or mail your check to Kovels, P.O. Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
A lithographed poster showing two baseball players competing in an 1884 championship game in Boston sold for $15,000 at an Bonhams auction in New York City last month.
Last Updated on Monday, 14 July 2014 08:53
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of May 12, 2014

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 12 May 2014 15:40

A faux bamboo finish was created for this late 19th-century American folding chair. Useful and decorative folding chairs in this style were made using both real or fake bamboo. This chair sold for $180 at Neal Auction Co. sale in New Orleans last year.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Expensive woods like teak or mahogany, marble, stone and other materials used to make expensive furniture are often imitated by a painted surface. Faux finishes have been used since the days of ancient Egypt. The Greeks and Romans admired murals that were examples trompe l'oiel (fool-the-eye) paintings.

Life-size objects on tables, half-open doors, stairways and furnishings included in these paintings looked real. The tradition of faux finishes experienced a resurgence in the 19th century. A major Civil War monument with an interior of pink marble walls was restored a few years ago. It was discovered during the restoration that the monument's walls were actually made of white marble painted with a faux finish that made the wall look like expensive pink marble. No doubt it was done to save money – and it was so well done it fooled the public.

Inexpensive wood used to make furniture has been painted to resemble mahogany, bamboo, teak, bird’s-eye maple or just decorative graining. Tabletops were "improved" with a faux marble finish. Talented artists also painted tops with what looked like multicolored mosaic designs.

Bamboo furniture was the rage in the early 1800s. Bamboo was hard to get in Europe and the United States, so Chinese-style furniture was made with wooden parts shaped like bamboo, then painted with trompe l'oiel graining. The wooden parts were stronger than real bamboo, so the faked parts often were an improvement.

The tradition of painted furniture has continued, and collectors pay a premium for American "grained wood" country pieces made from 1850 until about 1880. But the finish must be original and in good condition.

Q: Can you tell me if the old Franciscan earthenware pattern named Sierra Sand contains lead?

A: Franciscan china was fired at high temperatures and is safe, but you can buy a lead-testing kit at a hardware store or online and test it yourself to see if the glaze contains lead. Lead-free glazes have been required on dinnerware sold in the United States since the 1980s. But glazes may contain some lead and still be considered "lead free," according to U.S. Food and Drug Administration guidelines. If the pottery was fired at the correct temperature for the right amount of time, the lead fuses to the pottery and does not leach off. While your Franciscan dishes are safe, watch out for any pottery made in Mexico or China, handcrafted pottery, pieces that are highly decorated or have decorations painted over the glaze, and pottery with orange, red or yellow glaze.

Q: An uncle in Ireland gave us an old clock. The inscription on the face of the clock is "Lepaute, Hger Du Roi." It has Roman numerals for the hours and Arabic numerals for the minutes. Do you have any idea how old the clock is and what it might be worth?

A: The Lepautes were master clockmakers in the 18th century. Jean-Andre Lepaute (1720-1789) began making clocks in Paris in about 1740. He specialized in large clocks for public installations and invented several improvements to clocks. He was a "Horloger du Roi," a clockmaker to the king, by 1751. His brother, Jean-Baptiste (1727-1802), joined him in business in 1759 and became head after Jean-Andre retired in 1774. After Jean-Baptiste died, his nephews ran the business for several years. Some clocks by Lepaute sell for several thousand dollars. Your clock would need to be seen by an expert to determine its value. A famous 1765 mantel clock has auctioned for $111,462.

Q: My father found a metal Coca-Cola serving tray in the attic of a railroad depot being torn down in Fayette, Mo., in the early 1980s. It has been hanging in my parents' home ever since. I have tried researching it but haven't had any luck. The tray is rectangular and 24 by 34 inches. It has a green border surrounding a red inner border. In the center is a picture of a woman in a white gown wearing a tiara and holding an open black fan. Her right elbow is resting on an elaborate pedestal with flowers on it. The words on the tray are: "Delicious, Refreshing, Drink Coca-Cola, At Fountains 5 cents, In Bottles 5 cents." Can you help?

A: Your tray is a reproduction that dates from the late 1960s or '70s. The woman pictured is Lillian Nordica (1857-1914), a famous American opera singer. Coca-Cola used her image on oval serving trays in 1905. A 1975 tray similar to yours, but with a bottle of Coke on the pedestal was made to celebrate the 75th anniversary of an Atlanta bottler. That tray, with a history printed on the back, sells for about $20 today. Other trays like yours have a glass of Coke on the pedestal. Many authorized and unauthorized reproduction and "fantasy" Coca-Cola trays (a fantasy tray uses an old image but doesn't copy a vintage tray) have been made since the 1970s. They sell for $5 to $75, depending on quality, condition, rarity and whether or not the tray was authorized by the company or a bottler.

Tip: Re-glue a doll's wig with rubber cement. It's removable if you later want to change the wig.

Sign up for our free weekly email, "Kovels Komments." Terry writes about the latest news, tips and questions and her views of the market. If you register on our website, there is no charge.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Hull planter, white Siamese cat and kitten at rest, green paws base, 12 inches, $40.
  • Popeye Pez dispenser, blue base, 4 inches, $45.
  • Dog dish, Hudson's Soap ad, cast iron, white, black paint, circa 1910, 16 inches, $155.
  • Capo-de-Monte pitcher, man-on-the-mountain handle, painted cherubs, 16 inches, $210.
  • Old Salt bookends, Cape Cod fishermen, cast iron, painted, Connecticut Foundry Co., 1928, 5 1/2 inches, $210.
  • Neoclassical-style chair, beech, needlepoint upholstery, carved arms and frame, pair, $530.
  • Firehouse toy, wood, painted, faux stone exterior, two stories, two doors, 30 x 37 inches, $565.
  • Music box, Concerta, interchangeable cylinder, burled panel inlay, three cylinders, Ideal, 31 x 16 inches, $595.
  • Tiger-skull smoking set, silver mounting, applied insets, Siam, 10 x 13 inches, $1,295.
  • Keynoil Motor Oil can, metal, White Eagle Oil & Refining Co., 1 gallon, $1,300.

The Kovels have navigated flea markets for decades. Learn from the best. Kovels Flea Market Strategies: How to Shop, Buy and Bargain the 21st Century Way, by Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel, tells you about the latest smartphone apps and websites to help you shop, share and ship. It also clues you in about what to wear, what to bring and, most important, how to negotiate your way to a bargain. Also find tips on spotting fakes, advice about paying for your purchases, and shipping suggestions. Full-color booklet, 17 pages, 8 1/2 by 5 1/2 in. Available only from Kovels for $7.95 plus $4.95 postage and handling. Order by phone at 800-303-1996; online at Kovels.com; or mail to Kovels, Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

A faux bamboo finish was created for this late 19th-century American folding chair. Useful and decorative folding chairs in this style were made using both real or fake bamboo. This chair sold for $180 at Neal Auction Co. sale in New Orleans last year.

Last Updated on Monday, 14 July 2014 08:54
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of May 5, 2014

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 05 May 2014 12:34

Silver overlay on important pieces of pottery adds greatly to the value. This Rookwood vase with overlay by Gorham sold for $4,375 at a March 2014 auction held at Rago Arts and Auction Center in Lambertville, N.J.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio American art pottery artists often painted pictures on their vases, pitchers and other pieces. They painted bats, frogs, rabbits, birds and other animals in their natural form, as well as fantasy animals represented as well-dressed humanlike figures.

The marks on these ceramics often indicate the age, company and artist, as well as some other factory information about type of clay or glazes. What better way to suggest the origin, age and value of a piece today.

Robert Bruce Horsfall (1869-1948) was an artist at Cincinnati's Rookwood factory in 1893 when he decorated a Standard Glaze pitcher with pictures of the Toad of Toad Hall from The Wind in the Willows, the 1908 children's classic by Kenneth Grahame. The finished pitcher was then sent to Gorham Manufacturing Co., where it was given a silver overlay. The well-designed piece, with a complete history, sold for $4,375 at a March 2014 Rago Arts auction in Lambertville, N.J., even though it had some minor imperfections.

Q: I have a Lloyd Loom baby carriage that was bought for my dad when he was born in 1924. The inside has been re-covered, but everything else is original and is still in very good condition. It has glass porthole-type windows in the side of the hood, a wooden handle, rubber tires on the wheels and a brake. A metal tag on it reads, "Lloyd Loom Products" and "Method Patented Oct. 16, 1917." Can you tell me approximately when it was built and the current value? It's priceless to me because it was my dad's.

A: Marshall B. Lloyd (1858-1927) was an inventor and manufacturer. He opened Lloyd Manufacturing Co. in Menominee, Mich., in 1907 and began making children's wagons. In 1914 the company began making hand-woven wicker baby carriages. Then in 1917 Lloyd was granted a patent for a method of making a wicker-like material by weaving twisted brown wrapping paper around metal wires. He also invented a loom that wove the material, making the process much faster than weaving by hand. Lloyd Loom fabric is the name of the woven material. In 1919 Lloyd sold the patent for the process to a British furniture manufacturer. Your baby carriage was made between 1917, when the patent was issued, and 1924, the year your father was born. Today these carriages are not considered safe to use with a real baby, so they usually sell to doll collectors or decorators. It's worth about $300.

Q: I have a Coca-Cola serving tray that matches those I have seen online. It's from 1923 and pictures the "Flapper Girl." How can I tell if it's a reproduction or an original?

A: Coca-Cola's early lithographed tin serving trays probably are the most desirable of Coke collectibles. An original 1923 Coca-Cola serving tray is rectangular and measures 13 1/4 inches high by 10 1/2 inches wide. It's worth close to $400 if it's in near-mint condition or better. Of course, most old trays aren't near-mint, so even if yours is old, it probably won't sell for that much. Reproductions of this tray have been made since the 1970s, some even by the Coca-Cola Co. Some reproductions are round or oval, some may be marked with phrases like "Reg. U.S. Patent Office," and some may show a slightly altered image.

Q: I own a pair of barber scissors my father used to cut my hair when I was a boy back in the 1930s. Stamped on them is, "Vogel Bros., Chicago, Ill., E-Z Edge." How old are they and what are they worth?

A: The Vogel family, founders of Vogel Bros., say that the company has been making cutlery for 300 years. Within the past couple of years, Vogel's assets were sold, but family members are involved in the two companies that took over Vogel's assets: Anvil Corp. and Wolfe Industries. Your scissors probably date from the 1920s or '30s. E-Z Edge scissors sell online for $20 to $30.

Q: I have a wooden cigarette machine that once dispensed old packs of cigarettes, like Lucky Strike, for 15 cents. It doubles as a magazine rack. I know it was made sometime between 1929 and 1933. The label on it reads, "Howard Home Humidor, this humidor and its contents are the property of C.B. Howard Co., Inc.," and includes an address in New York. What is its value?

A: Your coin-operated combination cigarette dispenser and magazine rack probably was used in hotel lobbies or other places where a smoker might sit down to read a magazine and have a cigarette. Although it's called a "Home Humidor," it's unlikely someone would have a coin-operated cigarette dispenser in their home. C.B. Howard Co. made at least one other similar dispenser, a combination cigarette machine and end table. These date from about 1931. One sold a year ago for $300.

Tip: Be careful when cleaning bronze figurines, lamp bases, bowls, etc. Never use steel wool, stiff brushes or chemicals.

Need prices for your antiques and collectibles? Find them at Kovels.com, our website for collectors. You can find more than 900,000 prices and more than 11,000 color photographs that help you determine the value of your collectibles. Study the prices. Go to the free Price Guide at Kovels.com. The website also lists publications, clubs, appraisers, auction houses, people who sell parts or repair antiques, upcoming shows and more. Kovels.com adds to the information in this column.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Whiskey jug, The Greybeard, stoneware, black transfer, 8 inches, $95.
  • Paris porcelain pitcher, white-haired woman, period attire, flowers, baluster shape, leaf handle, 9 inches, $188.
  • Party dress, Emilio Pucci, silk, navy, Lord & Taylor, circa 1964, size 14, $270.
  • Paper knife, mother-of-pearl, gilt metal, tapered, Napoleon terminal, 4 1/2 inches, $63.
  • Weller Hudson vase, white flowers, light blue ground, bulbous, loop handles, Mae Timberlake, 8 x 9 inches, $480.
  • Wool-work diorama, bird on branch, fruit, yellow, green, brown, frame, circa 1850, 13 1/2 x 18 inches, $490.
  • Coffee canister, store size, tin, roll-back lid, mirror front, painted, stenciled S.A. Ilsley & Co., Brooklyn, N.Y., circa 1890, 20 inches, $750.
  • Stickley Brothers drink table, copper top, round, tapered legs, arched apron, 18 x 28 inches, $1,375.
  • Buck Co. cook stove, Junior No. 4, nickel plating, low shelf, 22 x 16 inches, $2,015.
  • Nantucket basket purse, Jose Formoso Reyes, whalebone plaque, knobs, circa 1960, 7 x 10 inches, $2,240.

"Kovels' A Diary: How to Settle a Collector's Estate." Our new week-by-week record of the settlement of an estate, from your first days gathering legal papers to the last days when you're dividing antiques among heirs and selling everything else-even the house. How to identify pottery, jewelry and other popular collectibles. Tips on where and how to sell furniture, jewelry, dishes, figurines, record albums, bikes and even clothes. We include lots of pictures and prices and explain the advantages of a house sale, auction, selling to a dealer or donating to a charity. Learn about how to handle the special problems of security and theft. Plus a free current supplement with useful websites, auctions lists and other current information. Available only from Kovels for $19.95 plus $4.95 postage and handling. Order by phone at 800-303-1996; online at Kovels.com; or write to Kovels, P.O. Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.

 



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

 Silver overlay on important pieces of pottery adds greatly to the value. This Rookwood vase with overlay by Gorham sold for $4,375 at a March 2014 auction held at Rago Arts and Auction Center in Lambertville, N.J.

Last Updated on Monday, 05 May 2014 12:54
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of April 28, 2014

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 28 April 2014 14:07
This English William IV desk cost only $984 at a New Orleans Auction Galleries sale. That's much less than a new desk of the same quality. The antique desk, made of solid mahogany in about 1830, has two shelves and 15 drawers.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Technology has changed the furniture we live with. Tables and desks had to change to accommodate modern, large and often clumsy electronics.

At first a radio or radio-phonograph combination was kept in a cabinet that resembled a piece of early William and Mary furniture. It was a boxlike two-door cabinet with long legs. The radio and phonograph were hidden behind the doors. Television sets required a rearrangement of chairs. The first sets were small and sat on a table. The screen was so tiny it required a magnifying-glass insert so more than one person could see the picture. When screens got larger, the TV set sat on the floor in a corner and chairs were arranged so the screen was easy for all to see. Soon, televisions were sold in attractive cabinets in reproduction furniture styles. Only the daring in the 1950s were buying modern furniture and leaving the television in plain view. Today's television is thin and often hangs on a wall.

Through the years, desks have changed, too. Early desks had myriad drawers, shelves and doors so they could be used like a filing cabinet. The famous and large Wooton desk was made with doors that could be locked. Computers made 18th- and 19th-century desks obsolete. Early personal computers had large boxlike monitors and separate keyboards that had to be at "writing" height. The "brains" (CPU) usually were kept on the floor nearby. Useful, but not attractive. As computers grew smaller, screens grew flatter. Now a laptop or tablet can be kept on any shelf or table and blend in with any furniture style.

Although prices for early desks have fallen, they still sell to those who like a period look. Exotic woods, marquetry, brass or gold trim, and carvings make an antique desk an attractive addition to a room, but not a great spot for a computer. Today average wooden desks from the past two centuries are a bargain, often selling for $300 to $1,000, much less than many new modern desks. And an antique desk is always in good taste.

Q: Back in the late 1980s, I bought an oak roll-top desk from someone who had owned it for years. On one side of the desk there's a bronze plaque that reads "Oak Creek by Riverside." Please tell me about the desk and if it has any value.

A: Riverside Furniture Corp., based in Fort Smith, Ark., was founded in 1946 and is still in business. So your desk, in Riverside's Oak Creek line, is not an antique. But Oak Creek is not among the furniture lines the company still is manufacturing. Reproduction roll-top desks of solid oak, like yours, sell for $250 to $650, depending on style and condition.

Q: I inherited a silver hand mirror that belonged to my grandmother. The back of the mirror and handle are decorated with repousse (raised) flowers and leaves. It's marked "Sterling 4000" and "R. Wallace & Sons." What is it worth?

A: R. Wallace & Sons was in business from 1871 until 1956, when it became Wallace Silversmiths. The company made silver plate and sterling silver. It became R. Wallace & Sons Manufacturing Co. in 1871. It made silver pieces for several other companies and didn't mark them with the Wallace name until 1897. Hand mirrors with silver backs and handles were very popular around the turn of the 20th century. Your sterling-silver mirror is worth $250 to $350.

Q: What is pearlash? I have a cookbook from the 1840s and many of the cake and cookie recipes call for pearlash.

A: Pearlash (purlash) was a lye-based chemical used in baking from about 1789 to 1840. A cook added pearlash and an acid like citrus to dough so that when it started to cook it released carbon dioxide, which made bubbles in the dough. This made the dough rise and the cakes light. It was replaced in our century by baking powder.

Q: I have an unopened 18-ounce beer bottle shaped like a baseball bat. The glass looks like it's wood-grained and the "handle" is painted to look like it's taped. It has the "A. Coors" signature and is labeled "Coors Light" and "The silver bullet." What would six of these be worth?

A: Baseball bat bottles were a big hit when they were introduced by Coors in 1996. The limited-edition bottles of Coors and Coors Light were first sold on March 1 at a Colorado Rockies exhibition game held at the team's spring-training facility at Hi Corbett Field in Tucson, Ariz. The bottles sold out quickly in the Tucson area because would-be collectors thought distribution would be limited to their area. But Coors introduced a "Signature Series" of baseball bat-shaped bottles in 1997. Each bottle featured an autograph of Ernie Banks, Reggie Jackson or Willie Mays, major league players who had hit more than 500 home runs. The sale of these limited-edition bottles helped support the Coors Light USA Softball World Series, but the bottles were prohibited in some states. State laws also govern the sale of beer, and you can't sell full bottles without a license. Empty baseball bat bottles sell for a dollar or two.

Tip: The old cord on a vintage phone adds value. Green cords are best. Other old styles are twisted cords, brown cords, and patterned cords called rattlesnakes.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Silver-plated gravy ladle, Daffodil pattern, Rogers, 1950, 6 1/4 inches, $40.
  • Hummel figurine, "Puppy Love," boy playing violin, puppy, stylized bee mark, 1960s, 5 inches, $45.
  • Oscar de la Renta suit, brown tweed, double-breasted, women's size 14, $85.
  • Pressed glass castor set, Daisy & Button pattern, cruet, mustard, shaker, clear, amber, circa 1890, 8 inches, $125.
  • Milk glass mug, man, flower, enamel design, Stiegel type, circa 1850, 6 inches, $180.
  • Carved wood figure, night watchman, Black Forest, Germany, 1900s, 21 inches, $280.
  • Windsor chaise lounge, mixed woods, continuous arms, turned legs, 19th century, 36 x 54 inches, $295.
  • Toy train box car, A.T. & S.F., pressed steel, orange, Smith Miller, 33 inches, pair, $425.
  • Scrimshaw cane, whale-bone clenched-fist handle, 31 1/2 inches, $770.
  • Shirley Temple movie poster, Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, 20th Century Fox, 1938, 27 x 41 inches, $810.

Keep up with changes in the collectibles world. Send for a free sample issue of our 12-page, color-illustrated newsletter, "Kovels on Antiques and Collectibles," filled with prices, news, information and photos, plus major articles and opinions about the world of collecting. An important tool for anyone who buys or sells antiques and collectibles. To subscribe at a bargain $27 for 12 issues, write Kovels, P.O. Box 8534, Big Sandy, TX 75755; call 800-829-9158; or subscribe online at KovelsOnlineStore.com.

© 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
This English William IV desk cost only $984 at a New Orleans Auction Galleries sale. That's much less than a new desk of the same quality. The antique desk, made of solid mahogany in about 1830, has two shelves and 15 drawers.
Last Updated on Monday, 28 April 2014 14:27
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of April 21, 2014

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 21 April 2014 10:16
These small vegetable figures fit into a 13-inch-high papier-mache cabbage-shape box. It's a child's skittles set that sold for $4,425 at a 2013 Bertoia toy auction in Vineland, N.J.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Antique games of all sorts interest collectors. Sometimes the rules of a game or the history of its design and graphics is unknown. Several 2013 auctions offered containers shaped like chickens, frogs or even vegetables that held nine related small figural pins. They are 19th-century children's skittles sets.

The game of skittles has been popular in England, Wales, Scotland and Germany for centuries, and was mentioned in writings as early as the 1300s. It is a lot like American bowling. It was played on a field, often near a pub. A ball, rounded stick or heavy disk was thrown at the nine pins. The object was to knock down all of the pins.

Amusing game sets with papier-mache figural pins and a rubber ball were popular in the 1920s and '30s. The sets with animals and vegetables were made for children, possibly by the companies that made papier-mâché candy containers. They were small enough to use on the nursery floor or a tabletop. Full children's sets are hard to find because the unusual pins often were used for other games and were eventually lost. Auction prices today for figural skittles sets in good condition range from about $1,500 to $18,000.

Q: Please tell me the value of a mahogany Killinger tilt-top tea table. It's part of an estate inherited by my husband. I believe the Chippendale-style table dates from the 1930s or '40s. It's marked with the letters CW; between the letters is a sort of arrow topped by the number 4.

A: Your table was made by the Kittinger (not Killinger) Furniture Co. of Buffalo, N.Y. The mark was used on official reproductions made for the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation from 1937 to 1990. Kittinger is said to have reproduced more than 300 pieces of American antique furniture for the foundation. Most were made of mahogany and copy Chippendale, Queen Anne and Hepplewhite American antiques. Kittinger, which still is in business in Buffalo, traces its history back to 1866. A Colonial Williamsburg reproduction made by Kittinger is a high-quality piece of furniture. Your table, if in excellent shape, could be worth more than $1,000.

Q: About 40 years ago, my uncle gave me an interesting light bulb with a crucifix inside it. The cross and the bulb both light up. Can you tell me when this was made and if it's worth anything?

A: Light bulbs with glowing figural objects inside were first made in the 1930s. They were made with different figures or words inside. Philip Kayatt invented them in 1933. He applied for a patent for a "glow lamp," a tubular light bulb with a silhouette inside. In 1941 Kayatt was granted a patent for a glow lamp that could display figural objects. The bulbs contained neon or argon gas. The metal figure inside the bulb was coated with phosphors that made it glow. The drawing accompanying the patent shows a crucifix inside the tubular bulb. Kayatt was president of Aerolux Kayatt Glow Lights, which later became the Aerolux Light Corp. The company made glow light bulbs from the 1930s until the 1970s, when it was bought by Duro-Lite. Other companies made similar bulbs. The value of glow bulbs can go from $15 to $65.

Q: I read your column about vintage talcum powder tins and the probability that old powder may be contaminated with traces of asbestos. I am 74 and still have some full talcum powder tins I was given as a little girl. The powder still smells good, but how can I tell if it contains asbestos?

A: Don't worry about testing the powder. It's not worth the expense and bother. But to be safe, don't open the tins or use the powder. Inhaling it is the problem. Just enjoy displaying the old tins. Any cosmetic powder sold by U.S. retailers after the mid 1970s is safe to use.

Q: I have a cream-colored Orphan Annie mug with green trim marked "manufactured exclusively for the Wander Co., Chicago, makers of Ovaltine." It has a picture of Orphan Annie on the front holding up a mug and saying, "Did ja ever taste anything so good as Ovaltine? And it's good for yuh too." Her dog, Sandy, is pictured on the back with the words, "Sandy's running for his Ovaltine." How much is the mug worth?

A: The comic strip Little Orphan Annie was created by Harold Gray in 1924. The Little Orphan Annie radio series debuted in 1931. It was sponsored by Ovaltine from 1931 to 1940. Your mug is one of the premiums offered to listeners. Its value today is about $15.

Q: I collect Victorian pressed glass. One odd piece I have had for years is a squat Amberette saltshaker with amber staining. Please tell me more about the pattern's history and also what the shaker is worth.

A: Your saltshaker is the smaller of two shaker styles in the pattern, which is also known as Klondike. The pattern was introduced in 1898 by Dalzell, Gilmore & Leighton Co. of Findlay, Ohio. Dalzall was in business from 1888 to 1902, but was sold to National Glass Co. in 1900. The pattern was made in clear glass, frosted glass, and frosted glass with amber staining. Collectors have also spotted a squatty shaker like yours in emerald glass. A pair of amber-stained squatty shakers would sell for about $350, but a single shaker is worth less than half that because most collectors want a pair.

Tip: Hold glass lampshades carefully when you remove a light bulb from an old lamp. The Tiffany lily-shaped shade and others like it are held in place by the screwed-in bulb.

Take advantage of a free listing for your group to announce events or to find antique shows, national meetings and other events. Go to the Calendar at Kovels.com to find, publicize and plan your antiquing trips.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Rabbit-in-egg candy container, papier-mache, glass eyes, 1920s, 7 3/4 inches, $75.
  • Sasha Gotz doll, blond, painted eyes, sailing suit, red tam, box, 1960s, $140.
  • Moser glass decanter, soldier profile in oval reserve, green ground, gilt scroll overlay, long neck, bulbous base, stopper, 9 x 4 inches, $195.
  • Baseball pennant, New York Yankees, sliding player, blue, white, felt, 1940s, 11 x 28 inches, $200.
  • Danish silver bowl, stepped foot, Georg Jensen, 4 x 8 inches, $450.
  • Copper Lobster Okimono, moveable, Japan, circa 1900, 3 1/2 inches, $710.
  • Pie crimper, wrought iron, pierced 1838 penny wheel, 7 inches, $770.
  • Coal scuttle, mahogany, tole white dog, England, circa 1890, 18 x 12 inches, $1,475.
  • Currier & Ives print, American Fireman: Prompt to the Rescue, frame, 1858, medium folio, $1,080.
  • Bench, oak, paneled, lift top, carved arms, England, circa 1780, 48 inches, $2,830.

"Kovels' A Diary: How to Settle a Collector's Estate" is our new week-by-week record of the settlement of an estate, from your first days gathering legal papers to the last days when you're dividing antiques among heirs and selling everything else - even the house. How to identify pottery, jewelry and other popular collectibles. Tips on where and how to sell furniture, jewelry, dishes, figurines, record albums, bikes and even clothes. We include lots of pictures and prices and explain the advantages of a house sale, auction, selling to a dealer or donating to a charity. Learn about how to handle the special problems of security and theft. Plus a free current supplement with useful websites, auction lists and other current information. Available only from Kovels for $19.95 plus $4.95 postage and handling. Order by phone at 800-303-1996; online at Kovels.com; or write to Kovels, P.O. Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.

 




ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
These small vegetable figures fit into a 13-inch-high papier-mache cabbage-shape box. It's a child's skittles set that sold for $4,425 at a 2013 Bertoia toy auction in Vineland, N.J.
Last Updated on Monday, 21 April 2014 10:38
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of April 14, 2014

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 14 April 2014 10:44
The 'Hootch-Owl' is a combination corkscrew-bottle opener-nutcracker that's 6 inches long. It sold for $1,725 at a February Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates auction in Mount Crawford, Va.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio - Wine spoils quickly if exposed to the air. It was not until the 18th century that glassblowers were able to make bottles with narrow necks that made airtight storage possible. The best seal for the bottle was a cork, and when the English began to bottle wine in the 1700s they also invented a corkscrew to open the bottle.

At first, corks were removed with an existing tool used to clean muskets. But soon other types of openers were invented. Early corkscrews were usually T-shaped devices that pulled the cork. It is said that the first patented corkscrews were made in England in 1795, France in 1828 and the United States in 1860. There are many types of corkscrews. The single-lever corkscrew and the double-winged-lever corkscrew, patented in 1930, both screwed into the cork. Raising and lowering the lever removed the cork. Hundreds of other clever designs can be found, so collecting is a challenge. By the 1970s, collectors could find books and clubs for corkscrew enthusiasts.

A corkscrew collector is called a "helixophile." Prices have been going up during the past 20 years as the supply of old, unusual corkscrews gets smaller and interest grows in wine and its necessary accessories.

A figural brass corkscrew named "Hootch-Owl," patented in 1936, sold for $1,725 in February 2014 at a Jeffrey S. Evans auction.

Q: I have a Roy Rogers and Dale Evans Double R Bar Ranch metal lunch box that pictures Roy on Trigger, Dale Evans waving her hat in greeting, and their dog, Bullet, running alongside. The back and sides look like wood grain and there is a "brand" on the back. Can you tell me when it was made and what it's worth?

A: Your lunch box was made by the American Thermos Co. in 1953. A nearly identical box with blue or red sides and a wood grain back was made in 1954. It came with a matching thermos. It was the first completely lithographed steel lunch box made. The lunch box with thermos sells for $75 to $100 today; the lunch box alone for $50 to $80.

Q: I am stumped by a piece of wooden furniture I inherited. It looks like a three-drawer dresser, but the dresser's top and the hinged front of the top drawer lift up to reveal a trouser press next to a small storage bin. And the bottom drawer front opens on hinges, too. The only mark I can find is "Pat. No. 112843." It's impressed on both the press and the back of the dresser. The press can be unscrewed from the dresser. Can you tell me who made it, how old it is and what it's worth?

A: The patent number refers to a British patent, not an American one. The patent application was filed in England in 1917 by Frank Henry Miles, a "cabinet manufacturer, Crown Cabinet Works, Redcross Street, Bristol." The patent was granted on Jan. 31, 1918. It relates to Miles's invention of a "trouser press & cabinet combined." The patent application states that the press could be "adapted to any piece of furniture as desired or if required made as a separate press." It is likely that your combination trouser press-dresser dates from the late 1910s or early 1920s. The storage bin was meant to be used for "small wearing apparel" (such as collars, etc.). As a piece of furniture, your press-dresser might sell for $200 to $300.

Q: I found two Bevo metal trays in my great uncle's attic. They have a red border with the words "Bevo the beverage" at the top, "The All-Year-Round Soft Drink" at the bottom, and a center lithograph of a carriage pulled by six horses. A man in a suit is driving the carriage and a fox dressed in a suit is sitting backward at the rear of the carriage. I have never heard of this beverage. Do you know anything about it? Are these trays worth anything?

A: Bevo was a "near beer," a nonalcoholic malt drink, made by Anheuser-Busch from 1916 to 1929. It was popular during Prohibition. Reynard the Fox, the footman on the carriage, is an Anheuser-Busch mascot. The mischievous character first appeared in European folk stories 800 years ago. Because few people remember Bevo, there are not many collectors who would want buy the trays. The graphics are interesting, though, so each tray could sell for $75 to $100.

Q: I have a plate that has a stamp on the reverse that reads "J.K.W. Decor, Carlsbad, Bavaria" in an ornate circle of gold. There is a crown above the initials. The plate is 12 inches wide and has a gold rim circling a wide turquoise band with gold decorations. The picture in the center looks like a mirror image of the Jean-Francois Millet painting, The Angelus, showing a farm couple praying over their vegetables. Does this plate have any value?

A: The mark on your plate was used by the Josef Kuba Werkstatte, a porcelain factory founded in Karlsbad, Bavaria (now Karlovy Vary, Czech Republic), in 1930. The factory was occupied by German soldiers during World War II. After the war ended in 1945, the factory moved to Wiesau, Bavaria, Germany. After Kuba died, his son took over the business. The company closed in 1989. Many of Josef Kuba's plates feature transfer decorations based on famous paintings. The plates were made as inexpensive decorations and sell today for less than $20 each.

Tip: Never dip a piece of rhinestone jewelry in water. It will cause damage.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

Sign up for our free weekly email, "Kovels Komments." Terry writes about the latest news, tips and questions and her views of the market. If you register on our website, there is no charge

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Tea Leaf ironstone butter pat, round, Alfred Meakin, 3 1/8 inches, 8 pieces, $15.
  • Majolica umbrella stand, Art Nouveau, grapes, brown ground, 23 inches, $120.
  • Mobilgas toy tanker, tin lithograph, red, white, friction, Japan, box, 8 inches, $140.
  • Jacquard coverlet, blue, green, red, flowers, by William Ney, Meyerstown, Lebanon County, Pa., 83 x 83 inches, $210.
  • Weller Pottery vase, Sicardo pattern, green iridescent, tapered cylinder, paper label, 5 1/2 x 3 1/4 inches, $275.
  • Tiffany blotter ends, Bookmark pattern, stamped "Tiffany Studios, New York," 12 x 2 inches, $300.
  • Hattie McDaniel photograph, wedding, inscribed to Sister Etta, May 1941, $625.
  • Sterling silver platter, oval, monogram, Reed & Barton, 1942, 18 x 13 inches, $815.
  • Hooked rug, horse, flowers, tan and gray ground, circa 1850, 37 x 39 inches, $960.
  • Lap desk, sea captain's, rosewood, brass inlay, leather writing insert, folding surface, stand, England, c. 1810, 25 x 20 inches, $2,090.

The Kovels have navigated flea markets for decades. Learn from the best. "Kovels Flea Market Strategies: How to Shop, Buy and Bargain the 21st Century Way," by Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel, tells you about the latest smartphone apps and websites to help you shop, share and ship as well as what to wear, what to bring, and, most important, how to negotiate your way to a bargain. Also find tips on spotting fakes, advice about paying for your purchases, and shipping suggestions. Full-color booklet, 17 pages, 8 1/2 by 5 1/2 in. Available only from Kovels for $7.95 plus $4.95 postage and handling. Order by phone at 800-303-1996; online at Kovels.com; or mail to Kovels, Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
The 'Hootch-Owl' is a combination corkscrew-bottle opener-nutcracker that's 6 inches long. It sold for $1,725 at a February Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates auction in Mount Crawford, Va.
Last Updated on Monday, 21 April 2014 10:23
 
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