ADVERTISEMENTS
Banner
Banner

Get Free ACN Daily Headlines

LiveAuctioneers

Search Auction Central News

ADVERTISEMENTS
Banner
Banner
Bookmark and Share
Kovels - Antiques & Collecting

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Dec. 29, 2014

PDF Print E-mail
Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 29 December 2014 11:46
This elaborate mahogany tall case clock with nine tubes and two different chimes dates from about 1890. It auctioned recently for $13,743 at Neal Auction Co. in New Orleans.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – The sound of chimes ringing 12 times at midnight blends with the "10, 9, 8 ..." chant that ushers in the new year on Jan. 1. Today we may watch the year change on a television screen, but in years past the celebration was timed by a chiming grandfather clock. Even earlier, New Year's were timed by a clock in the church steeple or the city hall tower. Before that, time was judged by daylight and darkness, and summer and winter climates.

Today the cell phone is always handy to let you know exactly what time it is. The grandfather clock was originally known as a tall case, longcase or floor clock. The 6- to 8-foot-tall clock has a weight-driven pendulum. It was invented in 1670 or so. In the early 20th century, it was the most accurate timepiece available. There are two types: the expensive eight-day clock that has to be wound once a week, and the less-expensive 30-hour clock that has to be wound once a day.

An unusually large 1880 carved mahogany clock, 107 inches high and made by J.J. Elliott of London, sold in September at Neal Auction Co. in New Orleans. The clock has elaborate carving, fretwork, rosewood panels with inlay, chimes, and a brass-and-silvered dial. It brought $13,743. To tell the accurate time for New Year's Eve, it must be placed in a room with a high ceiling – over 9 feet – and leveled.

Q: My four-piece bedroom suite includes a headboard, dresser, chest of drawers and nightstand. Each piece is marked with a triangle, a large letter "K" and "Korn Industries, Incorporated, Sumter Cabinet Company." It's solid oak and in excellent condition. What price could I ask for this set?

A: Sumter Cabinet Co. was a division of Korn Industries. Chester Korn started a timber company and sawmill in Cincinnati in 1889 to make buggy parts and other wood products. The company moved to Sumter, S.C., in 1921. Bedroom furniture was first made in the 1930s and dining room furniture in 1989. The company was sold in 2000 to Chromecraft Revington, which continued to use the Sumter brand name until late 2006. The price of used bedroom furniture depends on style, quality, condition and age. It probably can only be sold locally, because shipping is expensive. It should be priced as a bargain, about half the cost of a new set.

Q: How much is a bottle of Dom Perignon vintage champagne worth? I have a 1995 bottle, 750 ml, in its original box.

A: An unopened bottle of Dom Perignon vintage 1995 in its box is worth about $175 to $200. Empty, the bottle could sell for about $12 and the box for less than $10. Remember that in some states, you need a special license to sell bottled alcohol.

Q: Every time I used to visit my aunt, she asked me to polish her fancy silver tea-and-coffee service. When she died, she left the set to me. It includes a teapot, coffeepot, creamer, sugar bowl and waste bowl. Each piece is elaborately decorated, and each lid is topped by a pheasant finial. My aunt said she bought the set, which she thought was sterling, from an antiques dealer. The hallmark on the bottom is a circle surrounding the words "Meriden B Company." Also inside the circle is an image of a balance scale between two stars. Who is the maker, and what is the set worth?

A: Meriden Britannia Co. was organized in 1852 in Meriden, Connecticut, by brothers Horace (1824-1890) and Dennis (1828-1886) Wilcox and several other partners. Although its first products were made of Britannia metal (pewter), the company was making silver-plated hollowware by 1855. Your silver-plated (not sterling) set probably dates from the 1860s or '70s. In excellent condition, it could sell for over $1,000.

Q: I have a plastic clown bank in its original box. It must be at least 25 years old. The clown is 11 1/2 inches tall and is wearing a red-and-white polka-dot cloth shirt, yellow pants and orange shoes and hat. When you put a coin in his right hand and lift his left arm, the coin falls into his mouth. The box reads, "The more coins he eats, the bigger his belly gets." It's marked "J.S.N.Y." How much is it worth?

A: The initials stand for "Jeffrey Snyder New York," a company that made and imported giftware, housewares and toys. It was founded in New York in 1975, but its products were made in several Asian countries. It was part of Etna Products Co., a New York firm founded in 1945. The clown bank shows up online for about $15 without the box and for $30 with the original box.

Q: I have two souvenir paper needle books in fairly decent shape with all the needles still inside. One is from the 1939 New York World's Fair and pictures the Trylon and Perisphere. The other needle book reads "Ambassador of Good Will" on one side and pictures flags from several countries. It says "Lone Eagle" on the other side and pictures a plane flying over the globe, a ship and a train. Are they worth anything?

A: "The Lone Eagle" was a nickname for Charles Lindbergh, who flew a goodwill tour of Latin America in 1927 and 1928. Vintage needle books usually sell for $5 to $10. Needle cases that are Lindbergh souvenirs or mementos from a World's Fair are collectible. Each one might sell for about $15.

Tip: Clocks should be cleaned and lubricated every five years.

Take advantage of a free listing for your group to announce events or to find antique shows, national meetings and other events. Go to the Calendar at Kovels.com to find, publicize and plan your antiquing trips.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Soda bottle, stoneware, cobalt-blue spout, shouldered, stamped "J.E. Ferris," c. 1870, 10 inches, $85.
  • Betty Boop doll, wood, string-jointed, painted red dress and shoes, 1930s, 4 1/2 inches, $110.
  • Cupboard, step-back, two glass doors, two panel doors, two drawers, yellow paint, c. 1900, 48 x 82 inches, $205.
  • Dopey, walker, tin lithograph, clockwork, Walt Disney Enterprises, Louis Marx, 8 inches, $235.
  • Meissen porcelain plate, turquoise ground, center courting scene, gilt rim, 7 1/4 inch pair, $240.
  • Aviation medal, "Feriam Sidera" (Strike the Stars), bronze, Art Nouveau nude attaching wings to her ankles, storks taking flight on reverse, engraved by Paul-Marcel Dammann, 1920, 3 1/2 inches, $545.
  • Alabaster bust, girl wearing bonnet, mourning dead bird in her basket, Italy, 16 1/2 inches, $625.
  • Blackamoor, turban, striped rolled-up pants, papier-mache, 68 inches, $1,000.
  • Silver-plated epergne, Georgian, six arms, crystal bowls, armorial engraving, England, c. 1900, 26 x 24 inches, $1,375.
  • Art glass vase, black silhouettes, dancing nudes in forest, turquoise, oval, c. 1950, 22 inches, $1,500.

Ralph and Terry Kovel, syndicated newspaper columnists, best-selling authors, avid collectors and national authorities on antiques, hosted the HGTV series “Flea Market Finds With the Kovels." Enjoy the shows all over again, and explore some of the most exciting flea markets in the United States. In each episode, Ralph and Terry share their secrets about when and where to shop, what to look for at shops and flea markets, and how to make a good buy. The DVDs of Season 3 include three DVDs, 12 episodes in total. Available online at KovelsOnlineStore.com for $29.95, plus $4.95 postage; by phone at 800-303-1996; or mail a check to Kovels, P.O. Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
This elaborate mahogany tall case clock with nine tubes and two different chimes dates from about 1890. It auctioned recently for $13,743 at Neal Auction Co. in New Orleans.
Last Updated on Monday, 29 December 2014 12:07
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Dec. 22, 2014

PDF Print E-mail
Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 22 December 2014 13:15

This Santa is a bit thinner than usual so he can fit in his vintage tin car. It's a windup toy made in Japan before 1940. The toy sold for $37,760 – more than three times its presale estimate – at a 2013 Bertoia auction in Vineland, N.J.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Santa Claus traditionally arrives in his sleigh, but children born in the past 100 years or so have wondered why Santa doesn't use faster, newer ways to make his Christmas Eve journey. Writers and toymakers have modernized the Christmas story in several ways – with a train to the North Pole, an airplane, an early car, modern cars and even Santa in a rocket or spaceship. Of course, some still wonder how he can go around the world in one night while stopping to deliver gifts. One rare toy made in prewar Japan has Santa in an open car that's decorated with pictures of toys, children and a Christmas tree. Santa is seated with his bag of toys. The car has a clockwork drive wound with a key. It can zoom across the floor. The 7-inch-long toy sold for $37,760 at a 2013 Bertoia auction.

Q: Our family has complete collections of both Bing & Grondahl and Royal Copenhagen Christmas plates. We understand only a limited number of these plates have much value, but we would like to know the value of the collection as a whole. Is it greater than the sum of its parts?

A: Bing & Grondahl, a Danish porcelain factory, began making annual Christmas plates in 1895. The company became part of Royal Copenhagen in 1987. Royal Copenhagen, another Danish porcelain factory, had introduced its own series of Christmas plates in 1908. Many of the old plates can be found on the resale market. The first Bing & Grondahl Christmas plate, "Behind the Frozen Window, 1895," sold at auction for $2,320 in 2012. The first Royal Copenhagen Christmas plate, "Madonna & Child, 1908," sold for $2,722 in 2011. But most Christmas plates sell for about $20. Only the very earliest plates and those made during World War II are rare and sell for more. We have never seen a complete set of either company's plates offered for sale.

Q: I have a Bols Ballerina liquor bottle with a figural windup ballerina inside. When it's wound up, it plays music and the ballerina spins and moves her legs. A label on the bottom says "Le Bleu Danube" and "Bottle and Unit Made in France." The liquor has evaporated a little, but the ballerina works perfectly. The label says "Sale Distributors for the USA, Brown Forman Import Company, New York 16, New York." Does this bottle have any value?

A: Bols Ballerina bottles were made between 1957 and 1978. They came filled with different kinds of liquor made by Lucas Bols, a Dutch distillery. Two versions were made, with the ballerina wearing either a red skirt or a white skirt. The Bols family opened a distillery in Amsterdam in 1575, making Lucas Bols the world's oldest distillery brand. There have been several changes in ownership, but the company is still in business. Brown-Forman offered the Bols Ballerina bottle as a Christmas item in 1959. It was produced in limited quantities at that time but proved so popular that thousands more were made. Collectors like unique bottles. A full bottle in its original box sells for the highest price. Your partly full bottle without the box is worth about $50.

Q: We inherited a bird's-eye maple bedroom set that has been in the family for years. It consists of a bed, dresser, dressing table, rocking chair and straight-back chair. There is a sticker on the back of the dresser that reads, "The Upham Mfg. Co., Marshfield, Wisconsin, Manufacturers of Chamber Suits [sic] and Side Boards." The drawers to the dresser have little locks and we have the keys. Can you tell us anything about this furniture?

A: William H. Upham and his brother, C.M. Upham, built a sawmill in Marshfield in 1879. In 1881 they opened a furniture factory and veneer mill. Upham Manufacturing Co. was incorporated in 1883. By 1890 the company included a flour mill, grain elevator, general store, railway, waterworks and electric light plant. The 1904 Furniture Journal said the company sold "cheap, medium and high grade chamber suits, odd dressers, chiffoniers, sideboards and buffets." Upham Manufacturing was in business until 1927. Your furniture was probably made in the late 1890s or early 1900s.

Q: Are my old Budweiser Christmas steins worth anything?

A: Budweiser has issued an annual Christmas beer stein every year since 1980. The ceramic steins are made in Brazil. Today only the oldest, sold in 1980 and 1981, sell for more than $100. We have seen a 1980 stein listed for $130.

Tip: Coffee and tea stains can be removed from the inside of silver or porcelain pots or cups with warm water and a denture-cleaning tablet. Use a five-minute tablet in two cups of water, let it stand for 10 minutes, rinse and dry. If some loose residue remains, clean it with a wet brush.

Need prices for your antiques and collectibles? Find them at Kovels.com, our website for collectors. You can find more than 900,000 prices and more than 11,000 color photographs that help you determine the value of your collectibles. Study the prices. Go to the free Price Guide at Kovels.com. The website also lists publications, clubs, appraisers, auction houses, people who sell parts or repair antiques, show lists and more. Kovels.com adds to the information in this column.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Depression glass salt and pepper, Doric, pink, $25.
  • Fireplace surround, cast iron, wreath, leaves, S. Thompson, c. 1880, 35 inches, $315.
  • Popeye bag-puncher figure, pipe in mouth, tin, windup, Chein, 7 inches, $480.
  • Keno goose game, mahogany balls, turned wood, supports, c. 1880, 22 1/2 inches, $540.
  • Enterprise coffee mill, No. 750, cast iron, countertop, 1 wheel, red, blue, gold, 21 inches, $560.
  • Santa Claus nodder, composition head, fur beard, wood body, Germany, 11 1/2 inches, $590.
  • Decoy, trumpeter swan, sleeping, carved, white, black paint, Chesapeake Bay, 32 inches, $1,140.
  • Chanel necklace, bronze, 12 plaques, 4 mounted stones, rhinestone surround, marked, box, 1997, 24 inches, $2,390.
  • Bookcase, L. & J.G. Stickley, oak, gallery top, paned glass doors, shelves, c. 1910, 55 x 49 inches, $3,200.
  • Cane, oak, turned, carved names of 55 men executed at Auburn Prison, 1890-1916, A. Lamb, 31 inches, $7,340.
Keep up with changes in the collectibles world. Send for a free sample issue of our 12-page, color-illustrated newsletter, "Kovels on Antiques and Collectibles," filled with prices, news, information and photos, plus major articles and opinions about the world of collecting. An important tool for anyone who buys or sells antiques and collectibles. To subscribe at a bargain $27 for 12 issues, write Kovels, P.O. Box 8534, Big Sandy, TX 75755; call 800-829-9158; or subscribe online at KovelsOnlineStore.com.

© 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

This Santa is a bit thinner than usual so he can fit in his vintage tin car. It's a windup toy made in Japan before 1940. The toy sold for $37,760 – more than three times its presale estimate – at a 2013 Bertoia auction in Vineland, N.J. 

Last Updated on Monday, 22 December 2014 13:27
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Dec. 15, 2014

PDF Print E-mail
Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 15 December 2014 14:06
It seems odd that cherubs drinking wine, not beer, are carved on the outside of this ivory beer stein. It has a hinged lid and a handle. It sold for $5,760 at Fox Auctions of Vallejo, Calif., even though there are extra problems involved in selling old ivory.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Tradition claims that it was the bubonic plague in the 14th century that inspired the creation of beer steins. Many people had noticed that there were more deaths in filthy places in town than in clean sections, and that there were clouds of insects along with the illness in Central Europe. By the early 1500s, laws had been passed that all food and beverages served in public must be covered to keep insects away. The common drinking glass was a mug, so a hinged lid with a thumb-lift was added – and the stein was created. Since beer was already a common beverage and its taste was improved when lids helped prevent spoilage, beer consumption increased and so did the manufacture of steins. They were made of pewter, wood, stoneware and, for the very wealthy, ivory. Painted or carved decorations were added. A 1-liter stein made of carved ivory with scenes of cherubs drinking wine sold at a Fox stein auction in September 2014 for $5,760.

Q: I bought a Chinese lacquered cabinet from a friend who inherited it from her parents. Her father, a merchant seaman, bought the cabinet in Hong Kong years ago. It's 35 inches tall and 41 inches wide. The top opens up like a chest, and both the inside of the top and the outside of the cabinet are painted and inset with jade. Is the chest valuable?

A: Your chest probably would sell for a good price. Chinese antiques are "hot" these days – sought by collectors here and in China. Lacquered cabinets are especially desirable and can sell for prices into the thousands, as long as they're high quality and in great condition.

Q: I would like to know the value of a silver medicine spoon that belonged to my grandmother when she was a nurse at the turn of the 20th century. The handle curves back and turns under. There is a red cross on the back of the handle stamped, "Red Cross Medicine Spoon JB & SM Knowles, Prov., RI, USA." The gold-washed bowl ends in a pouring spout and is marked on the back "Pat. 1901, Sterling 925/1000." What's it worth?

A: Your medicine spoon, patented in 1901, was sold by druggists. The bent handle allows the spoon to rest level on a table so a teaspoon of medicine can be poured into it. J.B. & S.M. Knowles of Providence, R.I., was in business from 1875 until 1905. Your spoon is worth about $150.

Q: I have some Hess toy trucks from the 1960s and '70s. I think Hess Corp. releases a new toy nearly every holiday season. Are mine worth much?

A: The first Hess toy truck, sold in 1964, was a tanker-trailer that would sell today for about $120. Others from the 1960s and early '70s are even pricier. The 1970-'71 fire engine can sell for close to $500 if you have the original box, and the 1966 tanker ship with its box lists for well over $1,000.

Q: I have a Jim Beam decanter that's shaped like a baseball. It's 10 inches high, has a batter at the top and reads, "Professional Baseball's 100th Anniversary, 1869-1969." It has never been opened. What is it worth?

A: Jim Beam whiskey dates back to the late 1700s. The company started selling Kentucky Straight Bourbon in special containers in 1953. The bottles were made by Regal China Co. of Chicago, which made several series of collectible ceramic bottles. Your bottle is from the Sports Series. Jim Beam ceramic bottles are not as popular as they were years ago and are not easy to sell. Your bottle, full or empty, in excellent condition might sell for $80. In poor condition, it's worth $15 to $30.

Q: My father, born in 1889, worked as an electrician for the Sterling Bronze Co. of New York City. In 1916 he was working at a house in upstate New York, switching out a Sterling Bronze Co. six-light Colonial-style chandelier for a French Provincial model. He bought the Colonial model and left it to me in 1960. What do you think the chandelier would sell for today?

A: Sterling Bronze Co. was in business during the early decades of the 20th century. It made high-quality electric light fixtures, including chandeliers and sconces. We have seen pairs of Sterling Bronze Co. sconces auction recently for more than $2,000. Chandeliers may not sell for as much, though, because it's hard to find new light bulbs that work in antique fixtures. If you have bulbs for it that work and look attractive, ask a nearby appraiser to look at your chandelier in person to estimate its value.

Q: I would like to know if my picture titled Ulysses and the Sirens is of any value. It's 7 by 10 inches and is signed by Thomas Moran.

A: Thomas Moran (1837-1926) was born in England but moved to Philadelphia with his family when he was a child. He worked as an illustrator in Philadelphia before moving to New York City, where he became a magazine illustrator and landscape painter. His original landscape oil painting of Ulysses and the Sirens was completed in 1900 and is 28 by 40 inches. It sold at a 1999 Christie's auction for $178,500. Your small print of the painting would probably sell for under $20.

Tip: If two tumblers get stuck when stacked, try putting cold water into the inside glass, then put both into hot water up to the lower rim.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

 

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Cracker Jack box, Jack saluting, Bingo the dog, red, white, blue, 1920s, 6 x 2 inches, $25.
  • Hermes scarf, Luna Park, jacquard silk, pleated, multicolor, black ground, Joachim Metz, 35 x 35 inches, $265.
  • Texas longhorns, leather strap, 7 feet, 6 inches, $330.
  • Empire-style headboard, mahogany, gilt, arched crest, downturned swan's heads, 62 x 65 inches, $375.
  • Tiffany silver cake stand, engraved strapwork, shell border, molded shell rim, footed, 10 1/2 inches, $720.
  • Document box, domed, red, green, yellow flowers, leaves, berries, painted, tin, Connecticut, c. 1820, 10 inches, $720.
  • Doll furniture, Sheraton bench, tiger maple, shaped crest, plank seat, scrolled arms, 17 x 27 inches, $780.
  • Candy container, boy with snowball, bisque, googly eyes, cotton clothing, Germany, 5 1/2 inches, $830.
  • Stoneware pitcher, cobalt blue fruit and vines, oval, rim, base incised, Rockingham County, Va., c. 1866, 1 gallon, $980.
  • Irish Belleek mask, bulldog head, collar, brown, tan, black mark, c. 1885, 8 inches, $2,000.

"Kovels' Buyers' Guide to Modern Ceramics: Mid-Century to Contemporary" is our special report on contemporary, modern and midcentury ceramics made since 1950-hot collectibles today. The report identifies important pottery by American and European makers and includes more than 65 factories and 70 studio artists, each with a mark and dates. Works by major makers including Claude Conover, Guido Gambone, Lucie Rie, as well as potteries like Gustavsberg, Metlox and Sascha Brastoff, are shown in color photos. Find the "sleepers" at house sales and flea markets. Special Report, 8 1/2 x 5 1/2 inches, 64 pp. Available only from Kovels for $19.95, plus $4.95 postage and handling. Order by phone at 800-303-1996; online at Kovels.com ; or mail to Kovels, Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
It seems odd that cherubs drinking wine, not beer, are carved on the outside of this ivory beer stein. It has a hinged lid and a handle. It sold for $5,760 at Fox Auctions of Vallejo, Calif., even though there are extra problems involved in selling old ivory.
Last Updated on Monday, 15 December 2014 14:26
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Dec. 8, 2014

PDF Print E-mail
Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 08 December 2014 14:31
Postmodernist furniture is readily available to adventurous buyers who have modern houses that are simple enough to feature unusual pieces. This table, designed by Michael Graves in the 1980s, sold in October 2014 for $3,840 at Rago Arts & Auction Center of Lambertville, N.J.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio - "Postmodernist" is one of the newest styles in the United States. Walt Disney World's Swan Hotel, with a 47-foot swan on each side of the roof, and its Dolphin Hotel with two 56-foot dolphins on the roof, are examples.

Michael Graves, the architect of these buildings, also designed kitchenware, furniture, jewelry and hospital furnishings in his unusual style. His teapot with the whistling bird is so well-known that he made a less-expensive copy with a whistling whistle.

Graves designed his first furniture in the 1970s, and by 1982 he was winning awards for his designs. His modernist furniture was made in geometric shapes with features added in colors that included blue, orange and brown. One 1980s table was made of maple, painted plastic, painted wood, brass and glass. It is unmarked, like many of his designs. In spite of signs of wear and a few chips, the table sold for $3,840 at a Rago auction in October.

Q: I have a teapot and two matching cups and saucers. The mark on the bottom is crossed swords with an "S" below. Can you identify the maker?

A: Samson & Co. of Paris, used a crossed swords mark with the letter "S" below the swords from about 1873 until about 1905. The use of crossed swords as a mark was started in about 1725 by the Royal Porcelain Manufactory of Meissen, Germany. It has been used by many other companies since then. Samson & Co. was in business in Paris from about 1873 to 1969. The company made copies of Meissen and other china, often used as replacements for older pieces.

Q: I would like to know if there's any value to Gone With the Wind playing cards. There is a picture of Clark Gable as Rhett Butler on one deck and a picture of Vivien Leigh as Scarlett O'Hara on the other deck. The cards don't look like they have ever been used and are in a tin with a picture of the couple kissing on the front. The bottom of the tin is stamped "The Heirloom Tradition, No. 144109." There are three dates on the back, 1939, 1967 and 1989. Is there any value to these cards?

A: Your decks of cards were issued in 1989 to mark the 50th anniversary of the movie, Gone With the Wind. The movie, first released in 1939, was re-released in 1967. The only way to guarantee that the cards have never been used is if they are still sealed in plastic wrap. This set of two decks of cards in its tin often sells online for $4 to $10.

Q: I have a plate marked on the back "La Seynie, Limoges, P&P, France." There is another stamp, "Pat March 3rd 1909," and also the name "Dubarry." The plate has gold scalloped edges and pictures palms with a lake. How old is it?

A: The Paroutaud Freres company used the initials "P & P" (for brothers Pierre and Paul Paroutaud) and its location, "LaSeynie [the factory], Limoges [the city], France" as a mark from about 1903 to 1917. The patent date is the date the design was patented. Dubarry is either the pattern name or the decorator's name.

Q: I have a Hilda doll marked "JDK 1914." The doll has several other marks, one in German, and numbers on the back of her neck. Can you tell me about the doll and how I might go about selling it?

A: "JDK" stands for J.D. Kestner Co., a well-known German dollmaker that operated in Waltershausen, Germany, from 1805 until 1938. The company started making dolls in 1820. During the 19th century, Kestner made high-quality papier-mache doll heads and bodies, leather doll bodies, molded-hair china-head dolls with china limbs, celluloid dolls, kewpies and Bye-Lo babies. In the early 1880s, Kestner began to make dolls with bisque heads on jointed composition bodies. This is the type of doll that made Kestner famous, particularly since the company was the only German dollmaker that made both heads and bodies. The Hilda character doll was introduced in 1914. With peach-tinted cheeks, real hair eyelashes, a pug nose and an open mouth with two tiny upper teeth, Hilda dolls are wanted by doll collectors. They have sold for $900 to over $5,000, depending on the doll's size, details and condition. The numbers on your doll's neck are mold and size-code numbers, which will help further identify your Hilda. Old dolls in great condition sell quickly at auctions that specialize in dolls, such as Theriault's of Annapolis, Md.; McMasters Harris-Appletree Auctions of Newark, Ohio; and Frasher's Doll Auction of Oak Grove, Mo.

Q: I have a Firestone rubber-tire ashtray from the 1939 New York World's Fair. The tire is a Firestone Champion. A glass ashtray fits inside the rubber tire. The glass is etched with the Trylon and Perisphere and reads, "New York World's Fair." Does the ashtray have any value to a collector?

A: There are plenty of collectors of World's Fair memorabilia, and some specialize in a particular fair. Ashtrays like yours also are wanted by people who collect things related to cars and advertising. Firestone tire ashtrays like yours sell for about $25 to $30 today.

Tip: Keep dolls away from direct sunlight to avoid fading their hair and clothes.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Blue Ridge bread and butter plate, Cattails, 6 3/8 inches, $10.
  • Indian Oil sign, oil can, Indian chief, tin lithograph, multicolor, 5 x 2 inches, $160.
  • Bank, Goodyear Zeppelin, Akron hanger, duralumin, Ferrosteel, embossed, c. 1930, 7 x 3 x 2 inches, $200.
  • Sterling-silver ink blotter, rocker, engraved, blue, enameled pink rose garlands, 2 x 5 inches, $230.
  • Coverlet, Lover's Chain, overshot, olive green, red, white geometrics, Virginia, c. 1875, 68 x 94 inches, $345.
  • Paul Revere Pottery bowl, green matte glaze, incised interior flower band, S.E.G., 1 1/2 x 5 inches, $375.
  • Louis XV-style settee, fruitwood, carved, flower crest, painted, upholstery, 53 inches, $625.
  • American Brilliant cut glass punch bowl, four flashed hobstars, vessicas, notched prism bands, Fry, 7 1/2 x 14 inches, $1,265.
  • Lalique vase, Aras, macaws, berries, thorns, frosted glass, green patina, clear, squat, round, c. 1935, 9 inches, $3,125.
  • Tabriz rug, pendant medallion, spandrels, gray, red, blue, taupe, palmette border, Iran, 12 feet 8 inches x 9 ft. 10 inches, $4,375.

"Kovels' Antiques & Collectibles Price Guide, 2015," 47th edition, is your most accurate source for current prices. It's available now and includes a special bonus section that helps you determine prices if you're downsizing and selling your antiques. It's the best book to own if you buy, sell or collect - and if you order now, you'll receive a copy with the author's autograph. This large-size paperback has more than 2,500 color photographs and over 32,000 up-to-date prices for over 700 categories of antiques and collectibles. You'll also find hundreds of factory histories and marks, a report on the record prices of the year and helpful sidebars and tips about buying, selling, collecting, and preserving your treasures. Available for $27.95 plus $4.95 postage. Purchase online at KovelsOnlineStore.com ; by phone at 800-303-1996; at your local bookstore; or write to Price Book, P.O. Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Postmodernist furniture is readily available to adventurous buyers who have modern houses that are simple enough to feature unusual pieces. This table, designed by Michael Graves in the 1980s, sold in October 2014 for $3,840 at Rago Arts & Auction Center of Lambertville, N.J.
Last Updated on Monday, 08 December 2014 14:47
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Dec. 1, 2014

PDF Print E-mail
Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 01 December 2014 15:55
Antique cigar store Indians continue to be popular. This 19th-century figure of an Indian maiden, 68 inches high, sold for $42,550 at Cottone Auctions in March 2014.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Is an old barber pole or carved cigar store Indian worth as much as an oil painting of the same age? Some collectors today think so. One bidder paid $42,550 for a well-documented Indian maiden cigar store figure at a 2014 antiques auction.

The hand-carved figure was pictured in the 1970s book Treasury of American Design, which discusses a 1935 WPA project. Jobs were scarce during the Depression and the project gave jobs to artists who created watercolors of important American folk art. These original pictures can be viewed at the National Gallery of Art. You can see them online at www.nga.gov (search for "Index of American Design").

The wooden Indian was the accepted sign in front of a tobacco shop by the 1840s, but it was almost gone by 1900, replaced by flat signs with store names. The term "cigar store Indian" today includes all the wooden or metal figures used as store signs in the past. Most of them did represent American Indians and were dressed in traditional feathers and robes. Many held tobacco leaves.

The record price for a Santa Claus figure, set at Sotheby's in January 2014, is $875,000. The Santa Claus figure was made in 1926 by Samuel A. Robb, who also carved American Indians.

Even if a figure is a clown, dandy, Turk, soldier, young girl, Chinese man, Scotsman, Santa Claus or anyone else, all are referred to as "cigar store Indians."

Q: I was given a platter with a painted turkey in the center and a pink and green flower border. The platter is round, 2 inches high and 15 1/2 inches in diameter. It's marked with a green backstamp that reads "The Cowell & Hubbard Co., Cleveland, O" inside a shield-shaped cartouche. Can you tell me more about my platter and what it's worth?

A: Your turkey platter was sold by Cowell & Hubbard, but it wasn't made by that company. The Cowell & Hubbard Co. was founded in Cleveland in 1861 and was once Cleveland's oldest and most prestigious jewelry store. It sold a variety of luxury goods – jewelry, fine silver, china dishes, cut glass, clocks, lamps and engraved stationery. Cowell & Hubbard contracted with some of the best American and European ceramics manufacturers, such as Lenox in the United States; Haviland and Ahrenfeldt in Limoges, France; Cauldon, Minton, Wedgwood and Royal Worcester in England; and Rosenthal of Germany to buy dinnerware and decorative items that were sold exclusively by the store. Factories often printed the names or marks of retailers as part of a backstamp with and without the maker's own mark. It's not clear who made your platter, but it was probably made in the 1930s and is worth about $75 to $100, thanks to the turkey and every family's need for a Thanksgiving platter.

Q: We have a copy of the Nov. 23, 1936, issue of Life magazine. That's Vol. 1, No. 1. There is a picture of the Fort Peck Dam in Montana on the cover. It measures 8 1/2 by 6 1/2 inches and is in excellent condition. Is this a real original or a souvenir copy? It doesn't say "copy" on it anywhere. What would it be worth to a collector?

A: You have a replica of the first issue of Life magazine. It's an exact but smaller replica of the full-size issue. The Fort Peck Dam was built on the Missouri River as part of Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal projects. The cover photo was taken by Margaret Bourke-White. Life was published weekly until 1972. It was revived as a weekly newspaper supplement from 2004 to 2007. Full-size first editions of Life can sell for over $100, but online sellers offer the smaller replica for $10 to $15.

Q: I own a pine double-bed headboard and double dresser with mirror. A label in a drawer says "Hand Burnished Pine by Shockey." Could you give me a value?

A: Your two-piece bedroom set was made by Franklin Shockey Co. of Lexington, N.C. The furniture company opened in 1941 and appears to have operated into the early 1960s. Shockey made a line of mid-century modern pine furniture that collectors hunt for today. If your set is in the mid-century modern style and in good condition, you might get as much as $1,000.

Q: My husband and I knew the sculptor Edward Marshall Boehm and his wife when he was studying porcelain manufacturing in the 1950s. His earliest figurines were dogs and farm animals, made before he began creating the beautiful birds for which he became famous. I have a black and white Boehm cocker spaniel. What is it worth?

A: Edward Marshall Boehm (1913-1969) was a veterinarian's assistant from 1945 until 1949. He made most of his dog figures between 1949 and the late 1950s. He opened a porcelain studio in his home in Trenton, N.J., in 1950 and began experimenting with different glazes. His wife, Helen, promoted the business and marketed the figurines. Boehm made cocker spaniels in several colors and in two sizes. An early version, with the dog's head turned slightly to the right, was made between 1951 and 1957. Two hundred black and white cocker spaniels were made. Value of your figurine: $200 to $300.

Tip: Be careful when you're eating at your Thanksgiving dining-room table. The hardest stains to remove from a tablecloth – or a blouse – are gravy and Merlot wine.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Royal Bayreuth string-holder, rooster, wall mount, 6 1/4 x 3 1/4 inches, $90.
  • Wooden panel, carved, lacquered, reticulated, pheasants, sparrows, red, maroon, gilt, Chinese, 20 x 6 3/4 inches, pair $190.
  • Silver calling-card case, repousse, engraved, Philadelphia scenes, Leonard & Wilson, 3 1/2 inches, $240.
  • Fire screen, Art Nouveau, copper, cast iron, hammered edge, embossed leaves, c. 1910, 32 inches, $245.
  • Charm, Model T, 10K yellow gold, 20th century, 1 1/4 inches, $270.
  • Hans Wegner chair, Wishbone, oak, continuous arm, wishbone splat, woven seat, 1949, 29 inches, set of 4, $740.
  • Sign, Dr. Pepper "Good for Life," bottle image, tin lithograph, die-cut, 2-sided, 11 x 23 x 2 inches, $1,440.
  • Toy football player, running, holding ball, wearing helmet, celluloid, windup, marked Japan, c. 1935, 8 inches, $1,920.
  • Copeland plate, hunting scene, white border, painted, L. Edwards, retailed by Soane & Smith, c. 1930, 10 inches, 12 pieces, $4,065.
  • Uncle Remus mechanical bank, chicken coop, hen, policeman, painted, cast iron, c. 1895, 5 3/4 inches, $18,000.

Keep up with changes in the collectibles world. Send for a FREE sample issue of our 12-page, color-illustrated newsletter, "Kovels on Antiques and Collectibles," filled with prices, news, information and photos, plus major articles and opinions about the world of collecting. An important tool for anyone who buys or sells antiques and collectibles. To subscribe at a bargain $27 for 12 issues, write Kovels, P.O. Box 8534, Big Sandy, TX 75755; call 800-829-9158; or subscribe online at KovelsOnlineStore.com .

© 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Antique cigar store Indians continue to be popular. This 19th-century figure of an Indian maiden, 68 inches high, sold for $42,550 at Cottone Auctions in March 2014.
Last Updated on Monday, 01 December 2014 16:10
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Nov. 24, 2014

PDF Print E-mail
Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 24 November 2014 11:59
This unusual chair is in the Egyptian Revival style. The carved wooden chair-back of a jackal-headed man-bird and the geometric trim are borrowed from ancient Egyptian art. It sold for $777 at Neal Auction Co. in New Orleans. BEACHWOOD, Ohio – A chair decorated with Egyptian hieroglyphics, stylized birds and sphinx heads can probably be dated from its Egyptian Revival style. But furniture designs have been through several Egyptian revivals. One started in about 1800, after Napoleon battled in Egypt. Another lasted from the 1830s to the 1850s following great archeological finds in Egypt. A third short revival, from 1895 to the early 1900s, combined Egyptian Revival with elaborate Victorian styles.

Egyptian-style furniture seen most often today dates from the 1920s-30s, after the discovery of King Tutankhamun's tomb. Art Deco designs joined Egyptian-inspired animals and symbols to create a totally new look. Although Egyptian Revival jewelry from that period has been going up in price, the furniture has lost favor and is selling at bargain prices. An early 1900s chair with bone inlay and a very Egyptian-looking carved wooden back shaped like an Anubi (the Egyptian jackal-headed man who was god of the dead) sold at Neal Auction Co. in New Orleans for $777. Perhaps the symbolism of the Egyptian god was not wanted by many 2014 bidders.

Q: My grandmother, who was born in China, came to this country in 1953 and brought a stuffed bird-of-paradise with her. I have it stored in my cedar chest, and it is still in very good condition. Can I sell it in the United States or is this now illegal?

A: Most birds-of-paradise are found in New Guinea, although a few live on nearby islands and in eastern Australia. In 1522 members of Magellan's crew who sailed around the world brought back five bird-of-paradise "trade-skins." They were a gift for Emperor Charles V, who ruled the Holy Roman Empire, from the Sultan of Bacan. The birds' plumes were popular with European royalty, and by 1904 hats sporting feathers or entire birds were fashionable in the United States. Stuffed birds under glass domes were even displayed in homes of the wealthy. There are 39 species of birds-of-paradise. Some are endangered and it's illegal to hunt or export them, but local people are allowed to catch the birds for their plumes, which evidently are used in tribal ceremonies. You should contact the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service to see if it's legal to sell your stuffed example.

Q: I have three Disney drinking glasses decorated with different scenes from "Cinderella" and a few lines of text from the story. The pictures are red line drawings with a few areas filled in with pale blue or yellow. I think I got the glasses in the 1950s. Are they of any value?

A: Walt Disney's animated musical feature film"Cinderella" was distributed by RKO Radio Pictures in 1950. It was a popular movie and many Cinderella items have been made. Your glasses are part of a series that included at least eight different scenes. They sell today for $12 to $20 each.

Q: My aunt gave me a Will Rogers and Wiley Post lamp. The bronze base has a globe with relief busts of Rogers and Post above laurel leaves on the front and their names at the base. There is a two-seater plane landing on the top of the globe. The lamp has a vintage glass shade. Who were these men? How old is the lamp?

A: Will Rogers was a humorist who performed in vaudeville, on the radio and in films, and also wrote a syndicated daily newspaper column. Wiley Post was the first person to make a successful solo flight around the world. He asked Rogers to ride along on a flight while he surveyed air routes from the United States to Russia. They were killed when their plane crashed on takeoff near Point Barrow, Alaska, in August 1935. Your lamp was made to commemorate the pair shortly after their deaths. Condition is important. Prices range from $250 to $500.

Q: I have three Beneagles figural bottles – a Loch Ness monster, a gray badger and a clown-headed chicken. How much are they worth?

A: Beswick, an English pottery, made flasks for Beneagles Scotch Whisky. Twenty different animal shapes were made between 1965 and 1987. Your clown-headed chicken is called the "Haggis Bird." The flasks vary in size and price. Most sell today for $10 to $30.

Q: We own an old violin with this label inside: "Heinrich Th. Heberlein Jr., Markneukirchen 1898, Imitation: Joseph Guarnerius." The back and sides are beautiful tiger maple and the instrument is in fine condition. The violin belonged to a woman who was once a member of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. Can you tell us something about the violin's history and value?

A: Heinrich Thomas Heberlein Jr. (1843-1910) ran a violin-making workshop in Markneukirchen, Saxony, Germany – an area known since the 1600s for producing high-quality musical instruments. Heberlein styled many of his instruments after those of earlier makers. Yours is a copy of a violin by Joseph Guarnerius (1698-1744), a respected Italian violin maker also known as Giuseppe Guarneri. Women first joined the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra in 1942, so the woman who played your violin used it in 1942 or later. Heberlein violins are well-respected instruments, but an expert musician would have to play yours to help determine its value. We have seen Heberlein violins sell for hundreds of dollars into the low thousands.

Tip: Do not dry clean vintage textiles.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Worcester tea bowl and saucer, Milkmaids pattern, black and white, c. 1760, 4 1/2 inches, $94.
  • Weller vase, Dickens Ware, Bleak House, man holding child's hand, rusty glaze, 15 3/4 x 7 inches, $375.
  • Typewriter, Blickensderfer No. 5, roller ink, wood case, c. 1893, 13 inches, $510.
  • Pie safe, wood, two shelves, painted green, wire mesh sides, 1900s, 16 1/2 x 28 inches, $525.
  • Tramp art mirror, American flags, Red Cross merit medallion, c. 1960, 26 x 21 inches, $660.
  • Tole tea canister, chinoiserie, woman, yellow ground, cylindrical, England, 1700s, 18 inches, $690.
  • Weather vane, running horse, copper, zinc mounts, 16 x 38 inches, $1,875.
  • Pedal car, racer, Indy 5, Pennzoil, belt driven, radio-controlled, 1970s, 43 inches, $2,280.
  • Confederate flag, 11 stars, c. 1861, 12 1/2 x 16 1/2 inches, $7,380.
  • Stoneware crock, spotted stag, field, fence, cobalt blue, lug handles, J. & E. Norton, 1855, 15 inches, $11,400.

New! Kovels' Antiques & Collectibles Price Guide, 2015, 47th edition, is your most accurate source for current prices. It's available now and includes a special bonus section that helps you determine prices if you're downsizing and selling your collectibles and antiques. If you order directly from the Kovels, you'll receive our FREE Companion eBook with ALL of the book's 35,000 prices-ready for downloading to your eReader. "Kovels" is the best book to own if you buy, sell or collect. The large-size paperback has more than 2,500 color photographs and includes 700 categories of antiques and collectibles. You'll also find hundreds of factory histories and marks, a report on record prices, and helpful sidebars and tips about buying, selling, collecting and preserving your treasures. Available for $27.95 plus $4.95 postage. Purchase directly from the Kovels if you want the eBook Companion. Visit KovelsOnlineStore.com , call 800-303-1996, or write to Price Book, P.O. Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
This unusual chair is in the Egyptian Revival style. The carved wooden chair-back of a jackal-headed man-bird and the geometric trim are borrowed from ancient Egyptian art. It sold for $777 at Neal Auction Co. in New Orleans.
Last Updated on Monday, 24 November 2014 12:10
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Nov. 17, 2014

PDF Print E-mail
Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 17 November 2014 13:28

Look at the bottom of a vase to identify it. This vase has marks indicating it is a piece of Rookwood pottery made in 1883 by a talented decorator. It auctioned for $5,290 at Humler & Nolan of Cincinnati. Unmarked it would have sold for much less.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Rookwood pottery, made in Cincinnati since 1880, is perhaps the most popular American art pottery among collectors. The company not only made artist-decorated vases, molded bookends, art-deco figurines and commercial wares, but it also used marks that tell a collector exactly what it is. Until 1886 the mark was the year in numerals and the name Rookwood. In 1886 a new mark was chosen – a backward capital letter "R" leaning against a capital letter "P." A flame was added to a circle around the top of the mark each year until 1900. After that, a Roman numeral for the last two digits of the year was put under the mark. So 1904 was a flame mark with IV at the bottom. The company went out of business in 1967, but was later bought and sold several times.

In 2011 the business was bought by Martin and Marilyn Wade, Cincinnati real estate developers. Today Rookwood uses a new mark – the flame mark with the year in Roman numerals. So 2014 would be marked MMXIV. Other letter marks represent the color and type of clay, numbers 1 to 7301 tell the shape, and initials tell the name of the artist. All of these codes can be found in books or websites about Rookwood. It helps to know this history, but a collector should judge a piece of Rookwood by the quality of the glaze and the skill of the decorator, and then add extra value for condition, size, age, the fame of the decorator, and how much you like the piece.

Humler & Nolan, an auction gallery in Cincinnati, sold a 14-inch-high vase with early Limoges-style decoration that was probably made by the founder of the pottery, Maria Longworth Nichols. It's marked "Rookwood 1883." Although it was chipped and restored, the quality of the decoration, large size and artist attribution attracted a bid of $5,290.

Q: My old porcelain figurine is a bathing beauty posed on her tummy under a turtle's shell. The woman's backside is exposed. My aunt gave me the figure years ago and I think she owned it since the 1920s. What can you tell me about it?

A: Your bathing beauty figurine, sometimes called a "naughty novelty," is a form familiar to collectors. Posed porcelain figures of partially clad women on or under turtle's shells have been around since the early 1900s. Figures made in Germany before World War I are well made and sell today for $100 to $400. Similar novelties made in Japan before or after World War II sell for less.

Q: I have a Polyphon music box from Germany that plays music from perforated metal discs. There are nine discs with song titles from the 1880s and '90s. I'm downsizing and would like to sell it. How much is it worth?

A: Disc music boxes were invented in 1870. Polyphon Musikwerke was founded in Leipzig, Germany, before 1890. Most Polyphone disc music boxes were made between 1895 and 1905. The company also made musical clocks and other items with musical mechanisms. Music boxes are measured by the size of the disc, not the height of the cabinet. Polyphon music boxes sell at auctions for hundreds or even thousands of dollars, depending on size, rarity and condition. A Polyphon Excelsion tabletop single-comb music box and nine discs sold for $1,150 earlier this year.

Q: I'm trying to find a current value for an unopened 1974 Lionstone Lonely Luke figural decanter. The figure is an old cowboy sitting on a stump with a bottle in his hand and cup on the stump. The decanter is 10 1/2 inches tall and is still filled with whiskey. All the original labels still are on and very readable. What is it worth?

A: Limited-edition figural liquor decanters were very popular in the 1970s but don't sell well today. Prices have gone down. Lonely Luke decanters were part of Lionstone's Old West series of decanters. They held whiskey, port or liqueur. Collectors like the miniature version, 4 3/8 inches tall, issued in 1975. It sells for about $5 today.

Q: I have a breakfast set of four place settings of Franciscan Strawberry Fair dishes. I would like to sell the set.

A: From 1980 to 1982, Franciscan made two strawberry patterns, Strawberry Fair and Strawberry Time, on the same shapes. Strawberry Fair has a cream-colored background and Strawberry Time a green-tinted background. Sets of dishes are hard to sell. You can find them for sale online on eBay and replacements.com. Sources that sell dinnerware usually will buy dinnerware, but you can expect to get about half the price they sell it for.

Q: My parents gave me their antique bedroom set. It includes a nightstand, twin beds, a dresser with a mirror and a chest of drawers. Each piece is stamped "West End Furniture Company, Rockford, Illinois." I was told the wood is golden oak. Can you give me information on the company?

A: West End Furniture Co. was in business in Rockford from 1890 to 1941. The company made bedroom furniture, bookcases, buffets, desks, folding beds, tables and other furniture and offered lines of "medium" and "fine grade" furniture. Many Swedish furniture makers settled in Rockford, and at one time it was the second largest center of furniture manufacturing in the world.

Tip: When freezing old clothes to kill any insects, check the buttons first. Pewter, painted glass or ceramic buttons may be damaged by the cold.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

 

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Erector set, rocket launcher, Gilbert, box, 1959, $35.
  • Table, cast iron, marble top, cabriole legs, Britannia busts, shield, shelf, 30 x 28 inches, $95.
  • Delft tankard, hinged lid, loop handle, pewter thumb-rest, blue, yellow, red, green, signed, c. 1800, 9 inches, $230.
  • Model boat, Louisiana shrimper, fancy dancer, wood, painted, Angola Prison, 21 x 25 inches, $300.
  • Sampler, alphabet, numbers, floral urns, baskets, Mary Burton, aged 9, silk, linen, frame, 1827, 20 x 20 inches, $330.
  • Silver plaque, Mt. Rushmore, signed, 5 x 8 inches, $450.
  • Folk art diorama, hunter, dog pursuing deer, carved, painted, 10 x 16 inches, $480.
  • Doorknocker, Egyptian head clapper, iron, pyramid shape, Judd Co., 5 in. $510.
  • Veterinarian trade sign, horse's head, flowing mane, brown, c. 1900, 21 inches, $3,600.
  • Bronze centerpiece, Louis XVI style, divided carnation stems, flower candlesticks, clear vase, c. 1945, 21 inches, $5,000.

Contemporary, modern and mid-century ceramics made since 1950 are among the hottest collectibles today. Our special report, "Kovels' Buyers' Guide to Modern Ceramics: Mid-Century to Contemporary" identifies important pottery by American and European makers. Includes more than 65 factories and 70 studio artists, each with a mark and dates. Works by major makers, including Claude Conover, Guido Gambone, Lucie Rie, as well as potteries like Gustavsberg, Metlox and Sascha Brastoff, are shown in color photos. Find the "sleepers" at house sales and flea markets. Special Report, 8 1/2 x 5 1/2 inches, 64 pp. Available only from Kovels for $19.95 plus $4.95 postage and handling. Order by phone at 800-303-1996, online at Kovels.com; or write to Kovels, Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

Look at the bottom of a vase to identify it. This vase has marks indicating it is a piece of Rookwood pottery made in 1883 by a talented decorator. It auctioned for $5,290 at Humler & Nolan of Cincinnati. Unmarked it would have sold for much less. 

 

Last Updated on Monday, 17 November 2014 13:40
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Page 4 of 49
ADVERTISEMENTS

Banner Banner