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Kovels - Antiques & Collecting

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Sept. 15, 2014

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Tuesday, 16 September 2014 14:42

When this toy is wound, four Chinese men in colorful hats wave the canopy to toss the child. It recalls the Boxer Rebellion in China in 1900. The 5-inch-high toy sold for $14,800 at a Bertoia auction in Vineland, N.J., in 2013.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Sometimes an antique toy tells an almost-forgotten story. The Tammany Hall bank with a well-dressed man taking the penny is a criticism of corrupt politicians in New York City in 1871.

A 1940s blond doll wearing ice skates probably is not recognized today as Sonja Henie, a world-champion ice skater from 1923 to 1936 and star of a dozen Hollywood movies.

A rare clockwork toy has four Chinese men tossing a child in a blanket. Each of the men has a brightly painted hat that represents a European country. The toy, made in the early 1900s by Lehmann in Germany, is a comment on the Boxer Rebellion of 1900, when England, Russia, France and Germany occupied China. A Chinese secret society, the Boxers, led a rebellion against the European countries, killing foreigners and Chinese Christians, and destroying property. An international army that included Americans subdued the uprising. The rebellion ended in 190l, and China paid $330 million in reparations. It seems like a strange idea for a toy. It is claimed that only four of the toys still exist because the action required a complicated mechanism that broke easily. So in recent years, one of these toys in good working condition sold for $14,800.

Q: Can you tell me anything about a clear pressed glass serving bowl left to my husband by his grandmother? The inside is marked "Mountain City Mills, patent, flour."

A: A grain-milling company, or two different companies, named Mountain City Mills was in business in Chattanooga, Tenn., and Frederick, Md., in the early 1900s. It's unusual to find a piece of pressed glass marked like yours. It is possible that Mountain City contracted with a glass manufacturer to make pieces either for employees or as a premium for customers. Pressed glass is not as popular with collectors as it was 20 years ago. Depending on the pattern and size of your bowl, it could sell for $25 or more.

Q: My mother has had a mint-condition alligator purse since about 1940. The inside is labeled "Cuba." Can you tell me what it's worth?

A: Back in the 1930s, '40s and early '50s, Cuban manufacturers sold a lot of goods in the United States. Those were the same decades when alligator purses were at their peak of popularity. If the purse is in excellent condition, it probably would sell for $20 to $50. If it had a high-end designer label, it could sell for many times that.

Q: I inherited an antique stove and would like to sell it. It's a standing, round stove, and I assume it's a wood-burning model. It's black with metal accents and is marked "Great Western Stove Co., Leavenworth, Omaha, Denver." Where can I sell it, and how much can I get for it?

A: We receive many questions about antique stoves. The history of the Great Western Manufacturing Co. of Leavenworth, Kan., dates back to 1858. The related stove manufacturer, Great Western Stove Co., was formed in 1875 and operated into at least the 1930s. We have seen Great Western stoves offered for $100 to more than $1,000. Take a look at the website AntiqueStoves.com to get an idea of the types of stoves collectors are looking for and selling. Then you might want to try selling locally through a dealer or via Craigslist so the buyer doesn't have to worry about shipping costs.

Q: I have a tea set that I can find nothing about. It has a teapot, sugar and creamer and eight cups and saucers and is in mint condition. The pattern name is "Hawthorn" and it looks like Belleek, but I can't find any other information. Can you help with age and value?

A: Your tea set was made in Ireland by the Donegal Parian China Co. The company was formed in 1985 in Ballyshannon, County Donegal, by a group of former workers from the more-famous Belleek Pottery, just five miles away, across the border in Northern Ireland. Donegal China made marble-like Parian tableware and giftware in the Belleek style decorated with shamrocks, roses, hawthorn and other Irish designs, but the intricacy of the pieces was never that of traditional Irish Belleek. In 1996, Donegal China became a subsidiary of Belleek Pottery, which closed the Donegal China factory in 2005, dissolved the brand completely in 2012 and discontinued the Donegal Parian lines. Your tea set is worth about $250.

Q: I have a milk glass rolling pin with wooden handles that my mother got in 1931, and I got it when I married in 1954. I use it all the time and love it. Does it have any value?

A: Rolling pins were first used over 1,000 years ago. Early pins were handmade of wood. Rolling pins made of wood, glass, porcelain, marble, tin, and other materials were mass-produced beginning in the mid-19th century. In 1864, a rolling pin with a central rod that didn't turn with the rest of the rolling pin was invented by John W. Reed, a black American inventor. Rolling pins that are decorated, carved or have advertisements on them sell for more than plain pins. A milk glass rolling pin without decoration but with a brand name sells for about $15.

Tip: Repairs made to cut glass can be seen with a black light. It also will show most added plastic repairs. Look at where the foot, knob or handles might have been reattached. Many auctions have a black light available at the preview.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Street sweeper toy, metal, painted silver, yellow, black tires, Schuco Piccolo, 2 1/4 inches, $35.
  • Armoire, Art Deco, painted white, mirrored door, applied designs, 1920s, 42 x 17 x 54 inches, $80.
  • Gullah basket, coil, dyed bands, oval hand opening, flared, South Carolina, c. 1880, 8 x 18 inches, 115.
  • Telephone, candlestick shape, brass, 5-cent local calls, pay box, key, 12 1/4 inches, $180.
  • Buddy Lee doll, railroad engineer uniform, cap, circa 1925, 13 inches, $300.
  • Washing machine, Perfect Washer, domed, mixed woods, tin, iron, W.H. Whetzel, Lantz Mill, Va., circa 1870, 44 x 36 inches, $345.
  • Bracelet, silver, ball and twisted scroll links, pin and chain closure, Hector Aguilar, Mexico, circa 1940, 6 inches, $435.
  • Bronze sculpture, Roman gladiator, combat pose, shield, sword, yellow marble base, 6 1/2 inches, $815.
  • Mirror, over-mantel, Louis XV style, carved garlands, leaves, arched plate, 76 x 52 inches, $1,250.
  • Clamp, wrought iron, gilt tulip and bird terminals, initials, heart-shape base plate, circa 1810, 9 inches, $4,560.
New. Kovels' Antiques & Collectibles Price Guide, 2015, 47th edition, is the most accurate source for current prices. It's available this month and includes a special bonus section that helps you determine prices if you're downsizing and selling your antiques. It's the best book to own if you buy, sell or collect – and if you order now, you'll receive a copy with the author's autograph. This large-size paperback has more than 2,500 color photographs and more than 32,000 up-to-date prices for more than 700 categories of antiques and collectibles. You'll also find hundreds of factory histories and marks, a report on the record-setting prices of the year and helpful sidebars and tips about buying, selling, collecting and preserving your treasures. Available for $27.95 plus $4.95 postage. Purchase online at KovelsOnlineStore.com; by phone at 800-303-1996; at your local bookstore; or write to Price Book, P.O. Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

 

© 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.

 



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

When this toy is wound, four Chinese men in colorful hats wave the canopy to toss the child. It recalls the Boxer Rebellion in China in 1900. The 5-inch-high toy sold for $14,800 at a Bertoia auction in Vineland, N.J., in 2013. 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 16 September 2014 14:59
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Sept. 8, 2014

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Written by Terry and Kim Kovel   
Monday, 08 September 2014 16:36
This remarkable table, made of horns in 1892, is signed W. H. T. Ehle on the inlaid wooden top. The table was made from 82 horns and is 28 inches high. Auction price at a 2014 New Orleans Auction - $9,840.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio - Furniture made from recycled workbenches and school lockers, or huge metal parts from factory machines is not a new idea. Our ancestors recycled clothing into quilts, tin advertising signs into patches for a leaky roof and cattle horns into Victorian chairs. The earliest horn furniture was made in Germany in the 1830s, and by the late 1870s, it was being made in the United States. Slaughterhouses in Chicago had a huge supply of horns left over from the processing of meat. It is said that the Tobey Furniture Co. of Chicago exhibited a sofa and chair made with horn arms at the Chicago Exposition of 1876. Later they also used horns for the legs and backs with upholstered seats, forming furniture with the curving lines popular at the time. Horns from buffalo, elk and longhorn cattle, as well as antlers, were used for tables, hall trees, rocking chairs and footstools. This novel furniture lost favor, and by the 1890s was bought for hunting lodges and cabins. By 1900, horn chairs were considered old-fashioned and not often seen. But there was a revival of interest in the 1980s, and old pieces brought good prices at auctions. Today an antique piece of horn furniture made and signed by a famous maker, or one that shows exceptional skill with clever design and inlays, retails for over $10,000. Average pieces bring $1,000 to $2,000 or less.

***

Q: My grandmother left me a cobalt-blue glass pitcher and 12 tall matching drinking glasses. The pitcher has an ice lip. Each piece is decorated with a white silhouette of a sailboat and flying birds. I think the set is more than 100 years old. My aunt once told me they were stored in my grandmother's china closet and rarely used. They're in perfect condition. Who made the set and what is it worth?

A: Your set of Depression Glass dishes is about 75 years old, not 100. They were made in the late 1930s by the Hazel-Atlas Glass Co. of Wheeling, W.Va. The pattern usually is called "Ships" or "Sailboat." The pattern was made by adding the ship decoration to Hazel-Atlas' undecorated Moderntone dishes. Pitchers and tumblers in the Ships pattern are not in great demand these days, but if yours are in perfect condition they would sell - the pitcher for about $50 and the glasses for $10-$20 each, depending on their size.

***

Q: We have a set of children's furniture that includes a crib, dresser, chifferobe with drawers and a door, and a toy box. A tag on the back reads "Little Edison Furniture." We bought it in 1948, and it has served 17 children through the years. It's been professionally refinished and the lid to the toy box has been replaced. Any idea what the set is worth?

A: Thomas Alva Edison, the famous inventor, bought the Wisconsin Chair Company of New London, Wisconsin, in 1917 and changed the name to Wisconsin Panel and Cabinet Company. The factory made cabinets for Edison phonographs. Later, the name of the company became Edison Wood Products. A line of children's furniture was introduced in 1927. It was sold under the name "Edison Little Folks Furniture" beginning in 1937. The parent company merged with McGraw Electric Company in 1957 and became McGraw-Edison. Edison Wood Products continued operating under that name until 1969 when the Simmons Company bought McGraw-Edison and Edison Little Folks furniture became Simmons Juvenile Furniture. Value of your set that has been refinished and has replacement parts, $600.

***

Q: I have a piece of Satuma pottery that's marked "Satsuma" and "Made in China." What is it worth?

A: Not much. Satsuma is a Japanese ware. It's crackle-glazed and cream-colored with multicolor decorations. It was first made in the 1600s in the Satsuma area of Japan. Today it's also made in potteries near Kyoto. Any piece of pottery marked "Satsuma" in English probably dates from the 1970s or later. And anything also marked "Made in China" is not real Satsuma. Perhaps your Chinese vase used the pattern name Satsuma to mislead collectors. Marks on genuine Satsuma, most of them in Japanese, can be found online.

***

Q: When I was 10 years old (I'm 92 now), an elderly family friend gave me his violin. It has a label inside that reads "Anno 17 -, Carlo Bergonzi, Fece in Cremona." I have been told that it might have been made by an understudy of Stradivari. Could you tell me if that might be true?

A: Carlo Bergonzi (1683-1747) was indeed a pupil of Antonio Stradivari, and he made violins on his own, too. We receive a lot of questions about violins and can tell you that copies of Bergonzi and other high-quality 17th- and 18th-century violins have been made since the 19th century. It is very unlikely that your violin is a real Bergonzi. That doesn't mean it is a piece of junk, though. Have an expert take a look at it. Even a professional violinist can give you an educated opinion.

***

Tip: Mix and match dishes when you host a party. If color-coordinated, the dinner plate can be from a different set than the cup and saucer or salad plate. Use old and new sets. It's the "in" look today.

***

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, (Name of this newspaper), King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

***

Need prices for your antiques and collectibles? Find them at Kovels.com, our website for collectors. You can find more than 900,000 prices and more than 11,000 color photographs that help you determine the value of your collectibles. Study the prices. Go to the free Price Guide at Kovels.com. The website also lists publications, clubs, appraisers, auction houses, people who sell parts or repair antiques, show lists and more. Kovels.com adds to the information in this column.

* * *

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

Depression glass tray, Mayfair pattern, pink, center handle, 12 inches, $15.

Silver tray, grape and vase border, handles, oval, footed, Gorham, 16 inches, $85.

A&P store bin, wood, tin lining, red, gold paint, 18 x 30 inches, $235.

Royal Doulton vase, flambe, hunter with rifle, in forest, slope shoulder, 13 1/2 inches, pair, $295.

National Cash Register Model 35 3/4, embossed brass, marble sill, 1917, 22 inches, $450.

Mechanical bank, bricklayers, wall, cast iron, Shepard Hardware, 7 1/2 inches, $950.

Linen press, Chippendale, cherry, two panel doors, three drawers, bracket feet, c. 1790, 75 x 47 inches, $1,250.

Boehm porcelain eagle, wings outstretched, rocky base, c. 1990, 20 x 19 inches, $1,625.

Necklace, silver, amethyst drops, boomerang-shape links, box closure, Mexico, 16 inches, $1,875.

Birth fraktur, Johan Georg Schliger, ink, watercolor, blousy angel artist, Pennsylvania, 1794, 13 x 17 inches, $2,040.

** *

New! "Kovels' Antiques & Collectibles Price Guide, 2015," 47th edition, is your most accurate source for current prices. It's available this month and includes a special bonus section that helps you determine prices if you're downsizing and selling your antiques. It's the best book to own if you buy, sell or collect - if you order now, you'll receive a copy with the author's autograph. This large-size paperback has more than 2,500 color photographs and more than 32,000 up-to-date prices for more than 700 categories of antiques and collectibles. You'll also find hundreds of factory histories and marks, a report on the record prices of the year and helpful sidebars and tips about buying, selling, collecting and preserving your treasures. Available for $27.95 plus $4.95 postage. Purchase online at KovelsOnlineStore.com ; by phone at 800-303-1996; at your local bookstore; or write to Price Book, P.O. Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

***

Copyright 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.

 



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
This remarkable table, made of horns in 1892, is signed W. H. T. Ehle on the inlaid wooden top. The table was made from 82 horns and is 28 inches high. Auction price at a 2014 New Orleans Auction - $9,840.
Last Updated on Monday, 08 September 2014 16:45
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Sept. 1, 2014

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Tuesday, 02 September 2014 07:55

This Staffordshire figure of Benjamin Franklin was incorrectly labeled ‘General Washington’ when it was made in the 1820s. It sold recently for $338 at DuMouchelles auction in Detroit.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Watch out for fake antiques, especially copies of well-known pieces. In about 1820, some potters in the Staffordshire district of England made portrait figures of famous politicians, actors and athletes to sell in local shops. Remember, this was a time when there were no color images of people except paintings.

Often the potters confused the personalities. A famous error was the figure of Benjamin Franklin made in about 1820. Some had the name "General Washington" painted on the front of the base.

In the 1950s, when Staffordshire figures were again very popular, many copies of both the correct and incorrect Franklin were made. Other old fakes still are around. Some are antique jokes, like "The Vicar and Moses," which shows a judge sleeping in court. "The Tithing" is another faked figure, a group with a tax collector taking a percentage of the crop – and a new baby – as a tax from a farmer and his wife (sometimes the farmer was less cynical and brought a pig).

Other named copies show well-known men of the day, including Shakespeare, the comic Joseph Grimaldi, a bust of Washington or even a pair of cricket bowlers. Be careful. It is harder to recognize the 1990s Chinese copies than it was the 1950s copies.

Q: We have a rocking chair that has been in my husband's family for about 60 years. It's Craftsman-style and has armrests. It also has the original leather seat cushion with springs. On the bottom of the seat it reads, "Northwest Chair Co., Tacoma, Wash." I'm having a hard time finding information about the company and our chair. I would like to sell it. What do you think it's worth?

A: The Northwest Chair Co. made furniture in South Tacoma from about 1900 to the 1950s. In the mid-1920s, they opened distribution warehouses in Los Angeles and Berkeley, Calif. An advertisement claimed the company made "bedroom, children's, dining room, kitchen, library and store chairs made of ash, birch, mahogany, oak and walnut." In addition to furniture, the company made airplane parts for Boeing in 1944. We've seen a similar Morris-type rocking chair priced at $100.

Q: My mother has a very old set of china. The mark on the back reads "T & R Boote and Co." and has an image of a ship called Tusculana. Do you have any information about the maker?

A: T. & R. Boote was founded by Thomas and Richard Boote in Burslem, Staffordshire, England, in 1842. The company made pavement tiles, Parian ware and earthenware. It began making white graniteware for export to the United States in 1888. Production was limited to tiles after 1906. T. & R. Boote used a boat as part of its mark from 1890 to 1906. Tusculana is the name of a pattern that was made from 1903 to 1906.

Q: I bought an advertising booklet that has a man's frowning face and "Dyspeptic Pete" on the front and a smiling face with "Happy Pete" on the back. It also reads "The Walther Peptonized Port Co., Sole Proprietors, Pittsburgh, Pa., U.S.A." I bought it at an estate. Can you tell me its history and value?

A: Walther's Peptonized Port contained port wine and pepsin and was advertised as a cure for dyspepsia (indigestion). It was sold in drugstores and advertised "for nursing mothers, tired women, old folks, invalids, convalescents, weakened and run down folks generally." Your 12-page booklet includes a story in verse about Peter Gradgrind, who changed from "Dyspeptic Pete" to "Happy Pete" after trying a bottle of Walther's Peptonized Port. Many medicinal remedies sold during the 19th and early 20th centuries contained alcohol, although it didn't have to be listed as an ingredient until the passage of the Pure Food and Drug Act in 1906. Some popular remedies contained over 40 percent alcohol. Walther Peptonized Port was sold from about 1901 through 1915, so your booklet was published during those years. Value: $10 to $20.

Q: Is there any kind of a market for used shoe-topped roller skates from the 1940s? They're in very good shape, but I used them a lot because I used to dance in them several times a week.

A: Your skates are not what we'd call "collectible." That word would apply if, for example, someone famous once owned them. But it's possible you could sell them on eBay or Craigslist for $20 or even a little more.

Q: I found a very old straight razor in the original box. It was made by Johnson Brothers Hardware Co. of Cincinnati. How old is it? Are old razors collectible?

A: The Johnson brothers had a wholesale and retail hardware business in Cincinnati beginning in 1881. According to an 1886 listing, the company carried general hardware and "pocket and table cutlery." The name of the business became Johnson Bros. Hardware Co. in 1891. By then it was selling tools as well as hardware and cutlery. It still was in business in 1913, when it was listed in a directory of hardware dealers. Collectors of old razors want razors in good, unrestored condition. If you are thinking of selling the razor, don't polish it. The original box adds value. Old straight razors sell for $15 and up, depending on condition and maker.

Tip: Do not hang photographs in direct sunlight. The UV rays will damage photographs.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Campbell Kids print, "Tomato is a Fruit," blackboard, textured paper, 1970s, 8 x 10 inches, $15.
  • Pewter plate, round, Samuel Pierce, double touch mark, c. 1790, 8 inches, $105.
  • Wave Crest glass dresser box, oval, blue, pink flowers, enameled, marked "Kelva, CFM Co.," 5 1/2 x 4 inches, $240.
  • Carriage lamp, silver-plated, two gothic arches, glass panels, electrified, 1800s, 42 1/2 inches, $295.
  • Tea caddy, mahogany, casket shape, lion's head handles, ivory, brass, 8 x 12 inches, $355.
  • Coca-Cola tray, woman wearing yellow dress, wide white hat, 1920, 13 x 11 inches, $360.
  • Metal inkwell, figural, woman sitting in bathtub, copper surface, glass well, footed, Kercher Baths, Congress & Wabash, Chicago, c. 1916, 2 3/4 x 4 inches, $415.
  • Montblanc fountain pen set, propelling pencil, black hard rubber, clip, 1920s, baby size 0, $560.
  • Tiffany glass bowl, Favrile, iridescent gold, intaglio cut vine and leaf, flared rim, signed, 1925, 3 1/2 x 8 inches, $750.
  • Weather vane, running horse, full body, copper, zinc head, gilt, tan paint, Dexter, c. 1890, 18 1/2 x 31 1/2 inches, $1,530.

New. "Kovels' Antiques & Collectibles Price Guide, 2015," 47th edition, is your most accurate source for current prices. It's available this month and includes a special bonus section that helps you determine prices if you're downsizing and selling your antiques. It's the best book to own if you buy, sell or collect – and if you order now, you'll receive a copy with the author's autograph. This large-size paperback has more than 2,500 color photographs and more than 32,000 up-to-date prices for more than 700 categories of antiques and collectibles. You'll also find hundreds of factory histories and marks, a report on the record prices of the year and helpful sidebars and tips about buying, selling, collecting, and preserving your treasures. Available for $27.95 plus $4.95 postage. Purchase online at KovelsOnlineStore.com; by phone at 800-303-1996; at your local bookstore; or write to Price Book, P.O. Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.

 



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

 This Staffordshire figure of Benjamin Franklin was incorrectly labeled ‘General Washington’ when it was made in the 1820s. It sold recently for $338 at DuMouchelles auction in Detroit.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 02 September 2014 08:16
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Aug. 25, 2014

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 25 August 2014 12:39

Poison rings are part of history and mystery stories. Perhaps Lucrezia Borgia murdered her foes with her ring. This 18K gold ring with a hidden compartment has red enamel trim and an emerald set in the center. Advertised as a poison ring at a 2014 James Julia auction in Fairfield, Maine. It sold for $1,185.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Poison rings play a part in a lot of murder mysteries. Adversaries were removed with a flick of a ring cover over a glass of wine. The idea of a ring that held poison is thousands of years old, but it is the Victorian era that's called "the era of the poison ring." A ring was made to conceal a small compartment with a tight cover that could hold a poisonous powder. It was designed to be used to kill foes or to commit suicide if captured by enemies. But historians now think the rings were not often used to hold poison. Instead, the small compartment held religious relics, locks of hair of lovers, notes or other tiny memorabilia of a romantic or religious nature. The poison ring is not out of fashion. Internet ads offer hundreds of modern versions today. Prices range from under $40 for pewter or plated metal rings to thousands of dollars for gold rings set with precious stones.

Q: We purchased a stool in the 1970s while we were living in England. It's wood, 18 inches high, and has vertical fluted sections that join to make a circular outer case. When the top is raised, a hinged toilet seat appears. Under it is a compartment with a lidded ceramic potty jar. It also has a hinged slide-out footrest with a leather top. There are no marks on the wood frame. The lettering on the bottom of the jar reads, "Burleigh, Made in England." We have no idea of its origin or history. Can you help?

A: You have a type of commode the English call a "close stool." During the days before indoor plumbing, chamber pots with lids were usually kept under beds and used in the evenings when it was too dark or too difficult to go outside to an outhouse. The more well-to-do 18th-century family could afford a close stool, a small decorative cabinet that held a chamber pot inside. It was chair-seat height and had an opening on top so the user could sit somewhat comfortably. Later close stools were made with hinged outer lids that could be lifted to access the chamber pot. By the 1870s, many had a toilet seat and a lid. A pullout footrest made it easier for a child to use. Fancy close stools were designed to look like elegant pieces of furniture with stained woodwork and upholstered tops. With the advent of indoor plumbing, they were used as parlor stools or stands. The mark on your chamber pot was used in the 1930s by Burgess & Leigh, a British pottery company founded in 1862 in Burslem, England. The pottery started using the name "Burleigh Ware" in the 1930s, and it uses the same name today. Your close stool is worth about $200 to $300.

Q: I have been collecting Space Race-related mechanical banks for a few years. They're all pot metal, and some of them are labeled with the name of an American astronaut or a commercial bank. The shapes include a rocket, flying saucer, ray gun and spacecraft. What do you think they're worth?

A: Banks like yours were made from the 1950s into the early '70s by Dura Mold & Manufacturing Co. and Astro Manufacturing Co., both in East Detroit (now Eastpointe), Mich. Most were sold at wholesale prices to banks and insurance companies, which probably gave many of them away to new customers. While the banks are not very old, they appear to be scarce and are sought by an eager group of collectors. They sell online for $40 and up

Q: We have a booklet called Kellogg's Funny Jungleland Moving Pictures. The part of the cover with the title on it is orange and below that is a picture of an elephant and a giraffe dressed like people. The pages inside are illustrated with other animals dressed like people. They are cut into sections that can be moved to change the clothes the animals are wearing. It's marked "Copyright 1909 by W.K. Kellogg" and "Patented Jan. 15, 1907." The booklet is in pretty good shape other than a little hole in the fold of the book. What is it worth?

A: The booklet was a promotional item for Kellogg's Corn Flakes. It sells for about $10 today, but the hole in yours decreases its value.

Q: I recently inherited volumes of new collectible plates and plate sets and am researching venues to either bulk wholesale them or to offer them at below cost to a major retailer. Every plate I have looked at comes with a certificate of authenticity, a box, etc. All are new and in perfect condition. Do you know a retailer who might be interested in them?

A: Collector plates are hard to sell and almost all sell for less than their original value. Even the more expensive plates made by Danish manufacturers in the last 30 years have gone down in value. Most collector plates made by American makers sell for about $10 to $15 or less. If you want to sell the entire collection to a retailer, make a list of the plates you have and include the manufacturer's name and the name of the plate. Be sure to indicate that you have the certificate of authenticity and the box for each. You can contact an online source like Replacements.com or try local antiques or consignment shops. Remember, the retailer has to make money on the deal and you will be lucky to get half the price the retailer sells them for.

Tip: When you move, remember that there is no insurance coverage for breakage if the items are not packed by the shipper.

Sign up for our free weekly email, "Kovels Komments." Terry Kovel writes about the latest news, tips and questions and her views of the market. If you register on our website, there is no charge.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Political poster, Ronald Reagan, "Jelly Bean Kid," caricature dressed as cowboy, big head, 1981, 33 x 21 inches, $45.
  • Franciscan teapot, Desert Rose pattern, lid, 4 cups, 9 inches, $125.
  • Kneeler, Gothic Revival, oak, carved, bible stand, pierced back nautical compass, open-form base, padded knee rest, 1890s, 36 x 18 1/4 inches, $280.
  • Louis Armstrong windup toy, tin lithograph, vinyl head, cloth clothing, trumpet, Japan, 1950s, 10 inches, $285.
  • Cigar lighter, countertop, pull-out torch wand, hole punch, Ideal, 4 3/4 x 6 1/2 inches, $330.
  • Police truncheon, wood, red band, turned handle, painted, c. 1860, 15 inches, $350.
  • Bronze sculpture, Sphinx, plinth base, patina, England, c. 1900, 7 1/2 x 2 1/2 inches, $430.
  • Cane, horse head, jockey handle, silver-plated bronze, exotic wood, rubber ferrule, c. 1875, 37 inches, $485.
  • Stoneware jug, blue, gray, impressed "Burger, Rochester, N.Y.," 1886, 13 1/2 inches, 2 gallons, $740.
  • Scrimshawed whale's tooth, flag, cannon, drum, shield, red, white, blue, A. White, 1959, 7 1/2 inches, $3,305.

Keep up with changes in the collectibles world. Send for a free sample issue of our 12-page, color-illustrated newsletter, "Kovels on Antiques and Collectibles," filled with prices, news, information and photos, plus major articles and opinions about the world of collecting. An important tool for anyone who buys or sells antiques and collectibles. To subscribe at a bargain $27 for 12 issues, write Kovels, P.O. Box 8534, Big Sandy, TX 75755; call 800-829-9158; or subscribe online at KovelsOnlineStore.com.

© 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.

 



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

Poison rings are part of history and mystery stories. Perhaps Lucrezia Borgia murdered her foes with her ring. This 18K gold ring with a hidden compartment has red enamel trim and an emerald set in the center. Advertised as a poison ring at a 2014 James Julia auction in Fairfield, Maine. It sold for $1,185. 

Last Updated on Monday, 25 August 2014 12:52
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Aug. 11, 2014

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 11 August 2014 10:56
This Kelly Doll bag, a used Hermes limited edition, sold for $18,750 at a Heritage auction held last spring in New York City.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Vintage clothes can be inexpensive additions to a wardrobe, but sometimes vintage designer items are very expensive. A recent auction sold Hermes and other famous branded purses for thousands of dollars each. A used, limited-edition Hermes "Noisette Gulliver Leather Quelle Idole Kelly Doll Bag" in excellent condition sold at auction in April 2014. The humorous bag, with a smiling face, leather arms and feet, and a silver-colored metal "nose" and "eyes," brought $18,750. The price included the dust bag and box. Dozens of other used purses sold for more than $10,000 this year. Vintage designer purses are relatively new to auctions. They probably would not have been offered 20 years ago.

Q: We have a chest of drawers that has been in my family since the 1930s. It has six drawers with dark burled wood fronts and diamond-shaped pulls with enamel drops. The label on the back says, "Sligh Furniture Co., Grand Rapids, Mich." Do you have any information?

A: The Sligh Furniture Co. was founded in Grand Rapids in 1880 by Charles R. Sligh. The company was a mainstay of the city's furniture industry in the early 1900s, when Grand Rapids was considered the "Furniture Capital of the World." At first Sligh made inexpensive walnut bureaus with mirrors. Later it manufactured bedroom sets, chiffoniers and wardrobes in many styles. By the mid-1920s, Sligh claimed to be the largest manufacturer of bedroom furniture in the world. The company closed in 1932 but was reopened the next year by Sligh's son, Charles R. Sligh Jr., in Holland, Mich. The company went on to make grandfather clocks, office furniture and entertainment pieces. In 2011 Sligh was sold to Lexington Home Brands of Thomasville, N.C. Sligh chests like your 1930s piece sell today for $100 to $300.

Q: I have a porcelain vase with the words "Fraureuth, Made in Germany" on the bottom. It is marked with a crown above a circle. Inside the circle there's a small letter "c" and a capital letter "F." Handwritten above the mark is the name "G. Wokaty." Can you tell me who made the vase and how old it is?

A: Your vase was made by Porcelain Factory Fraureuth, which was in business in Fraureuth, Saxony, Germany, from about 1898 to 1935. It was successor to a porcelain factory that operated on the same site beginning in 1866. The handwritten name is probably the name of the decorator.

Q: I was office manager for a renowned big-game hunter, lecturer, photographer and fisherman. In 1970, he gave me a bracelet that he said was made from elephant hair. Can you give me any information about such a bracelet? I'm wondering how the value of something like this will be affected by the new laws about ivory. The bracelet appears to be made of seven strands of hair, or it could be just one long strand. The strands are slipped through knots of hairs so that the bracelet is adjustable.

A: Elephant-hair bracelets have been made for more than 1,000 years and are supposed to protect the wearer from harm, ward off sickness and bring good luck. Amelia Earhart wore an elephant-hair bracelet for years, but was not wearing it on her last flight in 1937 – when her plane disappeared. Bracelets are made from an elephant's tail hairs, which can be 2 or 3 feet long. The hairs are trimmed to a uniform thickness and boiled to soften them so they can be molded into shape. Poachers kill elephants for their tusks, but might also harvest the tail hair and sell it. Reputable companies sell elephant-hair jewelry made from hair that is shed naturally and found on the ground, so that is legal. Wear your bracelet. The natural oil on your skin will help preserve the bracelet. Your vintage elephant-hair bracelet is worth about $35 to $50.

Q: We inherited a collection of photographs that we would like to know more about. Each photo comprises duplicate prints pasted on a very hard card. The name "Keystone View Company" is listed on the side of the photos. This is printed at the bottom of one of the cards: "(97) 19163, Hail to the Heroes! Returning Troops on March En Route to Camp After Leaving Transport, New York Harbor." On the back of that card is a story about the pictures on the front. We have about 100 of these cards. Are they valuable?

A: You have a collection of "stereo cards." When two almost-identical pictures are viewed through a stereoscope, it produces a 3-D image. Stereoscopes were popular from the mid-1800s into the 1930s. The Keystone View Co. was one of the largest manufacturers of stereo cards, and had offices in several countries. The company was founded by Benneville Lloyd Singley in Meadville, Pa., in 1892. Keystone first published a series of stereo cards picturing World War I soldiers, battlefields and other military sites in 1923. Keystone became a subsidiary of Mast Development Co. in the 1960s and closed in 1972. The value of stereo cards is determined by maker and subject. A single card is worth $5 to $10. A complete set of World War I cards sells for about $100 to $150.

Tip: Remove traces of gum, adhesive tape and other sticky tape by rubbing the glue with lemon juice.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Purse, white wicker, seed beads, flower applique, braided handles, pink satin interior, gold-tone feet, Midas of Miami, c. 1960, 12 x 5 1/2 x 4 inches, $75.
  • Lawn sprinkler, figural, frog, iron, c. 1900, 8 3/4 inches, $240.
  • Mickey Mouse pull toy, drummer, Fisher-Price, 1941-'45, 8 1/2 x 7 1/2 inches, $145.
  • Dedham plate, Snow Tree pattern, glazed earthenware, blue, white, 1929-1943, 8 1/2 inches, $245.
  • Match holder, cowboy boot, bootjack striker, cast iron, scalloped pedestal base, 1890-1910, 5 x 5 1/2 inches, $280.
  • Hermes scarf, "Le Tarot," silk twill, teal, multicolor, Annie Faivre, c. 1991, 35 in. square, $320.
  • Alto saxophone, Bundy II, brass, mother-of-pearl, chrome, black case, Selmer Co., 1900s, 28 inches, $480.
  • Apple peeler, pine, metal, blue paint, 19th century, 25 inches, $530.
  • Pickle caster jar, Spot Optic pattern, cranberry glass, flower, bird, metal frame, leaves, c. 1880, 9 x 5 inches, $690.
  • Cinnabar box, globe shape, dome cover, figures in garden, black and red lacquer, marked, 1900s, 5 x 11 3/4 inches, $1,795.
  • Wake table, mahogany, oval, gate-leg, square molded legs, 1800s, 28 x 48 x 70 inches, $3,840

The Kovels have navigated flea markets for decades. Learn from the best. "Kovels Flea Market Strategies: How to Shop, Buy and Bargain the 21st Century Way," by Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel, tells you about the latest smartphone apps and websites to help you shop, share and ship, as well as what to wear, what to bring and, most important, how to negotiate your way to a bargain. Also, tips on spotting fakes, advice about paying for your purchases and shipping suggestions. Full-color booklet, 17 pages, 8 1/2 by 5 1/2 inches. Available only from Kovels for $7.95 plus $4.95 postage and handling. Order by phone at 800-303-1996; online at Kovels.com; or write to Kovels, Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
This Kelly Doll bag, a used Hermes limited edition, sold for $18,750 at a Heritage auction held last spring in New York City.
Last Updated on Friday, 15 August 2014 12:26
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Aug. 4, 2014

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 04 August 2014 12:43

This Anglo-Indian folding chair sold this spring for $590 at a Brunk auction in Asheville, N.C. It had some cracked pieces, but the typical carved decorations were intact.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Collectors in the 1950s usually wanted furniture and accessories in earlier styles, or perhaps a piece that represented the family's background, like a German stein or English china. But today collectors can see and buy items from all over the world on the Internet, and auctions have become more international.

Carved wooden furniture from 18th and 19th century China, painted chests from Scandinavia and Black Forest benches and tables with large, carved bears from Switzerland (although they were first sold as German) were not bought to use in many homes. But now interior designers and collectors want something "different" to decorate modern homes.

Anglo-Indian furniture that's elaborately carved still is a bargain because it is not well known. The British East India Co. explored the world, and had created industries in many ports by the 1700s. There was profitable trade in both Chinese and Indian furniture made for the British market. Samples of popular British chair styles, like Chippendale and Queen Anne, were sent to workmen in India to copy, and British tradesmen were sent to train Indian workers. The resulting furniture was a blend of cultures: British shapes and Indian woods like teak, ebony or rosewood. An inlay of ivory or silver was used on expensive pieces. An entire piece might be carved with a lacelike frame filled with birds and flowers.

There are many records of shipments of Anglo-Indian furniture, but little documented history. There even were complaints from British cabinetmakers that the quantity of imported furniture was harming their business. Today, an average Anglo-Indian carved chair in good condition made before 1900 auctions for $150 to $300. Small center tables go for $500 or more.

When you buy, be sure any damage is minor and can be repaired, because the carvings often break.

Q: My wife recently acquired a metal mechanical bank titled "Monkey Bank." It's 7 1/4 inches long. A monkey sits on one end, and an organ grinder on the other. When you put a coin in the monkey's mouth and press the lever behind him, the monkey flies forward and "deposits" the coin into the organ held by the organ grinder. Do you know the age or value?

A: The original Monkey Bank you describe was produced by the Hubley Manufacturing Co. of Lancaster, Pa., probably in the 1920s. Originals, however, are nearly 9 inches long. Reproductions abound. Some were produced using molds made from original banks, which is why the copies are smaller than originals. An original Monkey Bank recently sold for close to $600. Copies sell for $15 to $25.

Q: I have a blue-and-white beaded purse with a metal clasp and chain. It's needlepoint with cut steel beads. It was my grandmother's, so it must be 60-80 years old. Does it have any value, and where can I sell it?

A: Beaded purses were popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Many were imported from Europe. Beadwork was a popular form of needlework, and directions for making beaded bags were printed in women's magazines. Beaded purses are still popular fashion accessories and are made by some well-known designers today. Any vintage clothing store will be interested in your beaded purse if it's in good condition. Price depends on style, intricacy of the design and condition. Good purses sell for $150 to $250, while exceptional examples have brought about $800.

Q: I have a Heineken beer mug marked "Blue Delfts" on the bottom. I thought it ought to say "Delft." Do I have a fake

A: That depends on what you mean by "fake." You don't have an antique piece of Dutch delft pottery. They are not marked the way yours is. And while Heineken beer has been around for more than a century, blue-and-white pottery with that brand name on the front was made as giftware much more recently. Your mug might not even have been made in Holland. A mug like yours sells online for about $10.

Q: My mother gave me three nun figurines. The bottom of each figurine is marked "Dave Grossman Designs, copyright 1971, MEM." Two of the figurines also have paper stickers that read "Made in Japan." Can you provide any information on these figurines and their value?

A: David Grossman opened his company in Hazelwood, Mo., in 1968. The company made figurines, limited editions, music boxes, ornaments and snow globes. Some of the popular series of figurines made by Dave Grossman include Norman Rockwell, Gone With the Wind and The Wizard of Oz. The company was one of several sued by Warner Brothers for copyright and trademark infringement because Grossman used characters from Warner Brothers movies and cartoons. The suit was settled in 2014. The value of your figurines is about $10 each.

Tip: Don't leave vinyl tablecloths or rubber or plastic placemats on a wooden tabletop for a long time. They may react with the finish and cause damage.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Royal Crown Derby plate, molded white basket-weave border, gilt center medallion and rim, c. 1900, 9 1/4 inches, 12 pieces, $95.
  • Barbie doll, No. 3, blond ponytail, Picnic Set outfit, c. 1960, $115.
  • Fostoria cake stand, pressed glass, frosted, artichoke, upturned high and low rims, c. 1891, 5 5/8 x 9 1/2 inches, $185.
  • Peanut roaster, "Hot Peanuts," painted tin, Kingery Manufacturing Co., c. 1905, 65 inches, $360.
  • Stoneware jug, cobalt blue spotted bird, impressed "Edmands & Co.," New York, 1800s, 13 1/2 inches, $420.
  • Mid-century pottery vase, cylinder, incised linear design, gray matte glaze, signed "Harrison McIntosh," 4 x 5 inches, $500.
  • Golf markers, molded heart shape, painted zinc, 1900s, three pieces, $545.
  • Telescope, brass, spotter scope, collapsible steel tripod stand, J.H. Steward, Victorian, 46 inches, $815.
  • Garden bench, neoclassical, Sienna marble, acanthus-carved supports, c. 1900, 18 x 72 inches, $1,875.
  • Cabinet, teak, shelves, door, fall-front and sliding drawers, Peter Hvidt, Denmark, c. 1960, 66 x 53 inches, $2,460.

"Kovels' Buyers' Guide to Modern Ceramics: Mid-Century to Contemporary." Contemporary, modern and mid-century ceramics made since 1950 are among the hottest collectibles today. Our special report identifies important pottery by American and European makers. Includes more than 65 factories and 70 studio artists, each with a mark and dates. Works by major makers, including Claude Conover, Guido Gambone and Lucie Rie, as well as potteries like Gustavsberg, Metlox and Sascha Brastoff, are shown in color photos. Find the "sleepers" at house sales and flea markets. Special Report, 8 1/2 x 5 1/2 inches, 64 pp. Available only from Kovels for $19.95 plus $4.95 postage and handling. Order by phone at 800-303-1996; online at Kovels.com; or write to Kovels, Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE

This Anglo-Indian folding chair sold this spring for $590 at a Brunk auction in Asheville, N.C. It had some cracked pieces, but the typical carved decorations were intact.

Last Updated on Friday, 15 August 2014 12:26
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of July 28, 2014

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 28 July 2014 14:09
This Rookwood tile featuring a dark blue rook on a branch was used for advertising by the famous Rookwood Pottery of Cincinnati about 1915. One sold in 2012 at a Humler and Nolan auction in Cincinnati for $5,250.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Rookwood pottery probably is the most famous of the art potteries made in the United States in the late 19th and 20th centuries. It was started by Maria Longworth Nichols of Cincinnati in 1880, the first of many art potteries founded by women.

She saw some French Haviland pottery at the 1876 Centennial Exhibition, and after experimenting she was able to make pottery with similar decorations. In 1880, she started the Rookwood pottery where they made white graniteware and yellow clay pieces. By the next year they were making vases with underglaze blue or brown prints, some with Japanese inspired designs. A few years later the main product had "standard glaze," a more even-shaded glaze. Rookwood used many glazes, decorating techniques and designs before it went bankrupt in 1941, and it has been bought and sold several times since then. The company now makes new items, architectural tiles and art pottery.

The best of Rookwood sells for high prices, modern pieces for very little. But the company has always marked pieces with marks that can be dated. The most famous is the RP mark with flames. After 1900, Roman numerals were added that give the year of manufacture. One unusual Rookwood piece that collectors like is the advertising tile made in 1915. It was given to stores that had Rookwood pottery in the giftware section. Today the 4-inch-by-8-inch tile picturing a bird called a Rook sells for more than $5,000.

Q: I have a solid oak glider rocking chair that belonged to my grandparents, who were married in 1894. The label on the underside of the seat reads "Wisconsin Chair Co." Can you tell me something about this company and if the rocker has any value as a collectible?

A: The Wisconsin Chair Co. was in business in Port Washington, Wis., from 1888 to 1954. The company began making McLean Patent Swing Rockers in 1891. By the next year the Wisconsin Chair Co. was making a line of "fancy floor rockers and platform spring rockers," declaring that "all of our designs for 1892 are new and tasty." The company was the largest employer in Port Washington. The factory was destroyed by a fire in 1899 but was rebuilt and the company continued to make chairs until it closed in 1954. Montgomery Ward sold several styles of McLean Patent Swing Rockers in its 1895 catalog for about $3 or $4. Platform rockers don't sell well today. Your rocker might be worth $100-$200.

Q: I have an oak spool cabinet with nine drawers. It reads "Willimantic Co." on the top drawer. There is a picture of an owl with a spool of thread around its neck. It is sitting on a branch with the moon behind it. It has the original hardware and lettering on six of the drawers. Can you tell me its age and value?

A: Austin Dunham and Lawson Ives bought a cotton mill in Willimantic, Conn., in 1854 and founded the Willimantic Linen Co. The company began making thread for sewing machines soon after. Before the 1850s, colored thread came in skeins, and black and white thread came on spools. Willimantic was one of the first to make colored thread on spools. The owl was a logo used by the company. The company opened a factory to make wooden spools in Howard, Maine, in 1879. The name of the town was changed to Willimantic in 1881. Willimantic Linen Co. became part of the American Thread Co. in 1898. Your spool cabinet was probably made in the late 1800s. Its value is more than $1,000.

Q: I have a Beatles metal lunch box made by Aladdin Industries. It's light blue with the faces of the four Beatles and facsimiles of their autographs on the front and a picture of the band playing their instruments on the back. It has a small amount of rust and the original thermos is missing. The inside has a poem about safety rules from the National Safety Council. I've seen these sell for upward of $1,000 on the Internet and I'm wondering what this is worth.

A: Don't believe every price you see on the Internet. Look for prices of items that actually sold. Sellers can ask high prices, but items don't always sell for that much. Lunch boxes in good condition, with no rust, and complete with thermos sell for the highest prices. A lunch box like yours with thermos sold for $450 in 2012. Another, in good condition but without the thermos, sold at auction in 2013 for $300.

Q: I have an Emmett Kelly Jr. Collection figurine called "The Teacher." It's marked "Flambro, made in Taiwan, Republic of China." Is it worth anything?

A: "The Teacher" is one of several figurines made of Weary Willie, a clown dressed as a hobo. The character was created in 1933, during the height of the Depression, by Emmett Kelly Jr.'s father, who also was a circus performer. Emmett Kelly Jr. (1923-2006) performed as "Weary Willie" from 1960 until 2006. Flambro Imports was in business in Atlanta, Ga., from 1965 to 2006. The company imported figurines, giftware and other items. Flambro sold more than one line of Emmett Kelly Jr. figurines, and prices vary. Your figurine was made between 1987 and 2002 and sells for about $50 today.

Tip: Rearrange your furniture so valuable silver or paintings can't be seen from the street.

Take advantage of a free listing for your group to announce events or to find antique shows, national meetings and other events. Go to the Calendar at Kovels.com to find, publicize and plan your antiquing trips.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Buffalo Pottery cup and saucer, Blue Willow, marked, 1911, $45.
  • Fenton cruet, Coin Dot, cobalt blue, reeded handle, 7 inches, $95.
  • Amberina water pitcher, Spot Optic, spiral ribs, reeded handle, c. 1890, 8 1/2 inches, $185.
  • Cribbage-dominos game set, bone dominoes, red, brown circles, sliding box-top board, made by prisoner of war, c. 1810, 5 1/2 inches, $210.
  • Cookie jar, black mammy, hands on hips, yellow scarf, white apron, zigzag border, Brayton Laguna, c. 1950, 12 1/2 inches, $280.
  • Chalkware figurine, stag, reclining, painted reddish brown, c. 1850, 9 inches, pair, $425.
  • Wall bracket, giltwood, serpentine, plume-carved, Continental, c. 1780, 15 inches, $565.
  • Chair, Charles & Ray Eames, yellow fiberglass, enameled steel, Herman Miller Furniture Co., 1940s, 32 x 25 inches, $625.
  • Souvenir plates, Duke University, blue transferware school scene, raised border, Wedgwood, 1937, 10 5/8 inches, 8 pieces, $770.
  • Cutlery box, Federal, mahogany, string inlay, slant top, c. 1800, 15 x 9 inches, $3,185.

Kovels' "A Diary: How to Settle a Collector's Estate." Our new week-by-week record of the settlement of an estate, from your first days gathering legal papers to the last days when you're dividing antiques among heirs and selling everything else – even the house. How to identify pottery, jewelry and other popular collectibles. Tips on where and how to sell furniture, jewelry, dishes, figurines, record albums, bikes and even clothes. We include lots of pictures and prices and explain the advantages of a house sale, auction, selling to a dealer, or donating to a charity. Learn about how to handle the special problems of security and theft. Plus a free current supplement with useful websites, auctions lists and other current information. Available only from Kovels for $19.95 plus $4.95 postage and handling. Order by phone at 800-303-1996; online at Kovels.com ; or write to Kovels, P.O. Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
This Rookwood tile featuring a dark blue rook on a branch was used for advertising by the famous Rookwood Pottery of Cincinnati about 1915. One sold in 2012 at a Humler and Nolan auction in Cincinnati for $5,250.
Last Updated on Friday, 15 August 2014 12:26
 
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