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Kovels - Antiques & Collecting

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of July 28, 2014

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 28 July 2014 14:09
This Rookwood tile featuring a dark blue rook on a branch was used for advertising by the famous Rookwood Pottery of Cincinnati about 1915. One sold in 2012 at a Humler and Nolan auction in Cincinnati for $5,250.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Rookwood pottery probably is the most famous of the art potteries made in the United States in the late 19th and 20th centuries. It was started by Maria Longworth Nichols of Cincinnati in 1880, the first of many art potteries founded by women.

She saw some French Haviland pottery at the 1876 Centennial Exhibition, and after experimenting she was able to make pottery with similar decorations. In 1880, she started the Rookwood pottery where they made white graniteware and yellow clay pieces. By the next year they were making vases with underglaze blue or brown prints, some with Japanese inspired designs. A few years later the main product had "standard glaze," a more even-shaded glaze. Rookwood used many glazes, decorating techniques and designs before it went bankrupt in 1941, and it has been bought and sold several times since then. The company now makes new items, architectural tiles and art pottery.

The best of Rookwood sells for high prices, modern pieces for very little. But the company has always marked pieces with marks that can be dated. The most famous is the RP mark with flames. After 1900, Roman numerals were added that give the year of manufacture. One unusual Rookwood piece that collectors like is the advertising tile made in 1915. It was given to stores that had Rookwood pottery in the giftware section. Today the 4-inch-by-8-inch tile picturing a bird called a Rook sells for more than $5,000.

Q: I have a solid oak glider rocking chair that belonged to my grandparents, who were married in 1894. The label on the underside of the seat reads "Wisconsin Chair Co." Can you tell me something about this company and if the rocker has any value as a collectible?

A: The Wisconsin Chair Co. was in business in Port Washington, Wis., from 1888 to 1954. The company began making McLean Patent Swing Rockers in 1891. By the next year the Wisconsin Chair Co. was making a line of "fancy floor rockers and platform spring rockers," declaring that "all of our designs for 1892 are new and tasty." The company was the largest employer in Port Washington. The factory was destroyed by a fire in 1899 but was rebuilt and the company continued to make chairs until it closed in 1954. Montgomery Ward sold several styles of McLean Patent Swing Rockers in its 1895 catalog for about $3 or $4. Platform rockers don't sell well today. Your rocker might be worth $100-$200.

Q: I have an oak spool cabinet with nine drawers. It reads "Willimantic Co." on the top drawer. There is a picture of an owl with a spool of thread around its neck. It is sitting on a branch with the moon behind it. It has the original hardware and lettering on six of the drawers. Can you tell me its age and value?

A: Austin Dunham and Lawson Ives bought a cotton mill in Willimantic, Conn., in 1854 and founded the Willimantic Linen Co. The company began making thread for sewing machines soon after. Before the 1850s, colored thread came in skeins, and black and white thread came on spools. Willimantic was one of the first to make colored thread on spools. The owl was a logo used by the company. The company opened a factory to make wooden spools in Howard, Maine, in 1879. The name of the town was changed to Willimantic in 1881. Willimantic Linen Co. became part of the American Thread Co. in 1898. Your spool cabinet was probably made in the late 1800s. Its value is more than $1,000.

Q: I have a Beatles metal lunch box made by Aladdin Industries. It's light blue with the faces of the four Beatles and facsimiles of their autographs on the front and a picture of the band playing their instruments on the back. It has a small amount of rust and the original thermos is missing. The inside has a poem about safety rules from the National Safety Council. I've seen these sell for upward of $1,000 on the Internet and I'm wondering what this is worth.

A: Don't believe every price you see on the Internet. Look for prices of items that actually sold. Sellers can ask high prices, but items don't always sell for that much. Lunch boxes in good condition, with no rust, and complete with thermos sell for the highest prices. A lunch box like yours with thermos sold for $450 in 2012. Another, in good condition but without the thermos, sold at auction in 2013 for $300.

Q: I have an Emmett Kelly Jr. Collection figurine called "The Teacher." It's marked "Flambro, made in Taiwan, Republic of China." Is it worth anything?

A: "The Teacher" is one of several figurines made of Weary Willie, a clown dressed as a hobo. The character was created in 1933, during the height of the Depression, by Emmett Kelly Jr.'s father, who also was a circus performer. Emmett Kelly Jr. (1923-2006) performed as "Weary Willie" from 1960 until 2006. Flambro Imports was in business in Atlanta, Ga., from 1965 to 2006. The company imported figurines, giftware and other items. Flambro sold more than one line of Emmett Kelly Jr. figurines, and prices vary. Your figurine was made between 1987 and 2002 and sells for about $50 today.

Tip: Rearrange your furniture so valuable silver or paintings can't be seen from the street.

Take advantage of a free listing for your group to announce events or to find antique shows, national meetings and other events. Go to the Calendar at Kovels.com to find, publicize and plan your antiquing trips.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Buffalo Pottery cup and saucer, Blue Willow, marked, 1911, $45.
  • Fenton cruet, Coin Dot, cobalt blue, reeded handle, 7 inches, $95.
  • Amberina water pitcher, Spot Optic, spiral ribs, reeded handle, c. 1890, 8 1/2 inches, $185.
  • Cribbage-dominos game set, bone dominoes, red, brown circles, sliding box-top board, made by prisoner of war, c. 1810, 5 1/2 inches, $210.
  • Cookie jar, black mammy, hands on hips, yellow scarf, white apron, zigzag border, Brayton Laguna, c. 1950, 12 1/2 inches, $280.
  • Chalkware figurine, stag, reclining, painted reddish brown, c. 1850, 9 inches, pair, $425.
  • Wall bracket, giltwood, serpentine, plume-carved, Continental, c. 1780, 15 inches, $565.
  • Chair, Charles & Ray Eames, yellow fiberglass, enameled steel, Herman Miller Furniture Co., 1940s, 32 x 25 inches, $625.
  • Souvenir plates, Duke University, blue transferware school scene, raised border, Wedgwood, 1937, 10 5/8 inches, 8 pieces, $770.
  • Cutlery box, Federal, mahogany, string inlay, slant top, c. 1800, 15 x 9 inches, $3,185.

Kovels' "A Diary: How to Settle a Collector's Estate." Our new week-by-week record of the settlement of an estate, from your first days gathering legal papers to the last days when you're dividing antiques among heirs and selling everything else – even the house. How to identify pottery, jewelry and other popular collectibles. Tips on where and how to sell furniture, jewelry, dishes, figurines, record albums, bikes and even clothes. We include lots of pictures and prices and explain the advantages of a house sale, auction, selling to a dealer, or donating to a charity. Learn about how to handle the special problems of security and theft. Plus a free current supplement with useful websites, auctions lists and other current information. Available only from Kovels for $19.95 plus $4.95 postage and handling. Order by phone at 800-303-1996; online at Kovels.com ; or write to Kovels, P.O. Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
This Rookwood tile featuring a dark blue rook on a branch was used for advertising by the famous Rookwood Pottery of Cincinnati about 1915. One sold in 2012 at a Humler and Nolan auction in Cincinnati for $5,250.
Last Updated on Monday, 28 July 2014 14:49
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of July 21, 2014

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 21 July 2014 09:50
The figures on this Anna Pottery vase made in the 1860s give a message about the Civil war, slavery and the evils of alcohol. It sold for $69,000 at a Crocker Farm auction in March.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio - Artists often express political ideas in their work, and many years later, collectors have trouble understanding the politics.

Kirkpatrick/Anna pottery worked from 1839 to 1896 in Illinois and made pottery jugs and other useful containers. But they also created some very strange jugs. Pottery pigs marked with railroad routes were made in the 1870s and 1880s to give to politicians, important owners or employees of the railroads. Those pigs sell today for about $12,000 up to a record price of $35,000.

But mysterious "Temperance" jugs were decorated with three-dimensional figures that can be confusing to someone from the 21st century. One spectacular salt-glazed jug, 10 1/4 inches high, was made with more than 18 applied designs representing the Civil War, slavery and the drinking of alcohol. There is a bust of a Union soldier with a goatee being bitten by a snapping turtle. The rear end of a man in red pants "going in" probably is a reference to the evils of alcohol that "trap" him in the whiskey jug. One of the many snakes on the jug is eating a thin, bearded man. The head of a man, perhaps Abraham Lincoln, is shown near an eagle. The head of a black man and loose pottery chains represent slavery. A man smoking a pipe and drinking from a mug, and a classical figure of a woman holding a lyre still are unidentified.

The jug is well-marked, with the words "from Kirkpatrick Anna Pottery, Anna Union Co, Ills." It may be the most amazing of all of the Anna Pottery message pieces, and it sold at a Crocker Farm auction in Sparks, Md., for $69,000 in March.

Q: I have a glass compote with a frosted stem and foot. The stem has three female faces in relief. The clear-glass bowl has a piecrust edge. It has been in my family for a long time. Can you give me any information about it?

A: Three Face is a pressed glass pattern made by George A. Duncan & Sons, which later became Duncan and Miller Glass Co. It was designed by John Ernest Miller in 1878, and the designer's wife supposedly was the model for the face. Three Face pattern glass was made until 1892. However, it has been reproduced. Original, early pieces sell for high prices, but reproductions sell for about $100.

Q: I bought a Vibro-Shaver at a garage sale and would like some information about it. I have the original box and the instructions, but it doesn't say who made it or the year it was made. It runs and is in excellent condition. It still has the original price tag of $5. What is it worth today?

A: Vibro was advertised in a 1937 issue of Popular Mechanics magazine as the only nonelectric, automatic shaver made. The razor blade is held in the detachable head, which vibrates when the "key" on the front is wound. Shavers are not a popular collectible. Vibro-Shavers with original box sell online for $15 to $20 today.

Q: I have a silver-plated demitasse spoon by Crown Silver Plate Co. The engraving in the bowl of the spoon is of an old battleship. The letters on top read "Battleship Maine," and underneath the ship it reads "Captain Sigsbee." The ship sunk in Havana Harbor on Feb. 15, 1898. I'd like to know if this spoon has any value.

A: The battleship Maine was sent to Cuba in January 1898 to protect American interests during Cuba's fight for independence from Spain. On Feb. 15, an explosion onboard sank the ship. The cause was never definitely determined. The sinking inspired the slogan "Remember the Maine, to Hell with Spain" and spurred America's entrance into the Spanish-American War. To commemorate the sinking, several silver companies made souvenir spoons picturing the battleship in the bowl and the head of Capt. Charles D. Sigsbee on the finial at the end of the handle. The name "Crown Silver Plate Co." was used on silver flatware made by J.W. Johnson of New York City in 1898. Souvenir spoons like yours sell for about $5.

Q: I have a hobo clown doll that has been in my family since at least the early 1950s. It is 18 inches tall, has a hard-plastic head and cloth body, and a hand crank on the back that produces a laughing sound when turned. The doll has a cloth tag that reads "Gund Mfg. Co., J. Swedlin Inc." I have tried to learn more about it, and Gund says they have no record of this doll. Can you help?

A: Gund made your clown doll sometime between 1954 and 1957. German immigrant Adolph Gund started his company in 1898 in Norwalk, Conn. He retired in 1925 and sold the business to Jacob Swedlin with the understanding that the Gund name would continue to be used. Swedlin ran the company with his brothers. They changed the company's name to J. Swedlin Inc. but kept Gund as a trade name. Gund was bought by Enesco in 2008 and continues to make plush toys. The laughing box mechanism inside your clown doll is actually a phonograph-like device that plays a small record. It was patented in 1953. The device was used in millions of toys, including your clown doll and other toys made by Gund and other companies, until 1957. Your laughing clown doll would sell for $25 to as much as $100 if it's in good condition and still laughs.

Tip: If you are selling a car, rug, quilt or upholstered furniture and do not smoke, your ad should mention that it was owned by a nonsmoker. That is a plus for many buyers.

Need prices for your antiques and collectibles? Find them at Kovels.com, our website for collectors. You can find more than 900,000 prices and more than 11,000 color photographs that help you determine the value of your collectibles. Study the prices. Go to the free Price Guide at Kovels.com. The website also lists publications, clubs, appraisers, auction houses, people who sell parts or repair antiques, show lists and more. Kovels.com adds to the information in this column.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

 

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Currier & Ives print, Sinking of the Cumberland, lithograph, hand-colored, frame, 1800s, 17 x 21 inches, $60.
  • Orrefors bowl, clear, frosted dancing nude women, birds, deer, hexagonal, signed Simon Gate, c. 1945, 3 x 8 x 9 inches, $185.
  • Staffordshire group, Tithe Pig, minister, man holding pig, woman with baby, tree, circa 1830, 6 1/2 inches, $200.
  • Barber pole, carved wood, red and white paint, circa 1900, 67 inches, $240.
  • Indian Motorcycle sign, yellow-and-red logo, wood, round, Springfield, Mass., 1900s, 24 inches, $440.
  • Apron, flowers, rockwork embroidery, silk, shadowbox frame, Chinese, 50 x 25 inches, $610.
  • Chair, grain-painted, gilt stencils, turned crest rails, double cornucopia splats, ring-turned legs, circa 1825, 34 inches, pair, $620.
  • Print, Le Tresor Coree, Japanese woman holding small child, signed Paul Jacoulet, circa 1940, 19 x 14 inches, $710.
  • Doorstop, Old Salt sailor, cast iron, painted, black face, yellow slicker, holding knife, early 20th century, 14 inches, $1,650.
  • Schwinn bicycle, Black Phantom, painted black and red, chrome, leather seat, balloon tires, boy's, circa 1955, 20 inches, $4,025.

Contemporary, modern and mid-century ceramics made since 1950 are among the hottest collectibles today. Our new special report, "Kovels' Buyers' Guide to Modern Ceramics: Mid-Century to Contemporary," identifies important pottery by American and European makers. Includes more than 65 factories and 70 studio artists, each with a mark and dates. Works by major makers, including Claude Conover, Guido Gambone and Lucie Rie, as well as potteries like Gustavsberg, Metlox and Sascha Brastoff, are shown in color photos. Find the "sleepers" at house sales and flea markets. Special Report, 8 1/2 x 5 1/2 inches, 64 pp. Available only from Kovels for $19.95 plus $4.95 postage and handling. Order by phone at 800-303-1996, online at Kovels.com ; or mail to Kovels, Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
The figures on this Anna Pottery vase made in the 1860s give a message about the Civil war, slavery and the evils of alcohol. It sold for $69,000 at a Crocker Farm auction in March.
Last Updated on Monday, 21 July 2014 10:13
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of July 14, 2014

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 14 July 2014 08:45
J. and J.W. Meeks of New York City made this classical drop-leaf table about 1840. It has a stenciled label in the drawer with the address of the workshop from 1836 to 1855. It extends to 45 inches long. The table sold for $1,075 at Neal Auction this spring in New Orleans.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – No matter how large a house is, there always seems to be a need for more space. During the 19th century, especially in the South, homes often had long, wide front halls that went from the front door to the back door. That allowed the air to circulate and helped cool the house.

Clever furniture makers created a table that could be stored against the wall until it was needed. The table had deep drop leaves hinged to a narrow top. When opened, the leaves were supported by "swing" legs, and the extended table could open to 45 inches long and 32 inches wide. Sometimes the table was made with an under-the-top storage drawer that opened from the side. This type of drop-leaf table was made in the 16th century and has been made in a variety of styles, including modern versions made in the 21st century.

 

Q: I have been trying to get more information about a porcelain nut bowl that belonged to my grandmother. It has slightly curved sides and two gilt handles. It is painted with squirrels and grass on the outside and pinecones on the inside. The mark on the bottom is a shield with the words, "HC, Royal Bavaria, Patent Application." How old is it? Is there is any value other than as a family treasure?

 

A: Your nut dish was made in Bavaria (Germany) sometime between 1890 and 1914 but decorated in the United States. The decorating of porcelain "blanks" by independent artists rather than factory-employed artists was popular in the United States from the 1870s to the 1930s. It began in Cincinnati in 1874, when Mary Louise McLaughlin saw a set of European china paints and urged her art instructor to organize a class in china painting. The class was so successful that the ladies in the class exhibited their work at the 1876 Philadelphia Centennial Exposition. By 1900 there were an estimated 20,000 china painters in America. For the most part, they used china blanks imported from Germany and France. Your nut dish is worth about $35 to $50. Rare forms, such as condensed milk containers and celery dishes, usually bring higher prices than ordinary plates, cups and bowls.

 

Q: I have a small metal toy chair that was a prize in a Cracker Jack box many years ago. From information we have, we think it's from about 1915. Can you give us some information about Cracker Jack toys and what they are worth?

 

A: Cracker Jack has been a popular snack for more than 100 years. A combination of popcorn, peanuts and molasses was introduced at the 1893 World's Fair in Chicago, but the name "Cracker Jack" wasn't used until 1896. Prizes were put in every box beginning in 1912. Miniature metal toys were included in early years, plastic toys later. Collectors look for old Cracker Jack toys, boxes and advertising materials. The Cracker Jack Collectors Association is a club with a newsletter for collectors (www.crackerjackcollectors.com/cjcahistory.htm). Some early Cracker Jack toys sell at auctions or online for $10 or $15, but some that are rare or more desirable can sell for much more.

 

Q: I have two glass decanters with pewter overlay and pewter stoppers. The bottles have pinched sides, and the word "Haig's" is molded on the bottom. The base of the pewter is marked "Ngan Winghing" and "Made in Hong Kong." About when were they made?

 

A: Haig's is a famous brand of whiskey. Haig's pinch bottles were first made in 1893. Bottles with overlay probably were made at Christmastime. Your pewter overlay bottle is relatively new. Several companies in Hong Kong use the name "Wing Hing." Your pewter decanter may have been made by Wing Hing Metal Manufactory Ltd., a company that makes and exports metal products, including promotional items, metal boxes, badges, toys and other items. The company has been in business for more than 25 years.

 

Q: I recently rediscovered an album containing Beatles cards that I collected after the Beatles first arrived in the United States. They were the size of baseball trading cards, and had pictures of the Beatles engaged in activities. My Beatles cards are in perfect condition. Are they worth anything?

 

A: The Topps Co. released seven series of Beatles-themed bubble-gum trading cards in 1964, after the Fab Four made their first trip to the U.S. The first three sets in the series featured black-and-white photographs of John, Paul, George and Ringo, with blue facsimile signatures, totaling 165 cards. They were followed by a "Color Card" series of 64 cards, with questions, answers and facts on the back, a "Beatles Diary" series of 60 cards, with color photographs and "diary entries" by each Beatle on the back and a "Hard Day's Night" series of sepia-tone cards with pictures from the movie. There also is a series of 55 oversized "Beatles Plaks" cards, with photographs and slogans about the Beatles on shaped "plaks" that could be punched out and put together to form a chain-like display. Collectors also look for the wrappers and boxes they came in. Beatles Plaks cards are the hardest to find and therefore the most expensive. Other Beatles trading cards can sell for a few dollars to a few hundred dollars, depending on the set and condition of the cards. Beatles trading cards from the 1990s and 2000s are worth very little.

 

Tip: Avoid flies. They leave droppings on mirrors, pictures and chandeliers. Flyspecks on pictures can be carefully removed with a knife blade. Glass can be washed.

 

Sign up for our free weekly email, "Kovels Komments." Terry Kovel writes about the latest news, tips and questions and her views of the market. If you register on our website, there is no charge.

 

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

 

 

CURRENT PRICES

 

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

 

Compact, Yardley, gold-tone, black and white enamel, fitted interior, hinged, 1931, 2 1/2 x 2 inches, $40.

Ironstone bowl and pitcher, Grosvenor pattern, flowers, Charles Meigh, Old Hall Pottery, circa 1860, child's, two pieces, $160.

Aneroid barometer and thermometer, shaped oak case, ormolu mounts, circa 1880, 43 x 14 1/4 inches, $240.

Flask, liberty eagle, olive green, Willington Glass Co., 1800s, 6 inches, $265.

Whirligig, "Dewey Boy," sailor holding paddles, carved wood, painted, Nantucket, 1911, 22 x 36 inches, $430.

Cupboard, hanging, raised panel door, fitted interior, blue paint, circa 1850, 28 x 24 inches, $500.

Doll, Sonneberg, bisque dome head, paperweight eyes, human-hair wig, wood and composition body, low-waist dress, circa 1870, 18 inches, $510.

Indian storage basket, Pit River, California, geometric designs, circa 1920, 8 1/2 x 12 inches, $595.

Kutani porcelain vase, baluster shape, animal-shaped handles, mythological scenes, wood base, 1800s, 14 inches, pair, $1,110.

Civil War albumen photograph, Union Gen. William Rosecrans, sitting near tent, mounted, 1863, 7 x 9 inches, $1,765.

 

Keep up with changes in the collectibles world. Send for a free sample issue of our 12-page, color-illustrated newsletter, "Kovels on Antiques and Collectibles," filled with prices, news, information and photos, plus major articles and opinions about the world of collecting. An important tool for anyone who buys or sells antiques and collectibles. To subscribe at a bargain $27 for 12 issues, write Kovels, P.O. Box 8534, Big Sandy, TX 75755; call 800-829-9158; or subscribe online at KovelsOnlineStore.com .

 

© 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
J. and J.W. Meeks of New York City made this classical drop-leaf table about 1840. It has a stenciled label in the drawer with the address of the workshop from 1836 to 1855. It extends to 45 inches long. The table sold for $1,075 at Neal Auction this spring in New Orleans.
Last Updated on Monday, 14 July 2014 09:05
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of July 7, 2014

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Written by Terry Kovel   
Monday, 07 July 2014 11:39
Sometimes you get a bargain at an auction. This carved wooden eagle sold in March 2014 for $47 at Copake auction in Copake, New York. BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Flags, eagles, George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, the Statue of Liberty, Uncle Sam and other patriotic symbols are very popular with collectors. The image gives a simple message of patriotism to Americans. You can find them in advertisements, as textile designs, on dinnerware or made into figurines for the fireplace mantel. Folk artists often made large wooden carvings to be displayed publicly. But the price depends on the fame and skill of the artist, the age and size of the piece, and how it was used before it was sold to a collector. A large carved hanging wall eagle by John Bellamy (1836-1914) or an eagle made to display on a table made by the Wilhelm Schimmel (1817-1890) sells for thousands of dollars. An ordinary eagle by an unknown carver can be a bargain. This 35-inch-high painted wooden eagle sold for $47, slightly less than estimated, at a Copake auction in upstate New York.

***

Q: My aunt left me a lamp. The base is a figurine of an 18th-century woman sitting at a piano gazing affectionately at a man with a lute. It sits on an oval brass base. Two curved arms extend from the back and they are decorated with a metal vine and tiny porcelain flowers. In the 1940s, my aunt was window shopping in Chicago with a friend, when she spotted and admired this lamp. Later, the bell boy in her hotel delivered it to her room. It was a gift! I'm interested in learning its maker and history. Value, too.

A: Your lamp is a typical example of porcelain made in the town of Dresden, Germany. Dresden porcelain is known for its naturalistic flowers and gilt trim, reticulation (cutout areas) and lace decorations. Figurines of 18th-century ladies and gentlemen, romantic couples, animal groups, cherubs and mythological subjects were popular. The most famous Dresden figurines are called "crinoline groups," which show court-life scenes like people dancing and playing instruments. More than 200 porcelain-decorating studios operated in Dresden in the late 1800s and early 1900s. They decorated white porcelain made in Germany, Austria and France. Most porcelain blanks were not marked with the manufacturer's mark. Your lamp probably was made in the 1930s and would sell for about $100. Replace the cord. Old cords are often cracked and are fire hazards.

***

Q: I have a brown clay type teapot that was my grandmother's. It's embossed with a girl at the well. I was told it was "Rebekah at the Well." Can you tell me something about it? How old is it? Does it have any value?

A: "The Rebekah at the Well" teapot was first made by Edwin and William Bennett of Baltimore in 1851. The design was copied from a pot made by an English maker, Samuel Alcock & Company, in the 1840s. The mottled brown glaze is known as Rockingham. Bennett made Rebekah at the Well teapots until the factory closed in 1936. The relief design was so popular it was copied by other makers in the United States and England. It can be found on teapots, sugar bowls, pitchers and other items. Its value: $50 and up.

***

Q: I found a silk scarf in my grandmother's belongings. The scarf has a small hand-sewn hem around the edges. In the center there is a circle with a statue of a horse and rider standing on a pediment that reads "1688" and surrounded by the words "The Glorious & Immortal Memory of 1688 & 1690." Other symbols, including the harp of Ireland, are in the four corners of the scarf and the words "Aughrim," "Derry," "Enniskillen" and "Boyne" are along the sides. My grandmother's parents were from Ireland. What does this represent?

A: Your scarf commemorates battles in the "Glorious Revolution," when the Catholic king of England, James, was overthrown and replaced by the Protestant King William. The figure on the horse is William, who invaded England at the invitation of parliament in 1688. He and his wife, Mary, were crowned as monarchs of England in 1689. Then William invaded Scotland and Ireland, and became king of those countries, too. The places listed along the sides of your scarf were famous battles in Ireland. These battles still are commemorated by Orangemen in the Protestant parts of Ireland.

***

Q: What marking should be on the bottom to identify something as Fenton glass? I have seen a few different markings on items on eBay.

A: Fenton was founded in 1905 in Martins Ferry, Ohio. The company is known for its carnival glass made between 1907 and 1920. Most Fenton glass is marked "Fenton," but some other marks also were used. Pieces marked with an "F" in an oval were made from molds bought from other glass companies. Pieces marked with the three letters "O," "V" and "G" are part of Fenton's Olde Virginia Glass line, made from 1960 to 1979. Fenton stopped making art glass in 2011. Copies of Fenton items currently are being made by an unrelated company, Fenton's Collectibles, using original Fenton molds. The copies are marked with both the Fenton mark and Fenton's Collectibles mark.

***

Tip: Advertising collectors should check every address, phone number, name and price information that is on a label, a sticker or the container. They will help with the research to determine the age of the product.

***

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, (Name of this newspaper), King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

* * *

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions

Cruet, glass, feather pattern, pontil, McKee Brothers, c. 1896, 5 1/2 inches, $45.

Stand, Hepplewhite, cherry, drawer, square top, splayed legs, c. 1800, 28 x 18 x 18 inches, $125.

Toothpick holder, silver plated, circus bear on ball, side barrel, marked, Osborn & Co., c. 1885, 2 3/4 inches, $185.

Trivet, wedding, pierced date 1852, wrought iron, marked KW, KE, 13 inches, $240.

Fraktur, birth, watercolor, ink, on paper, two hearts, birds, children, Isaac Broft, 1806, 13 x 16 inches, $300.

Paperweight, pink flowers, green, white ground, domed, box, Paul Ysart, 20th century, 3 inches, $375.

Nautical quadrant, brass, glass lens, ebonized wood frame, case, Spenser, Barrett & Co., London, c. 1860, $415.

Atwater Kent radio, cathedral style, No. 82, 7 tubes, 1931, 19 1/2 inches, $450.

Pearlware figurine, Charity, woman with children, painted multicolor enamel, Staffordshire, c. 1800, 9 3/4 inches, $600.

Belleek figurine, Venus crouching on shell, bronzed, gilt bands on head and arms, black mark, c. 1885, 18 inches, $4,500.

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The Kovels have navigated flea markets for decades. Learn from the best. "Kovels Flea Market Strategies: How to Shop, Buy and Bargain the 21st Century Way" by Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel tells you about the latest smartphone apps and websites to help you shop, share and ship, as well as what to wear, what to bring and, most importantly, how to negotiate your way to a bargain. Also, there are tips on spotting fakes, advice about paying for your purchases and shipping suggestions. Full-color booklet, 17 pages, 8 1/2 by 5 1/2 inches. Available only from Kovels for $7.95 plus $4.95 postage and handling. Order by phone at 800-303-1996; online at www.Kovels.com ; or mail to Kovels, Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

***

(c) 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.

 



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
Sometimes you get a bargain at an auction. This carved wooden eagle sold in March 2014 for $47 at Copake auction in Copake, New York.
Last Updated on Monday, 14 July 2014 08:51
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of June 30, 2014

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Written by Terry and Kim Kovel   
Thursday, 03 July 2014 11:22
An airplane ejection seat is not often offered for sale, and the auction estimate for this chair was $11,000. No one bid high enough for the seat to sell. Photo credit: Hermann Historica, Munich, Germany. BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Antiques auction galleries sell more than antiques. Folk art, design, modernism, fashion, fossils and dinosaurs, rocks and minerals, comics, movie memorabilia, political and space all are words that have been used to advertise recent sales. No longer do the sales feature only furniture, glass, silver, ceramics, toys, dolls and paper ephemera. A unique item was an ejection seat from a Vulcan jet bomber made in England. It was offered in a Hermann Historica auction in Munich, Germany, on May 9, 2014. The chrome ejection seat, dated July 15, 1974, is 56 inches high by 21 inches wide. The Vulcan, first made in 1952, was used by the Royal Air Force during the Cold War. It could fly at 52,000 feet and carried nuclear arms. The newest look in decorating is "tech," and this seat with its perforated base, moveable arms and high curved back looks like a chair from the future. But it would seem destined for a space exploration museum, not a living room.

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Q: I inherited an old doll from a friend in 1999. She said the doll was about 160 years old. The doll's underskirt was made of handspun wool made by her grandmother. The doll originally had a wax head, but it was damaged in a house fire and couldn't be repaired, so it was replaced in 2001. The doll's body is made of leather and sawdust. How much is it worth?

A: Most dolls made before the early 1900s had bisque or china heads. Wax-head dolls were made in the late 18th and the 19th centuries. Wax was not as breakable as bisque or porcelain and could be easily molded. Later, most dolls were made with composition, vinyl or plastic heads. Wax can be damaged by light, heat and temperature changes. It is difficult and expensive to repair. With the original head and body, it would sell for a high price. Unfortunately, your doll is not worth much because of the replaced head.

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Q: I have a Royal Crown Cola cigarette lighter that was made by Kem Inc. of Detroit. It's 2 1/2 inches high. Is it worth anything?

A: Kem made a Royal Crown Cola cigarette lighter shaped like a bottle in the 1940s or '50s. It's chrome-plated and has a replica of the Royal Crown label on it. If in good condition, with the label intact, it usually sells for $20 to $75.

***

Q: We bought a reed organ at a yard sale several years ago. Above the stops and on the pedals are the words "Palace Organ." Above the keyboard, it reads "Loring & Blake Organ Co." and "Worcester, Mass., USA." The organ is in good shape and plays beautifully. Can you give us any information about the organ?

A: J.W. Loring and Rufus W. Blake started Loring, Blake & Co. in 1868. The name of the company became Loring & Blake Organ Co. before 1870. The company had locations in Worcester, Mass., and Toledo, Ohio, and was one of the country's largest producers of reed organs. In 1880 the company exhibited several parlor organs at the Worcester Fair, with prices listed from $40 to $1,200. Old reed organs are hard to sell today.

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Q: I have an old RCA Victor Model 6-RF-9 radio that friends of mine were about to throw out because they didn't have room for it at their new place. It was his father's and it still works. It has a propeller-shaped dial and glass bulbs on the inside that light up when I plug it in. Can you tell me anything about this radio?

A: RCA called your table model radio the "Livingston." It was pictured in a December 1951 magazine ad that mentioned its "modern" plastic case, phone-jack for a record-changer attachment and "Golden Throat" tone. It retailed for $79.50. Value today is $100 to $150.

***

Q: When my father was in the U.S. Army, we were stationed in Germany from 1949 to 1952. My mother bought a pottery wine pitcher in Munich at a shop that sold used items. It's white with relief decorations that include a man holding a musical instrument and a four-line poem in German below that. It has a lid with a pewter thumb-press and is 13 1/2 inches tall. The mark on the bottom looks like a large bird above the words "Villeroy & Boch." The numbers 1821, 90 and 20 are etched next to the crest. My father is 99 years old now and would like to sell the pitcher. Can you tell me more about it and its value?

A: Villeroy & Boch was founded in Mettlach, Germany, in 1836. The "bird" mark on the bottom of your pitcher, or master stein, is called the "Mercury mark." It is the head of Mercury with a winged cap. The number 1821 on the bottom is the mold or form number, 90 indicates it was made in 1890, and 20 is called the "mystery mark" because no one is sure what it means. Pitchers like yours sold at auction last year for $240 to $280.

***

Tip: A tennis ball can be used to rub out scuff marks on vintage linoleum tiles often used in homes before the 1960s.

***

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, (Name of this newspaper), King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

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CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

Pewter stein, glass bottom, engraved, Genesee Valley Hunt Club, July 4, 1894, $45.

Postcard set, July 4th and patriotic theme, comical, Tuck series, WWI-related, "Hope of the World," early 1900s, 197 pieces, $450.

Silhouette, Reverend Thomas Barnard, cut paper, frame, Salem, Mass., c. 1800, 6 x 5 1/4 inches, $660.

Silver fruit bowl, lobed, flared, applied scrollwork, handles, William Forbes, New York, c. 1840, 12 inches, $865.

Lolling chair, Federal style, mahogany, upholstered, open scrolled arms, box stretcher, 1800s, pair, $1,080.

Weather vane, Indian, bow & arrow, full body, verdigris, gilt, 20th century, 53 inches, $1,295.

Baseball card, Lou Gehrig, No. 160, Goudey Gum Co., 1933, $1,540.

Eagle bell toy, patriotic, Centennial Celebration commemoration, figural, spoke wheels, cast iron, Gong Bell Mfg. Co., c. 1876, 5 3/4 inches, $2,635.

Firefighting bucket, leather, red paint, R.H. Parker, Phoenix Fire Society, Exeter, N.H., 1932, 20 inches, pair, $3,360.

Wood carving, Abraham Lincoln, leather tie, brass buttons, base, painted, 1900s, 32 inches, $5,760.

***

New! The Kovels.com Premium website is up and running. In addition to 900,000 free prices of antiques and collectibles, more than 11,000 with photographs, premium subscribers will find a dictionary of marks for silver and another for ceramics, with pictured marks and company histories. Premium membership also includes a subscription to the digital edition of our newsletter, "Kovels on Antiques and Collectibles," and its archives, where you'll find hundreds of articles about almost anything you might collect. Up-to-date information for the savvy collector. Go to Kovels.com and click on "Subscription" for more information.

(c) 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
An airplane ejection seat is not often offered for sale, and the auction estimate for this chair was $11,000. No one bid high enough for the seat to sell. Photo credit: Hermann Historica, Munich, Germany.
Last Updated on Monday, 14 July 2014 08:52
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of June 23, 2014

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 23 June 2014 10:59
This French mother-of-pearl ‘egg’ is a ‘necessaire’ that holds sewing tools. The 6-1/2-inch-high piece was made in about 1875 and holds an awl, scissors, needle case and thimble. Price at a Theriault's auction in January 2014 was $1,064.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – The skill of sewing with a needle and thread was required in the centuries before the sewing machine was invented. A machine, probably the first, was used in England in 1715, and another was patented in 1844. But the Elias Howe (1845) and Isaac Singer (1851) machines were the ones that gained fame and sold by the thousands.

Women were expected to hand-embroider monograms on bedding and towels, cut and sew parts of a dress properly, and be able to mend. The mistress of the house was expected to sew in the evening, and equipment and fabrics were stored in a table in the living room near a fireplace. The wealthy of the 19th century had tools, scissors, bobbins, tape measures, thimbles and more made of gold or silver, stored in a fancy case.

Twentieth-century housewives had metal or plastic tools and a sewing machine. At a January 2014 Theriault's sale, a collection of sewing utensils brought high prices. A tape measure shaped like a sewing machine sold for $504. An English silver piglet topped by a purple velvet pincushion sold for $224. And a cash-metal thimble with brass finish sold for $112. Look in Grandma's sewing basket and junk drawer. There may be sewing treasures hidden there.

Q: I have a pottery casserole dish stamped with a Wilkinson Royal Staffordshire mark. I think the casserole dates to the 1890s from what I have learned about the mark. It has a gold-colored pattern around the edge of the base and lid. I'm wondering what it's worth.

A: Arthur J. Wilkinson took over the Royal Staffordshire Pottery in Burslem, England, in 1885. The company, known as A.J. Wilkinson Ltd., continued to operate for more than a century. Some Royal Staffordshire casseroles, even from the 1890s, sell for under $20. Others sell for prices in the hundreds.

Q: My mother bought a rocker at a Goodwill store in the 1960s for about $10. When we brought it home, Dad found a crest and date under the seat. It says "S. Bent & Bros., Inc., Gardner, Mass., 1867." It's still sturdy, although the arms have been imperceptibly braced where they meet the seat and the paint is worn down where the hands rest. Can you tell me something about the maker and an approximate value?

A: S. Bent & Bros. was founded in 1867 by Samuel, Charles and Roderic Bent. The company made Colonial-style furniture. The company closed in 2001. The furniture was mass-produced and a rocker sells for about $50 to $75 today.

Q: I own an antique Snoopy candy jar. It's glass with a color picture of Snoopy on it. Is it worth anything?

A: Anything related to Snoopy, Charlie Brown's pet dog in the Peanuts comic strip, can't be called an "antique" because it's not 100 or more years old. The comic strip, the work of Charles Schulz (1922-2000), debuted in 1950. The Snoopy candy jar dates from about 1965, which makes it a "collectible." The jar, in excellent condition, sells for $5 to $20.

Q: I have a glass butter churn, approximately 14 inches tall and 6 inches in diameter, with a metal lid and crank churning mechanism on the top. It has wooden paddles that do the work. The glass is embossed "Dazey Churn No. 40, Patented Feb. 1922, Dazey Churn & Mfg. Co., St. Louis, Mo., Made in USA." What is it worth?

A: Nathan Dazey became manager of the EZ Churn Co. of Dallas in 1904. He bought out the owner a couple of years later and moved the company to St. Louis. Dazey was granted a patent for improvements to small churns for household use on Feb. 14, 1922. The company was sold in 1947. Reproductions of the churn have been made. Dazey made 1, 2, 3 and 4 quart churns given Nos. 10, 20, 30 and 40. Smaller churns are reproductions. Vintage Dazey No. 40 churns sell for about $100.

Q: I own many beautiful items I would like to sell, but I'm not sure about finding a good antiques buyer in my city. I have lost two good Oriental rugs through consignment. When I called to check on my rugs, the owner told me they had been donated and I never received any money. Please give me some advice. I'm not originally from the area where I live now.

A: Before taking any of your antiques to a consignment shop, check on the shop by contacting your local Better Business Bureau. Never give anything to someone to repair, restore or sell without first getting a signed receipt that includes a detailed description of the items and states what you want the shop to do with them. Some places accept items for donation as well as for consignment. Be sure you are specific about what you expect. Some shops have policies that allow them to dispose of items if you don’t pick them up within a certain length of time. Be sure you understand what their policy is before you leave your items. If you feel the business has been dishonest, file a complaint with the bureau. To find your local Better Business Bureau, go to BBB.org.

Tip: Never wash plastic dishes in the dishwasher. They may warp.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Papier-mache hat stand, woman's head, flower top, Gemma Taccogna, Mexico, 1960s, 10 inches, $35.
  • Pressed glass creamer, Cupid & Psyche, footed, 1880s, 7 inches, $80.
  • Bradley & Hubbard student lamp, double, brass, white glass shades, painted design, c. 1890, 21 inches, $180.
  • Hooked rug, ship, anchor border, wool on burlap, c. 1930, 28 1/2 x 22 inches, $195.
  • Anatomical model of human left foot, cross-section, inflexible plastic, 1960s, 10 1/2 inches, $295.
  • Match safe, St. Louis World's Fair, eagle, flag, map, celluloid, 1904, 2 1/4 x 1 1/5 inches, $330.
  • Dresser, maple, six drawers, angled legs, signed Renzo Rutili, Johnson Furniture, 1960s, 40 x 45 inches, $375.
  • Paris porcelain plate, river landscape, house, family, cafe-au-lait border, gothic designs, c. 1850, 9 inches, $430.
  • Chinese famille rose jar, lid, porcelain, figures, palace, flowers, gilt dragon handles, foo dog finial, c. 1735, 18 inches, $1,355.
  • Icon, St. George slaying dragon, enameled flowers, silver riza covering, impressed mark, c. 1892, 5 3/4 x 7 inches, $3,250.

Keep up with changes in the collectibles world. Send for a free sample issue of our 12-page, color-illustrated newsletter, "Kovels on Antiques and Collectibles," filled with prices, news, information and photos, plus major articles and opinions about the world of collecting. An important tool for anyone who buys or sells antiques and collectibles. To subscribe at a bargain $27 for 12 issues, write Kovels, P.O. Box 8534, Big Sandy, TX 75755; call 800-829-9158; or subscribe online at KovelsOnlineStore.com.

© 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
This French mother-of-pearl ‘egg’ is a ‘necessaire’ that holds sewing tools. The 6-1/2-inch-high piece was made in about 1875 and holds an awl, scissors, needle case and thimble. Price at a Theriault's auction in January 2014 was $1,064.
Last Updated on Monday, 14 July 2014 08:52
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of June 16, 2014

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 16 June 2014 08:53
This pyramid-shaped tin lithographed can is hand-soldered. It probably was made before 1940. It sold for $4,830 at a William Morford auction in Cazenovia, N.Y., in March.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Vintage motor oil cans are popular among men. There is very little information available about the cans, but there's a lot about the companies that made the oil. So it's easy to date a can by its logo and style, which makes it easy to find great early examples.

The tin can was invented in 1810 to hold food for Napoleon's army. Cans were made by hand in the early 19th century. About six could be made by one man in an hour. By 1900 the main products stored in tin cans were food and petroleum products. Cans made around the turn of the 20th century had a soldered seam on the side that looks like a gray strip.

Cardboard cans were introduced in the 1940s but were widely used from the 1950s to the 1980s. The first soft drink aluminum cans were used in 1953. The first aluminum cans for motor oil were made in 1958. The square cardboard quart oil can came into use in the 1960s.

Most popular with collectors are the quart size, then the gallon, then the 5-gallon, and it does not matter if the can is full or empty.

An unusual Marathon motor oil container sold in 2014 at a William Morford auction. It's shaped and decorated to look like an oil well. The 15-inch-high can has the brand's "Running Man" logo, a silhouette of an ancient Greek runner and the slogan "Best in the long run." The logo dates back to the 1920s, but the brand was purchased by the Ohio Oil Co. in 1930.

Q: I have a New York Mets pennant from the 1969 World Series. It's red with white and blue lettering that reads "New York Mets, 1969 National League Champions." It has the Mets logo, Mr. Met, and the words "World Series." The last names of all the players and the manager are listed. The pennant is in good condition. What is it worth?

A: The New York Mets was an expansion team that ended up in last place in 1962, its inaugural season, and second to last the following seasons until 1969, when they clinched the National League pennant. The "Miracle Mets" upset the Baltimore Orioles and won the World Series that year, too. Mets pennants like yours in good condition sell for about $50 to $100.

Q: We have a Fleischmann's model steam engine that's 9 1/2 inches tall. It's in a box marked "Fleischmann 105/1" and "Western Germany." There also are operating instructions. We can't find a date or any other information, but it seems to be an old toy. Can you give us any information about this model?

A: Jean Fleischmann founded his toy company in 1877 in Nuremburg, Germany. The company began making steam toys after World War II. Model steam engines were made to power model trains and other toys. Fleischmann was taken over by Modelleisenbahn (Model Railways) in 2008 but continues as a separate brand. Your model steam engine was made between about 1950 and 1964. The steam engine sells for under $50.

Q: My small Victorian parlor table is made of oak. It has a shaped top and intricately turned legs and four little claw feet, each holding a little glass ball. I cannot find a mark or label. What would the table sell for today?

A: Those glass ball-and-claw feet were popular during the late Victorian Golden Oak period of furniture-making. If your table is in excellent condition, it could sell for $300 or more.

Q: I have a deck of playing cards with pictures of Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein, and his henchmen. The joker lists the ranks of Iraqi military next to ranks of the U.S. military. Can you tell me anything about these cards and their value?

A: A set of "personality identification playing cards" like yours was developed in 2003 to help members of the U.S. military identify "wanted" Iraqi government officials and party chairmen. Each card had the person's picture, if available, his or her last known location, and their government or committee position. High-ranking officials were pictured on the aces and face cards, and less important people on low-number cards. Saddam Hussein was pictured on the highest-ranking card, the ace of spades. The day the deck of cards was announced, an enterprising civilian downloaded the images from the U.S. Department of Defense website and offered them for sale on eBay. Soon other people also were selling the cards. Decks of Iraqi Most Wanted Playing Cards have sold online for $5 or less.

Q: In the 1970s, I was a salesman for Wilson's tennis equipment. I recently uncovered long-forgotten boxes of unused tennis rackets from the days when Wilson was far and away the leading manufacturer of rackets. The rackets are in perfect condition. Most of them have never been strung and most also come with a cover. Is there a market for these?

A: There is a market for vintage tennis rackets, although competitive players would never use them today – technology has improved rackets too much. You should contact a dealer or auctioneer who specializes in sports collectibles. And organize your collection and any related printed material to prove the age of each model. It is likely that a single racket could sell for $25 to $50.

Tip: Check wires and screw eyes before hanging an old picture.

Take advantage of a free listing for your group to announce events or to find antique shows, national meetings and other events. Go to the Calendar at Kovels.com to find, publicize and plan your antiquing trips.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Postcard, "To Dear Dad," flowers, anchor, embossed, 1908 postmark, $5.
  • Factory wheel tool, six spokes, wood, metal, Gifford Wood Co., Hudson, N.Y., circa 1900, 40 inches, $20.
  • Accordion, metal, cutout design, ivory keys, side strap handles, Alfred L. Fischer, case, 1950s, $70.
  • Cuff links, oval, mother-of-pearl, 10K gold, 3/4 inches, $120.
  • Teplitz pottery pitcher, applied dragon handle, berries, impressed Amphora mark, Austria, circa 1900, 11 inches, $270.
  • Shaving mug, occupational, cooper, man standing with barrel, gilt lettering, Haviland, stamped CFH/GDM, 1800s, 3 1/4 inches, $330.
  • Victorian chair, griffin-shaped arms, carved front legs, grotesque masks, shaped top rail, upholstered, late 1800s, 53 x 27 inches, $425.
  • Radiator cap topped by Indian hood ornament, headdress, thermometer, metal, H. Briand, Paris, circa 1930, 6 inches, $900.
  • Napoleon figurine, wearing coronation robes, porcelain, Scheibe-Alsbach mark, Germany, circa 1945, 14 inches, $1,000.
  • Cigar store Indian, standing, zinc, multicolor paint, William Demuth & Co., circa 1859, 65 inches, $2,070.
Contemporary, modern and mid-century ceramics made since 1950 are among the hottest collectibles today. Our special report, "Kovels' Buyers' Guide to Modern Ceramics: Mid-Century to Contemporary," identifies important pottery by American and European makers. Includes more than 65 factories and 70 studio artists, each with a mark and dates. Works by major makers including Claude Conover, Guido Gambone, Lucie Rie, as well as potteries like Gustavsberg, Metlox and Sascha Brastoff, are shown in color photos. Find the "sleepers" at house sales and flea markets. Special Report, 8 1/2 x 5 1/2 inches, 64 pp. Available only from Kovels for $19.95 plus $4.95 postage and handling. Order by phone at 800-303-1996; online at www.Kovels.com; or mail to Kovels, Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2014 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.



ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE
This pyramid-shaped tin lithographed can is hand-soldered. It probably was made before 1940. It sold for $4,830 at a William Morford auction in Cazenovia, N.Y., in March.
Last Updated on Monday, 14 July 2014 08:52
 
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