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Kovels - Antiques & Collecting

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of May 18, 2015

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 18 May 2015 08:25


Mildred Watkins, a well-known Cleveland enamelist, made this sterling silver box set with the enameled picture of a ship. It sold at a 2015 Skinner auction in Boston for the unexpectedly high price of $15,990.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio - Geography, knowledge and luck are a big part of finding a treasure in an unexpected place, and at a low price. It happens. A number of years ago, a collector found a stack of five enameled ashtrays at an estate sale. The trays were artwork made by a friend, but they were out of style and of no interest to the heirs. The collector asked the price and willingly paid the $5 for all of them. It was a number of years later that the name of the artist, Mildred Watkins (1883-1968), became nationally known.

A small round silver box with an enamel picturing a ship in the center sold at a January 2015 Skinner auction in Boston. It brought $15,990, about three times the high estimate. Watkins' name was well-known in Cleveland where she worked as a silversmith, jeweler and enamelist. She studied at the Cleveland School of Art from 1897 to 1901. She moved to Boston to study enameling, then returned to Cleveland and taught at the Cleveland School of Art from 1919 to 1953. She made enameled jewelry, boxes and ashtrays for local shops and shows. Today, the best of the five estate sale ashtrays is worth about $2,000 or more. The others should sell for $250 to $500.

The collector found a bargain because she was informed. But living in the same city as the artist and being lucky enough to get to the sale early led to finding a treasure.

Q: I have quite an extensive collection of American Brilliant Period cut glass that I started collecting when I was about 16 years old. I'm now 74. I know it has lost a considerable sum since the beginning of this century. Do you think the value of my collection will ever return?

A: The American "Brilliant Period" of cut glass was from 1876 until about 1910. The glass was "brilliant" because it was deeply cut and highly polished. Colored cut glass was made from the early 1880s until about 1900. The most popular type was "colored cut to clear" glass. American Brilliant cut glass has gone down in value partly because copies now can be made today in Europe for much less money. The older, heavy-cut glass is out of style, perhaps because it requires hand washing. We wish we could see into the future, but so many uncontrollable factors influence price. An article showing a collection that belonged to a movie star or a sudden interest in elaborately decorated clear glass can raise prices. Like any antique, the prices may go up or down and it usually takes about 25 years for the price of a collection to recover from a loss.

Q: I have a small burl walnut cabinet with two doors. It has an inside drawer that is branded "Hekman." The cabinet has metal loop door pulls. It's 28 inches high and the top is 38 wide by 18 inches deep. What can you tell me about it?

A: Edsko Hekman was a baker who emigrated from the Netherlands to Grand Rapids, Michigan, hoping to fulfill his dream of becoming a furniture maker. Towards the end of the 19th century, Grand Rapids companies had become leading producers of machine-made furniture and the city became known as "The Furniture City." Hekman started out as a baker in Grand Rapids, selling cookies door to door, and started the Hekman Biscuit Co., which later became the Keebler Co. It was Hekman's three sons who inherited his love of furniture craftsmanship and started the Hekman Furniture Co. in 1922. The company made affordable desks, cabinets, consoles, and all sorts of occasional tables and stands. In 1983, Hekman was bought by the Howard Miller Clock Co. of Zeeland, Michigan, and in 1993, Hekman bought a company noted for its upholstered furniture. The company is still in business. Your cabinet was made by Hekman about 1950 and is worth $200 to $300.

Q: I have a glass bank that is 4 3/4 inches high by 4 1/2 inches wide. It has raised letters that read "Watch your savings grow with Esso" and an oval with the Esso logo. Is it worth anything?

A: Clear glass block banks were popular advertising or promotional giveaways and souvenirs. They were printed, etched or embossed with all kinds of designs or company logos. Your glass block bank was available at service stations that sold Esso gasoline. The embossed logo and slogan on your bank was used by Esso starting in 1934. The bank probably had a paper label band around it when it was new. Some of the labels encouraged saving to buy U.S. Defense Bonds; later labels encouraged saving for Christmas, vacation, new car, and clothing. Your bank is from the early 1940s and is worth $40 to $75, depending on condition and clarity of the glass (some have yellowed). A bank with its label will bring a higher price. A glass block bank was also a popular souvenir at the 1939 New York World's Fair. It has the same Esso logo on one side and the Trylon and Perisphere and "New York World's Fair 1939" on the other. It can sell for up to $100.

A reader wrote us with added information about old mahjong sets that we mentioned in this column a while ago. We explained that new sets have more tiles so old ones are not often used by those who play mahjong. Our reader said there are old tiles for sale at the National Mah Jongg League, 212-246-3052, or www.nationalmahjonggleague.org or 250 West 57th Street, NY, NY 10107. If you send a joker, flower or symbol tile they will try to get a match to your set. They also have decals that can be used on your tiles. Tip: It is best to hand wash silverware and not put it in a dishwasher. The force of the water may make the silver bump, the detergent may have some harmful ingredients, and the handles on vintage knives may come unglued.

Sign up for our free weekly email, "Kovels Komments." Terry Kovel writes about the latest news, tips and questions and her views of the market. If you register on our website, there is no charge.= Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Blenko glass pitcher, yellow, flared top, 14 3/4 inches, $25.
  • Wood carving figure, gnome miner, on rock, Black Forest, Switzerland, c. 1900, 6 inches, $215.
  • Sterling-silver bowl, scalloped, flower border, Gorham, 1898, 11 x 3 inches, $360.
  • Chest, marquetry inlay, fitted interior, bombe, lid handle, Dutch, c. 1750, 17 x 22 inches, $565.
  • Marble Carving, bust, woman, upswept hair, white, gray dress, socle base, 24 x 17 inches, $635.
  • Creamware mug, brown, orange, blue slip twigs, green, black bands, Mocha, England, c. 1820, 3 1/2 inches, $660.
  • Movie poster, Two-Faced Woman, Greta Garbo, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1941, 27 x 40 inches, $750.
  • Toy fire wagon, hose reel, driver, horse drawn, red, black, white paint, cast iron, Carpenter, 14 inches, $770.
  • Pier mirror, giltwood, eagle attacking serpent panel, twist carved columns, c. 1890, 108 x 32 inches, $1,250.
  • Sampler, pictorial, verse, Biblical, Fraternal symbols, floral border, Mary Scott, Lurenckirk, silk on linen, frame, 1835, 19 x 20 inches, $2,400.

"Kovels' Buyers' Guide to Modern Ceramics: Mid-Century to Contemporary." New! Contemporary, modern and mid-century ceramics made since 1950 are among the hottest collectibles today. Our special report, "Kovels' Buyers' Guide to Modern Ceramics: Mid-Century to Contemporary" identifies important pottery by American and European makers. Includes more than 65 factories and 70 studio artists, each with a mark and dates. Works by major makers including Claude Conover, Guido Gambone, Lucie Rie, as well as potteries like Gustavsberg, Metlox and Sascha Brastoff are shown in color photos. Find the "sleepers" at house sales and flea markets. Special Report, 8 1/2 x 5 1/2 inches, 64 pp. Available only from Kovels for $19.95 plus $4.95 postage and handling. Order by phone at 800-303-1996, online at Kovels.com; or mail to Kovels, Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2015 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.

Last Updated on Monday, 18 May 2015 08:41
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of May. 11, 2015

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 11 May 2015 10:27


The gilt Ceres, goddess of agriculture, holds a suspended clock that appears to be running without any power source. She is 28 inches high. The clock, made about 1890 in France, was sold by Skinner Auctions of Boston for $5,843.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – What is a mystery clock? How does it work? Magicians never tell the secrets of their trade. But the secret of the mystery clock, first made in the 1860s, has been exposed.

The most famous mystery clock had a figure, often a goddess, who held a long pendulum that swung for no obvious reason. She stood on a circular base with a platform. The platform moved slightly, making the pendulum swing and the clock hands move to tell the time.

A different type of mystery clock was made in the 20th century. It was very popular from the 1950s to the 1980s. A normal-looking circular face that was secretly made of four glass discs was set in a modern looking case, usually rectangular. The hands were glued to the discs. The numbers for the hours were on a band on the case that went around the glass, so the hands seem to float on the glass while keeping the time. Many of these clocks were made with gold and jewels and sold for high prices.

Ceres, the goddess of agriculture, is featured in a mystery clock that sold late in November 2014 for $5,843. She is holding a ball-shaped black clock suspended on chains from her left hand. The round black clock has raised Roman numerals, and it furnishes the necessary rotation.

Q: I have an old 20-inch toy Army truck by Buddy L. It was given to my brother in 1940. The truck has a green metal body, a canvas cover and rubber wheels. The side door is embossed with "Buddy L." The truck is in good condition. What is it worth?

A: Your Army transport truck with the Buddy "L" bar and circle logo embossed on the door was made from 1939 to 1940. The truck was sold alone or with a trailer. It's worth $90 to $175, depending on its condition. The Buddy "L" company goes back to the Moline Pressed Steel Co. that was started by Fred A. Lundahl in 1913 in Moline, Illinois. His son, Arthur Brown Lundahl, was born in 1915 and nicknamed Buddy. Another boy named Buddy lived in their neighborhood, and to avoid confusion, Buddy Lundahl was called Buddy "L." His father's company began making toys under the name, Buddy "L" in 1921. Buddy "L" toys still are being made.

Q: I have a delicate blue and gold cup and saucer with flowers that is marked "Dresden, Saxony" along with an animal that looks like a calf. I'd love it if you could give me some information about it.

A: The mark on your cup and saucer was used by Ambrosius Lamm, a decorator who opened a studio in Dresden, Germany, in 1887. He decorated porcelain made by the famous manufacturers in the nearby town of Meissen. His mark shows a lamb over the word "Dresden." The word "Saxony" was added in 1915 and used until about 1934, when the mark was changed to say "Made in Saxony." That is when your cup and saucer were made. When Lamm retired in 1934, his daughter took over the business and continued to operate it until 1949. The fancy blue and gold decoration on your cup and saucer suggests the set is worth $100 to $150.

Q: I have six luncheon plates and six cups and saucers marked on the bottom "Designed for Pan Am" above an oval mark for "Bauscher Weiden, Bavaria, Germany." They are solid white with a gold border and are surprisingly sturdy. Do they have any value, or should I just give them to my granddaughter for her kitchen play?

A: Pan American Airlines was in business from 1927 until 1991. Early Pan Am planes had "dining rooms," where passengers dined at tables set with china plates, silverware, and real glassware, not plastic. Dinnerware was made especially for Pan Am by several different manufacturers from the 1930s to the 1980s. Airline china, like railroad china, and other restaurant ware, is heavier, making it less likely to break with constant use. Your dishes are the "Gold Rim" pattern originally made by Noritake in Japan in the early 1970s. Later, the same pattern was made by Bauscher Weiden. Another white pattern, with a wavy border design, was made for Pan Am by Bauscher Weiden beginning in 1986. There are collectors who search for vintage airline and railroad china. Six place sets like yours might auction for $150 to $250 depending on where and when it is sold. It will sell best at an auction with other airplane collectibles.

Q: I have a 10- by 5-foot snooker table. I believe the small size indicates this table is an American style rather than English, which would most likely be 12 feet by 6 feet. The brass badge on the table said "Ehrlich, St. Joseph, Mo., Dan Patrick cushions." Any information you might have would be greatly appreciated.

A: The brass badge probably reads "Dan Patch cushions," not "Dan Patrick." H. Ehrlich & Sons Mfg. Co. was listed as a maker of billiard and pool table cushions in 1912. The standard size for tournament snooker tables of 11 feet 8 1/2 inches by 5 feet 10 inches, plus or minus half an inch, is usually called a 12 by 6 foot table. Smaller tables like yours were made for use in homes, pubs, and other places. The Dan Patch cushions were named after the horse that set a world's record for the fastest mile in harness racing in 1906. When the horse retired in 1909, he held nine world records and was undefeated.

Tip: If your dark furniture has a scratch, you can make it less obvious by rubbing half a shelled walnut on it. This will stain the light scratch mark.

Need prices for your antiques and collectibles? Find them at Kovels.com, our website for collectors. You can find more than 900,000 prices and more than 11,000 color photographs that help you determine the value of your collectibles. Study the prices. Go to the free Price Guide at Kovels.com. The website also lists publications, clubs, appraisers, auction houses, people who sell parts or repair antiques, show lists and more. Kovels.com adds to the information in this column.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Campbell Kids mugs, kids eating sandwiches, M'm M'm Good, Westwood, 15 ounces, 3 1/2 inches, $5.
  • Lighter, cigar, silver, Art Deco, linear design, flower etched, square base, J. Knewite, circa 1900, 6 inches, $360.
  • Bisque figurine, women, seated, holding arrows, wheat, scythe, cold painted, turquoise base, 19 inches, pair, $530.
  • Jewelry, drop earrings, Gripoix glass, cobalt blue, red, goldtone setting, clip on, Chanel, 1993, 2 inches, $540.
  • Brass sculpture, puzzle, Portrait of Michelle, Miguel Berrocal, Spain, 1969, 4 x 3 inches, $565.
  • San Ildefonso Indian, vase, pueblo, serpent design, black on black, incised Marie, 9 inches, $805.
  • Advertising sign, Dr. Swett's Root Beer, woman, holding mug, tin, curled edges, 8-sided, circa 1905, 13 inches, $900.
  • Minaudiere, Panda, multicolor crystals, goldtone chain shoulder strap, Judith Leiber, 5 x 3 1/2 inches, $980.
  • Lounge chair, walnut, wood, high, triangular back, Adrian Pearsall, Kraft, 1960s, 40 x 34 inches, $1,215.
  • Tall case clock, Federal, cherry, line inlay, painted dial, eight-day, French feet, signed John Fisher, circa 1805, 103 inches, $2,500.

New! The Kovels.com Premium website is up and running. In addition to 900,000 free prices of antiques and collectibles, more than 11,000 with photographs, premium subscribers will find a dictionary of marks for silver and another for ceramics, with pictured marks and company histories. Premium membership also includes a subscription to the digital edition of our newsletter, "Kovels on Antiques and Collectibles," and its archives, where you'll find hundreds of articles about almost anything you might collect. Up-to-date information for the savvy collector. Go to Kovels.com and click on "Subscription" for more information.

© 2015 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.

Last Updated on Monday, 11 May 2015 10:46
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of May 4, 2015

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 04 May 2015 16:03


Neal Auction Co. of New Orleans sold this Victorian Hunzinger chair in January for $7,768. Webbing was used instead of conventional upholstery, and the straight lines of the frame make it look like a piece of modern furniture.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – In the 1870s, fashionable chairs were made with padded upholstery, elaborate mahogany carved frames and springs to make the seats more comfortable.

But George Jacob Hunzinger (1835-1898), a German immigrant craftsman, had other ideas. He used flat, metal, fabric-wrapped wire instead of springs and upholstery to make comfortable chairs. The frames were just as original, often with "rod and ball" turnings that led to the modern name of "lollipop chairs." He made many rockers with clever mechanical bases, and chairs that looked as if they were made of bolts and pipes. Some chairs could be folded, others just looked like folding chairs.

A recently sold rarity is the adjustable daybed. It was made about 1876. It has the fabric-wrapped wire webbing, spindles with ball finials and an adjustable back, and sold for $7,768. Hunzinger furniture is not as scarce as was thought before there were Internet listings, so prices have dropped a little since 2005. Most of the pieces are stamped with his name and a patent date.

Q: When I came to the U.S. from the U.K. some 25 years ago, I brought my collection of Moorcroft pottery. Some of the pieces date back to the 1930s. I would like to sell some or all of them. Unfortunately, there seems to be little or no interest now in Moorcroft. Any ideas how I can get a little cash for some of the pieces?

A: This is a good time to sell old Moorcroft. Prices are going up. William Moorcroft worked as a designer at James Macintyre & Co. in England before forming his own company in 1913. Financing was provided by Liberty, the famous London department store. The Moorcroft family bought out Liberty in 1962 and controlled the company until 1984, after which there were several changes in ownership. The company is still in business in Burslem, Stoke-on-Trent, England. According to the company's website, www.moorcroft.com, Moorcroft is selling more of its pottery today "than it did even in its previous heyday during the mid-1920s." Vintage Moorcroft vases sold this year for a few hundred to several thousand dollars. Contact some auctions in the U.S. that have been selling Moorcroft. There are also some auctions in Canada, England and Australia that sell vintage Moorcroft. There is an advantage to having international online buyers.

Q: I inherited a 1902 Sears hand-cranked washer from my parents. It's made of wood with iron parts and weighs 93 pounds. The crank turns two cylinders in opposite directions, agitating the clothes. The washer was listed in the 1902 Sears, Roebuck & Co. catalog for $5.66. What would it be worth at auction? It seems to be in good working condition.

A: Although the first washing machine was patented in England during the late 17th century, most housewives continued to wash clothes on a washboard until the mid-1800s. Wooden washing machines, operated by hand or foot, were made in the late 1800s and early 1900s by several companies. Washers powered by electric motors were first made about 1912. Vintage washing machines are hard to sell. Most sell at auction for under $75. Contact a local dealer at a shop, flea market or auction house to see what you can expect to get for a washer in your area. You may have trouble finding someone who is willing to buy it or sell it for you.

Q: What is a lusterweibchen chandelier?

A: Lusterweibchen chandeliers have a carved wood figure of the upper half of a woman's body mounted on deer or elk antlers. They were first made about 1425 and were popular in southern Germany during the 15th and 16th centuries. The words "luster" and "weibchen" are German for "chandelier" and "female." The woman often holds a candle or candle-shaped light in each of her outstretched hands. Some figures depict mermaids or other mythical figures with the tail of a dragon. Chandeliers with male figures, called luestermaennchen, also were made but are not as common. A bare-breasted mermaid lusterweibchen chandelier, made in the Black Forest about 1900, sold at auction in 2014 for over $9,000.

Q: Many years ago, my grandmother gave me a small bottle that belonged to her grandmother. My grandmother was born in 1901, so the bottle must be from the mid-19th century. The bottle is about 3 1/4 inches long. It's deep red glass and has engraved sterling-silver stoppers at both ends. My grandmother said one end held cotton soaked with smelling salts for when a lady felt faint and the other held perfume. Can you tell me how old it is and if it has any value?

A: The story your grandmother told you is accurate. Smelling salts were popular during the 18th and 19th centuries, especially with fashionable ladies who wore tightly laced corsets and were prone to fainting spells. People didn't bathe as often in Victorian times, so women carried perfume, too. Smelling salts are made of a mixture containing ammonium carbonate, which when sniffed can revive someone by irritating the mucous lining of the nose and causing the person to breathe faster. Collectors call the little bottles that held smelling salts "scent bottles." Necklaces, rings and other jewelry also were made to carry smelling salts. A 4-inch bottle like yours, but made of blue glass, sold recently for $275.

Tip: Taking part in the arts by going to shows, galleries auctions, museums, craft, carpentry and painting classes and lectures, maybe even garage sales to search for collectibles has a positive impact on your health and well-being, according to a recent British study.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Weller pottery, Woodcraft flower holder, five stepped openings, green, brown, 6 inches, $45.
  • Vasa Murrhina, water pitcher, clear glass, mottled pink, white, silver mica, 8 inches, $120.
  • Pickle caster jar, blue glass, enameled flowers, Aurora silver plate frame, footed, 8 inches, $205.
  • Razor, pearl pique handle, silver inlaid pins, Morocco leather case, Joseph Rodgers & Sons, $420.
  • Silver, salt & pepper, twisted, baluster shape, Antonia Pineda, Mexico, circa 1962, 3 inches, $530.
  • Arcade game, Fortune Teller, Gaze Into the Crystal For Your Fortune, Swami, lights up, coin-operated, 1930s, $540.
  • Inkstand, Louis XV-style, gilt bronze, two urn wells, lids, scrolls, dolphin heads, shell style decoration, doors, 7 x 18 inches, $625.
  • Desk, Art Nouveau, fruit & nut woods, veneer, roll-top, fitted interior, open shelf, 51 x 44 inches, $1,230.
  • Bible box, flowers, painted, turned feet, 11 x 19 inches, $1,320.
  • American Encaustic Tile, tile, hillside tableau, shepherdess, dog, sheep, 12 x 24 inches, $1,725.

New! "Kovels' Antiques & Collectibles Price Guide, 2015," 47th edition, is your most accurate source for current prices. It's available now and includes a special bonus section that helps you determine prices if you're downsizing and selling your collectibles and antiques. If you order directly from the Kovels, you'll receive our free Companion eBook with all of the book's 35,000 prices-ready for downloading to your eReader. The large-size paperback has more than 2,500 color photographs of 700 categories of antiques and collectibles. You'll also find hundreds of factory histories and marks, a report on record prices, and helpful sidebars and tips about buying, selling, collecting and preserving your treasures. Available for $27.95 plus $4.95 postage. Purchase directly from the Kovels if you want the eBook Companion. Visit KovelsOnlineStore.com, call 800-303-1996, or write to Price Book, P.O. Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.= © 2015 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.

Last Updated on Monday, 04 May 2015 16:16
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of April. 27, 2015

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 27 April 2015 13:24


This is a rare Venetian gondola chair made in the 19th century. It's carved and painted with gilt on a red background. The chair seat rests on a swivel

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – A gondola chair, according to furniture dictionaries, is a late 18th- to early 19th-century chair with a concave back and side rails that curve down to the seat. It has four legs and is upholstered on the seat and on both the front and back of the chair back and the arms. It is a chair type that still is being made.

But there is another more glamorous "gondola chair" that is less-publicized. The antique Venetian gondola chair is carved and painted or upholstered in leather. It has a high back that curves down to the seat. The sides of the back continue forward to form arms that are attached to the seat by another curved support. It has four splayed legs that start at the seat and slant away from the chair. This type of chair was made in the 1800s and got its name from its shape. The chair looks a little like the front of an Italian gondola. It may even have been a seat for a gondola passenger. The Venetian gondola chair is rare and even the leather-covered ones are expensive.

A carved and painted example sells for thousands of dollars. Neal Auction in New Orleans sold one in 2014 for $1,917.

Q: When I married in 1972, my mother gave me my grandmother's dishes. There are 10 plates and one large serving plate. The large plate has a hand-painted rabbit on it. Two of the dinner plates are painted with rabbits, two with deer, two with gazelles, and two with cows. The backs of the plates are marked "LS & S, Limoges, France." Are they worth anything?

A: This mark was used by Lazarus Straus & Sons, an importer and manufacturer in the United States. Lazarus Straus was born in Germany, immigrated to the United States in 1852, and began working as a pushcart peddler in Georgia. He opened a dry goods store there two years later. In 1869, he founded L. Straus & Sons in New York City. The company sold its china and glassware in Macy's department store basement beginning in 1873. Members of the Strauss family became part owners of Macy's in 1884 and sole owners in 1896. You have most of a set of game plates made in Limoges, France, and imported by L. Straus & Sons. These usually came with 12 plates plus a larger serving platter and were popular during the 1880s. Sets of game plates sell for about $375.

Q: I have a Dobro guitar that I got in 1956 when I was 10 years old. I think it's a Rex Ampliphonic guitar or Dobro. I don't know much about this guitar but some Dobro players have told me it's definitely an antique.

A: Ampliphonic guitars, also known as self-amplifying or resonator guitars, were developed about 1927 by John Dopyera. He and his brothers founded Dobro Manufacturing Co. in 1928. In 1929, he was granted a patent for his design for a guitar with a thin metal body and three aluminum diaphrams (resonators) to amplify the sound. Dobro guitars sold under several brand names in the 1930s. The Gibson Guitar Corp. has had sole rights to the Dobra name since 1993. Good quality old guitars sell for high prices. Find an expert at a shop that sells guitars or an auction house to find out what your guitar is worth.

Q: I have a Western-style working saddle made in the late 1890s or early 1900s by the Nebraska Saddlery Co. of Fremont, Neb. The company is no longer in existence. The design on the leather was done by hand and the stirrups have the original copper encasement around the bottom. The cinch, tie straps, stirrup hobbles and sheepskin under the saddle are new. I'd like to sell it to someone who appreciates such a beautiful piece of work and can just throw this on a horse and go to work. Where can I find someone who can give me an honest appraisal?

A: A vintage saddle like yours might sell well at an auction that specializes in Western items. You should be able to get an idea of value from a store that sells new quality leather saddles. Most major cities have stores that sell equestrian equipment. Auction houses that sell Western style items can be found by an online search. Most are located in the western U.S., but have online sales and interested bidders.

Q: I'm interested in selling a Pachinko game machine, a four-reel nickel slot machine made by Wisconsin Novelty, and a Michigan Model 7 candy store cash register. I've searched online but haven't been able to find any information or an estimated value for them. What's the best was to sell them?

A: All of your items can be sold at an auction or antiques shop. You can check prices on our website, Kovels.com, or on auction websites. Look at a site like LiveAuctioneers.com to see which auction houses have sold similar items and contact them to see if they are interested in what you have. Some won't take items below a certain value. Lower priced items can be sold to a dealer or antiques shop.

Tip: A glass flower frog, a holder for the flower stems in an arrangement, can be useful. Look for the round glass holders with many holes. Each hole can hold a marble so a group of about 5 to 15 stems can be displayed in different sizes of flower frogs.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Thermometer, Mail Pouch Chewing Tobacco, New Larger Size, blue, silver, red, tin, circa 1950, 38 3/4 x 8 inches, $90.
  • Sofa, Empire style, figured veneer frame, upholstery, bulbous legs, brass casters, 33 1/2 x 90 inches, $345.
  • Pen, Montblanc, Boheme Bleu, fountain, retractable nib, black resin body, blue gemstone, 4 1/4 inches, $380.
  • Red Ribbon Beer tray, Old Dutch Lager, Hawaiian woman, Mathie Brewing Co., tin, 13 inches, $390.
  • Baccarat glass champagne coupe, Narcissus pattern, acid etched stamp, France, 20th century, 5 1/2 inches, seven pieces, $525.
  • Silver plate tray, Edwardian, pierced gallery, handles, footed, engraved, Daniel & Arter, 38 x 17 inches, pair, $615.
  • Terra-cotta figurine, bathing woman, rocky base, birds, nest overhead, France, 28 3/4 inches, $625.
  • Stoneware pitcher, cobalt blue flower, feathered swag, incised neck rings, strap handle, circa 1870, 2 gallons, 13 inches, $805.
  • Toy, Adam the Porter, pushing hand car, tin lithograph, hand painted, clockwork, Lehmann, 8 inches, $1,005.
  • Aluminum dish, cover, whale shape, red eyes, stand with swimming whales, A. Court, 1979, 12 inches, $1,465.

"Kovels' A Diary: How to Settle a Collector's Estate." Our new week-by-week record of the settlement of an estate, from your first days gathering legal papers to the last days when you're dividing antiques among heirs and selling everything else – even the house. How to identify pottery, jewelry and other popular collectibles. Tips on where and how to sell furniture, jewelry, dishes, figurines, record albums, bikes and even clothes. We include lots of pictures and prices and explain the advantages of a house sale, auction, selling to a dealer, or donating to a charity. Learn about how to handle the special problems of security and theft. Plus a free current supplement with useful websites, auctions lists and other current information. Available only from Kovels for $19.95, plus $4.95 postage and handling. Order by phone at 800-303-1996; online at Kovels.com; or write to Kovels, P.O. Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2015 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.

Last Updated on Monday, 27 April 2015 13:41
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of April 20, 2015

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Sunday, 19 April 2015 14:51


Ever see an antique top hat covered with old wallpaper? This 8-inch-high top hat is lined with an 1814 newspaper that mentions the nominee for governor of Massachusetts. Perhaps it was worn at a political party. But although the hat was well cared for during the past 200 years, its use remains a mystery.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Odd, unidentified or unusual collectibles make every antiques show and shop more fun. How do you use a dog treadmill? Did the dealer say it was an elephant catcher? Is that strange crock really an 1850 chicken feeder? And what is the use for an oversized cardboard top hat covered in wallpaper?

Don Olson, a Rochester, N.Y., folk-art dealer, just sold an early 19th-century top hat. The 8-inch-high hat seemed a bit large to wear. It was well-made with yellow-and-green wallpaper that pictured leaves. The pattern was carefully matched. The inside was lined with newspaper, dated 1814, that reported on an auction of cannons and a nominee for governor. The hat was in excellent condition. It didn't seem to have been worn much. Old wallpaper-covered hatboxes are valued antiques and many are in museum collections. But this is the first hat we've seen. It's 200 years old and in great condition.

Well-made unique folk art sells quickly. Look carefully at some of the strange things you might find in your ancestor's attic. There could be a valuable treasure or an important piece of forgotten history.

Q: I have a thimble that reads "Massasoit Coffee." There is a small star after the word "coffee." Can you tell me something about collecting thimbles and which ones are considered of more value?

A: Massasoit Coffee was produced by Chas. E. Brown & Co. of Springfield, Mass., in the early 1900s. Thimbles have been made for more than 1,000 years and are a popular collectible today. Thimbles by known makers sell for the most money. Some collectors specialize in a particular type of thimble, like advertising, commemorative, political, souvenir, floral, scenic, cities or states, or by material. Thimbles have been made in aluminum, brass, gold, pewter, plastic, porcelain, silver, wood and other materials. Some have a maker's mark on the band or inside the cap. Thimbles made in the late 19th century or later may be marked with the size. Advertising thimbles were made beginning in the 1800s. Early advertising thimbles were made of brass, silver or aluminum. Later, they were made of plastic. There is an international club for thimble collectors, Thimble Collectors International, ThimbleCollectors.com.

Q: I have an old French country-style chair with the label "Barnard & Simonds Co., Grand Rapids, Mich." It's fruitwood with a caned back and padded seat. I'm tempted to refinish it, but I'm told that to keep value in a piece of furniture you shouldn't. Can you help me decide by telling me about the company and the value of the chair?

A: Barnard & Simonds Co. was founded in Rochester, N.Y. in 1898. The company made reproductions of American- and English country-style upholstered furniture and novelties. In 1959, it moved to Grand Rapids, Mich., where it merged with Michigan Furniture Shops and Stratford Shops. The company was bought by Baker Furniture in 1967 and the Barnard & Simonds name was discontinued by 1971. Your chair probably was made in the 1960s and is worth about $50, so have fun refinishing it and make it gorgeous.

Q: I've seen articles about the increasing value of old radios. I have a large number of old radio vacuum tubes. Is there a market for them?

A: People who repair old radios need old radio tubes. You should contact someone in your area who repairs old radios to see if they are interested in buying the tubes or search online for restorers of vintage radios.

Q: My wooden chest was given to my stepfather by his son when he served in World War II. It has a label that reads "Golden Dragon Co., Wood Carved Factory, Chest Factory Goods and Furniture, etc. Broadway, Shanghai." It's about 32 inches long, 16 inches wide and 16 inches high. The top and sides are covered with all-over carvings of people and scenery. It has an Asian-looking lock. Does this have any value?

A: Several companies in Shanghai, China, made carved wooden furniture in the 20th century. Many pieces were exported to the West. Carved wooden chests were often bought by tourists and brought back to the United States. Most 20th-century Chinese carved chests sell for about $300 to $400 because of their decorative value.

Q: How can a person find out ahead of time what auction houses are selling so they can get their item included? For instance, when I got your newsletter I was surprised and dismayed to see that an auction of toy stoves had been held. I have a salesman's sample Engman-Matthews stove that my great-grandfather used to have. I have a snapshot of him standing next to a real stove. Had I known this auction was "going to happen," I would have contacted the auction house. So how does a person get this information?

A: If you have something you want to sell, you should contact an auction house that sells similar items. They will let you know when they are having a sale that can include it. The auction house starts working on the catalog months before the sale. Be sure you are aware of the terms of the sale, including seller's costs, and what happens if your item doesn't sell.

Tip: If buying a vintage fountain pen, examine it carefully. Look for extra holes in the cap that indicate a missing clip and signs of glue near the clip or trim. And run your fingernail around the cap lip to check for cracks or chips.

Take advantage of a free listing for your group to announce events or to find antique shows, national meetings and other events. Go to the Calendar at Kovels.com to find, publicize and plan your antiquing trips.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Bitters bottle, Doyle's Hop, 1872, amber, square, circa 1860, 9 1/2 inches, $35.
  • Mantel surround, Renaissance-style, oak, carved, dolphin shape-brass handles, circa 1880, 62 x 67 inches, $295.
  • Lalique glass hood ornament, eagle's head, frosted feathers, polished tips, signed, 4 1/2 inches, $300.
  • Dollhouse, three-story, Victorian, porch, painted, blue roof, Gottschalk, Germany, circa 1890, 17 x 9 3/4 inches, $460.
  • Steuben glass, vase, acid cut back, goblet shape, footed, green geometric flowers, textured alabaster, 6 inches, $575.
  • Sterling-silver teapot, Art Deco, oval, footed, swan neck spout, fluting, domed lid, Miyata, 7 x 10 1/4 inches, $575.
  • World War II poster, "Books are Weapons in the War of Ideas, Books Cannot be Killed," S. Border, 1942, 28 x 20 inches, $1,410.
  • Bunny Spice tin, allspice, white rabbit, color lithograph, cardboard, metal top, 2 1/2 x 2 1/4 inches, $1,670.
  • Binoculars, tortoiseshell, gilt bronze, Carpenter & Westley, England, 1835-1914, 5 x 4 inches, $2,705.
  • Mirror, George III, giltwood, leaf carved frame, beaded border, divided panes, circa 1790, 39 x 27 inches, $3,750.

Keep up with changes in the collectibles world. Send for a free sample issue of our 12-page, color-illustrated newsletter, "Kovels on Antiques and Collectibles," filled with prices, news, information and photos, plus major articles and opinions about the world of collecting. An important tool for anyone who buys or sells antiques and collectibles. To subscribe at a bargain $27 for 12 issues, write Kovels, P.O. Box 8534, Big Sandy, TX 75755; call 800-829-9158; or subscribe online at KovelsOnlineStore.com.

© 2015 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.

Last Updated on Monday, 20 April 2015 08:04
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of April 13, 2015

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Monday, 13 April 2015 07:44
This toy, probably made in France, shows a 6-inch-high 19th-century fruit vendor. A clockwork mechanism makes the woman's legs walk. The rarity of the toy and its almost perfect paint encouraged a bidder to buy it for $339 in September 2014 at a Bertoia auction in Vineland, New Jersey.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Tin toys, especially those that picture everyday life, are popular with today's collectors. Political, social, women's work and other themes inspired toy makers. Many early toys were made of thin tin that was painted in bright colors. Some of the toys moved when wound and had either clockwork or key wind mechanism. Toy collectors are careful to use the proper word – "clockwork" or "windup." Clockwork toys have gears and parts like those used on a clock. In 1862, a cheaper type of power for moving toys was developed that used a spring, which was wound with a key or crank. Some still were being made as late as 1920. By the end of World War II, plastic parts were used for toys and the earlier metal wind-up was out of production. Battery-operated toys were made in Japan after 1946 and today there are electronic toys. All of these toys are popular with collectors and price is determined by condition, rarity and the appeal of the design. Toys that move or make noise always attract buyers.

Q: I have a gold ring that belonged to my grandfather and perhaps his father. It's engraved with initials on a flat section on the front. The sides of the ring band are decorated with a geometric pattern. Inside is a small mark, the capital letters "OB" in a rectangle with clipped corners. Can you tell me who made it?

A: OB stands for Ostby & Barton Co. a jewelry firm that worked from 1880 to the 1950s. Englehart C. Ostby was born in Norway, moved to the United States, and by 1879, had joined with Nathan B. Barton to form a jewelry company. The firm was so successful they became the country's largest jewelry manufacturer and the largest ring makers in the world. In 1912, Ostbys, Barton and his 22-year-old daughter Helen went on a trip to Europe to vacation and to buy precious stones for the company. They changed their vacation plans, deciding to return on the RMS Titanic with friends. When the Titanic hit the iceberg, the Ostbys both went from their staterooms to the lifeboats and waited to leave. Barton went back for a coat and missed a lifeboat; he drowned and his body was later found, identified, and buried near his home. Barton's daughter, who had to leave the Titanic without him, was rescued, and she continued working with her brother at Ostby & Barton. Collectors search for pieces of O & B jewelry partly because of Nathan's newsworthy death and partly because of the quality of the jewelry. Price depends on the value of the stones, the gold and the design. Most jewelry offered online is priced from $125 to $350, with some prices as high as $3,500.

Q: I have the chance to buy an old Sligh dresser from a family member. It's made of walnut, 54 inches wide, has columns on the sides, a burled oval on the front, and 2 large and 2 small drawers. Can you tell me if it is an antique? What would be a fair price to offer?

A: Charles R. Sligh founded the Sligh Furniture in 1880 in Grand Rapids, Michigan, after working for Berkey & Gay as a furniture finisher and travelling salesman. By the 1920s, Sligh advertised itself as "the largest manufacturer of furniture exclusively for the bedroom in the world." From 1910 through the 1920s, the company offered more than 80 bedroom suites and 11 dining room suites in a wide range of styles, including Sheraton, Louis XVI, Jacobean and Italian Renaissance. Some had a painted finish or painted decoration. Sligh closed in 1932. Your dresser probably is a retro piece made in an older style. A fair price to offer would be $150 to $200.

Q: I have a figural bottle opener that my grandparents had for many years. I'm 80 years old, so it must be quite old. It's shaped like a woman's face. She has red hair, four blue eyes and big lips open in a smile. Her upper teeth can be used to pull the cap off a bottle. There are holes in her ears so you can nail or screw the opener to the wall. I think there are three more with different faces. Should I keep looking for them in antiques shops or just give up?

A: The best place to find four-eyed bottle openers is at a flea market or online. They are not as old as you think. Four-eyed bottle openers like this were made by Wilton Products, a company in business in Wrightsville, Pennsylvania, from about 1935 to 1989. The company decorated cast-iron bottle openers, banks, trivets and other novelty items made by Susquehanna Castings, a company operated by the Wilton family, beginning in 1892. Several different versions of the four-eyed bottle opener were made in at least four shapes, including the woman, a bald man with handlebar mustache, a bald man with a bushy mustache, and a man with hair and mustache. They were hand painted and can be found in different colors. One source says "Seeing double he is a warning against overindulgence in alcohol." Reproductions have been made.

Q: I would like to know the value of a Rowenta Snip lighter with case. =A: Robert Weintraud founded Weintraud & Co. GmbH in Frankfurt, Germany, in 1884. The name Rowenta, a combination of his first and last names, was adopted in 1909. Rowenta began making lighters in the 1940s. Rowenta Snip lighters were first made in 1952. Rowenta is now part of Groupe SEB. Value of your lighter, $30 to $40.

Tip: Don't hang an oil painting above a fireplace that is used frequently. Smoke will damage the paint.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Silver, asparagus tongs, Feather Edge Shell pattern, Goldsmiths & Silversmiths Co., 1901, 3 inches, $95.
  • Cambridge Glass tray, decagon, center handle, amber, 10 1/2 inches, $110.
  • Toy, sulky, red cart, seated jockey, embossed seating, spoke wheels, iron, gold trim, Pratt & Letchworth, 8 inches, $235.
  • Rug, black bear, full head, claws, felt pad, Crosby Fur Co., 69 x 72 inches, $320.
  • Fairy Soap sign, girl sitting on soap, slogan, cardboard, die cut, easel back, countertop, 18 x 12 3/4 inches, $400.
  • Decoy, Hooded Merganser, wood, painted, ringlet neck, tack eyes, lead weight on base, 6 x 18 inches, $530.
  • Battersea enamel, etui, gilt metal, push button latch, painted scenes, portrait, Bilston, 1700s, 4 x 2 inches, $805.
  • Papier-mache doll, shoulder head, painted face, hair, inset eyes, stitch jointed, Germany, circa 1840, 29 inches, $950.
  • Commode, Louis XV-style, black lacquer, gilt, marble, two drawers, Japanese scenes, c. 1950, 33 x 39 inches, $1,125.
  • Wristwatch, Rolex, Datejust, 18K yellow gold, diamonds, presidential-style bracelet, circa 1974, woman's $8,610.

"Kovels' Antiques & Collectibles Price Guide, 2015," 47th edition, is your most accurate source for current prices. It's available now and includes a special bonus section that helps you determine prices if you're downsizing and selling your collectibles and antiques. If you order directly from the Kovels, you'll receive our free Companion e-book with all of the book's 35,000 prices-ready for downloading to your e-reader. The large-size paperback has more than 2,500 color photographs 700 categories of antiques and collectibles. You'll also find hundreds of factory histories and marks, a report on record prices, and helpful sidebars and tips about buying, selling, collecting and preserving your treasures. Available for $27.95 plus $4.95 postage. Purchase directly from the Kovels if you want the Companion e-book. Visit KovelsOnlineStore.com, call 800-303-1996, or write to Price Book, P.O. Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2015 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.

Last Updated on Monday, 13 April 2015 11:27
 

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of April 6, 2015

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Written by TERRY AND KIM KOVEL   
Tuesday, 07 April 2015 09:13

BEACHWOOD, Ohio — Practical jokes are not a new idea. Puzzle jugs that trick bar patrons can be traced back to the 15th century or even earlier. By the middle of the 17th century, puzzle jugs large enough to hold about two cups of beer were made by many pottery companies in England. Almost all had decorations related to drinking, plus unusual cut-out designs and a rounded rim with protruding spouts. There often was a poem that encouraged a bet with a drinker to test if he could drink without spilling. The idea persists. George Ohr, the early 1900s pottery genius from Biloxi, Mississippi, made small puzzle mugs that held just one cup of beer. Early puzzle jugs from Liverpool, Leeds, Bristol and Doulton, as well as 19th century jugs from Cambrian Pottery, Swansea, Sunderland, Ridgway and others, all relied on the same puzzle. Of course the pierced holes made it impossible to tip the jug without spilling liquid, but to win the wager, you had to drink the contents of the jug. It was a simple trick. The rounded rim had one hollow spout that was used as a straw to suck the drink thru the hollow handle. It led to the inside and the contents of the jug. Smart bar patrons should not have been fooled twice. Today, there are copies of early jugs that sell for $75 to $150 and antique examples that are $150 to over $1,000.

Q: My husband and I bought a hexagonal "occasional" table at an Atlanta flea market about 40 years ago. The top is about 30 inches across. It has a lower caned shelf and turned legs with carved stretchers. A metal tag underneath says "H. Pander & Zonen, Den Haag, Amsterdam, Rotterdam." The table is in good condition with original finish. We'd like to sell it. Any idea of its history?

A: The Pander family was in business in the Netherlands for over 100 years. In 1855, Klaas Pander started making rush mats for fisherman. His son, Hendrik, opened a furniture workshop, with model rooms displaying furniture, in 1887. It became H. Pander & Zonen (H. Pander & Sons) and eventually was one of the largest furniture companies in the country. H. Pander & Sons bought an airplane-manufacturing company in 1924 and made small planes, as well as furniture, until 1934. The company had offices or factories in The Hague, Amsterdam, and Rotterdam. It went out of business in 1985.

Q: I have a Gone With the Wind lamp that has a red puffy glass globe. It's covered with years of grime. Can I put the shade in the dishwasher to wash it?

A: Never wash old glass in the dishwasher. Glass will sometimes crack from the heat. Dishwasher detergents are too harsh for old glassware. You can wipe off the dirt with a damp cloth or wash the globe in warm, soapy water. Use a mild detergent and line the sink with a towel. Dip the globe in soapy water, rinse, and air dry.

Q: My scale was in an upstairs room in my grandparents' old farm house as far back as I can remember. I have the original envelope with instructions on how to use it. The directions say it's a 10-ton capacity wagon scale. There is a date of "11-10-41" in one corner. Do you have any information about this scale and what it's worth?

A: Thaddeus and Erastus Fairbanks, two brothers, founded The E. & T. Fairbanks Co. in St. Johnsbury, Vermont, in 1824. Thaddeus Fairbanks invented the platform scale and held several patents for weighing scales. By the late 1800s, Fairbanks scales were sold worldwide. Today the company, called Fairbanks Scales, sells a wide variety of scales. It has corporate offices in Kansas City, Missouri. There are a limited number of buyers of old wagon scales. It probably would have to be sold at a farm auction.

Q: I have a white cup and saucer marked "Pyroceram Brand Tableware By Corning." What is Pyroceram?

A: Pyroceram was developed at Corning in the 1950s. The process was discovered by accident in 1952, when a piece of glass was overheated and turned into a white glass-ceramic material that was break-resistant. The material originally was used on rocket nose cones because it was transparent to radar. It was used to make CorningWare cookware beginning in 1958. The cookware was resistant to sudden extreme temperatures and could go directly from freezer to stovetop to table. Millions of pieces of the cookware and restaurant ware were made. Your cup and saucer are part of the line made for restaurants. Original Pyroceram was not made after the late 1990s. World Kitchen bought Corning's consumer products division in 1998 and began making CorningWare in 2001. The original Pyroceram material was brought back in 2009. Four Pyroceram cups and saucers sold online for $12 and a cereal bowl sold for $7

Tip: Always carry a slab of marble with the thin edge up. The weight of the piece, if carried the wrong way, could crack the marble.

Need prices for your antiques and collectibles? Find them at Kovels.com, our website for collectors. You can find more than 900,000 prices and more than 11,000 color photographs that help you determine the value of your collectibles. Study the prices. Go to the free Price Guide at Kovels.com. The website also lists publications, clubs, appraisers, auction houses, people who sell parts or repair antiques, show lists and more. Kovels.com adds to the information in this column.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Lily of the Valley Oats box, cardboard, color lithograph, Lauderbach-Griest Co., 7 x 4 1/4 inches, $80.
  • Toothpick, 14K yellow textured gold case, retractable, 1 3/4 inches, $205.
  • Candy container, Easter Bunny, pushing wheelbarrow, bunny's head removes, 11 inches, $295.
  • ABC plate, Red Riding Hood, grandmother, brown transferware, Brownhills Pottery, 1880s, 7 inches, $300.
  • Bohemian glass, claret jug, ruby glass, enameled overlay, opalescent panel, scrollwork, gilt, 13 1/4 x 5 1/4 inches, $370.
  • Judaica, Tzedakah charity box, mixed metal, ginger jar shape, architectural details, arched top door, 11 inches, $415.
  • Mechanical bank, Clown on Globe, cast iron, painted, windup, spins, J. & E. Stevens, 11 inches, $885.
  • Toy, butcher shop, wood, painted, paper lithograph, butcher, scale, meats, Gottschalk, 1910, 13 inches, $945.
  • Silver meat dish, oval, wavy rim, chased flowers, leaves, Martele, Gorham, 1917, 17 inches, $3,250.
  • Dower chest, Chippendale, walnut, pie board molded lid, till, drawers, 28 x 51 inches, $5,015.

The Kovels have navigated flea markets for decades. Learn from the best. "Kovels Flea Market Strategies: How to Shop, Buy and Bargain the 21st Century Way" by Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel tells you about the latest smartphone apps and websites to help you shop, share, and ship as well as what to wear, what to bring, and, most important, how to negotiate your way to a bargain. Also, tips on spotting fakes, advice about paying for your purchases and shipping suggestions. Full color booklet, 17 pages, 8 1/2 by 5 1/2 in. Available only from Kovels for $7.95 plus $4.95 postage and handling. Order by phone at 800-303-1996; online at Kovels.com; or mail to Kovels, Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

Copyright 2015 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 07 April 2015 09:45
 
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