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Auction Results in the News

Starry glass mountain climbs to $65,520 at Kaminski sale

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Written by Auction House PR   
Wednesday, 24 April 2013 15:37

Eighteenth century, starry glass mountain. Kaminski Auctions image.

BEVERLY, Mass. – Prices for exciting and rare glass, ivory, bronze, and ceramic items soared above their high estimates at the March 30 day-long Fine Asian Art and Antiques Auction at Kaminski.

LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

The top lot of the day brought in phone and online bidders from around the world for competitive bidding. The auction hall audience and staff watched as the bidding for Lot 4236, a carved starry glass mountain, climbed well above the original estimate of $12,000 to finally settle at a record-setting $65,520. The glass mountain with a Qianlong mark was carved in the form of three rams on a rocky outcrop and set on a huanghuali wood stand. It came to Kaminski Auctions from the collection of a Boston College professor, and stood 6 1/2 inches tall.

Despite the small scale of the mountain, the piece carries great historical significance and auspicious meaning. “Starry glass,” was a form of glassmaking newly developed in the 18th century, when artists added gold dust to give the glass its entrancing shimmer. Research done prior to the sale at Kaminski Auctions indicates that only one other starry glass mountain in this form has been sold at auction. The three rams that surround the mountain are known as sanyang and indicate that the New Year will bring a change of fortune.

A pair of monumental elephant tusks that became a focal point of the Kaminski gallery in the weeks leading up to the sale also garnered significant bidding attention. The tusks, complete with original documentation of their legal capture, towered above visitors at 7 feet 3 inches tall, and each weighed over 100 pounds. The pair, after much competition, sold for $54,990.

A pair of equally large and impressive 66-inch-tall huanghuali lanterns was also among the top lots of the sale. The pair of lanterns came from the Qing Dynasty and featured intricate carvings of clouds, monkeys, dragons and coins, and sold for $25,740.

Kaminski’s sale also featured two high selling rhinoceros horn items. Lot 4378 included an antique pair of rhinoceros horns mounted in sterling silver that sold for $32,400. A pair of rhinoceros horn inkwells also sold well, fetching $13,200.

A beautiful pair of bronze vessels in the form of decorated elephants carrying vases on their backs also captured the interest of the audience. The Qing Dynasty pieces sold to an Internet bidder for $25,200. A thangka from 18th or 19th century Tibet also sold above estimate at $19,890. The finely painted cloth featured the Shakyamuni Buddha in the center surrounded by guardians and Luohan.

Fine Asian furnishings also performed well. A pair of zitan chairs with distinctive cutout designs and back slat panels with intricately carved flowers fetched $17,000. Another pair of chairs, with horseshoe shaped woven seats and floral carved back panels, sold for $9,500.

View the fully illustrated catalog for Kaminski Auctions’ Fine Asian Art and Antiques Auction on March 30, complete with prices realized, at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Eighteenth century, starry glass mountain. Kaminski Auctions image.

Pair of monumental elephant tusks. Kaminski Auctions image.

Huanghuali lanterns. Kaminski Auctions image.

Silver mounted rhinoceros horns. Kaminski Auctions image.

Bronze elephant tusks. Kaminski Auctions image.

Pair of carved zitan chairs. Kaminski Auctions image.

Last Updated on Thursday, 02 May 2013 15:31
 

Leyendecker’s ‘Honeymoon’ rings up $194,500 for Heritage

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Written by Auction House PR   
Thursday, 18 April 2013 14:31

Joseph Christian Leyendecker (American, 1874-1951), ‘Honeymoon,’ ‘The Saturday Evening Post’ cover, July 17, 1926, oil on canvas. Heritage Auctions image.

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. – J.C. Leyendecker’s spectacular Honeymoon, The Saturday Evening Post cover, July 17, 1926, realized $194,500 to lead Heritage Auctions’ $2.8 million Illustration Art Signature® Auction on April 11-12, a sale that saw tremendous prices realized across the board, especially where pinup and golden age classic artworks were concerned. The piece came to auction from a consignor in New England whose mother was gifted the painting by the artist himself upon her own wedding, where Leyendecker also walked her down the aisle.

LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

“Collectors would be hard pressed to find a Leyendecker that showcases the artist’s skill in a ways as spectacular as this painting,” said Ed Jaster, senior vice president of Heritage Auctions. “This was the third-highest price ever for the artist, and with good reason – it’s a masterpiece.”

The auction also saw spirited bidding for Patrick Nagel’s oversize acrylic, Her Seductive Look, which soared to $158,500 – more than tripling the world record for the iconic 1980s artist.

“This is a staggering price realized for Nagel,” said Todd Hignite, vice president of Heritage Auctions. “Heritage set a record for Nagel last fall, at $56,250, and we felt that was a great result. Clearly, with the results from this auction, we’re seeing that Nagel’s profile continues to rise.”

With a 95 percent sell-through rate, numerous world record prices in the auction were witnessed from some of the great names of the form, such as Earle Bergey’s classic The Cybernetic Brains, Startling Stories pulp cover, September 1950, the auction catalog’s cover piece, which realized $89,500, along with Thorton Utz’s whimsical, complex Love's Lost Child at Information Booth, The Saturday Evening Post Christmas cover, Dec. 20, 1958, which drew applause in the room as it finished at $104,500. Rolf Armstrong’s dazzling Twinkle Toes proved quite popular at $68,500, while Edward Runci’s aquatic pinup, Scenic Shorelines, finished the day at $62,500, all world records for the artists. Frank McCarthy's original movie poster artwork for 1967’s The Dirty Dozen sold for $27,500, a world record for the artist’s movie poster art.

“The room was buzzing and we are seeing many new collectors entering the field right now,” said Hignite. “This auction proved that great examples across all genres and value ranges of Illustration are poised to set records in our auctions.”

Further highlights include, but are not limited to:

Gil Elvgren, A Near Miss (Right On Target), Brown & Bigelow calendar pinup, 1964: Realized $104,500.

Gil Elvgren, Let's Go Around Together, Brown & Bigelow calendar pinup, 1948: Realized $101,500.

John Philip Falter, Antique Store Accident, The Saturday Evening Post cover, June 20, 1959: Realized $74,500.

View the fully illustrated catalog for Heritage Auctions’ Illustration Art Signature® Auction on April 11-12, complete with prices realized, at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

Joseph Christian Leyendecker (American, 1874-1951), ‘Honeymoon,’ ‘The Saturday Evening Post’ cover, July 17, 1926, oil on canvas. Heritage Auctions image. 

 Patrick Nagel (American, 1945-1984), ‘Her Seductive Look,’ acrylic on canvas, 70 x 32 inches, signed lower right. Heritage Auctions image.

Earle Bergey (American, 1901-1952), ‘The Cybernetic Brains,’ ‘Startling Stories’ pulp cover, September 1950, oil on canvas, 27 x 18 inches, signed center left. Heritage Auctions image. 

Thorton Utz (American, 1914-1999), ‘Love's Lost Child at Information Booth,’ The Saturday Evening Post’ Christmas cover, Dec. 20, 1958, oil on board, 23.75 x 22 inches, signed lower left. Heritage Auctions image. 

Rolf Armstrong (American, 1889-1960), ‘Twinkle Toes,’ 1947, pastel on Masonite, 40 x 29 inches, signed lower center. Heritage Auctions image. 

Edward Runci (American, 1921-1986), ‘Scenic Shorelines,’ 1950, oil on canvas, 26 x 20 inches, signed lower right. Heritage Auctions image. 

 

Last Updated on Thursday, 18 April 2013 15:17
 

Marge Schott necklace hits home run for Cowan’s at $192,000

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Written by Auction House PR   
Thursday, 18 April 2013 13:49

The top lot in Cowan’s Fine Jewelry and Timepieces Auction was this 28-carat platinum and diamond necklace made for Marge Schott of the Cincinnati Reds. It sold for $192,000. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.

CINCINNATI – Cowan’s Auctions Inc.’s Fine Jewelry and Timepieces: Live Salesroom Auction on April 14 realized $585,00. With strong bidding from the Internet and phone, a crowded salesroom of over 50 participants on the floor battled against competitive bids for many of the lots in the sale. LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

Fine jewelry and timepieces by renowned designers and makers such as Tiffany & Co., Patek Philippe and Cartier were offered in the auction, and a selection of five pieces owned by the late Marge Schott, longtime owner of the Cincinnati Reds, hammered down for just over $315,000.

The sale’s top selling lot was a 28-carat platinum and diamond necklace made for Schott. Two bidders battled back and forth on the phone and Internet for the piece, and eventually the necklace sold to a phone bidder for $192,000, more than doubling its estimate of $65,000-$85,000.

Other fine jewelry from Schott achieved great results in the auction. Competing bids between the floor and Internet drove Schott’s platinum and diamond 18-carat brooch up to $55,350, which eventually sold to an Internet bidder. A platinum Hamilton wristwatch with eight carats of diamonds sold to a participant on the floor for $57,000, and a platinum brooch with pear-shape, baguette and round diamonds realized $10,455.

A number of rings and earrings performed well in the auction. A platinum fancy intense yellow three-stone ring sold to an Internet bidder for $9,840. Competing bids in the audience and on the phone drove the selling price of an 18K white gold tanzanite and diamond ring to $7,800, eventually selling to the floor bidder. A pair of platinum fancy yellow diamond earrings also sold to the floor for $9,600.

Exceptional timepieces were also offered in the sale. Two bidders on the phone and Internet battled for a ladies’ platinum and diamond Omega wristwatch, which sold to the Internet participant for $18,450. A Vacheron & Constantin 18K gold pocket watch sold for $8,600, and an E. Mathey 14K yellow gold hunter case repeater pocket watch realized $4,600.

Cowan’s next Fine Jewelry and Timepieces: Live Salesroom Auction will take place Dec. 8 at noon EST. For more information about the auction or to consign for future auctions, call Brad Wanstrath at 513-871-1670.

View the fully illustrated catalog for Cowan's Auctions Inc. jewelry and timepieces auction April 14, complete with prices realized, at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.



ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

The top lot in Cowan’s Fine Jewelry and Timepieces Auction was this 28-carat platinum and diamond necklace made for Marge Schott of the Cincinnati Reds. It sold for $192,000. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.

The Vacheron & Constantin 18K gold pocket watch sold within estimate for $8,600. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 24 April 2013 15:27
 

Leslie Hindman jewelry and timepieces auction hits $4.89M

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Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 16 April 2013 12:29

Fancy vivid yellow color diamond ring, 7.85 carats. Price realized $542,500. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

CHICAGO – Leslie Hindman Auctioneers’ spring auctions of fine jewelry and timepieces achieved a record total of $4.89 million. Hundreds of bidders participated in the salesroom, on the telephones and via the Internet in the auction sessions held April 7-8. LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

Several exceptional fancy colored diamonds and colored stones elicited spirited interest from private collectors and dealers worldwide. A highlight of the fine jewelry sale was an impressive 7.85-carat diamond ring of fancy vivid yellow color. The rare combination of the color saturation and the antique cushion cut enabled the lot to surpass the estimate of $150,000-$200,000 to ultimately realize $542,500. Another highlight from the sale included a 10.99 carat fancy yellow oval brilliant cut diamond ring, which held a presale estimate of $100,000-$150,000 and realized $170,500.

The fine jewelry auction clearly indicated that the market for pink diamonds is strong. The demand from investors from around the globe continues to rise as pink diamonds become increasingly scarce. Highlights include an 18K rose gold and fancy purple pink diamond ring that sold for $302,500 and a fancy deep pink diamond that realized $266,500.

Hindman’s highly anticipated fine timepieces sale, held Monday evening, also generated strong interest and prices realized. Contemporary wristwatches by important makers such as Patek Philippe and Rolex as well as collectible antique timepieces in fine condition with desirable complications, proved to be highlights of the sale.

Leslie Hindman Auctioneers’ next fine jewelry and timepieces auction will be held Sept. 8-9. Consignments are welcome through July 12.

Inquiries should phone 312-280-1212.

View the fully illustrated catalog for Leslie Hindman Auctioneers’ spring fine jewelry and timepieces auction April 7-8, complete with prices realized, at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Fancy vivid yellow color diamond ring, 7.85 carats. Price realized $542,500. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

Fancy yellow oval brilliant cut diamond ring, 10.99 carats. Price realized $170,500. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

This 18K rose gold and fancy purple pink diamond ring sold for $302,500. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

Art Deco platinum, emerald, diamond and enamel necklace, 28.20 carats. Price realized: $40,000. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

Last Updated on Thursday, 18 April 2013 14:22
 

Jeffrey S. Evans lighting sale generates strong bidding

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Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 09 April 2013 15:58

This Coral Reef / Seaweed squat stand lamp featuring a blue opalescent font, with a no 2 fluted collar, fitted with a period no. 2 burner and rare chimney-shade, by Hobbs, Brockunier & Co. or Beaumont Glass Co., sold for a record $5,175. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

MT. CRAWFORD, Va. – Lighting and lighting accoutrements were the specialty offering at Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates’ March 23 auction. Period lighting is considered the finishing touch by many decorators and historians alike – a clear signifier of period, time and place. Bidders came from as far away as Canada; New Hampshire and Missouri to attend the sale in person, and participants from 15 countries bid on-line for items ranging from period kerosene lamps to parts such as chimneys, burners and shades. LivewAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

A rare Coral Reef / Seaweed squat stand lamp featuring a blue opalescent font, with a no. 2 fluted collar, fitted with a period number 2 burner and extremely rare matching-pattern chimney-shade, by Hobbs, Brockunier & Co. or Beaumont Glass Co., dating to the late 19th or early 20th century, sold for a record $5,175. The lamp came from the Dorothy Gooch collection of Hopkinsville, Ky., and was estimated to bring $1,500-2,000. Listed and photographed in contemporary literature on period lamps, this example was in great condition and fresh to the market.

“The late Dorothy Gooch’s name is known to all kinds of lighting collectors and items from her collection really stimulate collectors to bid,” said auctioneer Jeffrey S. Evans.

Second highest price of the day was another Gooch-owned rarity, a Diamond and Loop Panel with Triple-Dolphin stem base stand lamp, with a colorless font and opaque lavender base. This lamp had a no. 1 fine-line collar, with the base by Boston & Sandwich Glass Co. Dating to the third quarter of the 19th century, the lamp sold for $4,025.00, far above the $1,000-1,500 estimate.

The third in the highest-priced offerings department, and also sold with a rare color and shape description, was a cast brass Plume & Atwood “Harvard” double-arm student lamp, with horizontal tanks, ornately embossed with scrolls and various figural heads. This lamp was fitted with a period setup comprising two H.C. Moehring electrified burners, shade rings, matching cased lemon-yellow narrow ribbed umbrella-form shades and slip chimneys, and dated to the fourth quarter of the 19th century. The combination of the bright yellow shades and the rare form created a bidding frenzy, leading to a finished price of $2,760, well over the estimate of $400-600.

Among the highlights of the parts section of this auction, a setup comprising a cut and frosted ball-form shade with rare applied blue rim, a lip burner by E. F. Jones with a Merrill’s air director, a shade ring with edge coining, and a lip chimney, sold for $1092.50 against its estimate of $200-300. The shade was probably a product of the Mt. Washington Glass Co. based on the example illustrated in Ken Wilson’s Mt. Washington and Pairpoint Glass Volume 1, page 55, figure 3-10.

A Christmas Tree no. 2 size slip chimney decorated with alternating medallions of floral patterns and a female bust, and a gauffered eight-petal rim sold for $805. It was also a likely product of the Mt. Washington Glass Co. Victorian shades were led by a jadeite green dragon-decorated ball-form shade, also formerly in the Dorothy J. Gooch collection, dating to the late 19th or early 20th century sold for $862.50.

The auction realized $185,455 (including 15 percent buyer’s premium) from 779 registered bidders spanning 15 countries. The 538 cataloged lots were followed by 300 uncatalogued lots of lamp parts.

Phone 540-434-3939 for more details.

View the fully illustrated catalog for Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates March 2, complete with prices realized, at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

This Coral Reef / Seaweed squat stand lamp featuring a blue opalescent font, with a no 2 fluted collar, fitted with a period no. 2 burner and rare chimney-shade, by Hobbs, Brockunier & Co. or Beaumont Glass Co., sold for a record $5,175. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

Diamond and Loop Panel with Triple-Dolphin stem base stand lamp, with a colorless font and opaque lavender base. Price realized: $4,025. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

Victorian shades were led by a jadeite green dragon-decorated ball-form shade, which sold for $862.50. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

A cut and frosted ball-form shade with rare applied blue rim, a lip burner by E.F. Jones with a Merrill’s air director, a shade ring with edge coining, and a lip chimney, sold for $1092.50. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

Cast brass Plume & Atwood ‘Harvard’ double-arm student lamp, with horizontal tanks. Price realized: $2,760. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

 

 

 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 10 April 2013 08:36
 

Leland Little builds international following with latest auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Monday, 08 April 2013 10:52

Tiffany Studios Lemon Leaf table lamp. Sold: $15,930. Leland Little Auction & Estate Sales Ltd.

HILLSBOROUGH, N.C. - Leland Little Auction & Estate Sales Ltd. held a successful Spring Cataloged Auction March 15-16 , selling well over $1 million in fine art, jewelry, Asian art, couture, antiques, fine wine and collectible objects.

More than 600 bidders attended the sale. Bidders unable to attend the sale placed over 4,000 absentee and telephone bids. In addition, over 1,200 bidders watched and participated in the auction online, from more than 50 countries around the world, using www.liveauctioneers.com.

Fine jewelry offerings highlighted the sale, being led by an impressive 10.32-carat platinum and diamond ring that soared to $135,700 (all prices include an 18 percent buyers premium). An Edwardian platinum three-stone diamond ring achieved $13,570, and a stunning pair of Etruscan Revival ear hoops, Tiffany and Co., circa 1900, rose to $11,210.

Asian Art demonstrated strength, with a pair of Chinese hardwood throne chairs climbing between live-internet, phone, and in-person bidders to reach $18,880. An impressive Meiji lacquer and gilt display cabinet achieved $18,290, and a fine six-panel Chinese floor screen rose quickly to sell for $11,800.

The auction gallery's new couture and fine accessories department debuted with a strong showing of Louis Vuitton and Chanel, driving the department's sales to over $70,000, and was led by a monogram canvas wardrobe trunk, Louis Vuitton French, circa 1950, that garnered international attention and sold for $10,030.

The sale featured many works, as always, of fine art including Vladimir Kush (b. 1965), Sunrise by the Ocean, and Chauncey Foster Ryder (New York/New Hampshire, 1868-1949), Home, each soaring beyond their estimates to sell for $9,440 each.

Other fine and decorative arts performed well, including a Tiffany Studios Lemon Leaf table kamp that quickly climbed to $15,930, an Edgefield, S.C., storage jar, attributed to Thomas Chandler, that delighted in-house bidders when it achieved $10,915, and a Meissen mythological group of Apollo, surged to $10,030.

The rare and fine wine session achieved $300,000 in sales and was celebrated with a well-attended opening wine and hors d'oeuvres reception. As guests socialized, enthusiastic wine bidders participated in the sale, which featured large selections of Petrus and Chateau Latour. The crowd particularly enjoyed bidding on two bottles of 1748 Medeira Verdelho, which sold for $4,720, and a magnum bottle of 1957 Romanee Conti, Domaine de la Romanee Conti, which achieved $7,375.

LLAES Ltd. is always seeking quality consignments, whether it be an entire estate or a significant item. To discuss selling call the gallery at 919-644-1243 or email at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Tiffany Studios Lemon Leaf table lamp. Sold: $15,930. Leland Little Auction & Estate Sales Ltd.

Impressive 10.32-carat platinum and diamond ring. Sold: $135,700. Leland Little Auction & Estate Sales Ltd.

Monogram canvas wardrobe trunk, Louis Vuitton. Sold: $10,030. Leland Little Auction & Estate Sales Ltd.

Chauncey Foster Ryder (NY/NH, 1868-1949), 'Home.' Sold: $9,440. Leland Little Auction & Estate Sales Ltd.

1966 La Tache, Domaine de la Romanee Conti, four bottles Sold: $5,900. Leland Little Auction & Estate Sales Ltd.

Last Updated on Monday, 15 April 2013 17:20
 

Leslie Hindman's Asian Works of Art auction brings $2.99M

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Written by Auction House PR   
Wednesday, 03 April 2013 14:14

Chinese scroll painting, Zhao Shao'ang (1905-1988), ink and color on paper, height 72 inches x width 32 inches. Price realized: $86,500. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

CHICAGO – Leslie Hindman Auctioneers’ Asian Works of Art auction brought spirited energy and a packed salesroom to its Chicago gallery March 24-26. The three-day sale grossed over $2.99 million, offering Chinese, South Asian and Japanese paintings and works of art to buyers around the world.

LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding, which had a significant impact on the sale. Of the 1,359 lots offered, 500 were purchased online, nearly 37 percent. Bidders participating via LiveAuctioneers’ live-bidding console numbered 1,336. In addition, 1,599 absentee bids were placed through LiveAuctioneers.com. The online catalog buzzed with activity. LiveAuctioneers.com recorded more than 169,000 page views during the auction; 76,771 on the first day of the sale.

“The Chinese session of the sale was well-rounded and caught the attention of a myriad of buyers, both old and new, achieving strong prices in every medium. Jade performed especially well; however, we were also pleased with prices realized in paintings, bronze, furniture, textiles, porcelain and other mediums of art,” said Phyllis Kao, director of Asian Works of Art at Leslie Hindman Auctioneers.

The highly anticipated painting by Chinese artist Zhao Shao’ang, brought $86,500. The consignor, David D. Buck, Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Wisconsin, originally purchased the painting at the artist’s studio in 1967.

Other highlights of the sale included the cover lot, a pair of carved white jade quail boxes bearing imperial Qianlong seals. The pair sold for $92,500 to an overseas bidder on the telephone. A jade and wood hat stand carved with scrolling clouds surprised the audience early in the sale when it brought $116,500. The hat stand was from the estate of Frank Buttram of Oklahoma City and was one of several Chinese works from the estate that sparked interest in the sale.

Perhaps the most exciting lot sold during the three-day auction, was a carved jade lotus-form bowl, which generated strong bidding activity on the phone, the Internet and in the room, ultimately selling to a bidder in the room for $230,500.

The Japanese session ended the three-day auction with noteworthy activity and demonstrated that the Japanese art market continues to strengthen. A shibayama and silver decorated koro brought $10,625 and a Meiji period cloisonné covered vase by Kawade Shibataro brought $23,750.

Leslie Hindman Associates' next Asian Works of Art auction is scheduled for Sept. 16-17. Consignments for this auction are welcomed through July 22.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Chinese scroll painting, Zhao Shao'ang (1905-1988), ink and color on paper, height 72 inches x width 32 inches. Price realized: $86,500. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

Chinese carved jade and wood hat stand, height overall 11 1/4 inches. Price realized: $116,500. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

Pair of white jade quail-form boxes, Qing Dynasty, length 3 7/8 inches. Price realized: $92,500. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

Chinese carved celadon jade bowl, diameter 5 1/2 inches. Price realized: $230,500. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

Last Updated on Friday, 05 April 2013 09:32
 

Mid-19th C. gambling box sells for record $20,230 at Clars

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Written by Auction House PR   
Friday, 22 March 2013 13:24

A world record was set at Clars when this rare Gold Rush era gambling device, a Hugh McConnell and Frederick Adolph Will (1837-1912) Faro dealing box, lot 4105, sold to an Internet bidder for $20,230. Clars Auction Gallery image.

OAKLAND, Calif. – A new world record was set at Clars Fine Art and Antiques Sale on March 16 when a rare Gold Rush-era gambling device described as a Hugh McConnell and Frederick Adolph Will (1837-1912) faro dealing box sold for $20,230 to an Internet bidder. LiveAuctioneers.com provide Internet live bidding for the two-day auction, March 16-17, which realized just over $1 million.

Created in San Francisco by the famed makers, the faro box bore the name F.A. Will on the under slider and was complete with leather case. Faro is a game in which players bet on cards draw from a dealing box. Presale estimate on this faro box was $1,000 to $2,000 and the bidding opened at $500. Fueled quickly by savvy collectors, the price escalated quickly.

The decorative arts category dominating the sale in both excitement and prices realized.

Excitement returned on Sunday when several lots in the decorative arts and furnishings category realized over-the-top prices. A rare Meissen Armorial plate from the “Swan Service” (circa 1737-1741) was decorated with the coat of arms of Count Bruhl, then director of the Meissen factory. Modeled by Kändler and Eberlien, the plate was conservatively estimated at $6,000 to $8,000. Once again, advanced collectors drove the price to $17,850.

An 18th century Italian giltwood carved chandelier, which had been wired for electricity, also solidly surpassed expectations, more than doubling its high estimate. Executed in the Renaissance taste, the fixture hung in the foyer of the Classical Mansion in San Francisco built in 1904 for noted millionaire Julius J. Jack. Expected to achieve a high $7,000, this chandelier brought an impressive $21,420. A second chandelier from this mansion, an America hanging leaded glass fixture also sold for almost twice its high estimate at $7,110.

But perhaps the most surprising lot of the decorative arts offerings was a pair of Chinese export silver teapots. Each of the pots featured a finely hammered ground decorated with exotic flowers, birds and textured reserves in repousse. Presale estimates had this unassuming pair at $500 to $700 but that didn’t last long as they escalated quickly against heated bidding selling in the end for $16,660.

This sale also featured property from the estate of Frank N. and Frances D. Alioto of San Francisco. A pair of monumental, possibly Sevres, scenic vases was offered for $6,000 of the high side but quickly soared to a final sale price of $11,035. Also from the Alioto estate was a Shreve & Co. Renaissance-style sterling silver jardinière, which exceeded expectations realizing $7,735 and a pair of Baccarat crystal candelabra that sold very well at $4,443.

The other categories in this two-day sale also performed well with the highlights of the jewelry offerings being a Hamilton platinum and diamond covered wristwatch selling for solidly within estimate for $21,420 and a fine jadeite and diamond ring in platinum earning $19,040.

In fine art, the headliners were an oil, sand and oxblood on canvas by Nonda (Greek, 1922-2005) titled Poisson, circa 1962, which sold nicely for $9,520 followed by the top lot of the photography offerings. By George Hoyningen-Huene (American/Russian, 1900-1968), his silver gelatin titled, Divers (Horst with Model), Paris, achieved high estimate, selling for $8,925.

In the Asian category, a number of offerings realized much higher than expected prices. Of particular note were two lots, the first being a Chinese underglaze blue porcelain censer, Ming/Qing Dynasty, that was estimated to sell for $800 to $1,200 but achieved a surprising $9,520. Following were two Chinese Mongolian-style tobacco boxes, Qing dynasty. Offered as one lot, these tobacco boxes achieved $8,887 against their high estimate of $700.

For complete information email Clars at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or call at 510-428-0100.

View the fully illustrated catalog for Clars Fine Art and Antiques Sale on March 16-17, complete with prices realized, at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.



ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

A world record was set at Clars when this rare Gold Rush era gambling device, a Hugh McConnell and Frederick Adolph Will (1837-1912) Faro dealing box, lot 4105, sold to an Internet bidder for $20,230. Clars Auction Gallery image.

This rare Meissen Armorial plate from the ‘Swan Service’ (circa 1737-1741) was decorated with the coat of arms of Count Bruhl, then director of the Meissen factory. The plate was conservatively estimated at $6,000 to $8,000 but sold for $17,850. Clars Auction Gallery image.

This 18th century Italian giltwood carved chandelier (electrified) surpassed expectations selling for $21,420. This fixture hung in the foyer of a San Francisco mansion built in 1904. Clars Auction Gallery image.

The most surprising lot of the sale was this pair of Chinese-export silver teapots. Expected to achieve $500 to $700, heated bidding drove the final sale price to $16,660. Clars Auction Gallery image.

This pair of monumental scenic vases, possibly Sevres, was estimated at $4,000 to $6,000 but sold for $11,035. Clars Auction Gallery image.

The highlight of the jewelry offerings was this Hamilton platinum and diamond covered wristwatch that sold for $21,420. Clars Auction Gallery image.

This oil, sand and oxblood on canvas by Nonda (Greek, 1922-2005) ‘Poisson,’ circa 1962, sold for $9,520. Clars Auction Gallery image.

 

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 09 April 2013 15:30
 

Turquoise cut glass claret jug earns $75,000 at Woody sale

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Written by Auction House PR   
Friday, 22 March 2013 07:42

This 16-inch turquoise cut to clear claret jug attributed to J. Hoare, with embossed Gorham sterling spout sold for $75,000. Woody Auction image.

ST. CHARLES, Mo. – A magnificent 16-inch American Brilliant Cut Glass turquoise cut to clear claret jug attributed to J. Hoare sold for $75,000 at an auction held March 2 by Woody Auction at the St. Charles Convention Center. The jug, boasting an embossed Gorham sterling spout with hinged lid, a pattern cut handle and a modified Russian zipper and pillar swirl motif, was easily the top lot of the auction.

Just over 400 lots of American Brilliant Cut Glass came up for bid in a sale headlined by the collection of Dr. and Mrs. Charles Dudgeon. About 150 people, holding 82 bidder numbers, attended the event in person, while another 350 bidders participated online, through LiveAuctioneers.com. Around 24 absentee bidders also took part. There was no phone bidding. It was an absolute auction – all lots sold.

“Sellers can be a little leery of an auction without reserves, but this sale proved that if you have quality merchandise to offer, you’ve got nothing to worry about,” said Jason Woody of Woody Auction, based in Douglass, Kan. “We were very pleased with the outcome, both in terms of high prices realized and the tremendous turnout of live and online bidders. The success reflects the quality we were selling.”

Following are additional highlights from the auction. All prices quoted are hammer, exclusive of a sliding commission structure. There is no buyer’s premium at a Woody Auction.

A signed Libbey punch bowl set in the rare Aztec pattern, with a 14-inch by 15-inch two-part punch bowl with 12 punch cups with handles and a matching ladle, soared to $35,000; and an original four-drawer cherrywood stemware chest, stocked with 69 rock crystal stems in Pattern #105 (as featured in Sinclaire, Vol. I, pg. 24), brought $25,000. The glass lid lifted to reveal a mirrored base.

An exquisite 12 1/2 inch signed Tuthill round tray in the Rex pattern, having one of the clearest blanks ever seen on such an example, changed hands for $23,000; and the finest rose bowl Woody Auction has ever sold at auction – a massive 7 1/2 inch by 10 inch signed Libbey bowl, cut in the rare Emerson pattern designed by W.C. Anderson, one of the true cut glass rarities – hammered for $18,000.

A super 17 1/2-inch by 10-inch ice-cream tray with 12 plates in the Wedgemere pattern by Libbey, with all of the 7-inch plates in outstanding condition and the overall set in great condition, breezed to $10,000; and a 13 1/4 inch round tray with six 7-inch plates having a flashed hobstar center surrounded by interlocking vesicas featuring cane and diamond point highlights topped out at $9,500.

Two lots posted identical prices of $5,500. The first was a hard-to-find bread bowl in the Columbia pattern by Libbey, measuring 11 3/4 inches by 7 3/4 inches and boasting a brilliant blank and fine cutting. The second was an attractive 14 1/2-inch signed Tuthill flared vase in the Wild Rose pattern. The vase had a heavy blank with a pattern cut base and overall was of very good quality. Both fine examples.

One other lot reached $5,000. It was a pie-shaped round tray in the Arabesque pattern by J. Hoare, measuring 2 inches by 10 1/2 inches. Also, a beautiful five-piece cranberry to clear table set with three stems, one finger bowl and one underplate, attributed to Hawkes on Steuben blanks, coasted to $4,250. The set featured bulging teardrops with engraved floral highlights and with a cut stem and base.

A pair of 4 1/2-inch tall amber cut to clear wine glasses in a Russian pattern with star cut buttons and a pattern cut base commanded $4,250; a gorgeous 12-inch signed Libbey round tray in the Delphos pattern with brilliant blank and superb cutting, garnered $4,300; and a pair of 4 1/2-inch cranberry cut to clear wine glasses in a modified Russian pattern attributed to Hawkes, with clear blank, rose to $4,750.

A rare bowl in the Columbia pattern by Libbey, 4 1/4 inches by 8 3/4 inches, went for $4,500; a quality ice-cream tray in the Fern pattern by Ohio Cut Glass, 17 1/2 inches by 10 1/2 inches, commanded $3,700; a 5 inch by 11 inch bowl in the Peerless pattern by Straus with an inch-thick blank hit $3,500; and a 6- inch by 6-3/4 inch signed J. Hoare rose bowl in the Kohinoor pattern with great cutting made $3,000.

A set of five rose-colored cut to clear wine glasses in a strawberry diamond, hobstar and fan motif, with double teardrop stem and rayed base, 5 1/4 inches tall, achieved $3,500; and an elegant 11 1/2-inch green cut to clear handled pitcher with finely engraved iris décor and fancy embossed sterling iris spout, attributed to Thomas Webb with carved and decorated European art glass by Grover, made $3,100.

A 16 1/2-inch Gone With the Wind kerosene lamp with hobstar, strawberry diamond, block and fan motif, with the original oil font having a patent date of 1884, illuminated the room for $3,000; a 10-inch, eight-sided tray in the Alahambra pattern by Meriden, with good quality teeth, realized $2,500; and a pedestal stand in the Alahambra pattern, also known as Greek Key, with extra heavy blank, hammered for $2,300.

A set of three gold-colored finger bowls and underplates with hobstar center and hob button border, attributed to Union Cut Glass, breezed to $2,200; a 10-inch signed Sinclaire plate in the Assyrian pattern fetched $2,200; a pedestal flared center bowl, Aberdeen by Jewel, with extra heavy blank, brought $2,100; and a pair of signed Hawkes cut to clear wine glasses in the Gladys pattern gaveled for $2,100.

A beautiful green cut to clear pyramid-shaped decanter with engraved iris décor, elephant-shaped handle, embossed sterling spout with iris décor and matching stopper, attributed to Thomas Webb, found a new owner for $2,000; an ice-cream tray with six 7-inch plates in the Columbia pattern by Blackmer went for $2,000; and a six-sided pedestal vase in the Adam #2 pattern by Sinclaire, topped out at $1,900.

Woody Auction is always accepting quality consignments for future sales. To consign an item, an estate or a collection, call them at 316-747-2694. Or e-mail them at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

View the fully illustrated catalog for Woody Auction's sale March 2, complete with prices realized, at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

This 16-inch turquoise cut to clear claret jug attributed to J. Hoare, with embossed Gorham sterling spout sold for $75,000. Woody Auction image.

Original four-drawer cherrywood stemware chest in Sinclaire Pattern #105, with 69 rock crystal stems. Price realized: $25,000. Woody Auction image.

Ice-cream tray, 17 1/2 inches by 10 inches, with 12 plates, in the Wedgemere pattern by Libbey. Price realized: $10,000. Woody Auction image.

Signed Libbey rose bowl, massive at 7 1/2 inches by 10 inches, in the rare Emerson pattern designed by W.C. Anderson. Price realized: $18,000. Woody Auction image.

Signed Libbey punch bowl set in the rare Aztec pattern, with two-part punch bowl and 12 handled punch cups. Price realized: $35,000. Woody Auction image.

Exquisite 12 1/2-inch signed Tuthill round tray in the Rex pattern, with very clear blank. Price realized: $23,000. Woody Auction image.

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 09 April 2013 15:31
 
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