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Jackson's 'World Treasures' 2-day sale tops $2.5M

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Written by Auction House PR   
Monday, 15 July 2013 16:22
One of a group of Russian lacquerware items (circa 1825-1945) and forming a collection comprising about 100 lots that totaled $110,000. Jackson’s image.

CEDAR FALLS, Iowa – In an aptly named “World Treasures” sale, buyers from over 50 countries descended on this Midwest hamlet for a two-day auction totaling over $2.5 million in sales. Jackson’s International played host to buyers from around the world on June 11 and 12 as they sold over 1,000 lots featuring treasures from Russia, Asia, Europe and America. LiveAuctioneers.co provided Internet live bidding.

The sale started out with a small but interesting collection of European artwork selling, including a charming genre scene painting of Apple Pickers by Cesar Pattein (French 1850-1931) that sold for $13,750 to a collector in Nebraska. An oil on board by Ludolf Liberts (1895-1959) depicting the Boulevard Haussman at Night sold to a Latvian buyer for $16,250.

Jackson’s once again offered a unique selection of Russian treasures to choose from. Highlights of this section of the sale include a small (measuring 6.6 inches) Russian silver and enamel shaded lidded box by the 11th Artel, which crossed the block at $18,125.00 going to a buyer in New York. An interesting, diminutive (height 3.75 inches) Russian silver card case engraved with maps, coats of arms, figures, views and statistics sold to a buyer in Moscow for $18,750. A watercolor of Prince Vladimir by Ivan Ivakovlevich Bilibin (Russian 1876-1942) sold for $23,750. An interesting group of Russian watercolors by satirical Russian/American artist Vladimir Fedorovich Kadulin was offered in this sale featuring scenes of social realities that still resonate with those who grew up in the Soviet system and reflect the attitudes of many Russians who were violently suppressed by the early communist government. Although an unknown artist, together the group sold for nearly $70,000.

Another interesting Russian lot was a grouping of 29 original handwritten manuscripts and artworks by Russian modernist writer Alexei Mikhailovich Remizov (Russian 1877-1957). The grouping comprised of 29 original manuscripts or abstract compositions signed or monogramed by Remizov. This grouping sold to a Russian buyer for $30,000 against a conservative $3,000-$5,000 estimate. Another interesting Soviet period piece to sell was a painted plastic cigarette case presented to the Soviet military commander Vasily Gregoryevich Terentiev (1899-1957), dated 1942. The small case, 4.25 inches, went to a New York collector for $7,500.

This sale also featured a life collection of Russian lacquer boxes and other lacquer objects. The Russian lacquerware items were acquired by the consignor from the exhibition “Russian Lacquer Art from Two Centuries” held at the Museum for Lacquer Arts in Munster, Germany, May 11, 1995 through Jan. 4, 1996. Most were published and illustrated in the exhibition catalog. Together, this grouping totaled $110,000.

One area of expertise Jackson’s, and particularly President and CEO James Jackson, is well-known for is the realm of Russian Icons. As such, a Jackson’s auction would not be an auction without icons. Some highlights include a Russian presentation icon of St. Nestor the Chronicler, Moscow, 1896. This icon headed back to Russia at over $56,000 against a $20,000-$30,000 estimate. The next lot to sell was a Russian icon of the Kazan Mother of God, with marker’s marks for Feodor Ruckert, Moscow, 1899-1908. This slight icon (3.6 inches x 2.7 inches) from the Dr. John Sinsky collection sold to a Moscow buyer for $52,500. Other highlights include a 17th century Kazan Mother of God icon selling for $37,500; a Russian icon of St. Nicholas, Moscow, circa 1900 selling for $27,500; and a large icon of St. Michael Metropolitan of Kiev, Moscow, circa 1892 finished at $20,000 to a St. Petersburg buyer who outbid several other phone bidders.

One of the many interesting lots in American art was a small sketch by American impressionist Frederick Carl Frieseke (1874-1939) depicting a woman with a pink parasol. The painting will be included in the upcoming catalog raisonne on the artist being compiled by his grandson, Nicholas Kilmer. The winning buyer was a private collector on the phone who acquired the sketch for $37,500.

Another interesting lot offered was a cache of photograph negatives by noted American photographer, Arnold Genthe (1869-1942). Typically recognized for his work after the San Francisco earthquake, Genthe was also a pioneer in the world of modern dance photography. Some of the negatives found in this collection featured named models and dancers in a variety of poses and settings. The archive of over 450 negatives, in various states of condition, sold to a Midwest gallery for $5,500.

This sale also featured a small mix of Old Master and European paintings. Some examples include a 17th century Italian school painting of St. John the Baptist and St. Claire of Assisi Presenting a Monstrance to the Infant Christ and the Virgin Mary, which sold for $10,000 against a $6,000-$9,000 estimate. An oil on panel painting by German artist Ignatz Alois Frey (1752-1835) depicting a church interior and dated 1792 brought $5,000 and will return to its native Germany. A large oil on canvas by Jan Styka (Polish 1858-1925) depicting the Sacred Heart of Christ was purchased by a private institution, crossing the block at $12,500, and bringing almost double the conservative $5,000-$7,000 estimate. A lovely Madonna and Child painting by German artist Franz Ittenbach (1813-1879), measuring 19 inches x 10 inches sold for $20,000.

European artwork gave way to decorative arts, with a variety of objects being offered including a Rene Lalique French art glass Moineaux amber opalescent table clock, selling to a private collector for $4,250 and a fine Loetz Austrian Federzeichnung mother of pearl art glass vase surpassing expectations bringing $11,250, selling to a private Arizona collector. A large Meissen polychrome and gilt-decorated porcelain “Elements” ewer from the 19th century fetched $13,750 after heated bidding. And a large KPM plaque, artist signed by Carl Meinelt after the original painting by August Riedel depicting Judith with the head of Holofernes sold to a California buyer for $31,250.

Other European works to sell included an interesting and attractive Louis XVI-style mineralogical cabinet after George Haupt that was presented by Gustave III of Sweden to Prince de Conde in 1774. The early 20th century example sold to an Italian buyer after much bidding, finishing at $32,500. Bronzes also fared well with some highlights being a beautiful gilt-bronze lamp by Raoul Larche (French 1860-1912) titled Loie Fuller, which sold for $18,750 to an East Coast buyer. A Cupid bronze by French artist Louis Alexander Bottee (1852-1940) sold to an Arizona buyer, finishing at $6,875, and a Louis Chalon (French 1866-1940) bronze depicting sea sprites, circa 1895, sold to a Canadian private collector for $21,250. Other sales of note from decorative arts include a Viennese-style enameled silver-gilt and jeweled animated bird and musical box selling to an Egyptian buyer for $6,250 and a nice pair of silver and ivory jousting knights, probably German, which finished at $13,750, going to a Californian.

The sale concluded with a variety of Asian works including a Japanese silver and shibayama cabinet from the Meiji period selling for $21,250 against a $6,000-$9,000 estimate and an exceptional Japanese carved ivory okimono from the Meiji period fully carved in the round of a well modeled young standing samurai in full attire finishing at $17,500. Asian art also did quite well, especially an oil on canvas of Two Florists by Vietnamese artist Le Pho (1907-2001), which finished at $35,000 after having a spirited battle on the phone lines. A pretty painting depicting a Canton singer by Chinese artist Guan Zeju (b. 1941) sold above its $1,500-$2,000 estimate, finishing at $6,250. Asian decorative arts continue to draw wide interest including a Chinese carved white jade brush pot and cover, selling to a Beijing buyer for $16,250, and a Chinese carved jade boulder, height 7.5 inches, crossing the block at $6,250 against a $3,000-$5,000 estimate.

For information about consigning works to Jackson’s call 800-665-6743.

View the fully illustrated catalog of Jackson’s June 11-12 World Treasures auction, complete with prices realized, at LiveAuctioneers.com.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalogs for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE
One of a group of Russian lacquerware items (circa 1825-1945) and forming a collection comprising about 100 lots that totaled $110,000. Jackson’s image. While only 6.5 inches in length, the Russian silver and enamel box by the 11th Artel, circa 1900, sold for $18,125. Jackson’s image. The diminutive Russian icon of the Kazan Virgin measuring just slightly over 3.5 inches and made by the firm of Feodor Ruckert, Moscow, circa 1899-1908, sold to a buyer from Moscow for $52,500. Jackson’s image. This 8.5-inch Loetz Austrian mother of pearl art glass vase brought $11,250. Jackson’s image. This bronze by French artist Louis Chalon (1866-1940) titled ‘Sea Sprites’ sold for $21,250. Jackson’s image. Measuring only 9.25 inches high, this Japanese silver and shibayama cabinet from the late 19th century sold for $21,250. Jackson’s image.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 06 August 2013 10:41
 

Regional, Continental works drive Cowan’s auction over $1.1M

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Written by Auction House PR   
Monday, 15 July 2013 14:17
‘Friends Forever’ by Russian artist Demetre Chiparus, realized $60,000. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image. CINCINNATI – Cowan's Auctions two day Fine and Decorative Art Auction realized $1,130,000 in the July 13-14 sale. With a packed salesroom of more than 100 people and over 2,000 bidders online from over 20 different countries, the auction saw competitive bids between the floor, absentee, online and phone bidders throughout the day. Regional paintings and European works achieved high prices in the auction. LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

The sale’s highest selling lot attracted considerable attention from both phone and Internet bidders. The work, a sculpture titled Friends Forever by Russian artist, Demetre Chiparus, realized $60,000.

“Our two-day auction was a smashing success. I was particularly pleased with the results of the works by Henry Faulkner. Our exhibit brought many people in the door and the painting’s themselves sold tremendously,” said Graydon Sikes, director of paintings and prints. “Material from the Yost estate in Pennsylvania had a great deal of interest, especially the Choultse painting and Chiparus bronze. Other estates in the auction, some of which remained anonymous, sold very well because they were buried in collections for decades.”

The sale’s second highest selling lot was a painting by Ivan Choultse, titled Coucher De Soleil Sur La Mer, which sold for $50,400. An original receipt of purchase from New York accompanied the painting, noting that it was sold in 1932 for $700.

A collection of over 25 Civil War carved soldiers pipes from the estate of Jan Sorgenfrei of Old Barn Auction in Findlay, Ohio, garnered high prices in the sale. Heated bidding between the floor and phones drove the selling prices up considerably. A Reuben T. Woodward 21st Massachusetts Pipe trounced its estimate of $1,000-1,500 and sold for $15,600. A patriotic Lady Liberty carved pipe realized $10,800, and a Liberty or Death poatriotic carved pipe sold for $9,000. Cowan’s also offered Sorgenfrei’s collection of antique toys in the sale. A George Brown “Excelsior” clockwork locomotive sold for $5,535 and a Hubley cast-iron transitional ladder truck brought $3,600.

Works by Midwest regional artists, including Henry Faulkner, Paul Sawyier and Elizabeth Nourse did particularly well in the auction. A painting by Faulkner, titled The Cellist, sold for $11,400, and Faulkner’s Staircase in Taormina realized $10,224. A watercolor of a girl by Cincinnati native, Elizabeth Nourse, brought $11,600, and a river scene by Kentucky artist, Paul Sawyier, sold for $15,600.

American furniture brought competitive bidding in the sale. A Charles Tinges inlaid Baltimore federal tall-case clock sold to a phone bidder for $18,000, a Rococo Revival bed hammered down at $6,600, a Rococo Revival dresser and commode stand for $5,700 and a Rococo Revival etagere realized $4,920.

Silver attracted bidders on the floor, phone and Internet. Cowan’s offered Kentucky coin, Gorham, Tiffany and Chinese export silver in the auction. A Kentucky coin silver cup by well-known early maker Asa Blanchard started the auction off with a bang, selling for $4,800. A Gorham Classical-style urn realized $4,500; a set of Tiffany & Co. sterling trays sold for $3,360, a Chinese export urn form incense burner hammered at $7,995, and a Chinese export silver presentation bowl with dragons realized $5,400.

Other notable lots in the July 13-14 auction included an Andrew Clemens sand bottle. Two bidders on the floor battled back and forth for the Clemens bottle, which eventually sold for $22,800. A set of John J. Audubon bound octavo Birds of America books realized $27,600, a Fuse Box pinup by Harry Ekman brought $19,200, a folk art painting by Charles Wysocki, titled Lilac Square, sold for $10,800, and a sculpture by Ferdinand Preiss, titled Archer, hammered down at $15,600.

For more information call Cowan’s at 513-871-1670.

View the fully illustrated catalog of Cowan’s Auctions’ Fine and Decorative Art Auction July 13-14, complete with prices realized, at LiveAuctioneers.com.

 

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE
‘Friends Forever’ by Russian artist Demetre Chiparus, realized $60,000. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image. ‘Coucher De Soleil Sur La Mer’ by Ivan Choultse sold for $50,400. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image. An Andrew Clemens sand bottle sold for $22,800. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image. A Charles Tinges inlaid Baltimore federal tall-case clock sold for $18,000. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image. A set of John J. Audubon bound octavo Birds of America books realized $27,600. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.
Last Updated on Thursday, 18 July 2013 13:16
 

John Moran achieves strong prices for Asian art June 18

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Written by Auction House PR   
Friday, 12 July 2013 13:04
Dating to the 17th-18th centuries, this gilt-splashed bronze incense burner sent bidders into a frenzy, selling for $54,000 (estimate: $3,000-$5,000). John Moran Auctioneers image. PASADENA, Calif. – John Moran Auctioneers’ June 18 Antiques and Decorative Arts Auction featured quality American and European furnishings, decorative arts, and fine art, as well as a vast selection of Native American textiles, baskets, beadwork and pottery. International bidding activity via online bidding platforms including LiveAuctioneers.com was especially busy. Nearly a third of all successful bidders bought online.

Asian works of art, particularly Chinese, did especially well. Almost every one of the carefully selected items in this category outperformed its high estimate. The most contested lot was a Chinese gilt-splashed bronze incense burner, dated to the late 17th-early 18th century. Tying up every available phone line and pulling in numerous international bidders via online platforms, the censer realized $54,000, leaps and bounds over the conservative estimate of $3,000 to $5,000.

A pair of impressively carved Chinese carved spinach jade covered urns followed, realizing $12,300 (estimate: $1,000-$1,500). Though restored, a Chinese red coral figural carving depicting two figures atop a phoenix bird achieved $6,765 (estimate: $800-$1,200). A massive Chinese export Canton famille rose punchbowl, a find at one of John Moran’s monthly walk-in “What’s It Worth?” appraisal clinics, was estimated to bring between $2,000-$3,500, and found a buyer for $5,400. Also causing quite a stir online among international buyers was a Ming Dynasty celadon-glazed warming bowl. It earned $13,200 at the block (estimate: $3,000-$4,000).

Among the 70 Native American objects, Navajo textiles appeared in abundance. A room-size Navajo regional weaving in red, black, cream and gray on a natural brown ground earned just over the estimated $4,000-$6,000, selling for $6737.50. A striking pictorial rug, featuring stylized frogs, lizards, and human figures on a red ground, estimated to bring $3,000-$5,000, brought $6,600 after some serious competition between telephone bidders. A finely woven Navajo Third Phase woman’s wearing blanket, woven of aniline-dyed red, indigo-dyed blue, and natural brown, grey and cream wool exceeded expectations with a final price tag of $8,400 (estimate: $5,000-$6,500).

Prices were also strong among a variety of other types of Native American art. An exceptionally rare Sioux beaded hide horse mask, a parade piece decorated with American flags, was in excellent condition for its 100 years. Originally conservatively estimated to find a new owner for between $12,000 and $16,000, it inspired a battle between floor bidders who duked it out until at last the dust settled at an impressive $27,000.

Numerous absentee buyers bid on a Southern Plains Indian hairpipe breastplate, dating to the late 19th century, driving it to a final selling price of $3,600 (estimate: $800-$1,200). A striking Tlingit carved wood clan helmet, dating to the late 19th or early 20th centuries, realized $6,000 (estimate: $3,000-$6,000). Featuring effigies of a killer whale, a raven, a frog and a bear, the helmet hailed from a private collection in the Northwest. A collection in Los Angeles yielded a number of great baskets, including a California Mission Cahuilla polychrome basket with a design of two snakes circling a central eagle. In very good condition and dated to the first quarter of the 20th century, it sold for $6,600 at the block (estimate: $3,000-$5,000).

Continental decorative arts, a mainstay at Moran’s, also found buyers at competitive prices. A rare Rene Lalique Jeunesse perfume bottle with a dauber modeled as a standing cherub realized $3,382.50 (estimate: $800-$1,200), while a pair of Georg Jensen sterling silver candlesticks designed by Alphonse La Paglia brought $2,400 (estimate: $1,000-$1,500). A pair of Georgian walnut dining room urns on pedestals drove bidders wild, fomenting intense interest both online and via telephone. At the end of the tussle, the urns sold for $21,600 (estimate: $2,500-$3,500).

In the category of fine art, a festive oil-on-canvas titled The Wedding, by Pjotr Stajanow, realized $3,600, well over the estimated $800-$1,200, and setting a record for the Russian artist’s works at auction. Shortly following, a charming oil-on-panel by Dutch artist Anton Mauve depicting cows in a pastoral Dutch landscape found a buyer at $3,600 (estimate: $2,000-$3,000). An oil by Western genre specialist Percy Van Eman Ivory titled Striking Oil earned its place as a standout with a selling price of $4,200, exceeding the estimated $1,200-$1,800. Offered shortly after was a lot of 11 vintage American sports paintings, estimated at $3,000-$5,000 due to various condition issues. A compelling slice of Americana and collegiate history, the group went for a respectable $4,287.50. Late in the auction, a languid scene by master Southern California engraver Paul Landacre titled Forest Girl realized $2,700 (estimate: $600-$800).

Select highlights also include:

– A 1958 Selmer Mark VI tenor saxophone, in excellent original condition, attracted bids both domestic and international, eventually going to an online buyer for $10,040 (estimate: $4,000-$6,000);

– A set of lithographs by Mexican artist Rufino Taymayo (eight works of the “90th Anniversary Series”), brought $18,375 at the block (estimate: $10,000-$15,000);

– A circa 1740 map of the South Seas engraved by Dutch cartographers Andries & Hendrik de Leth found a new home with a phone bidder for $7,200 (estimate: $3,000-$5,000):

– A 1926 Steinway Model O grand piano with a carved Louis XV-style case, consigned from a San Marino, Calif., estate, realized $11,295 (estimate: $6,000-$8,000).

Consignment inquiries are always welcome at John Moran Auctioneers. Interested sellers should contact the office directly via email at: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , or via phone at: 626-793-1833.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE
Dating to the 17th-18th centuries, this gilt-splashed bronze incense burner sent bidders into a frenzy, selling for $54,000 (estimate: $3,000-$5,000). John Moran Auctioneers image. A pair of carved spinach jade covered urns on gilt metal bases, marked with a Qianlong chop mark, earned a $12,3000 sale price, well over the estimated $1,000-$1,500. John Moran Auctioneers image. This Third Phase woman’s wearing blanket carried an estimate of $5,000-$6,500. It realized $8,400 on the block. John Moran Auctioneers image. This intricately beaded Sioux horse mask was in excellent condition for its age, earning a price of $27,000 (estimate: $12,000-$16,000). John Moran Auctioneers image. These George III walnut dining room urns are a furniture type described in George Hepplewhite’s late 18th century treatise ‘The Cabinet-Maker and Upholsterer’s Guide.’ The pair found a new home for $21,600 (estimate: $2,500-$3,500). John Moran Auctioneers image. ‘Striking Oil,’ by Sacramento-born Western artist Percy Van Eman Ivory, hammered at $4,200 (estimate: $1,200-$1,800). John Moran Auctioneers image.
Last Updated on Monday, 15 July 2013 14:10
 

Cast-iron banks dominated at Morphy’s June 22 Toy Auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Wednesday, 10 July 2013 15:17

Atlas cast-iron mechanical bank, $12,000. Morphy Auctions image.

DENVER, Pa. – There were no bank “bailouts” required at Morphy’s June 22 antique toy auction, with Internet live bidding through LiveAuctioneers. Collectors eagerly stepped up to the plate to stake their claims on an excellent assortment of cast-iron mechanical and still banks – a category that ended up leading all others in the $502,000 event. Prices quoted in this report are inclusive of 20% buyer’s premium.

Seven of the top 10 lots were banks made during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Among them was a figural cast-iron bank depicting the muscular Greek god Atlas with the world hoisted onto his back. Complete and in near-mint condition, the coveted moneybox swept past its $6,000-$8,000 estimate to settle at $12,000.

Another strong entry within the mechanicals was a Lighthouse bank with realistically detailed red brick tower. The 10½-inch cast-iron piece surpassed expectations, garnering a winning bid of $10,800.

Other mechanical banks in the top 10 included three J. & E. Stevens productions. They included a Magic bank, pistachio green with red version, with a front door that opens to reveal a smartly dressed cashier, $8,400; and a near-mint-plus Owl Turns Head bank, which more than doubled its high estimate at $4,500. A Stevens Perfection registering mechanical bank pocketed $10,800.

A beautiful, all-original example of a beady-eyed Pelican still bank was a crowd favorite. The near-mint-plus sea bird flew past its $6,000-$8,000 estimate to land at $11,400. Another popular non-mechanical bank was a Stevens circa-1880 “General Butler,” which was offered together with a framed picture of its namesake, Civil War general Benjamin Franklin Butler. Estimated at $3,000-$4,000, it took in a tidy $8,400.

The 595-lot sale had opened with more than 140 antique occupational shaving mugs from the Ray and Theresa Jones collection. Each mug from the barber-shop era of more than a century ago was an individual expression of its owner, typically emblazoned with a depiction of the person’s occupation and his name in gold. A colorful mug with an eye-catching image of a red and white lighthouse by the sea sailed past its $800-$1,200 estimate to close at $3,900.

Not far behind was a mug depicting a very different type of lighting source. The well-detailed image was of a worker, with rolled-up shirtsleeves, seated at a workbench and handcrafting light bulbs. With expectations of making $700-$900, it illuminated the auction gallery as it hammered $3,000.

“Shaving mug collectors really go for the unusual occupations,” said Morphy Auctions CEO Dan Morphy. “We knew this mug was rare, but when it comes right down to it, it’s always the collectors who call the shots on value. Obviously there were at least two bidders who were determined to take this particular mug home – that’s all it takes for an estimate to be left in the dust.”

Three early barber poles were included alongside the selection of shaving mugs. An aggressive bid of $5,700 clinched a handsome 44-inch red and gold striped pole with a three dimensional eagle on its finial.

Other auction highlights included a boxed Linemar Disney friction fire engine toy, $3,300; and an extremely rare “Moving Pictures” kaleidoscope candy container made by West Bros. & Co. of Grapeville, Pa. Constructed of metal with an applied red paper label, the candy container even retained its original box. It was bid to the upper reaches of its presale estimate, realizing a very sweet $7,200.

To discuss consigning to a future toy and bank sale at Morphy’s, call 717-335-3435 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

To view the entire online catalog from Morphy’s June 22 Toy Auction, complete with prices realized, log on to www.liveauctioneers.com.

 

# # #



ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Atlas cast-iron mechanical bank, $12,000. Morphy Auctions image.

Antique occupational shaving mug depicting a lighthouse, $3,900. Morphy Auctions image.

Early 44-inch red and gold striped pole with a three dimensional eagle on finial, $5,700. Morphy Auctions image.

J. & E. Stevens Magic cast-iron mechanical bank, pistachio green with red version, $8,400. Morphy Auctions image.

Lighthouse cast-iron mechanical bank with realistically detailed red brick tower, $10,800. Morphy Auctions image.

Pelican cast-iron still bank, $11,400. Morphy Auctions image.

Linemar lithographed-tin friction fire engine with Disney characters, accompanied by original box, $3,300. Morphy Auctions image.

Moving Pictures kaleidoscope candy container made by West Bros. & Co. of Grapeville, Pa., accompanied by original box, $7,200. Morphy Auctions image.

Last Updated on Monday, 15 July 2013 14:14
 

Jeffrey S. Evans sells Va. stoneware pot for record $86,250

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Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 09 July 2013 16:33

Signed ‘Emanuel Suter,’ Rockingham Co., Shenandoah Valley of Virginia salt-glazed stoneware honey or sugar pot, circa 1851. The 5-inch pot sold for $86,250, a new record price for Virginia pottery. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

MT. CRAWFORD, Va. – A rare stoneware honey or sugar pot by Emanuel Suter sold for a record-breaking price of $ 86,250 at Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates’ auction of Americana & Fine Antiques on June 22.

Internet live bidding was facilitated by LiveAuctioneers.com.

The pot, from the collection of Rudolph Evers, is important because it bears a stenciled mark, “Emanuel Suter,” which is known on this and only two other examples. Emanuel Suter (1833-1902) is widely recognized as the preeminent Mennonite potter of the American South during the second half of the 19th century.

For more information on Suter see A Great Deal of Stone & Earthen Ware – The Rockingham County, Virginia School of Folk Pottery by Jeffrey S. Evans and Scott Hamilton Suter. The pot broke the previous record of $82,250 for Virginia pottery, held by an Anthony Bacher earthenware figure of a goat sold in 1995 as part of the Dr. Henry Deyerle collection. The Suter pot was purchased by private collectors from Maryland who have ties to the Shenandoah Valley.

There were many other strong prices achieved during the auction. An important Wythe County, Valley of Virginia paint-decorated blanket chest, sold for $34,500 to private collectors in the area. The blanket chest, lot 603, had a presale estimate of $20,000-$30,000.

A rare coin silver covered fruit bowl with elaborate Rococo Revival repousse decoration, marked for retailers Mitchell & Tyler of Richmond, Va., and maker Peter L. Krider of Philadelphia, that descended in the Dooley family of Richmond, sold to a Virginia institution for $31,050 against an estimate of $5,000-$8,000. [Lot 880].

Purchases by the Museum of the Shenandoah Valley included an extremely rare Frederick County, Va., fraktur, one of only six known by the same hand. This example featured a spread-wing eagle and two heart-form leaves above "MARY E. / JONES / Died July 29th 1849 Aged 49.y 4m. 20d." executed in gold leaf, watercolor and ink. Estimated at $10,000-15,000, the fraktur sold for $29,900, against strong bidding. [Lot 527]. The catalog entry for the lot included a possible identification of the artist of this group based on research conducted by Jeffrey S. Evans and William McGuffin.

A rare pair of circa 1775 Southside Virginia Chippendale black walnut side chairs [Lot 607] was also hotly contested, realizing $26,450 against an estimate of $8,000-12,000. They are identical to an example in the Colonial Williamsburg collection that is illustrated on p. 108, fig. 24.1 of Southern Furniture 1680-1830 by Ron Hurst and Jonathan Prown and carried a Milly McGehee provenance.

Among the fine art sold at the auction, a Southern genre painting by William Aiken Walker, also from the Evers estate, sold for $17,250 against an estimate of $10,000-15,000. The estate collection of Betty and Richard Robertson of Waynesboro, Va., yielded two miniature portraits signed by members of the famous Peale family of artists. A Raphaelle Peale portrait of a gentleman, realized $9,200, while a James Peale portrait of a woman, realized $8,625.00. [Lots 815 and 816]. Both had estimates of $2,000-4,000.

The mammoth 1,010-lot auction realized slightly more than $870,000. All prices include a 15 percent buyer’s premium. Bidders from over 23 countries participated in the sale and the auction house received thousands of online and left bids.

“The demand for well documented, fresh Southern material continues to be strong,” said Jeffrey S. Evans. “Institutional interest in this auction was tremendous with several museums successfully adding important objects to their collections of Southern decorative arts.

“As for the antiques market as a whole, we are seeing a significant increase in the number of bidders and bids, which is resulting in an uptick in prices. Buyers are recognizing the great values available in the current market and are taking advantage of some great deals,” added Evans

For further details email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , or call 917-302-1757, or call Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates, 540-434-3939.

 

View the fully illustrated catalog of Jeffrey S. Evans’ June 22 Americana & Fine Antiques Auction, complete with prices realized, at LiveAuctioneers.com.

 



ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Signed ‘Emanuel Suter,’ Rockingham Co., Shenandoah Valley of Virginia salt-glazed stoneware honey or sugar pot, circa 1851. The 5-inch pot sold for $86,250, a new record price for Virginia pottery. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

Extremely rare Frederick Co., Shenandoah Valley of Virginia fraktur, watercolor, ink and gold leaf on paper, a death record for Mary E. Jones, circa 1849. 9 3/4 inches x 7 3/4 inches sight. Price: $29,990. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

Important Wythe Co., Va., paint-decorated poplar blanket chest dated 1802. Price: $34,500. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

An important pair of Southside Virginia Chippendale black walnut side chairs, probably Southampton or Greensville Co., circa 1765-1785. Price: $26,450. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

Rare Richmond, Va., retailed coin silver fruit bowl with cover, stamped for the firm of Samuel P. Mitchell and John H. Tyler Sr. (1845-1866) of Richmond and Peter L. Krider (1845-1860) of Philadelphia, circa 1845. Price: $31,050. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

 

 

Last Updated on Monday, 15 July 2013 14:10
 

Imperial embroidery sews up $12,000 bid at Kaminski

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Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 02 July 2013 11:29

Imperial yellow embroidery, China, embroidered with five-clawed dragons among clouds and waves, 92 inches x 44 inches. Price realized: $11,000. Kaminski image.

BEVERLY, Mass. – With over 600 lots, the Fine Asian Arts and Antiques Auction at Kaminski on June 22 saw the successful sale of a wide variety of Chinese objects, including ivory, jade, bronze, porcelain, silk and hardwood pieces—all selling with an 81 percent pass rate.

LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

While a few high selling lots became the clear stars of the auction, the sale performed very well overall. The majority of lots sold within or above estimate, indicating the high quality and desirability of the items selected for the sale by Kaminski’s Asian appraiser Bob Yang, with the aid of Asian department assistant Helen Eagles. Yang joined the Kaminski team in November 2012 and has since brought a deep knowledge of Chinese antiques as well as a wide variety of truly intriguing and valuable objects to each auction.

Of the standout lots of this sale, the highest grossing was a large carved hardwood screen that stood 73 inches tall. The screen featured figurative carving to both sides, broken into multiple panels. An online bidder purchased the piece for $14,000.

A large huanghuali armchair also commanded a high price for its beautiful carvings. Raised on a huanghuali platform, the chair featured carved dragons on the headrest, seat back and skirt. This impressive piece of furniture sold for $11,000, far above the $5,000 original high estimate.

A rare cloisonne plaque from the collection of a former Boston College professor also displayed impressive artistry as well as veritable age. The 18th century Chinese Qing Dynasty plaque depicted a range of azure mountains against a sky of the same color, and in the lower portion, elegantly bent trees shading a small building with a lone inhabitant. The scene also included an inscription in the top right hand corner. Many bidders competed to own the plaque, which ultimately sold for $12,000.

The sale additionally included a number of silk and embroidered pieces, the most impressive of which was a yellow Chinese imperial embroidery. The length of fabric, 92 inches by 44 inches, was filled with detailed and multicolored embroidery outlining the sinuous curves of five clawed dragons among billowing clouds and waves. Originally estimated at $4,000 to $6,000, the embroidery was hammered down at $11,000.

A decisive absentee bid outperformed a number of eager buyers on the floor and online for a bronze figure of Yama, 7 inches in height. The 18th or 19th century Tibetan figure of the wrathful god also sold for far above its estimate, fetching $9,000.

One of the most highly anticipated lots of auction was a red glazed vase from the Chinese Qianlong period of the Qing Dynasty (1736-1795). The vase featured a bamboo shaped neck that opened into a wide bulbous body, and had been preserved in excellent condition. After intense bidding on the floor and online, the final hammer price of the vase came to $8,000. Other high selling porcelain lots included a pair of famille rose boy figures from the Qing Dynasty, also in very good condition, which sold for $4,250, and a pair of finely painted landscape plaques in rosewood frames for $4,750.

The smaller jewelry items included in the sale were equally impressive. Many bidders were especially drawn to a Chinese pearl necklace of the later 19th century. Sold for $11,000, the stately necklace consisted of a string of 106 large pearls rich with iridescent pinks and purples and accented by carved coral beads, turquoise, lapis, agate and cloisonne elements.

Equally impressive in quality was a white jade brush holder, carved in the form of a mountain range. The high quality piece of jade carried a carved Shiru mark, and rested upon a zitan wood stand. The lot sold for $5,500.

With the conclusion of this summer auction, the Asian Arts and Antiques Department at Kaminski looks forward to their fall Asian auction, to be held on Sept. 21.

 

View the fully illustrated catalog of the June Fine Asian Arts and Antiques Auction at Kaminski, complete with prices realized, at LiveAuctioneers.com.

 



ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Imperial yellow embroidery, China, embroidered with five-clawed dragons among clouds and waves, 92 inches x 44 inches. Price realized: $11,000. Kaminski image.

Rare cloisonne plaque, China, Qing Dynasty, 18th century, depicting a landscape scene, 19 1/2 inches x 26 3/4 inches. Price realized: $12,000. Kaminski image.

Pearl necklace, China, later 19th century, with carved turquoise, lapis, and red coral beads, carved purple quartz and cloisonne hanging accent pendants, 60 inches long. Price realized: $11,000. Kaminski image.

White jade brush holder, China, with carved Shiru mark, carved in the form of a mountain range, on a zitan wood stand, 1 5/8 inches x 4 3/4 inches. Price realized: $5,000. Kaminski image.

Bronze figure of Yama, Tibet, 18th/19th century, 7 inches x 7 inches. Price realized: $9,000. Kaminski image.

Last Updated on Friday, 05 July 2013 16:03
 

1844 campaign flag raises $49,350 at Cowan's auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Monday, 01 July 2013 15:39

Clay and Frelinghuysen ‘The Same Old Coon’ 1844 presidential campaign flag. Price realized: $49,350. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.

CINCINNATI – Cowan’s Auctions Inc.'s American History: Live Salesroom Auction realized just over $750,000 on June 21. Over 350 bidders on the floor, phone and Internet participated in the auction. The sale featured rare political campaign ephemera, photographs, daguerreotypes, books, manuscripts, Lincoln items, maps, Civil War collectibles, and folk art carved Civil War soldiers pipes from the collection of the late Jan Sorgenfrei, who owned and operated Old Barn Auction in Findlay, Ohio, for many years. Strong bidding from the phones and Internet drove many of the lots well past their estimates.

LiveAucitoneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

“From the never-before-seen Clay and Frelinghuysen 1844 campaign flag, which brought $49,350, to the Alexander Gardner photograph of President Lincoln at Antietam and the Mathew Brady portrait of Robert E. Lee and staff, we were elated with the strong prices realized in Friday’s American History Auction.” said Katie Horstman, director, American history department.

The highest selling lot in the auction was a Clay and Frelinghuysen “The Same Old Coon” 1844 presidential campaign flag, which quadrupled its original estimate of $10,000-$15,000 and sold for $49,350. Two bidders on the phone and Internet battled for minutes over the item, which eventually sold to the phone bidder. This previously unknown red, white and blue silk flag banner depicts the Henry Clay coon in the act of skinning a fox, meant to symbolize Martin Van Buren, in the center.

Rare and exceptional daguerreotypes also garnered high prices in the auction. A remarkable sixth plate stereo daguerreotype by Southworth and Hawes of Samuel Gilman Brown, president of Hamilton College, sold for $17,625. A half plate daguerreotype of a ’49ers mining scene hammered down at $16,450, and a half plate daguerreotype of the gold rush also realized $16,450.

Other photography also had a strong showing and exceeded their estimates in the sale. A History of the Northern Pacific Railroad, featuring F. Jay Hayes tipped-in photographs and a letter from the author, E.V. Smalley, trounced its estimate of $2,500-$4,500 and sold to a phone bidder for $29,375. A rare Gen. Robert E. Lee and staff photograph by Mathew Brady realized $19,975, a photograph by Alexander Gardner of President Lincoln at the Battlefield of Antietam sold for $15,275, and a Lewis half plate daguerreotype camera with a Jamin/Darlot lens sold for $10,575.

Manuscripts and archives also brought competitive bidding. A rare 1844 Southern illustrated stagecoach broadside sold for $10,575, another rare 1791 Kentucky statehood broadside realized $9,400, a Benedict Arnold letter to J. Thompson, dated to 1780, sold to a phone bidder for $5,581.50, and a Civil War diary of CSA Col. George K. Griggs, Virginia 38th Infantry, hammered down at $12,925.

Other featured items in the sale that realized high prices included Blind Tom, the African American musical prodigy’s flute, which hammered down at $14,100. An exceptional collection of over 18,000 cigar labels sold for $18,800, a rare 1863 Gettysburg battlefield map by T. Ditterline realized $5,400, and a Civil War folk art carved pipe depicting the Battle of New Bern from the collection of Jan Sorgenfrei realized $4,500.

For more information about the auction or to consign for an upcoming sale, visit cowans.com or call Katie Horstman at 513-871-1670 ext. 46.

 

View the fully illustrated catalog of Cowan's Auctions' American History sale June 21, complete with prices realized, at LiveAuctioneers.com.

 



ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Clay and Frelinghuysen ‘The Same Old Coon’ 1844 presidential campaign flag. Price realized: $49,350. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.

‘History of the Northern Pacific Railroad,’ featuring F. Jay Haynes tipped-in photographs and letter from the author, E.V. Smalley. Price realized: $29,375. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.

Exceptional collection of cigar labels. Price realized: $18,800. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.

Rare Gen. Robert E. Lee and staff photograph by Matthew Brady. Price realized: $19,975. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.

Rare Southern illustrated stagecoach broadside, 1855. Price realized: $10,575. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 02 July 2013 11:16
 

Kamelot Auctions cites many standouts in June 14-15 sale

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Written by Auction House PR   
Monday, 01 July 2013 13:38

Kamelot Auctions image.

PHILADELPHIA – Buyers at Kamelot Auctions’ two-day Town & Country Estate Sale on June 14 and 15 competed for treasures of 20th century and antique designer furniture, lighting, garden antiques, Orientalia, and quality fine art and decorative art. LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

Friday’s portion of the sale included decorative arts, fine art and Orientalia and saw a strong opening with a carved Asian antique ivory goddess, circa 1900, that brought $3,600 (lot 1) and a set of four signed watercolors of koi that brought $11,000 (lot 17). Other highlight’s of Friday’s sale include a collection of Herend porcelain Rothschild Bird dinner service that grossed over $14,000 (lots 230, 231, 232, 234), a Rene-Paul Marquet ivory and gilt bronze figure that earned $6,000 (lot 141) and an oil painting by Guatemalan-born artist Rodolfo Mishaan titled La Bandera Serie Quetzel that brought $3,800 (lot 299).

Saturday continued with strong sales with a diverse array of antique and mid-century furniture, lighting and garden antiques. Lot 501, a Pedro Friedeberg carved hand-form chair, circa 1970, grossed an impressive $9,000 along with a rare pair of Murano teardrop floor lamps circa 1940 that brought $7,500 (lot 633). Other highlights include a pair of Syrian mother of pearl settees that earned $6,000 (lot 750), a pair of Napoleon III Turkish style club chairs circa 1880 that brought $7,200 (lot 726) and a labeled J.W. Fiske cast-iron fountain with three tiers that grossed $6,300 (lot 937).

The June sale at Philadelphia’s Kamelot Auctions exhibited many such successful results throughout the two-day run of over 1,000 lots. The next three sales at Kamelot Auctions will take place in September, October and November. For more information, visit kamelotauctions.com or call 215-438-6990.

View the fully illustrated catalog of Kamelot Auctions’ sale held June 14-15, complete with prices realized, at LiveAuctioneers.com.



ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

 Kamelot Auctions image.

 Kamelot Auctions image.

 Kamelot Auctions image.

 Kamelot Auctions image.

 Kamelot Auctions image.

 Kamelot Auctions image.

Last Updated on Monday, 01 July 2013 14:06
 

Asian soapstone carving sells for record $2.3M at Michaan’s

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Written by Auction House PR   
Wednesday, 26 June 2013 14:09

An exceedingly rare and important soapstone figural carving,18th century, dated by inscription to 1750. Sold for $2,235,000. Record price for soapstone carving sold in a US Auction house. Michaan's image.

ALAMEDA, Calif. – Michaan’s Fine Asian Works of Art Auction held on Sunday, June 23, 2013 realized over $4,670,000, making it the San Francisco Bay Area company’s highest grossing event ever. LiveAuctioneers.com provided the Internet live bidding services for the sale.

Half of the day's gross was attributable to another phenomenon: lot 3080. An exceedingly rare and important soapstone figural carving centering Qing dynasty imperial porcelain kiln supervisor Tang Ying was far and away the star of the auction.

Expectations ran high for the work of art, with a presale estimate of $100,000-150,000. As bidding commenced for the piece, people rose from their seats amongst a standing room floor audience of well over 100 attendees, while all phone banks were busy with calls. Two online bidding stations managed the activity as calls poured in from around the world. Heavy floor and phone bids pushed the selling price to $2 million, closing with a victorious phone bid and a round of applause. The carving broke auction records as it captured a final price of $2,360,000, making it the highest-selling Asian soapstone carving ever auctioned in the United States, as well as Michaan’s highest-single selling lot to date.

Asian Art Specialist Harry Huang remarked that the sale “...greatly exceeded my expectations. I believe that this work of Tang Ying will continue to be a powerful force in the world marketplace. I also think that this auction speaks volumes on the explosive state of the current Asian antiquities marketplace; what appears to be its very bright future is a thrilling prospect for Michaan’s Auctions.”

Categorically, fine jade carvings dazzled at auction, with a substantial list of successes. Two jade double-gourd-form pendants performed amazingly well, as they sold for over 53 times their high estimate (lot 3027, $1,500-2,000). The pendants closed at $106,200, garnering expressions of elation and awe. The pair of pendants topped a lengthy list of 15 additional carved jade lots to sell from over 5 times to over 33 times projected high values.

Additional honorable mentions from the astounding jade sales included two phoenix plaques at $64,900 (lot 3014, $2,000-3,000) and two figures of pigs at $50,150 (lot 3074, $1,000-1,500). Three jade lots also managed to realize a price of $44,250 each, greatly exceeding their estimates. The shared figure was seen in groupings of two rectangular white jade pendants (lot 3008, $2,000-3,000), four animal carvings (lot 3020, $1,500-2,000) and three white jade bird carvings (lot 3033, $4,000-6,000).

Chinese paintings were another section of the auction to hold top performers. A new international record was established by a hanging scroll titled “Mountainous Dwellings” by Li Yin (lot 3217, $25,000-35,000). The piece realized $112,100, the highest figure ever achieved at auction by a Li Yin work. Rounding out the impressive lots in the category was a collection of fan paintings and calligraphy by various artists that sold for $76,700 (lot 3218, $30,000-50,000), a hand scroll after Li Tang depicting figures on horseback for $56,050 (lot 3206, $3,000-5,000) and an anonymous album of three paintings realizing a price of $50,150 (lot 3209, $2,000-3,000).

A 14th century album of 12 paintings attributed to Wang Yuan (lot 3210, $6,000-8,000) and a landscape hand scroll in the style of Wen Boren (lot 3212, $4,000-6,000) each brought $47,200. In addition to the substantial figures that these painting selections brought, the section proved to be a formidable platform in obtaining solid numbers for lesser-known artists. Examples are found in an ink and color on paper hand scroll after Xu Longjiu (lot 3208, $5,000-7,000, sold for $10,620) and Zhong Hui’s album of 10 paintings sold as lot 3225 ($1,200-1,800, sold for $5,900).

Handsome figures were also seen across other Asian art disciplines. A Tibetan cloisonné enamel ewer and cover from the Qianlong period surpassed its $20,000-30,000 estimate at $53,100 (lot 3150). Multiple ceramic offerings saw fruitful numbers, as evidenced in a pair of famille rose porcelain plaques (lot 3310, $5,000-7,000, sold for $32,450), a famille rose vase of the Guanxu mark and period that sold for over 13 times its high estimate (lot 3292, $1,500-2,000, sold for $26,550), yet another famille rose offering in a pair of 19th century vases (lot 3294, $3,000-5,000, sold for $26,550) and a pair of enameled-porcelain plaques signed “Zou Guojun” (lot 3311, $4,000-6,000, sold for $26,550). A pair of hardwood armchairs with marble insets was another lot to realize $26,550. It sold for over eight times the projected high value (lot 3178, $2,000-3,000).

Numerous private collection offerings in the auction produced excellent sell-through numbers, as did the entire sale, which had a more-than-84% sell-through. A largely jade-based, private San Francisco collection saw a 100% sell-through of its 44 lots, as did a prominent collection once owned by Senator Theodore Francis Green. A collection of Chinese silk fan paintings from the Reynold Tom Collection sold out as well, as did the entire painting collection of Mr. and Mrs. Edward W. Tom.

Michaan’s Auctions Vice President and Chief Operating Officer Scott Bradley acknowledged the impact and scope of the sale. “This Asian auction has established itself as the largest and most significant event in our company’s history thus far. The sale of the Tang Ying carving was the largest single sale I have presided over in my career. It has been a thrilling and exciting time to say the least.”

View the fully illustrated catalog, complete with prices realized, online at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

 

# # #



ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

An exceedingly rare and important soapstone figural carving,18th century, dated by inscription to 1750. Sold for $2,235,000. Record price for soapstone carving sold in a US Auction house. Michaan's image.

Li Yin (Early Qing Dynasty),Mountainous Dwellings.Sold for $112,100. World record price the artist. Michaan's image.

Two jade double-gourd-form pendants. Sold for $106,200. Michaan's image.

Two jade figures of pigs, Han Dynasty.Sold for $50,150. Michaan's image.

After Li Tang (1066-1150), Figures on Horseback, Qing Dynasty. Sold for $56,050. Michaan's image.

Tibetan cloisonne enamel ewer and cover, Qianlong mark and mark of the period.Sold for $53,100. Michaan's image.

Pair of hardwood armchairs with marble insets. Sold for $26,550. Michaan's image.

Last Updated on Monday, 01 July 2013 13:29
 
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