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Auction Results in the News

Hale painting, Willard clock share limelight at Case auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Monday, 03 June 2013 16:02

The most visited lot in the online catalog was this painting of a young woman behind black lace curtains by Boston Impressionist Philip Leslie Hale. It ultimately sold for $42,120 (est. $25,000-35,000). Case Antiques image.

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – A Boston School painting by Philip Leslie Hale and a Simon Willard labeled tall-case clock tied for top lot status at the Spring Case Antiques Auction, held May 18. The painting and clock came from the estate of Margaret Wemyss Connor of Nashville, whose collection of primarily American art and antiques accounted for 178 lots in the sale. The other 550 lots in the auction hailed from other estates and collections, including an institutional collection of Native American objects.

LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

More than 1800 bidders participated by phone, written absentee bid, by Internet and in person, including 150 floor bidders.

The painting, titled La Donna/Mi Velata, depicted a brunette beauty smiling enigmatically from behind sheer black curtains. The artist was Philip Leslie Hale, a Boston impressionist painter whose writings and teachings about art somewhat overshadowed his actual works of art during his lifetime (1865-1931) but whose work has become more sought after in recent years. The painting attracted multiple phone and Internet bidders, but a floor bidder took it home for $42,120.

The Simon Willard clock with Roxbury case, which also hammered down for $42,120, retained its original Isaiah Thomas engraved and printed label and French style feet, and sold to a phone bidder. Running a close third to the painting and clock was a 3.04 carat diamond solitaire ring (H color, VS2 clarity) in a 14K white gold setting, which sparkled at $37,440 (est. $25,000-30,000). All prices in this report include the buyer’s premium.

An oil on canvas of a dog in a landscape titled Champion Jojo by Frank Stick (American, 1884-1966) attracted seven phone bidders and online action before hammering down at $12,400 (est. $5,000-8,000). Other fine art highlights included a small (7 x 10 inches) oil of Paris in the rain by Edouard Cortes (French, 1882-1969), $5,382; an oil on canvas seascape by Prosper Louis Senat (American, 1852-1925), $4,212; a Leroy Nieman signed serigraph, F.X. McRory’s Whiskey Bar, $3,720; and an oil on canvas of the Grand Canal in Venice by Warren Sheppard (American 1858-1937), $2106.

There were four Erte bronze Art Deco style sculptures; each sold in the $2,500 range. A Smoky Mountain landscape by Louis E. Jones (1878-1958) led the Southern paintings at $4,914, while a pair of Jones etchings tripled their estimates at $1,112. Other regional art included an oil on canvas depiction of the Old Absinthe House in New Orleans by Cornelius Hankins (Mississippi/Tennessee, 1863-1946), $1,755; a surreal watercolor by Werner Wildner (Nashville, 1925-2004) of owl and gnome, $1,287; and a watercolor mountain scene by Mayna Avent (Tennessee, 1868-1959), also $1,287. A charcoal profile portrait of a man in a “fancy” painted chair, possibly an early image of James K. Polk, attributed to itinerant artist Charles Burton, who painted several prominent Southern subjects in the early 1800s, hammered down for $1,404.

“Brown” furniture, a tough sell in recent years, showed some bright spots. A Federal inlaid cherry sideboard attributed to Eastern Kentucky or Western Virginia, from the Connor estate, served up $10,530, and a rare Tennessee hunt table, the same height as a hunt board but with a top only 28” wide, brought a full huntboard-size price at $6,786 (est. $2,000-$2,500). It had descended in the family of a Tennessee politician. A cherry chest of drawers from the Connor estate with top center prospect door, bearing a documentation label from the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts, competed to $5,382 against a $2,500-$3,500 estimate, even with replaced feet.

“It was a curious piece,” noted company president John Case. “While the form is associated with Mecklenburg County, Virginia, this piece was documented in the Art and Mystery of Tennessee Furniture, has been in Middle Tennessee since at least 1920, and had secondary woods consistent with Middle Tennessee versus Mecklenburg County. MESDA told us there is a possibility it was made by a cabinetmaker who moved to the Nashville area from Virginia.”

Other furniture included an East Tennessee corner cupboard with glazed doors and vine inlaid stiles which sold for $6,552; a pair of tiger maple canopy beds, $3,744; a Sheraton period wing chair, tentatively attributed to Boston, $2,108; and a set of five contemporary Stickley brand Harvey Ellis/Arts and Crafts style inlaid oak dining chairs, $2,223.

Two Chinese watercolor on silk scroll paintings shattered their estimates. Both were believed to date from the early Qing period and were estimated in the hundreds range due to condition issues, but drew heavy attention from Chinese bidders. One, depicting figures on a terrace, competed to $13,455; the other, with a mountain landscape design, hit $11,700. Also attracting international interest was an ancient Near Eastern silver vase with heavy repousse design, which shot to $3,042 against a $250-350 estimate. A pair of large Japanese Imari floor vases with crane designs sold for $1,736, while a Famille Rose vase with celadon background and applied lizard handles brought $1,053. A small blue and white sweetmeat dish with Chinese-style decoration, made by Worcester during its Dr. Wall period, doubled its estimate at $744, and a pair of English blue and white pierced porcelain baskets attributed to Bow earned $682. A Continental creamware dish with pierced cover and underplate and figural finial brought $702, and two lots of Herend “Queen Victoria” pattern dinnerware, one containing 76 pieces, the other 33, realized $3,276 and $2,808 respectively.

In the Southern ceramics category, an East Tennessee Decker pottery stoneware jug, inscribed C.D. Decker, hammered down for $2,223 (est. $700-900). And there was reaction from the crowd when a single owner collection of miniature whiskey jugs began crossing the block and commanding full-sized price. Two flat-sided jugs from Owensboro Ky., brought $1,112 (est. 200-250), a pair from L.T. Doores of Bowling Green, Ky., brought $819 (est. 250-350), and two from Louisville (including one believed to be from a brothel) brought $761. Three miniature jugs from Nashville earned $527, the same price as a single one inscribed from the Star Saloon in Frankfort Kentucky.

The sale also included a collection of Native American pottery and artifacts, much of it deaccessioned by an East Tennessee institution. An 8-inch-long Native American three-quarter groove ax recovered alongside the Mississippi in Illinois brought $1,638, while a Mississippian grayware stirrup bottle served up $556 and a Caddo bowl with incised “friendship” designs around the rims brought $527. A 1930s Navajo Ye’ii pictorial rug depicting three figures amid cornstalks realized $682.

Metalware highlights included a 120-piece set of Reed and Barton Francis I sterling flatware, $4,329, and a George III tankard with engraved armorial crest, $2,728. A cigarette case with AH monogram by Bruckmann and Sohne, said to have been confiscated from Eva Braun’s apartment during an attempted capture of Adolph Hitler, sold for $819, while a German Art Nouveau style silverplated centerpiece by Orivit with glass bowl tripled its estimate at $1,736. A William Spratling silver and tortoiseshell necklace in the form of joined hands captured $1,989 and a circa 1940 Fred Davis Mexican silver necklace made $1,521. Early brass candlesticks from the Connor collection saw healthy demand. A lot of four Queen Anne-style candlesticks with petal bases lit up at $1,178, and a lot containing two pairs of 18th century brass candlesticks with octagonal sockets and bases brought $1,287.

The signature of Sam Houston, the only person to have been elected governor of two states, Tennessee and Texas, helped propel a Tennessee land grant to $2,106 (est. $1,000-1,200), while an 1805 judicial certification signed by Tennessee’s first governor, John Sevier, earned $1,989 (est. $400-600). An archive of letters from a Pennsylvania Civil War soldier that included a graphic account of the battle of Antietam rallied to $1,736, while an archive of letters from soldiers of the Minnesota 3rd Regiment brought $995. Other items of note in the historical category included a tintype of a Union soldier holding his sword, $744, and a group of four Abraham Lincoln/John Bell campaign lapel pins and tokens, $1,178.

Case is currently accepting consignments for its upcoming auctions. Requests for auction estimates can be emailed along with jpeg photos to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

For more information or to be added to the mailing list, visit the company’s website at www.caseantiques.com, call the gallery in Knoxville at 865-558-3033 or the company’s Nashville office at 615-812-6096, or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

View the fully illustrated catalog of the Spring Case Antiques Auction held May 18, complete with prices realized, at LiveAuctioneers.com.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

The most visited lot in the online catalog was this painting of a young woman behind black lace curtains by Boston Impressionist Philip Leslie Hale. It ultimately sold for $42,120 (est. $25,000-35,000). Case Antiques image.

A Simon Willard tall-case clock with original Isaiah Thomas paper label inside the waist door brought $42,120. Case Antiques image.

A 3.04-carat brilliant diamond ring with 14K white gold setting and GIA certification earned $37,440. Case Antiques image.

Sporting art was in demand. This Frank Stick (American, 1884-1966) oil on canvas of a hunting dog titled ‘Champion Jojo’ sniffed out a top bid of $12,400. Case Antiques image.

Related to the storied Southern huntboard, but smaller and less commonly found, are hunt tables. This one wore a nice old surface and served up $6,786 (est. $2,000-$2,500). Case Antiques image.

More bidders participated from China than from any other countries except the U.S. and Canada, and many of them wanted this early watercolor on silk scroll, which sold for $13,455. Case Antiques image.

Last Updated on Monday, 03 June 2013 17:17
 

Picasso linoleum cut hits $572,500 at Hindman art auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Thursday, 23 May 2013 14:44

Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973), 'Buste de Femme d'apres Cranach le Jeune,' 1958,  linoleum cut; Galerie Louise Leiris, pub., 25 1/2 x 20 7/8 inches. Price realized: $572,500. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

CHICAGO – Leslie Hindman Auctioneers’ Modern Art auction May 13 was a success with international competition from hundreds of bidders in the salesroom, on the telephones and via the Internet. The auction, which featured important modern photographs, original contemporary works and a strong session of prints and multiples, grossed $2.85 million. LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

The highlight of the sale was a Picasso titled Buste de Femme d’apres Cranach le Jeune, which realized $572,500, making it the most expensive unsigned Picasso linoleum cut ever sold at auction.

Some of the other highlights from the sale included an untitled Alexander Calder painting, which sold for $146,500, a Deborah Butterfield sculpture titled Doney, which brought $110,500, an untitled Barnett Newman etching, which sold for $107,500 and an untitled painting by Sam Francis, which brought $92,500.

Two photographs by Robert Frank also realized strong prices. One of his photographs titled Trolley, New Orleans brought $134,500, and another titled Hoboken realized $104,500.

The sale was preceded by a successful American and European Art auction, which grossed $2.02 million. Highlights of the sale included John William Godward’s Dolce far Niente, which realized $290,500 and William Tylee Ranney’s Haying Time, which brought $182,500.

Leslie Hindman Auctioneers’ next Modern and Contemporary auction will be held Sept. 24. The American and European Art auction will be held Sept. 23. Consignments are welcome through the end of July.

View the fully illustrated catalog Leslie Hindman Auctioneers’ Modern and Contemporary Art Auction May 13, complete with prices realized, at LiveAuctioneers.com.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973), 'Buste de Femme d'apres Cranach le Jeune,' 1958,  linoleum cut; Galerie Louise Leiris, pub., 25 1/2 x 20 7/8 inches. Price realized: $572,500. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

Robert Frank (American, b. 1924), 'Trolley, New Orleans,' 1955, gelatin silver print, signed, 9 1/2 x 14 inches. Price realized: $134,500.  Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

Alexander Calder (American, 1898-1976), 'Untitled,' circa 1945, oil on canvas, 16 x 12 1/8 inches. Price realized: $146,500. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

Last Updated on Thursday, 25 July 2013 11:44
 

Top ceramic artists have big impact at Cowan’s auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Wednesday, 22 May 2013 14:45

Peter Voulkos, untitled sculpture, 1957, realized $39,000. Cowan’s Auctions Inc.

CINCINNATI – Cowan’s Auctions Inc. Modern and Contemporary Ceramics Auction on May 17 saw high prices for well-known artists such as Lucie Rie, Peter Voulkos, Beatrice Wood and Robert Arneson. Immediately following the ceramics sale was Cowan’s 20th Century Art + Design sale, which highlighted exceptional pieces of mid-century and contemporary design, fine art, works on paper, photography and art glass.

LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

Masterworks from the Art of Peter Voulkos hit the auction block in the ceramics portion of the sale. The highest-selling lot in the auction was an untitled stoneware sculpture from 1957 which hammered down at $39,000. Another untitled vase from 1957 more than doubled its preauction estimate of $7,000/10,000 and sold for $24,000.

Other piece by Lucie Rie, titled Pink and Grey Bottle/Vase, eventually sold for $24,000. This is a signature form known as the “stamp vase.” A similar work was chosen by the Royal Mail in 1987 adorning one of four stamps to commemorate the achievement of British potters.

Other items that garnered high prices in the auction were pieces by Robert Arneson, Michael Lucero and Ken Ferguson. Michael Lucero’s most famous work, Young Lady with Ohr Hair, realized $23,370. A piece by Robert Arneson, titled Pot Kisser, sold for $7,995, and another Arneson self-portrait shot glass realized $4,059. Ken Ferguson’s Triple Udder Mermaid Vessel smashed its original estimate of $2,500/3,500 and hammered down at $8,610.

The highest-selling lot in the 20th Century Art + Design Auction was an oil on canvas painting by Giuseppe Pino titled Melissa. The painting sold for $17,220 over its preauction estimate of $8,000/12,000.

Other notable lots were a floral woodblock by Edna Boies Hopkins that sold for $5,535, a Louis Vuitton trunk realized $5,227 and a Dunbar rocking chaise by Edward Wormley sold for $6,600.

For more information about the auction or to consign for future auctions, visit www.cowans.com or contact Sam Cowan at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or call 513-871-1670.

View the fully illustrated catalog for Cowan’s May 17 Modern and Contemporary Ceramics and 20th Century Art + Design Auctions, complete with prices realized, at LiveAuctioneers.com.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Peter Voulkos, untitled sculpture, 1957, realized $39,000. Cowan’s Auctions Inc.

Lucie Rie, ‘Pink and Grey Bottle Vase,’ realized $24,000. Cowan’s Auctions Inc.

‘Melissa’ by Giuseppe Pino realized $17,220. Cowan’s Auctions Inc.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 12 June 2013 08:38
 

Calder painting soars to $114,000 at A.B. Levy’s auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 21 May 2013 16:34

Gouache on paper by Alexander Calder (1898-1976), titled ‘Red and Blue Egg.’ Price realized: $114,000. A.B. Levy’s Auction image.

PALM BEACH, Fla. – An original gouache painting by renowned artist Alexander Calder (American, 1898-1976), titled Red and Blue Egg, signed in the artist’s hand and dated 1969, sold for $114,000 at a two-session auction held May 5 by A.B. Levy’s. More than over 450 quality lots were offered. LiveAuctioneers.com provided Inter net live bidding.

The Calder piece was the superstar of the fine art category. Impressive at 29 inches by 42 inches, the work on paper attracted attention because it was an original, not a lithograph, and for its whimsical and colorful qualities. Calder was famous as a sculptor, best known for his kinetic abstract mobiles. But he was also a skilled painter who worked in watercolors, oils and gouache.

A standing room only crowd packed A.B. Levy’s gallery, with all 80 seats taken and the spillover forced to participate standing. In addition, over 500 people registered to bid online, via LiveAuctioneers.com and through the A.B. Levy’s website (www.ablevys.com). The phones were also active and absentee bidding was brisk in an auction that grossed about $1.14 million.

“We were excited that the top lots did so well, and the same was true of the less expensive items,” said Albert Levy of A.B. Levy’s. “The middle market merchandise didn’t fare quite as well, but overall it was still a successful auction. There’s a real hunger out there for quality items – the best of the best – and this sale demonstrated that. We were very pleased.”

Following are additional highlights from the auction. All prices quoted include a buyer’s premium of 20 percent for up to $100,000 and 15 percent after that.

The top lot of the sale was a Cartier diamond ring, centered by a cut cornered rectangular modified starburst cut fancy intense yellow diamond weighing 6.01 carats and boasting VS2 clarity. Flanking the main stone were trillion cut diamonds, weighing about 1.23 carats. The size 6 3/4 ring—mounted in platinum with 18K yellow prongs—brought $182,000.

Two works of fine art realized identical selling prices of $12,000. The first was a piece by noted glassblowing artist Dale Chihuly (American, b. 1941), consisting of five “Persian” glass pieces in amparo blue with red lip wrap, circa 1999. The other was a lithograph in colors on Arches paper by Marc Chagall (French/Russian, 1887-1985), titled Les Mimosas, 1968, signed by the artist.

In the furniture category, a late 19th or early 20th century mahogany marquetry and parquetry bureau a cylindre (a desk with a front of curved quarter-circle form), made in Paris after the model by Jean-Henri Riesner and numbered 100, garnered $36,000; and a late 19th century Paul Sormani Louis XV-style ormolu-mounted amaranth and bois satin bureau plat (French flat-topped writing table with drawers to the frieze) with signed lock plate, hit $14,400.

Satsuma was a big hit with bidders. Two Yabu Meizan Satsuma vases, both signed and made in the Meiji Period (late 19th century) were sold as separate lots for $21,600 and $11,070. The costlier vase was taller (7 inches, vs. 5 inches) and was of globular form (vs. rectangular tapered form).

In the antique clocks category, a fine Louis XV-style gilt-bronze and champlevé enamel mounted onyx and marble tall case clock, circa 1900-1925, rose to $14,400.

Fine watches included a Cartier 18K yellow gold Tank Americaine women’s wristwatch with rectangular silvered dial and Roman numeral indicators on an 18K yellow gold link bracelet with a deployment buckle ($10,200); and a Swiss Piaget 18K white gold “Dancer” automatic wristwatch with 38mm silver brush dial and applied markers, on a Piaget bracelet ($10,800).

Noteworthy carved creations included a pair of Italian carved, painted and gilt female figures made in the 18th century and each showing a semi-nude maiden holding floral and fruit bouquets on a torch base, 61 inches tall ($24,000); and a pair of Italian carved marble blackamoors depicting a man and woman, each on a raised circular pedestal ($12,000).

Jumping to jewelry, a size 9 3/4 platinum and diamond men’s ring with one bezel set round brilliant cut diamond, weighing 3.45 carats, with VS1 clarity and 23.3 dwt, hit $24,000; a Versace 18K yellow gold, diamond and emerald necklace set with 135 round cut diamonds and weighing 4.46 carats, breezed to $22,800.

A fine diamond and sapphire necklace set with diamonds weighing approximately 14.50 carats, having G color and VS1 clarity and 25 sapphires weighing around 14.39 carats, went for $15,600; and a signed Lambert 14K yellow gold and diamond ring, set with three fine European cut round diamonds and a center stone weighing 1.50 carats, with a 5 dwt, commanded $12,000.

Rounding out the day’s top lots, a fine pair of circa-1840 French Le Page, Paris) cased percussion pistols, engraved “Deismas D’Acier” and with a complete accessory set and fine presentation box, rang out at $30,000; a Hermes black crocodile 32 cm “Kelly” bag, Paris, with gold hardware, reached $30,000; and a 19th century continental carved ivory tusk made $18,000.

A.B. Levy’s next big auction will also be a two-session event, slated for Sunday, Oct. 27, again at the Worth Avenue showroom in Palm Beach, starting at 1 p.m. EDT. Featured will be estate jewelry, artwork, fine china, antique clocks and other antiques in many categories. Already consigned is a great collection of 19th century Chinese red coral that is certain to garner attention.

A.B. Levy’s is actively accepting quality consignments for the Oct. 27 auction and all future sales. To consign a single piece, an estate or an entire collection, call them at 561-835-9139, or you can e-mail them at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . To learn more about A.B. Levy’s and the Oct. 27 auction, log on to www.ablevys.com. Updates are posted frequently.

View the fully illustrated catalog for the A.B. Levy's auction May 5, complete with prices realized, at LiveAuctioneers.com.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Gouache on paper by Alexander Calder (1898-1976), titled ‘Red and Blue Egg.’ Price realized: $114,000. A.B. Levy’s Auction image.

The top lot of the sale was this Cartier 6.01-carat fancy intense yellow diamond ring, which sold for $182,000. A.B. Levy’s Auction image.

Meiji Period Satsuma vase of globular form, 7 inches. Price realized $21,600. A.B. Levy’s Auction image.

Louis XV-style gilt-bronze and champleve enamel mounted onyx and marble tall-case clock. Price realized: $14,400. A.B. Levy’s Auction image.

Late 19th or early 20th century mahogany marquetry and paquetry bureau a cylindre. Price realized: $36,000. A.B. Levy’s Auction image.

Fine pair of French LePage cased percussion pistols with presentation box, circa 1840. Price realized: $30,000. A.B. Levy’s Auction image.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 28 May 2013 14:00
 

Peale portrait of Washington sets record at Heritage

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Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 21 May 2013 15:02

Rembrandt Peale (American, 1778-1860), 'George Washington,' circa 1856, oil on canvas, 361/2 x 29 inches. Price realized: $662,500. Heritage Auctions image.

DALLAS – Rembrandt Peale’s iconic portrait of U.S. President George Washington—created in the artist’s lifelong quest to paint the most recognizable image of the “Father of the United States”—realized a new world record for a porthole portrait by the artist when it sold for $662,500 to lead Heritage Auctions’ two-day, $4.5-plus million American art events in Dallas. LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

The May 10-11 events spanned American Indian art, Texas, Western and California Art and masterpieces of Fine American art. The auction sold 88 percent by lot and 93 percent by value and pushed three artists’ records past $500,000.

Peale’s portrait of Washington was presented with his equally iconic portrait of Martha Washington, which reached $158,500. It followed other important offerings including John McCrady’s Steamboat 'Round the Bend, a mammoth tribute—both figuratively and literally—to Southern regional art. At 14-feet wide, the 1946 commission for Delmonico’s Restaurant in New Orleans is recognized as McCrady’s most famous mural, helping it realize $542,500—a new world record for the artist. Jerome Thompson’s 1865 oil on canvas titled Riverbank in Bloom sold for $512,500 to shatter its $8,000-plus preauction estimate and set the new record for this artist.

“These results confirm Heritage Auctions looms large in the American art auction arena,” said Ed Beardsley, vice president of fine art at Heritage. “An increasing number of important collectors trust us with their paintings and sculpture because we consistently deliver knowledgeable buyers across the complete spectrum of American fine art.”

The auction also features works by acclaimed living artists such as Stephen Scott Young, whose Hibiscus Dress (Little Cindy), 2009, realized $68,500 and Final Study for Mr. Buck’s Funeral, 2010, sold for $62,500. An oil on canvas by Shen-Huan Lu, titled House by the Pond, 1996, reached $21,250.

Among the offerings of Western and California Art were a number of iconic works, such as Indian Tales, Taos, 1922 by Blanche Grant, which realized $62,500 and Girl with Calabash, Moorea, 1977, by Millard Sheets, a notable example of California modernism, which fetched $40,625. Additional highlights include four butterfly paintings by Albert Bierstadt, offered individually, which realized a combined $64,375, Thomas Hill’s Trout Fishing, 1891, brought $42,500 and End of Day by Gordon Snidow, achieved $30,000.

Works by Texas’ plein air impressionist masters remain popular with collectors as Julian Onderdonk’s Coreopsis, Near San Antonio, Texas, 1919, reached $50,000 and Texas Cacti by Dawson Dawson-Watson, a classic example of his signature style, realized $32,500. Porfirio Salinas’ Texas Summer, fetched $25,000, and his Bluebonnets on the River Bank, realized $15,625. Jose Vives-Atsara’s Mission San Jose, San Antonio, Texas, realized $17,500 to round out the selection’s top lots.

A fresh-to-market selection of American Indian art was led by a rare and substantial Apache pictorial coiled storage jar, which reached $32,500 to more than double its preauction estimate. A monumental Santa Clara redware jar by Richard Eberlacker, sold for $18,750, and a Santa Clara carved blackware jar by Margaret Tafoya, fetched $15,625.

The auction also features a collection of pre-Columbian gold ornaments, pendants and talismans, led by a large Quimbaya gold pendant, circa A.D. 1200-1400, representing a composite human/animal creature, which sold for $15,625.

Additional highlights include but are not limited to:

Fine American Art:

  • The Artist’s Wife by Guy Pène Du Bois. Realized: $95,500.
  • Views of Northern Head at Sunrise in the Bay of Fundy by William Bradford. Realized: $53,125.
  • Dusk, Woodstock, New York, 1910 by Brige Harrison. Realized: $30,000.

Western & California Art:

  • Breaking the Ice by Earl Biss. Realized: $27,500.
  • Sisters by Mian Situ. Realized: $20,000.
  • Rocky Road Nocturne by Robert Pummill. Realized: $20,000.

Texas Art:

  • Guadeloupe River Scene by Robert William Wood. Realized: $13,750.
  • Bluebonnets, 1960 by Porfirio Salinas. Realized: $13,750.
  • Early Morning on the San Antonio River at Mill Bridge by Julian Onderdonk. Realized: $12,500.

American Indian Art:

  • A Navajo sandpainting weaving, depicting Mother Earth/Father Sky, circa 1940. Realized: $14,375.
  • A photo album from South Dakota’s Pine Ridge Reservation. Realized: $12,500.
  • A Sioux beaded hide baby carrier, circa 1890. Realized: $11,250.

View the fully illustrated catalog for the Heritage Auctions American art events held May 10-11, complete with prices realized, at LiveAuctioneers.com.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Rembrandt Peale (American, 1778-1860), 'George Washington,' circa 1856, oil on canvas, 361/2 x 29 inches. Price realized: $662,500. Heritage Auctions image.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 21 May 2013 16:44
 

Chippendale pie-crust table tops Kaminski sale at $11,000

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Written by Auction House PR   
Wednesday, 15 May 2013 13:02

18th century Chippendale tilt-top table with pie-crust edge. Price realized: $11,000. Kaminski Auctions image.

BEVERLY, Mass. – Kaminski’s latest monthly estate auction, held May 5, brought a diverse set of surprising and valuable items to the podium. LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

The top lot of the sale was an 18th century Chippendale tilt-top pie-crust table. The finely carved table featured a beautiful spiral turned urn and shaft, carved knees, and sculptural ball and claw feet.

Tables of similar attributes and quality are listed among the “better” and “superior” examples in Albert Sack’s The New Finer Points of Furniture. The spiral turned and subtly tapered shaft, however, set this particular table apart from more typical examples listed in the book. Despite recent market trends predicting the contrary, this elegant table performed well at the podium, bringing in an $11,000 hammer price.

A 19th century Victorian revival walnut cabinet of exceptional quality also found a receptive market at Kaminski. Offered as Lot 7129, the piece featured fine inlays, bronze oval panels and an original circular hand-painted central porcelain medallion. The quality piece met its high estimate, selling for $5,500.

Also a surprise to many bidders was an 1818 broadside reproduction of the Declaration of Independence, penned by Benjamin Owen Tyler, and engraved by Peter Maverick. The fine, accurate and detailed penmanship along with Maverick’s skilled engraving made this a particularly desirable version of the 1818 copies of the Declaration of Independence from the years preceding the nation’s 50th anniversary. Originally expected to sell for between $1,000 and $2,000, the price of the broadside climbed to $7,500.

Also featured in the auction was an authentic 18K gold Presidential Rolex watch brought in at a local free appraisal event. The gold watch attracted significant preauction attention, with many interested parties requesting condition reports and additional images. The original box and paperwork, along with extra links, were also offered with the watch, which succeeded in fetching $6,000.

Of the many decorative paintings included in the sale, one watercolor caught the attention of bidders most. Many in the audience and online competed to own a scenic and sunlit watercolor of a wooded path signed W.M.T. Richards, 1868. The framed watercolor ultimately fetched $5,500.

From exceptional furniture to historic documents and paintings, the May estate sale brought an impressive variety of items to the auctioneer’s podium at Kaminski.

View the fully illustrated catalog for the Kaminski estate auction on May 5, complete with prices realized, at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

18th century Chippendale tilt-top table with pie-crust edge. Price realized: $11,000. Kaminski Auctions image.

Watercolor, signed W.M.T. Richards. Price realized: $5,500. Kaminski Auctions image.

Broadside engraving of the Declaration of Independence. Price realized: $7,500. Kaminski Auctions image.

Victorian Revival walnut cabinet attributed Poitier and Stymus. Price realized: $5,500. Kaminski Auctions image.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 21 May 2013 15:05
 

Keen interest shown in Calif. artists at John Moran auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Monday, 13 May 2013 14:16

The gorgeous watercolor 'Sunday Morning, Moorea' by Millard Sheets brought $54,000 at the block, setting a new auction record for Sheets’ work (estimate: $20,000 - $25,000). John Moran Auctioneers image.

PASADENA, Calif. – Bidders seeking more affordable, smaller works by classic California and American artists at John Moran Auctioneers’ April 23 auction may have been surprised to find that the normally approachable price points for such works were rather elevated. LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

Paintings estimated to bring between $1,000 and $20,000 consistently sold near or above the high end of their estimates, while larger works with higher estimates met with more selective buyers. Nevertheless, prices at Moran’s April 23 sale were good overall, and a few records were set. Overall the sale achieved a sell-through rate of 80 percent, with 550 bidders participating.

Perhaps most notably, a large watercolor by Millard Sheets, originally estimated to bring between $20,000 and $25,000, achieved the artist’s world record, selling for $54,000 (all prices include 20 percent or 22.5 percent buyer’s premium). Executed in the later part of Sheets’ career, using transparent but rich jewel tones that evoke light filtering through stained glass, Sunday Morning, Moorea depicts a group of women in their Sunday best outside a chapel.

Moran’s also achieved records for works by Arthur J. Stephens and Cornelis Botke. The Stephens, a charming cityscape titled Villa Riviera, shows a view of historic downtown Long Beach, the artist’s hometown. Facing intense competition from prospective buyers on the floor, a phone bidder won the painting for $2,280 (estimate: $800 - $1,200). The Botke, a superb etching titled Mount Teewinot, Grand Tetons, realized $4,500, which is the highest price achieved for the artist in that medium.

Colin Campbell Cooper’s painting of the San Francisco Palace of Fine Arts and reflecting pool was another runaway highlight. One of a series of studies Cooper made of the Palace of Fine Arts under different lighting conditions, this work was completed shortly after construction on the Palace was completed in 1915. The structure was built to house artworks submitted to the Panama Pacific International Exposition, and Cooper coincidentally won the gold medal in the category of oil paintings and the silver for a watercolor during the exposition. Its location hitherto unknown, this particular work resurfaced as a part of the aforementioned series when it was brought to Moran’s by a private collector. Assigned a conservative estimate of $15,000 - $25,000, it achieved a price of $90,000, with every available phone agent bidding.

Other works by familiar names in California plein air painting—Maurice Braun, Edgar Alwin Payne and Clarence Hinkle (all of whom also submitted works to the 1915 Panama Pacific Exposition—also did very well at the block. Early in the sale, a small landscape of yellow flowers in a hilly California landscape by Braun brought $6,737.50, well above the estimate of $3,000 - $5,000. Payne’s Sycamores Near Santa Paula, an excellent example of the artist’s mastery of deep-set compositions, found a buyer at $39,000 (estimate: $20,000 - $30,000). Hinkle’s Clam Hunters – Laguna, Low Tide received a good deal of interest prior to the sale date, and a number of phone lines were already reserved shortly after catalog was published. While originally estimated to bring $1,000 - $2,000, this painting went to an absentee bidder for $4,200.

Select works by New York artists also brought excellent prices. Ukrainian-born Simka Simkhovitch’s work The Ringmaster, dated 1929, five years after the artist’s immigration to the United States, is an interesting example of his thoughtful composition and the ethereal palette he favored after his arrival in this country. The estimate of $4,000 - $6,000 was handily outstripped within a few short seconds, the selling price landing at $11,637.50. Max Arthur Cohn’s charming New York Street Scene quietly gained attention prior to the sale date, shooting to a selling price of $4,500 after intense competition between phone bidders (estimate: $2,000 to $3,000). A striking terra-cotta sculpture of the head of a young African American woman by celebrated Harlem Renaissance artist William Ellsworth Artis was originally expected to bring $15,000 - $25,000 at the block, but sold for $33,000, another world auction record for Moran’s.

Additional highlights include:

  • The frenzied Moulin Rouge, a 1924 watercolor by Frans Masereel, found a European buyer at $23,275 after a well-fought battle between phone, Internet and multiple absentee bidders (estimate: $1,500 - $2,500).
  • A large, unframed oil of Taos Canyon in winter by Ernest Leonard Blumenschein exceeded expectations with a final price tag of $12,000, above the estimate of $6,000 - $8,000.
  • Stephen Seymour Thomas’s charming composition titled The Old Dove Cote, featuring a figure before a ramshackle dovecote in a verdant, newly sprouted spring landscape was estimated to bring $2,500 - $3,500, but bidding did not top out until $7,200.
  • Camilla, by Pal Fried, is a playful example of the artist’s figural works portraying beautiful young women and earned $8,575 at the block, more than twice the high estimate of $2,000 - $3,000.

Consignment inquiries are always welcome at John Moran Auctioneers. Interested parties are encouraged to contact John Moran Auctioneers directly at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or 626-793-1833. John Moran Auctioneers is currently seeking items for their July 30 Antiques Auction and the Oct. 22 California and American Fine Art Auction.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

The gorgeous watercolor 'Sunday Morning, Moorea' by Millard Sheets brought $54,000 at the block, setting a new auction record for Sheets’ work (estimate: $20,000 - $25,000). John Moran Auctioneers image.

The substantial preauction interest in this painting of the San Francisco Palace of Fine Arts by Colin Campbell Cooper, one of a series set at different times of day, resulted in a final selling price of $90,000, well over the estimated $15,000 - $25,000. John Moran Auctioneers image.

This classic Maurice Braun plein air landscape, originally estimated to bring $3,000 - $5,000, found a new home for $6,737.50. John Moran Auctioneers image.

One in his series of terra-cotta busts of African American youths, this work by William Ellsworth Artis realized a record $33,000 at Moran’s April 23 Fine Art Auction (estimate: $15,000 - $25,000). John Moran Auctioneers image.

Following heavily competitive bidding, Frans Masereel’s moody and energetic depiction in watercolor of the raucous interior of the Moulin Rouge in Paris earned a price tag of $23,275 (estimate: $1,500 - $2,500). John Moran Auctioneers image.

A meditative oil-on-canvas rendering of Taos Canyon in winter by New Mexico native Ernest Leonard Blumenschein piqued the interest of multiple bidders. The work brought $12,000 (estimate: $6,000 -$8,000). John Moran Auctioneers image.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 15 May 2013 12:53
 

Set of Finn Juhl chairs surprises Leighton Galleries auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Friday, 10 May 2013 14:26

A set of six Finn Juhl for Niels Vodder Egyptian chairs sold for $22,000. Leighton Galleries image.

ALLENDALE, N.J. – Leighton Galleries offered 300 lots including Judaica silver, fine art, jewelry, mid-century furniture and other objects of value on April 18. The sale was highly successful with strong bidding in all categories with many lots surpassing high estimate as well as some nice surprises throughout the evening. LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding. The following results do not include a 19 percent buyer’s premium.

Mid-century furniture sold exceedingly well. Highlighting this category was a set of six Niels Vodder teak Egyptian chairs designed by Finn Juhl. The chairs carried an estimate of $6,000-8,000 and after fierce competition between the Internet, floor and phone bidders, they were finally hammered down at $22,000.

Another surprise of the night was a pair of unsigned teak caned-seat benches estimated at $300-500, which were hammered down at $4,300. Rounding out the category was a 1950s Johannes Hansen valet chair designed by Hans Wegner which was hammered down at $6,500 against a $5,000-7,000 estimate, and a pair of Worts Mobler credenzas also designed by Hans Wegner, each bringing $950 against their $800-1,200 estimates.

A fine estate collection of Judaica silver also stirred up some competitive bidding. Among the pieces exceeding their high estimates included a Hanukkah oil menorah selling for $2,200 against a $1,500-2,000 estimate, a German seder plate realizing $2,300 exceeding high estimate of $1,500, and a Sabbath challah plate that reached $1,300 topping its estimate of $800-1,200.

Among the artworks that sold exceedingly well was a Leroy Neiman lithograph Namath which garnered $3,200 (est. $300-500), a bronze sculpture after Antoine Barye Running Elephant realized 1,800 (est. $400-600), an A. Carrier bronze Cavalie sold for $1,200 (est. $600-800), an English watercolor portrait of Mr. Thomas Haixby Esq. brought $1,100 (est. $300-500), a Bernard Buffet lithograph Bouquet with Butterflies reached $900 (est. $400-600), and a bronze sculpture of Ben Franklin after Francois-Marie Suzanne realized $700 (est. $300-500).

Bidding also proved strong for jewelry. The sleeper of the night was an amber, amber-style and plastic costume jewelry group that soared past its $250-350 estimate hammering down at $1,900. Other highlights include a 2.25-caret diamond engagement ring selling for $7,500 (est. $6,000-6,500), a gold mechanical Pesag bracelet watch going for $1,500 (est. $1,000-1,200), a yellow gold choker necklace realizing $1,400 (est. $800-1,000), a Tiffany sapphire and diamond ring selling at $1,300 (est. $800-1,200), and a pair of 18K fluted earclips that fetched $500 (est. $250-300).

There were many other lots well exceeding their high estimates throughout the evening. An 18th century Italian inlaid desk was hammered down at $12,000 against a $1,000-1,500 estimate, a Samuel Yellin iron candlestand sold for $4,800 (est. $2,000-3,000), a Japanese carved ivory tusk section reached $1,700 (est. $400-600), a Wedgwood Colonnade china service brought $1,400 (est. $500-700), a Chinese enameled dragon-form ashtray garnered $1,300 (est. $300-500), a pair of polychromed blackamoor figures brought $1,100 (est. $600-800), and a pair of Chinese porcelain figural headrests sold for $850 surpassing its modest estimate of $150-250.

For more results or information call 201-327-8800 or www.leightongalleries.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog for the Leighton Galleries auction April 18 auction, complete with prices realized, at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

A set of six Finn Juhl for Niels Vodder Egyptian chairs sold for $22,000. Leighton Galleries image.

Eighteenth century Italian inlaid desk, hammer price: $12,000. Leighton Galleries image.

Pair of Danish Modern benches, hammer price: $4,300. Leighton Galleries image.

Leroy Neiman lithograph ‘Namath,’ hammer price: $3,200. Leighton Galleries image.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 15 May 2013 09:21
 

Corset display laces up $17,100 at Showtime Auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 07 May 2013 14:30

C/B a la Spirite corset display having original etched and gold leaf in front of display case, with mannequin, sold for $17,100. Showtime Auction Services image.

ANN ARBOR, Mich. – A C/B a la Spirite corset display with the original box, original etched and gold leaf on the front of the large display case and even a mannequin inside sold for $17,100 at an auction held April 12-14 by Showtime Auction Services. LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

The display measured 23 1/2 inches by 42 inches by 20 inches and the mannequin was in very good original condition, except for some minor staining. The lot was typical of many other country store and general store displays that contained actual product, driving up their value and desirability as a collectible. Most of these displays had not been on the market for 30 to 40 years.

They came from the collection of the auction’s headlining consignors—Bill and Kathie Gasperino, known in antique circles for having one of the finest country store and advertising collections in the United States. Also offered was Part 2 of the Robert and Harriett Potter fire fighting collection and Part 3 of the Ed and Christy Ramsey collection of toys and pedal cars.

In all, over 2,400 lots came up for bid in an auction that grossed about $2.2 million. “It was one of our best spring auctions ever,” said Mike Eckles of Showtime Auction Services, based in Woodhaven, Mich. “Over 500 lots were rare and unseen country store and general store displays and products from the Gasperinos. I can’t stress enough the quality of their collection.”

The auction featured merchandise from over 30 categories—fairly typical for Showtime Auction Services, which conducts only two auctions a year. Approximately 2,200 people registered to bid online.

Following are additional highlights from the auction. All prices quoted include a buyer’s premium.

The sale’s top lot was a rare Campbell’s Soup embossed tin sign, which read: “6 Plates for 10 Cents – Just Add Hot Water and Serve.” Measuring 40 inches by 27 1/2 inches, it is one of the most sought after advertising signs by advertising and folk art collectors. Some nail holes around the perimeter and light rusting didn’t deter bidders, who drove the final price to $60,000.

Following closely at $57,000, was a 1917 La France automatic aerial ladder truck, professionally restored and in excellent running condition. “In our opinion, this is the finest hook and ladder fire truck ever offered at auction,” Eckles said. The truck (Reg. #352) came with a period braided life net and equipment, and read on the side: “Martin’s Ferry Hook & Ladder.”

A Bellingham Bay Beer reverse glass sign in the original frame, in mostly excellent condition and 19 1/2 inches in diameter, soared to $31,200; an outdoor sand sign for Walden Eddy Plows (Greenwich, N.Y.), in very good condition, 59 inches by 24 inches, brought $20,520; and a rare Kelly Tire round tin sign in good original condition, 24 inches in diameter, made $17,100.

A National Cash Register Model 442-E-L cash register with reproduction top sign (“Try Our Oysters”), professionally restored by Peter Warns, whose grandfather was a repairman at NCR when the brass machines were first made, rose to $6,600.

A bronze sculpture by the Egyptian-born American artist Maher Morocos (b. 1946), one of only 20 cast, changed hands for $15,960. The sculpture, 34 inches tall, depicted an American Indian brave leaning down from his horse and handing a canteen to a wounded, thirsty cowboy. It was designed as a 73rd birthday present for President Ronald Reagan.

An authentic Sioux beaded baby cradle in a geometric pattern, made circa 1890 from sinew, sewn supple cowhide, 21 inches tall, garnered $7,500; a circa 1930s Steelcraft Auburn Super Charge pedal car, fully restored, with pneumatic tires, 55 inches long, sped off for $4,560; and a J. Chein Popeye bag puncher tin toy, near mint in the box, hit $3,600.

Showtime Auction Services’ next big auction will be held Oct. 3-5, also at the Washtenaw Farm Council Grounds in Ann Arbor. It will feature the lifetime advertising collection of Don and Diane Sayrizi, plus consignments from over 100 advanced collectors, in the many categories that have made Showtime Auction Services renowned in the industry.

These include petroliana and automobilia, general store, country store, toys, pedal cars, barber shop, tobacciana, fire fighting antiques and memorabilia, veterinary, hardware, advertising signs, store tins, soda fountain, Coca-Cola, Western, Native American, farm signs, whiskey, breweriana, match safes, drug store, saloon, post office, coin-op, arcade, scales, gambling, cash registers, folk art, department store, millinery, showcases and store fixtures.

Showtime Auction Services is always accepting quality items for future sales. To consign an item, an estate or an entire collection, call Michael Eckles at 951-453-2415; or e-mail him at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

View the fully illustrated catalog for Showtime Auction Services for that portion of the auction, April 13-14, complete with prices realized, at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

C/B a la Spirite corset display having original etched and gold leaf in front of display case, with mannequin, sold for $17,100. Showtime Auction Services image.

Rare Campbell's Soup embossed tin sign, highly sought after by collectors, soared to $60,000. Showtime Auction Services image.

Bellingham Bay reverse-glass sign in original frame, 19 1/2 inches in diameter ($31,200). Showtime Auction Services image.

Walden Eddy Plows, Greenwich, N.Y., outdoor sand sign, very good original condition. Price realized: $20,520. Showtime Auction Services image.

National Cash Register Model 442-E-L, with original gooseneck lights, professionally restored. Price realized: $6,600. Showtime Auction Services image.

Bronze sculpture by Egyptian-born American artist Maher Morocos (b. 1946). Price realized: $15,960). Showtime Auction Services image.

Circa 1890 authentic Sioux beaded baby cradle in geometric pattern. Price realized: $7,500. Showtime Auction Services image.

Popeye bag puncher tin toy No. 255 by J. Chein, near mint in the box, 9 1/2 inches tall. Price realized $3,600. Showtime Auction Services image.

Last Updated on Friday, 10 May 2013 16:07
 
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