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Auction Results in the News

Chinese export clock tops expectations at Michaan’s auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Thursday, 16 April 2015 14:54


Chinese Export mother-of-pearl inlaid rosewood automaton bracket clock on a matching revolving stand. Price realized: $10,620. Michaan's Auctions image

ALAMEDA, Calif. – Touted as the most prestigious clock in Michaan’s April 11 auction, the Chinese export timepiece did not disappoint. The charming decorative clock of intricate mother-of-pearl inlay with a delightful automaton figure surpassed estimations selling for $10,620, also achieving the highest figure of the day (est. $7,000-9,000).

LiveAuctioneers.com provided absentee and Internet live bidding.

Additional successes from the furniture offerings were found in a bevy of modern design furnishings, including an Eames Herman Miller lounge chair with ottoman benefitting the Oakland Museum for $4,720 (est. $1,500-$2,000).





Achieving the second highest figure at auction was a classic Tiffany & Co. solitaire diamond ring that realized $9,440 (est. $7,000-$9,000). The round brilliant-cut diamond of an approximate weight of 1.40 carats set in a polished platinum band mounting was accompanied by an original Tiffany & Co. box, certification and folder.





Also performing quite well in the jewelry category was a jade lot collection of a bangle, two disc pendants and earrings. The final sale surprised at over four times the given projections at $4,425, purchased by an Internet bidder from Haining City in the Zhejiang Province of China (lot 070, $700-900).





For information call Michaan’s Auctions at 510-740-0220 ext. 0 or e-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 



Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.
Last Updated on Thursday, 16 April 2015 15:47
 

C.W. Peale portrait miniatures were in demand at Dianni auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Wednesday, 15 April 2015 13:18


Miniature on ivory portrait painting by Charles Wilson Peale (1741-1827) of Robert R. Livingston, one of five men who drafted the original Declaration of Independence. Price realized: $23,600. Louis J. Dianni, LLC images

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. – Nine oval miniature on ivory portrait paintings of prominent men and woman from Colonial-era America, all of them rendered by Charles Willson Peale (Md./Pa., 1741-1827), sold for a combined $94,163 to lead Louis C. Dianni LLC’s sixth annual Palm Beach Auction, held Feb. 14-16.

LiveAuctioneers provide absentee and Internet live bidding. More than 6,000 bidders from 70 countries participated via the Internet, to compete for the nearly 2,000 lots of unreserved offerings, making this the largest antiques, arms and art auction in the state of Florida.

The paintings included portraits of Lt. Col. Richard Cary, an aide-de-camp to then-Gen. George Washington; Gen. Anthony Lamb, who served in the War of 1812; and Robert R. Livingston, one of five men who drafted the original Declaration of Independence.

“This was our most successful auction to date, hands down,” said Louis J. Dianni. “We had a fabulous mix of merchandise, and so much to choose from, but the Peale portrait miniatures were the big draw. People flew in to bid on them – collectors, dealers and museum curators, you name it. But a local man acquired the group’s top-selling lot.”

That would be the miniature watercolor and gouache on ivory portrait of Robert R. Livingston (1746-1813), a Declaration signer and an American lawyer, politician and diplomat from New York. He is also considered one of the nation’s Founding Fathers, and was known as “The Chancellor,” after the office he held for 25 years. His portrait miniature gaveled for $23,600.

Charles Willson Peale was born in Maryland and was active there and in Pennsylvania. He became one of the first major figures in American art. He created an art and natural history museum that became world famous, especially for the gallery of more than 250 portraits he did of various distinguished Americans. These probably included the miniatures sold in the auction.

“It's quite astounding, the fact that these miniatures were consigned less than two weeks prior to the auction date, unreserved, with no time for print advertising,” said Dianni.

An oil on board waterfall scene by John Gadsby Chapman (American/Italian, 1808-1889), titled Peyton Falls, Va., painted in 1862, sold for $7,080.





Asian objects were led by a red coral carving of a Guan Yin figure holding an ingzahi scepter and surrounded by nature and animals, mounted on a carved rosewood base and standing 11 1/2 inches tall, sold for $14,580.





Two very different lots realized identical selling prices of $6,847. One was a late 19th century trunk by Louis Vuitton of France, refinished, with brass handles and latches, three clothes holders and padding inside.





Also selling for $6,847 was an early bracelet Rolex watch, with a face measuring a diminutive one-half inch. The bracelet had an openwork gold hinged “wire” for an enveloping fit, along with six carats of diamonds.





A Civil War-era Colt Model 1851 Navy revolver, fourth model, .36 caliber with a 7 1/2-inch barrel, factory engraved and shipped to J. C. Grubb & Co., Philadelphia, on Nov. 23, 1861, achieved $12,150.





Louis J. Dianni LLC is always accepting quality items. To inquire about consigning an item, a collection or an entire estate, call 954-895-8727 or send an email to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .



View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 15 April 2015 15:47
 

Chinese wall pocket tops Ahlers & Ogletree auction at $50,000

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Written by Auction House PR   
Monday, 06 April 2015 16:48
Chinese porcelain hand-painted wall pocket from the late 19th or early 20th century, 6 3/4 inches tall, with four-character cobalt underglaze Qianlong Nian Zhi mark. Price realized: $50,000. Ahlers & Ogletree Auction Gallery images

ATLANTA – It’s a long way from mainland China to Miami Circle in Atlanta, but that’s exactly how far one determined bidder traveled to vie for a Chinese porcelain hand-painted wall pocket from the late 19th or early 20th century. The 6 3/4-inch-tall urn-form piece was the top lot at Ahlers & Ogletree Auction Gallery’s Spring Estates Auction, held March 21-22, hammering for $50,000.

The auction was packed with more than 1,000 lots, ranging from Asian objects to original works of art to fine estate jewelry to antique clocks. +All prices quoted are hammer, exclusive of a buyer’s premium.

The porcelain wall pocket, was marked to the underside with the four-character cobalt underglaze Qianlong Nian Zhi mark. It stood on a gilt red stand and was presented in a purple, velvet-hinged box.

An oil on canvas painting by Albert E. “Beanie” Backus (American, 1906-1991), one of the legendary Highwaymen artists of the 1950s and ’60s, went to a phone bidder for $20,000. The work, done circa 1960s and signed by Backus, was titled View of Florida Coastline and depicted a scene that might be of St. Lucie, on Florida’s northern coast, with the ocean, palm trees and a sandy beach.

A second pattern Confederate national flag, made during the time of the Civil War and possibly issued to the Confederate States Navy, hammered at $15,000. The flag, measuring 52 inches by 106 inches, had 13 hand-sewn, cotton stars configured in the shape of a diagonal cross, atop a blue wool bunting or tammy on a red ground. The stars were stitched around the outer edges.

A Continental, 20th century Empire-style malachite, patinated and gilt bronze center table, with the top 39 1/4 inches in diameter, changed hands for $14,000. The veneered center table had a circular top over an ormolu mounted apron, on three bronze Egyptian-style figural supports.

For more information contact Ahlers & Ogletree Auction Gallery at 404-869-2478 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 07 April 2015 08:04
 

New Orleans Auction Galleries’ first sale at new location tops $2M

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Written by Auction House PR   
Monday, 06 April 2015 15:47
A painting by Max Friedrich Rabes (German, 1868-1944) ‘The Costume Ball,’ oil on canvas, 46 3/4in x 61in, sold for $49,200. New Orleans Auction Gallery images

NEW ORLEANS – On March 20-22, New Orleans Auction Galleries realized over $2.4 million in a three-day estates auction. The new gallery, located just blocks from the company’s previous space, was officially unveiled at a highly anticipated evening preview reception on March 19.

LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

“This was a landmark sale that sets the stage for a year of growth and success, thanks in part to our spectacular new facilities. Our St. Joseph Street location enables us to streamline our operations and entertain clients in a premier venue,” said Susan Sarofim, CEO of New Orleans Auction Galleries.

The three-day sale featured the contents of Glenridge Hall, a sprawling estate in Sandy Springs, Georgia, that was built by Atlanta-area businessman and philanthropist, Thomas K. Glenn, and his wife, Elizabeth Ewing.

Sale highlights from Glenridge Hall included a fine Edwardian chinoiserie-decorated satinwood breakfront that soared to $39,360 against a $3,000 to $5,000 estimate.

New Orleans Auction Galleries’ first sale at new location tops $2M

The personal library of New Orleans printer and noted antiquarian William Pfaff also garnered tremendous interest from collectors. Highlights from this important collection were a first edition Poor Richard’s Almanac for 1756 by Benjamin Franklin that soared to $11,377 against a $3,000 to $5,000 estimate.

New Orleans Auction Galleries’ first sale at new location tops $2M

Sunday began with an impressive selection of jewelry that realized high prices and sold to bidders in the room, on the phones and to the Internet. A stunning 18K white gold, sapphire and diamond ring with a central cushion-cut sapphire with an approximate weight of 9.35 carats sold to a phone bidder for $49,200.

New Orleans Auction Galleries’ first sale at new location tops $2M
Last Updated on Monday, 06 April 2015 16:21
 

Calif. artists achieve record results at John Moran auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Wednesday, 01 April 2015 12:43
Pasadena artist Guy Rose’s (1867-1925) seascape, ‘Black Rock, Laguna,’ dated circa 1915-1916, excited bidders as soon as the catalog went up online. The work sold for $168,000 (estimate: $150,000 to $200,000). John Moran Auctioneers image

PASADENA, Calif. – Boasting a curated catalog of 268 works, John Moran’s March 24 California and American Fine Art Auction posted robust sales figures, amassing nearly $1.4 million in gross sales including the 20 percent buyer’s premium. With strong examples by artists ranging from Dr. Suess to important California Impressionist mainstays and spanning in estimate from $1,000 up through $300,000, bidders were offered a vast array of choices. Even so, a number of bidding wars erupting over the course of the evening, resulting in some impressive prices realized.

LiveAuctioneers.com provided absentee and Internet live bidding.

Works by James A. Fetherolf (1925-1994 Los Angeles) seem to be particularly in vogue at present, with one work by the artist, Malibu Vista, selling for $19,200, well over the $3,000 to $5,000 estimate and nearly twice the previously held world auction record for the artist’s work. Sand Dunes, Monument Valley likewise brought a price realized well over the estimate, finding a buyer for $15,600 (estimate: $3,000 to $5,000). While Moran’s prices for the artist have always been relatively strong (a work titled Santa Monica Hills in their October 2014 auction earned $5,819, nearly 50 percent over the high estimate), the current trend seems to indicate an increased appreciation among buyers for the artist’s hyper-realistic, finely rendered landscapes.

Another world auction record was set for the work of celebrated San Francisco artist Samuel Marsden Brookes (1816-1892). Brookes, a founding member of the Bohemian Club as well as the California Art Union (which eventually became the San Francisco Art Association), was well known for his realistic, cascading still life compositions, often depicting fish, flowers, fruit and birds. The present work, an extremely fine still life of ling cod, red vermillion and salmon, is an excellent example of the artist’s mastery of light and the reflectivity and texture of fish scales. Offered with an estimate of $12,000 to $18,000, the lot earned $48,000 after brief but intense competition.

The last record for the night was set when a work by Margaret Keane (b. 1927, Honolulu, Hawaii) was sold for $7,800 – just over the standing record of $6,545, established in February of this year. Dating to 1961, the melancholy painting depicts a young girl and dog looking out from behind a brick wall draped with chicken wire (estimate: $2,500 to $3,500). Interestingly, Keane’s work has enjoyed a marked uptick in prices realized at auction as of late, likely due to the recent resurgence of interest in the artist’s life and paintings as fueled by the release of Tim Burton’s biopic Big Eyes.

Watercolors by Millard Sheets, Percy Gray, Milford Zornes and Jake Lee all earned robust prices at the block, with a Jack Laycox (1921-1984 San Francisco) composition of a four-level freeway interchange in downtown Los Angeles earning well over the assigned $7,000 to $9,000 estimate with a price realized of $14,400. Thematically germane to the Laycox, and following directly after in the March catalog, Jake Lee’s (1915-1991 Los Angeles) work depicting a hazy Chinatown skyline incited competition among online bidders, finally closing with a price tag of $10,667 (estimate: $6,000 to $8,000). A sweeping ranch view with red rock formations receding into the hazy, atmospheric background, Mormon Paradise by another well-known Los Angeles-based artist, Emil J. Kosa Jr. N.A. (1903-1968) likewise exceeded expectations; the $5,000 to $7,000 estimate was quickly outstripped thanks to competition between absentee, telephone and in-person buyers (price realized: $9,000).

One dark horse highlight came in the form of an illustrative, moody work by Pasadena-raised Daniel Sayre Groesbeck (1878-1950). Known for his charming, luminous depictions of historical scenes and figures, this particular work, The Thieves’ Market, shows a crowded Vladivostok, Russia market scene backed by a foggy skyline. Estimated to bring $1,000 to $2,000 at auction, the piece found a buyer for $8,785.

One of the most revered and high-earning California impressionist artists, Guy Rose (1867-1925 Pasadena), has been well represented in Moran’s California and American Fine Art Auctions as of late. One of two works in Moran’s March auction by the artist, Black Rock, Laguna garnered considerable interest. Dating to 1915-1916, the coastal offers a glimpse into Rose’s ample skill in capturing impressionistic “reflections on water and multifarious atmosphere … [and] his personal penchant for creating images of solitude and quiet” (W. South, Guy Rose: American Impressionist, Oakland, Calif., 1995, p. 62). Estimated to find a buyer for between $150,000 to $200,000, Black Rock, Laguna was sold to a floor bidder for $168,000.

Additional works by important California impressionists provided some excellent highlights. Lingering Snow, by Hanson Duvall Puthuff (1875-1972 Corona Del Mar, Calif.), a technicolor landscape with purple-tinged snow-capped peaks rising over the top two thirds of the canvas was brought to the block early in Tuesday’s auction. The work, which was offered with the original frame hand carved by the artist’s first wife, May Longest Puthuff, found a new home with a floor bidder for $24,000 (estimate: $15,000 to $20,000). William Wendt’s (1865-1946 Laguna Beach, Calif.) Canyon Cottage, depicting bright green structures on a crisp autumn day, carried an estimate of $30,000 to $50,000, and garnered a flurry of interest on the auction floor. A determined floor bidder eventually won out, paying $54,000 for the painting.

Proving that there is still room in the market for excellent examples by relatively unknown artists, a number of such pieces exceeded expectations by earning strong prices at Moran’s Tuesday auction. German-born Julius Moessel (1871-1957 Chicago), known primarily for murals, illustration and sometimes surreal compositions, was represented in the catalog by an exquisitely detailed still life featuring a Chinese enameled lantern and ceramic bowl against an embroidered silk backdrop. Showcasing the artist’s skill in depicting reflected light and texture, the work found a new home for $4,200 (estimate: $2,000 to $3,000). Near the end of the auction catalog, a whimsical, monumental floral still life by San Francisco artist Ira Yeager (b. 1938) found an appreciative audience and bidding quickly outstripped the $2,000 to $3,000 estimate, topping out at $5,400. Another large-scale work, this one by Peter Nielsen (1873-1965 Santa Ana, Calif.) and titled Bishop Park (Oceanside, Calif.), provides a sweeping view of a verdant California ranch scene. Offered for $1,000 to $2,000, an enamored floor buyer took the Nielsen home for $11,400.

John Moran Auctioneers will host their next California and American Fine Art Auction on Oct. 20. Consignments are now invited for this and all other upcoming auctions; interested parties are invited to call the Moran offices at: 626-793-1833 or to email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE
This sweeping landscape by James A. Fetherolf (1925-1994, Los Angeles), titled ‘Malibu Vista,’ earned $19,200 at John Moran’s March 24 Fine Art Auction, setting a new auction record for the artist. (estimate: $3000 to $5000). John Moran Auctioneers image An excellent example of Samuel Marsden Brookes’s (1816-1892, San Francisco) mastery of the still life, this work was estimated to earn $12,000 to $18,000, with competition between bidders bringing the final price up to $48,000. John Moran Auctioneers image ‘The Thieves’ Market,’ by Daniel Sayre Groesbeck (1878-1950), found a buyer for four times the high estimate, earning $8,785. John Moran Auctioneers image A cheerful work by renowned Laguna Beach painter William Wendt (1865-1946), ‘Canyon Cottage,’ was assigned an estimate of $30,000 to $50,000. It sold for $54,000. John Moran Auctioneers image This skillfully executed still life by Julius Moessel (1871-1957 Chicago) found popularity among telephone and absentee bidders, realizing a final price of $4,200 (estimate: $2000 to $3000). John Moran Auctioneers image
Last Updated on Wednesday, 01 April 2015 13:24
 

Booming interest in pop culture drives million-dollar result at Hake’s

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Written by Auction House PR   
Thursday, 26 March 2015 13:27
Mickey and Minnie Mouse mechanical Old King Cole store display pair, circa 1935, ex Doug and Pat Wengel collection. Sold for $29,222. Hake’s image YORK, Pa. – Hake’s Americana & Collectibles, the company that brought pop culture auctions to the mainstream 48 years ago, reached another historic milestone on March 19th: its sixth million-dollar-plus sale. Hake’s two-session Auction #214, held on March 17 and 19, chalked up a $1,024,337 total, with a strong 81% sell-through rate (by lot). All prices quoted include a 15% buyer’s premium.

“With this auction we also set a record for the number of bidders who participated, which is a testament to the strength of the collectibles industry,” said Alex Winter, president of Hake’s Americana.

The top lot in the sale was a pair of mechanical, painted-composition store displays depicting Mickey and Minnie Mouse. Made around 1935 by Old King Cole Inc., the pie-eyed pair boasted remarkable condition and came with provenance from the peerless Doug and Pat Wengel collection. Estimated at $10,000-$20,000, the duo attracted 12 bids before settling at $29,222.

Wherever there are mice, cats often follow, and that was the case in Hake’s auction. The hand-drawn and artist-signed original artwork for George Herriman’s November 3, 1935 Krazy Kat Sunday comic strip was an 11-panel beauty that featured the endearing feline with many other popular characters. It sold near the top of its estimate range for $17,014.

Another coveted piece of comic art, a black & white production cel from the 1934 animated short “Two-Gun Mickey,” presented a focused depiction of Mickey in Western attire, on one knee with a gun in each hand. The artwork had remained in the same collection since the 1950s and was completely fresh to the market. Estimated at $5,000-$20,000, it commanded a final price of $13,800.

One of the most enduring of all cowboy characters, The Lone Ranger, appeared on the cover of a prototype “ashcan” pulp magazine printed in August 1936. In this early iteration, The Lone Ranger wears a red bandanna to disguise his face, rather than the later – and more familiar – black eye mask. One of only two such “ashcan” prototypes published to establish copyright, the very rare magazine was even more desirable because it had been graded by CGC, which does not ordinarily grade “pulps.” With an opening bid of $5,000, it finished its bidding run at $8,419.

Every auction has at least one surprising price realized, and this time around, the honors went to a Marx Batman factory prototype bagatelle game with working mechanism and six marbles. Richly graphic with images of The Caped Crusader, Robin and eight different criminals, including The Penguin in a prison uniform, the colorful toy that never reached the production stage was bid to $11,828 – more than four times its high estimate.

Leading the 500-lot political section, a military discharge document signed on June 8, 1783 by General George Washington, with the countersignature of his aide-de-camp John Trumbull Jr., achieved the midpoint of its estimate at $7,558. Following closely behind at $7,400 was a Ulysses Grant/Henry Wilson jugate stickpin with oval ferrotype portraits of the 1872 Republican presidential and vice-presidential running mates.

Additional auction highlights included a 1941 Sensation Comics promotional postcard depicting Wonder Woman and Wildcat, $6,900; and a 1934 Tom Mix pocketwatch with a beautiful, full-color image of Mix on his rearing horse, Tony, $6,569.

Commenting on the million-dollar sale, Hake’s founder Ted Hake said: “It’s a wonderful time to be a collector, as so many special items that went into collections in the late 1960s through early 1980s are now coming to auction. There’s a new generation of collectors ready to preserve these great historical and pop-culture artifacts.”

Visit Hake's online at www.hakes.com.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE
George Washington hand-signed Revolutionary War military discharge document dated June 8, 1783. Sold for $7,558. Hake’s image George Washington hand-signed Revolutionary War military discharge document dated June 8, 1783. Sold for $7,558. Hake’s image Historical ‘ashcan’ prototype pulp with the first appearance in print of The Lone Ranger, published April 1937, one of two known examples. Sold for $8,419. Hake’s image Marx Batman factory prototype bagatelle game. Sold for $11,828. Hake’s image 1934 ‘Two-Gun Mickey’ black & white production cel. Sold for $13,800. Hake’s image 1941 Sensation Comics promo postcard with Wonder Woman and Wildcat. Sold for $6,900. Hake’s image 1934 Tom Mix pocketwatch, inscribed on verso: ‘Always Find Time For A Good Deed.’ Sold for $6,569. Hake’s image
Last Updated on Monday, 30 March 2015 16:35
 

LiveAuctioneers bidders win nearly one-third of lots in Oakridge sale

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Written by ACNI Staff   
Thursday, 26 March 2015 13:08
Carved bamboo brush pot, 18th or 19th century. Price realized: $37,500. Oakridge Auction Gallery image VIENNA, Va.  – Oakridge Auction Gallery’s specialty sale of Chinese and Japanese fine art and antiques was a big success on March 22. Oakridge Auction Gallery's Director of Business Operations, Joseph Kikta, reports the 344-lot auction totaled $2.4 million on the hammer and that LiveAuctioneers was a major contributor to its success. Nearly one-third of the lots were sold through LiveAuctioneers.com.

LiveAuctioneers customers won 109 lots totaling $446,425, for a sell-through rate of 31.7 percent (by lot).

The top-selling item on LiveAuctioneers.com was an 18th or 19th-century finely carved bamboo brush pot, which sold for $37,500 after spirited Internet bidding. The carving depicted a classic red cliffs scene of Su Dongpo and his friends in a boat. The reverse had a quotation from Su Dongpo's Song of Red Cliff and was signed “Shigong.” The brush pot was 5 3/4-inches high.

A LiveAuctioneers customer prevailed with an absentee bid to win an 18th-century huanghuali altar table that cost $27,500. The small table had a rectangular top approximately 35 1/4 inches long by 21 1/2 inches wide and stood 30 1/2 inches high. It had a double curved apron and four square-cut legs.

An Internet bidder competing in real time through LiveAuctioneers won out over absentee bidders to claim an early 20th-century enameled plaque, painted and signed by Duan Zian, for $18,000. The well-painted landscape, approximately 17 inches by 11 3/4 inches, included a poem, had two seals and was signed “Zian.” It came from a Connecticut estate and was acquired in Hong Kong in the 1950s.

LiveAuctioneers bidders also won two blue and white ceramic items for $17,000 each. The first was a 12-inch-tall blue and white porcelain statue of Daoist divinity stamped with “Zeng Longsheng.” Zeng Longsheng (1901-1964) was one of the most prominent porcelain artists in the early 20th century. Also selling for $17,000 was an 11-inch imperial blue and white gu vase bearing a Jiaqing mark. It came from a Washington, D.C., estate.

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Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE
Small huanghuali altar table, 18th century. Price realized: $27,500. Oakridge Auction Gallery image A Duan Zian enameled plaque,  20th century. Price realized: $18,000. Oakridge Auction Gallery image Zeng Longsheng statue, early 20th century. Price realized: $17,000. Oakridge Auction Gallery image Imperial gu vase Jiaqing period. Price realized: $17,000. Oakridge Auction Gallery image
Last Updated on Thursday, 02 April 2015 18:49
 

Hans Wegner Papa Bear chair, ottoman earn $9,000 at Capo Auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 24 March 2015 15:16

Hans Wegner Papa Bear chair and ottoman in original green wool upholstery. Price realized: $9,000. Capo Auction Fine Art and Antiques image

NEW YORK – Capo Auction Fine Art and Antiques in Long Island City recently hosted their February’s Finest auction on Feb. 28 with both antique and mid-century modern furniture taking much of the spotlight.

LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

Various decorative items, bronze sculptures, fine art, silver and jewelry also did very well at the February sale. As always, the crowded New York auction house was packed with their regular customers, collectors and dealers from around the New York area, with a great deal of bidding also online and on the phones.

Highlights included the Hans Wegner Papa Bear chair and ottoman with original green wool upholstery. This mid-century modern set was designed in 1951-1953 and sold for $9,000.

Also selling high were a set of six hall chairs, each with a modified heart-shaped back with inset armorial decoration and panel seats. These sold for $10,200.

Capo Auction also sold a beautiful Italian Baroque cabinet, with rectangular top and molded edge, over two drawers and a two-door cabinet, 50 inches high by 5 feet 11 inches wide by 28 inches deep. It realized $2,400.

In the fine art arena, Capo Auction offered a set of three bronze and paint figures by Lena Cronqvist (Swedish, b. 1938). Each signed, dated (2000) and numbered AP 1/1, the set sold for $9,000. A bronze, an untitled abstract, by Jean Arp (German-French, 1877-1966), 6 1/4 inches high, sold for $1,320.

In other areas a 14K gold bangle with alternating rubies and diamonds, 11.2 grams, sold for $1,680, while a pair of Chinese silk embroidered rank badges, both a Phoenix bird, 15 3/4 inches overall, sold for $960.

For details contact Capo Auction at 718 433-3710

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Hans Wegner Papa Bear chair and ottoman in original green wool upholstery. Price realized: $9,000. Capo Auction Fine Art and Antiques image

This set of six hall chairs sold for $10,200. Capo Auction Fine Art and Antiques image

Italian Baroque cabinet. Price realized: $2,400. Capo Auction Fine Art and Antiques image

Three sculptures by Lena Cronqvist (Swedish, b. 1938), the tallest height standing 5 3/4 inches. Price realized: $9,000. Capo Auction Fine Art and Antiques image

Last Updated on Thursday, 26 March 2015 13:05
 

Rare Sioux dress sells for $7,475 at Allard Western auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Monday, 23 March 2015 16:21

Rare Sioux 12-row fully covered, removable shell yoke with canvas and a dentalium and tradecloth dress, circa 1900. Price realized: $7,475. Allard Auctions Inc. image.

MESA, Ariz. – A circa 1900 Sioux dentalium (tooth shell) and tradecloth dress that was featured on an episode of the PBS series Antiques Roadshow just prior to auction (where it was appraised for $5,000-$7,000), sold for $7,475 at the Big Spring Phoenix Auction, an annual event conducted by Allard Auctions Inc.

LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

This year’s two-day event, held March 7-8, featured more than 900 lots of Native American and Western artifacts, art and related collectibles. Included were Anasazi pottery, Zuni bolo ties and concho belts, a collection of Katsina dolls, baskets, pottery, beadwork and jewelry, Navajo rugs, original art, bronzes and prehistoric items.

The Sioux dentalium and tradecloth dress with yoke was in very good condition. It featured a rare old 12-row, fully covered and removable dentalium shell yoke with canvas, having the original selvage tradecloth dress with ribbon and metallic sequin accents. A few of the dentalium shells were missing, not unusual considering its age. Larger dentalium shells were often used as money by the Native American tribes of the Pacific Northwest.

A capacity crowd of over 100 people packed the venue in person. About half of all lots sold went to absentee and Internet bidders. By the time the final gavel fell on the second day of selling, the auction grossed about $230,000, including the buyer’s premium.

“The auction was helped along by a diverse selection of merchandise, including a nice collection of bolo ties and concho belts, prehistoric pottery from a private collection out of Texas and some great Navajo rugs,” said Steve Allard of Allard Auctions Inc., adding, “Jewelry is a category that’s still very strong, while pottery and baskets sold within range. In all, it was a great auction.”

Following are additional highlights from the auction. Prices quoted reflect a 15 percent buyer’s premium, although the actual percentage may have been a bit different, depending on how the winning bid was placed.

A woman’s outfit from the Shoshone plateau tribe of Wyoming, made circa the 1960s, went for $5,463. The outstanding sinew-sewn flat and lazy stitch beaded white buckskin outfit was in very good condition. Also, a near room-size Navajo Crystal rug or weaving from the 1940s or ’50s, with a striking geometric design in still vivid colors, 75 inches by 128 inches, realized $4,025.

Bolo ties made by the Zuni tribe from New Mexico, famous for their inlay work, were a surprise hit of the auction, sailing past even their high estimates. Two bolo ties from Virgil and Shirley Benn, both made in the 1970s or ’80s, made $3,738 and $2,185; and a tie made by Eddie Beyuka (1920-1922), circa 1970s, hit $2,588.

In the jewelry category, a size 8 Hopi ring crafted by Charles Loloma around the 1970s or ’80s, a beautiful wide all-silver band ring inlaid with raised stones – one of them gold – brought $2,875. A Zuni matching necklace and earring set, made circa 1998 by Ricky and Carlton Jamon, set with finely carved turquoise frog fetishes all on a silver link chain and silver tube beads, rose to $2,588.

Hopi jars were a big hit with collectors. A mid-1900s jar by the legendary craftswoman Fannie Nampeyo, a classic wide polychrome olla with gorgeous colors featuring the “migration” pattern, breezed to $2,588; and a jar made by Dextra Quotskeyva, Fannie Nampeyo’s granddaughter, a very fine traditional polychrome example, blasted past a high estimate of $550 to sell for $1,955.

An oil on canvas painting by Marjorie Reed (Ariz./Calif., 1915-1996), rendered in the 1950s and titled Stable Room Only, depicting a night scene of the Holy Family’s arrival, 29 inches by 39 inches, reached $2,588. Reed was famous for her paintings of Western scenes, often showing Butterfield Overland stagecoaches, the Overland Mail Route, cowboys and horses.

A prehistoric Anasazi pottery jar, a black-on-white water olla in as-found condition, Tularosa, a village in Otero County., N.M., 11 3/4 inches tall, with some cracks but in remarkable condition for its age, finished at $2,185; while a traditional hand-carved and painted Hopi cottonwood root “White Ogre” kachina doll from the Home Dance ceremony, 15 inches tall, commanded $978.

Baskets that fared even better than expected included a Chemehuevi basket from the early 1900s, an outstanding oval-shaped tray with arrow and diamond figures. Estimated to bring $400-$800, the basket went for $1,840. And a Papago (a tribe from south of Phoenix, known for their crude stitch baskets) large cylindrical storage basket, circa 1970s (est. $200-$400) made $748.

Other lots that exceeded expectations included a Navajo miniature, all-silver canteen from the 1960s or ’70s, with the edges and stopper set with square-cut turquoise stones. Estimated at $300-$600, the canteen brought $1,265. Also, mid-1900s hand-wrought, all-silver Navajo salt dish with matching spoon, expected to sell for $150-$300, finished at $920.

To inquire about consigning items to Allard Auctions, based in St. Ignatius, call 406-745-0500 or toll-free 888-314-0343 or send an email to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Rare Sioux 12-row fully covered, removable shell yoke with canvas and a dentalium and tradecloth dress, circa 1900. Price realized: $7,475. Allard Auctions Inc. image.

Outstanding Shoshone woman's sinew sewn flat and lazy stitch beaded white buckskin outfit, circa 1960s, small/medium. Price realized: $5,463. Allard Auctions Inc. image.

Fantastic near-room size Crystal Navajo rug or weaving from the 1940s or '50s, with striking geometric design. Price realized: $4,025. Allard Auctions Inc. image.

Zuni inlay bolo tie by Virgin and Shirley Benn, made circa 1970s or '80s, with remarkable silver channel inlay. Price realized: $3,738. Allard Auctions, Inc. image.

Beautiful wide, all-silver band Hopi ring by Charles Loloma, circa 1970s or '80s, with raised stones, one of them gold. Price realized: $2,875. Allard Auctions Inc. image.

Wide polychrome Hopi pottery jar, or olla, by Fannie Nampeyo, mid-20th century, with beautiful colors and a ‘migration’ pattern. Price realized: $2,588. Allard Auctions, Inc. image.

Oil on canvas rendering of the Holy family's arrival by Marjorie Reed (Arizona/California, 1915-1996), titled ‘Stable Room Only,’ circa 1950s. Price realized: $2,588. Allard Auctions, Inc. image.

Prehistoric Anasazi pottery jar, a black-on-white water olla in as-found condition, 11 3/4 inches tall. Price realized: $2,185. Allard Auctions, Inc. image.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 24 March 2015 08:17
 
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