Payday Loans
payday loans
ADVERTISEMENTS
Banner
Banner

Get Free ACN Daily Headlines

LiveAuctioneers

Search Auction Central News

ADVERTISEMENTS
Banner
Banner
Bookmark and Share
Auction Results in the News

Calligraphy scrolls keep Asian items on a roll at Michaan’s

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Auction House PR   
Monday, 11 August 2014 14:29

Two famille rose vases. Price realized: $4,130. Michaan's Auctions image.

ALAMEDA, Calif. – Chinese arts and antiquities continued to prove their worth as a hot commodity in Michaan’s estate auction Aug. 3. A runaway sales success was found in lot 179, a set of six hanging scrolls of calligraphy brushwork attributed to Yu Youren, which was estimated to sell for $2,000-3,000. The set provided a formidable as well as collectible group of works to a worldwide bidding audience. Competition was strong for the calligraphy suite, ending with an impressive winning bid placed by a Chinese American floor bidder. The sale of the calligraphies came to surpass the high estimate well over eight times, with a final price realized of $25,960.

LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

Asian Art Specialist Harry Huang believed what struck bidders was “the comprehensiveness of the grouping. Having these artworks as a complete body of work in a collection of six scrolls is a wonderful way to not only present them, but also to display them.”

Desirable performance was achieved by many other Asian lots, found in an impressive list of top performers at auction. Of note was a painted Buddhist scripture upon silk (lot 180, $800-1,200, sold for $7,080) as well as two famille rose vases depicting beauties and birds (lot 232, $300-500, sold for $4,130).

Among Michaan’s jewelry offerings, certified stones carried their weight at auction. A pair of jade, diamond and white gold earrings accompanied by a Mason Kay Report sold for a handsome $6,490 (lot 093, $2,000-2,500). Also on the auction block was a GIA-certified diamond and platinum ring of a marquise cut that realized a price of $4,425 (lot 089, $1,700-2,000). Select pocket watches also sold well, as evidenced by a Spaulding & Co. 18K yellow gold piece (lot 123, $800-1,000, sold for $2,950) and a group of 10 gold-filled timepieces listed as lot 118 ($400-600, sold for $2,655).

Top selling lots were seen across department lines as well. An authentic, mid-century modern classic Hans Wegner Papa Bear Chair was sold alongside its original ottoman for $7,670 (lot 425, $3,500-4,500). Also noteworthy was a standout lot from the furniture and decorative arts portion of the sale in a stately Kindel Winterthur mahogany inlaid sideboard that more than quadrupled estimates (lot 389, $500-700, sold for $3,245).

For general information please call Michaan’s Auctions at 510-740-0220 ext. 0 or e-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Two famille rose vases. Price realized: $4,130. Michaan's Auctions image.

Set of six hanging scrolls of calligraphy brushwork attributed to Yu Youren, (1870-1964). Sold for $25,960. Michaan's Auctions image.

Painted Buddhist scripture silk hanging. Price realized: $7,080. Michaan's Auctions image.

Pair of jade, diamond, 14K white gold earrings. Price realized: $6,490. Michaan's Auctions image.

The Hans Wegner Papa Bear Chair with ottoman sold for $7,670. Michaan's Auctions image.

Kindel Winterthur mahogany inlaid sideboard. Price realized: $3,245. Michaan's Auctions image.

Last Updated on Thursday, 14 August 2014 10:50
 

Anatole Vély painting leads bidding at John Moran auction

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Auction House PR   
Thursday, 07 August 2014 13:03

A monumental composition by French artist Anatole Vely, titled ‘Le Reveil du Coeur’ (The Awakening of the Heart), sold for $22,800, over the estimated $10,000 - $20,000. John Moran Auctioneers image.

PASADENA, Calif. – John Moran Auctioneers’ July 22 Antiques and Fine Arts Auction, featuring a carefully curated group of 176 lots in the cataloged session and 175 in the uncatalogued Discovery Sale, the majority of which were gathered from a few important estates and private collections, attracted a large crowd of eager bidders despite the heat and humidity of a typical Southern California summer. While more than 150 bidders battled the weather to attend the sale in person at the Pasadena Convention Center, a record number of bidders (1,129 to be exact) chose to bid from the comfort of their own homes via online auction platforms.

LiveAuctioneers.com facilitated Internet live bidding.

The auction was notable in part for the prices achieved for 19th and early 20th century European paintings, a category comprising a substantial portion of the catalog and one in which Moran’s continues to expand its successes. One of the most notable of these was a monumental composition by French artist Anatole Vély (1838 – 1882 French) titled Le Reveil du Coeur (The Awakening of the Heart). At an impressive 97 inches high by 57.5 inches wide, and estimated to bring $10,000 - $20,000, the haunting work brought $22,800 (all prices include a 20 percent buyer’s premium). A small oil-on-canvas by French painter Fernand Pelez (1843 – 1913), a study for his larger Petit Misere ou Mendiant au Chapeau which realized $80,120 at Sotheby’s Paris, was offered with an estimate of $6,000 - $8,000 and brought a respectable $7,800. Featured on the cover of Moran’s auction catalog, an early 20th century French School oil on canvas depicting St. Mark’s Square in Venice exceeded its estimate of $600 - $800, finding a buyer for $1,560. A romantic oil-on-canvas depicting a fisherman in a coastal scene by Italian artist Guido Odierna (1913 – 1999), known for his seascapes and seaside vignettes, realized $1,066.75 (estimate: $400 - $600).

Predominant in the sale, however, was the array of Continental furnishings, glistening with gilt finishes and richly colored marbles. An impressive pair of Napoleon III ormolu-mounted gray marble urns by Maison Millet were won by a telephone bidder who was compelled to battle a large group of spirited online bidders. Estimated to bring $3,000 - $5,000, the urns topped out at $14,400. A finely crafted gilt bronze-mounted Louis XV- style bureau plat exceeded expectations when it sold for a hefty $13,200 (estimate: $3,000 - $5,000).

A handful of modern and contemporary furnishings and works of art were offered across all categories, earning prices above and beyond their estimates. A stoneware covered jar by Claremont, Calif., potter Harrison McIntosh (b. 1914), exhibiting one of the artist’s typical forms (squat and acorn-like), was offered for $1,000 - $1,500. Ombre-glazed in green over cream, the vessel realized an impressive $4,200 after a bidding war between telephone and online buyers. A handsome set of rosewood tables (one coffee table and two end tables) designed circa 1960 by Ole Wanscher for Poul Jeppesen, realized $878.50, within the $600 to $900 estimate. A prismatic crystal sculpture by Paul Schulze for Steuben certainly turned a number of heads, eventually selling to an enthusiastic online bidder. Titled New York, New York, and dating to 1984, the piece was estimated to earn $3,000 - $5,000, and earned a $7,530 price tag.

As a class, antique clocks did quite well at the July 22 auction. A Napoleon III gilt bronze and marble mantel clock dated to the third quarter of the 19th century was expected to bring $2,000 - $3,000 at the auction block. Surmounted by a classically modeled bronze woman and putti, each carrying an attribute representing the arts, the piece brought $2,700. Later in the sale, a large, elaborately carved oak grande sonnerie bracket clock made waves with collectors, realizing a respectable $3,000 (estimate: $2,500 - $3,500)

Antique decorative glass was also in demand. A circa 1900 Gallé cameo glass cabinet vase featuring an alpine landscape in violet, green, and blue on a yellow ground, assigned an estimate of $600 - $800, found a buyer for $,1200. A stunning silver-plate and green glass punch service made circa 1900 by WMF (Wurttembergische Metallwarenfabrik) was purchased by a floor bidder for $1,680, within the estimate of $1,200 - $1,800.

Additional highlights include:

– A carved Longquan celadon vase, possibly dating to the Ming Dynasty and estimated to find a buyer for between $1,000 and $1,500, sold for $3,382.50

– An exquisitely modeled marble sculpture of a boy with a dog by American artist Samuel James Kitson (1848 – 1906), executed during his sojourn in Rome, brought $12,000 (estimate: $7,000 – $10,000)

Early Morning, an oil on board composition depicting cows watering by a lake by Brooklyn, N.Y., landscape painter J. Carleton Wiggins incited competition between online and telephone buyers, the final selling price coming to $4,392.50 (estimate: $2,000 - $3,000).

For consignment inquiries contact John Moran Auctioneers directly, either via email ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) or telephone 626-793-1833.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

A monumental composition by French artist Anatole Vely, titled ‘Le Reveil du Coeur’ (The Awakening of the Heart), sold for $22,800, over the estimated $10,000 - $20,000. John Moran Auctioneers image.

Selling for $14,400, these Maison Millet Napoleon III ormolu-mounted marble urns (estimate: $3,000 - $5,000) were among the most anticipated lots of Moran’s July catalog. John Moran Auctioneers image.

This gilt bronze-mounted Louis XV-style bureau plat incited competition among floor and telephone bidders, finally going to a local buyer for $13,200 (estimate: $3,000 - $5,000). John Moran Auctioneers image.

American pottery has been doing well at Moran’s auctions lately, and this example by Harrison McIntosh earned a $4,200 (estimate: $1,000 - $1,500). John Moran Auctioneers image.

This handsome carved oak grande sonnerie bracket clock was estimated to earn $2,500 - $3,500 at the July 22 auction; it realized $3,000. John Moran Auctioneers image.

This strikingly elegant silver-plated and green glass punch service, complete with ladle and seven goblets, found a buyer for $1,680. John Moran Auctioneers image.

Last Updated on Thursday, 07 August 2014 16:50
 

Victorian, art glass excel at Jeffrey Evans auction July 26

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Auction House PR   
Wednesday, 06 August 2014 12:44

This Scottish Moor-pattern amethyst opalescent glass water pitcher, possibly by the West Virginia Glass Co., circa 1890, was the leading item in the sale. It realized: $4,887.50. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

MT. CRAWFORD, Va. – An unusual Scottish Moor-pattern amethyst opalescent glass water pitcher, possibly by the West Virginia Glass Co., circa 1890, sold for $4,887.50 at the Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates auction of Art & Victorian Glass on July 26. Estimated to sell for $300-500, the pitcher (Lot 297) led the day’s results.

LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

Seven Continental two-color cut overlay Rhine wine glasses, rose color to Vaseline (uranium) bowls, each with Strawberry Diamond and Ellipse design, on tall, cut-facet stems and star-cut feet, possibly by Baccarat or St. Luis, France, also did very well. The set of glasses (Lot 49) sold for $2,300, nearly 10 times the high estimate.

 

Two circa 1900 Opaline Brocade/Spanish Lace green water pitchers made by the Northwood Glass Co. realized the same $1,495 price. One example had a squat body, with a seven-point star rim (Lot 249). The other had a ribbon-tie mold to the waist, and a circular, crimped rim (Lot 260). Both came from the collection of Larry and Diana Nellans.

Among the art glass sold, an Art Deco-period French Schneider/La Verre Francais vase in the Pavot pattern sold above estimate for $1,380 (Lot 551). The vase came from the estate of Jane K. Neal of Huntington, W.Va.

For more information email www.jeffreyevans.com or call 540-434-3939.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

This Scottish Moor-pattern amethyst opalescent glass water pitcher, possibly by the West Virginia Glass Co., circa 1890, was the leading item in the sale. It realized: $4,887.50. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

Seven Continental two-color cut overlay Rhine wine glasses sold for $2,300. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

Art Deco-period French Schneider/La Verre Francais vase in the Pavot pattern. Price realized: $1,380. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

Opaline Brocade/Spanish Lace green water pitcher by Northwood Glass Co., circa 1900. Price realized: $1,495. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

Last Updated on Monday, 15 September 2014 10:12
 

Warhol portfolio, decorative items impress buyers at Capo auction

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 05 August 2014 12:44

Marked ‘EP’ for Emile Puiforcat, this French silver tankard with domed cover sold for $5,600. Capo Auction Fine Art and Antiques image.

NEW YORK – A Capo Auction Fine Art and Antiques’ mid-summer auction in Long Island City on Saturday, July 26, featured some wonderful art and decorative items from multiple estates. LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

Among the top sellers was an after Andy Warhol (American, 1928-1987) The Myths Portfolio (including The Star, Superman, Santa Claus, The Shadow, Mammy, Mickey Mouse, Uncle Sam, The Witch, Dracula and Howdy Doody). Published by Ronald Feldman Fine Arts Inc. in 1981, the lithographs in color, 1981, were ach signed in marker (front), title, date, subject and publisher (verso). Each sheet measured 7 x 7 inches. In an envelope and unframed, the portfolio sold for $6,300.

A more traditional piece was the Royal Vienna porcelain charger titled Rape of the Sabine Women. The 22-inch charger, which was signed “H. Stadler” on the lower left sold for $5,700, while a French silver tankard, marked “EP” for Emile Puiforcat, having a domed cover surmounted by a figure of a putto and a cylindrical body, all around decoration of classical females and a scroll handle, sold for $5,600. The tankard weighed 150 grams and stood 11 1/2 inches tall.

Other decorative items included the blue/green slag glass lamp with pink flower border, standing 21 1/2 inches high, which sold for $1,975 and the carved marble figure of a female nude, modeled reclining. This large carved marble measured 26 inches high, 51 inches wide and 16 inches in depth. It too sold for $1,975.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Marked ‘EP’ for Emile Puiforcat, this French silver tankard with domed cover sold for $5,600. Capo Auction Fine Art and Antiques image.

After Andy Warhol (American, 1928-1987) ‘The Myths Portfolio’ lithographs in color, 1981, published by Ronald Feldman Fine Arts Inc., sold for $6,300. Capo Auction Fine Art and Antiques image.

Royal Vienna porcelain charger called ‘Rape of the Sabine Women,’ signed ‘H. Stadler,’ sold for $5,700. Capo Auction Fine Art and Antiques image.

Blue-green slag glass lamp with pink flower border, standing 21 1/2 inches high, sold for $1,975. Capo Auction Fine Art and Antiques image.

This carved marble figure of a female nude sold for $1,975. Capo Auction Fine Art and Antiques image.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 05 August 2014 12:58
 

Case record-breaking Summer Auction a ringing success

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Auction House PR   
Monday, 04 August 2014 16:49

This rare Tennessee ring jug is the most elaborately decorated Southern example of the form found to date, and was made by Civil War era potter Christopher Haun. It sold for $30,680 and will soon go on display at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts. Case Antiques Auction image.

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – A rare piece of Southern pottery and an exceptionally large diamond were the star lots at the Summer Case Antiques Auction, held July 19 at the company’s gallery in Knoxville. The sale attracted more than 3,200 registered bidders from over 60 countries, bidding in person, by Internet, by phone and by absentee (left) bids – a record for participation in a Case summer auction. It was also the company’s highest-grossing Summer sale to date.

LiveAuctioneers.com provide Internet live bidding.

The auction’s prize pottery piece is headed to the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA) in Winston-Salem, N.C.: a 19th century copper oxide and lead-glazed earthenware bottle made in the shape of a ring, which sold for $30,680 (all prices include the buyer’s premium). Although a utilitarian form, company president John Case said it was the most elaborately decorated Southern ring bottle discovered to date, and the only such known form by Tennessee potter Christopher Haun. Haun is remembered not only as an excellent potter, but also for his role in Civil War history: He was part of a group of Union sympathizers executed for burning the Confederate-controlled Lick Creek Bridge in Greene County, Tenn., in 1861.

The bottle was purchased on behalf of MESDA's new William C. and Susan S. Mariner Southern Ceramics Gallery and will go on exhibit there in October 2015. A 6-gallon William Grindstaff stoneware jar with double handles and glaze drips hammered for $4,248 (est. $1,200-1,400), setting a new auction record for that East Tennessee potter, and a 6 1/2-inch tall Mid-Atlantic cobalt stenciled stoneware preserving jar with elaborate vase of flowers decoration and script “Ham Easters Clay” competed to $2,596. A rare stamped Maryville Pottery stoneware/redware transitional jug delivered $1,770, and a Blount County, Tenn., stoneware jug by D.L. Smith reached $1,534.

The auction’s highest grossing lot overall was a 5.06-carat diamond ring flanked by channel-set diamonds totaling an additional carat, all set in an 18K yellow gold mounting. A GIA report confirming the diamond’s S12 clarity and I color was included and helped propel the ring to $54,450 (est. $30,000-$40,000).

Jewelry was a hot category overall. A 2.45-carat natural sapphire, flanked by two oval brilliant diamonds in platinum prongs on an 18K yellow gold ring shank earned $6,372 (est. $4,000-$5,000), while an Art Deco ring with 1.65 carat diamond encircled by sapphires in an octagonal platinum setting brought $4,598. A Patek Philippe pocketwatch ticked to $2,832.

One of the top-selling paintings was a sleeper: an impressionistic landscape with barns by Alabama painter John Kelly Fitzpatrick (1888-1953). Fitzpatrick’s work is relatively scarce, and multiple phone, Internet and floor bidders chased it to $15,730 – 10 times its low estimate – despite some condition problems. A marine seascape by Albert Pinkham Ryder (American, 1847-1917) sold for $18,150, while a New England village landscape with windmill by Charles Wysocki (American, 1929-2002) blew past its $3,000-5,000 estimate to $13,570, and a Southern genre landscape depicting an African American family and their cabin by William Aiken Walker (South Carolina, 1838-1921) earned $12,390. A drawing of an African American couple in a wagon by Alfred Hutty (South Carolina, 1877-1954) brought $3,776, and a watercolor autumn landscape by Lloyd Branson (Tennessee, 1861-1925) sold for $2,832. A posthumous oil portrait by Cornelius Hankins (Tennessee, 1863-1946) depicting Robert E. Lee, believed to have been commissioned by the daughter of a soldier who fought with Lee, rallied to $3,872. An oil on canvas of a child with her doll by Edmund Adler Rode (Austria, 1876-1965), charmed its way to $6,136, while a mid- 20th century Paris street scene signed Antoine Blanchard brought $3,146.

It was a banner day for Nashville surrealist painter Werner Wildner (1925-2004). Wildner’s painting of a patched-up Humpty Dumpty sitting atop a wall cracked the artist’s previous world auction record by reaching $5,664, but a second Wildner painting in the sale – a trompe l’oeil style “Punch and Judy” scene – outmatched it when it hit $12,390. Both were from a collection of 20th century art consigned by Nashvillians Stephen and Lisa Steiner Small. The Smalls’ collection also included a painting of a circus train by Kentucky memory painter Helen LaFrance (b. 1919) which steamed to $3,509 (est. $800-1000), and a surrealist oil on canvas by self-taught artist Paul Lancaster (Tennessee, b. 1930), titled Eve in the Garden, which elicited $2,242. A colorful abstract mixed media painting by Henry Faulkner (Kentucky, 1924-1981) brought $2,420. A mixed media serigraph, Back-Out, by Robert Rauschenberg (American, 1925-2008), signed and numbered 38/100, realized $2,124, while an Andy Warhol (1928-1987) screenprint depicting Kimiko Powers brought $1,815, and a Joan Miro (Spanish, 1893-1983) signed lithograph, Maravillas con variaciones acrosticas en el jardin de Miro, 1975, yielded $1,815.

The sale featured several sculptures. Top seller was a bronze by Harriet Frishmuth (American, 1880-1980) at $8,496. A sculpture of a partially nude woman, Odaliske, by Eugene Barillot (French, 1841-1900) sold for $6,292, while a patinated bronze depiction of a woman and girl at a well, after Emile Joseph Nestor Carlier (French, 1849-1927), drew $5,808. A Salvador Dali gold sculpture, St. John of the Cross, edition G-7/500, 1981, registered in the Dali archives, doubled its low estimate at $3,304.

Folk art highlights included a carved and painted cigar store “Indian Princess” with feathered headdress, which soared to $12,980 (est. $3,500-$4,500), and two carved and painted African American ventriloquist dolls, which descended in the family of a Tennessee minstrel show performer. The female brought $2,242 and the male, $1,888. A brightly colored East Tennessee Princess Feather pattern quilt wrapped up $1,180 and a tree of life textile collage by Kate Clayton “Granny” Donaldson of North Carolina (1864-1960) flourished at $1,062. A rare mid-19th century Middle Tennessee house sampler stitched up $5,664.

Civil War-era firearms were in demand, led by a brass frame .36 caliber six-shot revolver, likely made by Samuel Griswold of Georgia, which hit $17,770. A Smith and Wesson .32 caliber No. 2 Army Revolver with holster, formerly belonging to a member of the Hancock Guards (which occupied Nashville during the Civil War) reached $3,304, and a Sharps Model 1859 Carbine, circa 1859-1866, brought $1,888.

An 1844 map of the world by T. & E.H. Ensign with early depiction of the Republic of Texas reached $2,360. An 1827 land grant signed by Tennessee governor Sam Houston two days before he actually took office, doubled expectations at $3,776.

For the first time in company history, the top-selling piece of furniture in the auction was crafted during the 20th century: a George Nakashima cherry “Frenchman’s Cove” #2 Dining Table, circa 1968, which sold for $14,750. There were three bronze and pewter tables by Phillip and Kelvin Laverne, all of which sold within or above estimates: a “Lo-Ta” cube table, $5,428; a coffee table decorated with Roman figures, $5,566; and a circular “Chan” coffee table, $3,872.

The Nakashima table narrowly beat out a beloved 19th century Southern furniture form: a cherry sugar chest from the Middle Tennessee plantation known as Mooreland, which brought a strong $11,800.

“It’s been awhile since we saw a sugar chest crack the $10,000 mark,” noted company president John Case. “The market for brown furniture isn’t entirely dead – it’s just highly selective.”

A circa 1830 cherry china press with glazed doors and East Tennessee provenance brought near the top of its estimate, $9,676, and a Greene County, Tennessee Chippendale chest of drawers with ogee bracket feet doubled its high estimate at $2,242.

There was avid competition for a Federal tea service by Alexandria, Va., silversmith Charles Alexander Burnett (1769-1849), formerly owned by noted East Tennessee collector Richard Doughty. It sold to a private collector for $11,800. Other tea related items in the sale included a six-piece mid-20th century Mexican sterling tea service, $4,427; a Wood and Hughes Aesthetic Movement five-piece silver tea service, $2,541, and an unmarked American Federal period coin silver teapot, $1,062.

Tennessee’s Milligan College selected Case to sell several deaccessioned Chinese items, including a Qing official’s winter wool and silk skull hat with various accessories, $4,114 (est. $500-700), a Qing civil official’s blue silk surcoat with dragon badge and leggings, $3,872 ($700-1,000), and a Qing silk robe with undergarments, $2,541 ($600-900). A Chinese Export hardwood settee adorned with carved rats, monkeys, cranes and other birds led the Asian category overall at $21,780. A turquoise glazed 6-inch diameter bowl with incised dragons commanded $4,356 (est. $300-400).

The sale featured a sizeable collection of European porcelain, led by a KPM-style porcelain plaque of a partially nude woman embracing a lion, which doubled its estimate to earn $7,502. A pair of large bronze-mounted French cobalt porcelain urns rallied to $6,050 (est. $1,400-1600), while another pair of bronze mounted urns with white porcelain and courting scenes realized $4,356. A scarce Rene Lalique blue Canarina perfume bottle with original box competed to $2,596.

A large consignment of model trains was led by a mechanical scale model of the wood-burning DeWitt Clinton steam engine locomotive and three passenger coaches (the Dewitt Clinton was the first American passenger train). It steamed to just over its high estimate, $1,815.

Other highlights included an oak Reginaphone “Lion’s Head” Model 240 music box and phonograph without tone arm or turntable, $10,148 and a small Continental silver-cased bird automaton music box, $3,068. A framed Chattanooga Brewing Company advertising poster circa 1901 depicting the profile of a young beauty bubbled well past its $800-1000 estimate to earn $4,114.

Case is currently preparing for its September online Asian Arts Auction featuring the contents of the Dragon Dreams Museum, a privately owned Chattanooga museum devoted to dragon-themed decorative arts, whose founder died earlier this year. The company is accepting consignments for its next live Fine and Decorative Arts auction, set for Jan. 24.

For more information, call the gallery in Knoxville at 865-558-3033 or the company’s Nashville office at 615-812-6096 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

This rare Tennessee ring jug is the most elaborately decorated Southern example of the form found to date, and was made by Civil War era potter Christopher Haun. It sold for $30,680 and will soon go on display at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts. Case Antiques Auction image.

A farm landscape by Alabama painter John Kelly Fitzpatrick yielded a strong $15,730. Case Antiques Auction image.

A George Nakashima 'Frenchman’s Cove #2' cherry dining table was the day’s top-selling furniture piece at $14,750. Case Antiques Auction image.

A six-piece Federal coin silver tea service by Charles Burnett of the Washington, D.C., area served up $11,800. Case Antiques Auction image.

Jewelry had a strong showing, led by this 5.06 carat diamond and 18K gold ring at $54,450. Case Antiques Auction image.

Punch and Judy set a new auction record for Tennessee artist Werner Wildner, hitting $12,390. Case Antiques Auction image.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 05 August 2014 12:44
 

Benjamin West artworks sell for £138,880 at Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 29 July 2014 13:23

Benjamin West, 'St. John the Baptist.' Sold for £73,160. Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

LONDON – In the wake of Old Masters Week, two original chalk studies for lost paintings by Benjamin West were in high demand at Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions’ July 24 sale of Watercolors, Drawings & Prints, selling for a combined total of £138,880 ($235,845).

LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

Richard Carroll of the Pictures Department at Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions said: "When the West drawings arrived at Bloomsbury House we anticipated a considerable amount of presale interest and it was with great pleasure that we watched six telephone bidders and a collector in the room battle for these exceptional works. The final selling prices not only reflect the exceptional scale and quality of the two drawings, but also their importance in expanding our understanding of the artistic output of Benjamin West.”

American-born Benjamin West was a pioneer of historical painting, an Old Master who produced work for nobility and royalty, acting as residence historical painter for the court of King George III.

These works date from a period when West explored religious themes and appeared to be preparatory studies of larger scale works which are now lost. The lost works later served as the basis for the engraved illustration in Thomas Macklin’s Bible, published circa 1793, but it is these chalk drawings that provide the first real insight into how West’s lost paintings may have originally appeared.

In The Paintings of Benjamin West, Von Erffa and Stanley suggest that the two lost paintings may have formed the outer wings of a triptych around West’s The Resurrection, now held in St George’s Parish Church, Barbados.

Additional highlights:

Thomas Carwitham (fl. 1713-1733) – A sheet of studies, showing figures grappling, mythical gods and pyramids, pen and brown ink, bears signature verso and dated 1713-14 , on laid paper watermarked with fleur-de-lis armorial device, 26 x 40.5 cm. (10 1/4 x 16 inches), unframed. Carwitham is primarily known for his drawings held by Tate bought from the Oppé Collection, and also for the numerous mythological sketches he executed depicting scenes from Ovid's Metamorphoses. It is thought that Carwitham was at one point the pupil of Sir James Thornhill. Sold for £7,440 [Lot 16].

Thomas Rowlandson (1757-1827) – Two sportsmen, one possibly Rowlandson, out shooting in Hengar Woods, watercolor, pen and ink, over pencil, inscribed in brown ink verso Hengar Wood, W. Camelford, Cornwall, circa 1795, 21 x 27 cm. (8 1/4 x 10 5/8 inches). Provenance: Private collection, UK. Sold for £6,200 [Lot 78].

Giovanni Battista Piranesi (1720-1778) – Prisoners on projecting platform, pl.X, from: Carceri d'Invenzione, etching, circa 1749-1751, on thick laid paper, Hind's first state before number, [Hind 10.I; F.32; Robinson 36], unframed, 410 x 540 mm. (16 1/8 x 21 1/4 inches). Sold for £3,720 [Lot 186].

Robert Nanteuil (1623-1678) – Large group of portraits, including French aristocrats, religious figures, military men and scholars, comprising over 120 engravings, on various papers, 17th century, all unframed, various sizes, largest 375 x 470 mm (14 3/4 x 18 1/2 inches). Sold for £3,224 [Lot 221].

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Benjamin West, 'St. John the Baptist.' Sold for £73,160. Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

Benjamin West, 'Moses Showing the Brazen Serpent.' Sold for £65,720. Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

Thomas Carwitham (fl. 1713-1733), sheet of studies, showing figures grappling, mythical gods and pyramids. Sold for £7,440. Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

Thomas Rowlandson (1757-1827), two sportsmen, one possibly Rowlandson, shooting in Hengar Woods, watercolor, pen and ink, over pencil. Sold for £6,200. Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

Giovanni Battista Piranesi (1720-1778), prisoners on projecting platform, from Carceri d'Invenzione, etching, circa 1749-1751. Sold for £3,720. Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

Robert Nanteuil (1623-1678), large group of portraits, over 120 engravings. Sold for £3,224. Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

Last Updated on Monday, 04 August 2014 17:10
 

Aboriginal shields shoot to $23,000 each at Clars Auction Gallery

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 29 July 2014 12:49

These two rare, possibly 19th century Aboriginal Northern Australia shields, were estimated to sell for $400 to $600 each, but soared to $23,000 each. Clars Auction Gallery image.

OAKLAND, Calif. – Clars Auction Gallery’s monthly fine art, jewelry and decorative art auction on July 12-14 resulted in the largest July auction in the firm’s history, realizing just over $1 million. The success of the sale was fueled by both exceptional estate property and Clars’ global marketing.

LiveAuctioneers.com facilitated Internet live bidding.

The excitement began on Saturday when two Aboriginal shields from northern Australia came up for sale. The shields came to auction as part of the ethnographic collection from a prominent San Francisco estate. They were both made of fig tree wood, had carved handles and carved bosses to the front. They measured 34 1/2 inches high by 14 1/2 inches wide. Prior to the sale, because of the difficulty of putting an age on the shields, they were conservatively projected to likely be post-World War II by Clars and another major auction house. Based on this assumption, they were both assigned presale estimates of $400 to $600.

The bidding opened on the first shield at $400 but quickly became a heated phone battle between two Australian collectors, skyrocketing the final sale price to $23,000. It was a repeat performance for the second shield, which also earned the same amount. Both shields were bought by the same Australian collector. After the sale, Deric Torres, vice president and director of Furniture and Decorative Art for Clars Auction Gallery, commented that, after further evaluation, these shields were likely 19th century.

Australian fine art and decorative art have made for several exciting sales at Clars. In February Possum Dreaming by contemporary aboriginal artist Clifford Possum Tjapaltjarri (1932-2002) achieved the highest price ever for this artist in the United States selling for $131,000.

The decorative arts and furniture category continued to have exceptional results throughout the next two days. Almost tying the world record price for its form, a Murano glass “Pulcini” bird by Alessandro Pianon for Vistosi, circa 1963, sold for $4,000, solidly surpassing its high estimate of $2,500. Also surpassing high estimate was a pair of Meissen covered urns, which garnered an impressive $9,000. Selling for solidly within estimate were a pair of Napoleon III boulle-style commodes, which earned $7,500, and a pair of Empire ormolu and patinated bronze ewers fetched $10,000. Rounding out this category, a slick 2012 Nissan 370 Z touring coupe sped off for $22,500.

Fine Art

Two new world auction records were set during this sale. The first, an oil on board painting by Douglas Hofmann (American, b. 1945), titled Madam Derriere, soared past its high estimate of $2,000 achieving the new record price for the artist of $11,900. The second was a colorful, majestic oil on canvas by Tarmo Pasto (American, 1906-1986). Titled California Foothills, this work sold for $2,300, more than doubling the artist’s previous record of $1,080.

Another high achiever was the large and dramatic bronze sculpture by Bob Grieves (b. 1986) titled Shanandoah Farewell, which amazed the crowd when it achieved $15,470, well above its $8,000-$12,000 estimate. Works by Peter Max continued to be strong with a vibrant acrylic on canvas titled Better World landing well past its $4,000-$6,000 estimate selling for $11,900.

Jewelry

Once again, it was a spectacular jewelry offering that took top lot of the sale. A fancy light brownish pink unmounted diamond weighing 1.51 carats sold for $24,000. A Rolex Submariner stainless steel wristwatch, circa 1971, and retailed by Tiffany stunned the crowd earning well over twice its high estimate selling for $15,500.

Asian Art

Typical for Clars, the Asian art section had a high sell through rate and was a well-rounded sale with items from various categories performing well. The category had a great start with the first lot, a painting in the manner of Fu Baoshi (Chinese, 1904-1965), Scholars Playing Chess, experiencing competitive bidding bringing the final price to eight times its high estimate selling for $9,250. In the jades offered, a celadon nephrite carving intricately sculpted with a cricket perched on a bitter melon achieved $5,300. The Himalayan offerings performed above their estimates including one thangka of Penden Lhamo, which sold for $3,300.

For more information email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

These two rare, possibly 19th century Aboriginal Northern Australia shields, were estimated to sell for $400 to $600 each, but soared to $23,000 each. Clars Auction Gallery image.

Almost equaling the world record price for its form, this Murano glass ‘Pulcini’ bird by Alessandro Pianon for Vistosi, circa 1963, sold for $4,000, surpassing its high estimate of $2,500. Clars Auction Gallery image.

This oil on board painting by Douglas Hofmann (American, b. 1945), titled ‘Madam Derriere,’ soared past its high estimate of $2,000, achieving the new record price for the artist of $11,900. Clars Auction Gallery image.

A new world record was set with this majestic oil on canvas by Tarmo Pasto (American, 1906-1986) titled ‘California Foothills.’ It sold for $2,300, more than doubling the previous record of $1,080. Clars Auction Gallery image.

This large and dramatic bronze sculpture by Bob Grieves (b. 1986) titled ‘Shanandoah Farewell’ reached $15,470, well above its $8,000 to $12,000 estimate. Clars Auction Gallery image.

This fancy light brownish pink unmounted diamond weighing 1.51 carats was the top seller of Clars’ July auction earning $24,000. Clars Auction Gallery image.

Competitive bidding on this painting, in the manner of Fu Baoshi (Chinese, 1904-1965), drove the final sale price to $9,200, over eight times its high estimate. Clars Auction Gallery image.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 29 July 2014 13:23
 

Busy preview foretells success for Morphy’s July 19 Firearms sale

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Auction House PR   
Monday, 28 July 2014 11:16
Top lot of the sale, a pair of 1857 Colt Walker Type 3 Dragoons with consecutive serial numbers, $54,000. Morphy Auctions image DENVER, Pa. – Staff members assisting previewers the day before Morphy’s July 19 Firearms Auction were all in agreement – they had never before seen the gallery so full or so continuously busy throughout the day. There was strong interest in the rare antique weapons entered in the sale, and a queue of eager gun collectors was waiting outside even before the doors opened at 9 a.m.

The Saturday auction session, which was available to online bidders through LiveAuctioneers, contained 1,038 lots. As the hammer fell on the final item offered, the sale’s total was confirmed at $744,000. All prices quoted in this report include a 20% buyer’s premium.

“We had every expectation that there would be a great response. There were some very desirable Colts in the sale, especially the 1857 Colt Walker Type 3 Dragoons, which sold within estimate for $54,000,” said Dan Morphy, president and founder of Morphy Auctions. “The guns were special because they had consecutive serial numbers and were purchased in the same order directly from Colt. It’s very unusual to encounter guns of that type that were bought together and remained that way over such a long period of time.” The original owner was a Pennsylvania man named Lambert Wolfe, who went on to serve in the Union Army during the Civil War.

Another Colt lot consisted of two .357 caliber “Snake Eyes” pistols that were new and unfired. One of the guns was stainless, while the other was blued. Both retained their original boxes and were in near-mint condition. They sold for $13,200, around the midpoint of their estimate.

Many rifles were offered in the sale, including a Winchester Model 1886 .50 Express. Manufactured in 1906, it swept past its $1,500-$3,000 estimate to settle at $11,400. Another Winchester production, a Model 1886 Takedown .45-.90 caliber rifle, more than tripled its high estimate in realizing $7,800. A rare Smith & Wesson 320 Revolving Rifle manufactured in 1871 also had a good day at auction, ringing the register at $7,200 against a $3,500-$4,500 estimate.

Among the shotguns, the top-finishing lot was a Beretta Model S687EELL 16 gauge designed for pigeon shooting. Together with an extra barrel and its box, case and accessories, the gun reached $4,800 against an estimate of $2,000-$3,000. Finishing closely behind the Beretta was a Winchester Model 42 .410 gauge shotgun, which nearly tripled its high estimate at $4,500.

The top pistol in the sale was a Colt Model 1902 .38 caliber Standard Military Automatic in fine condition. Together with its original box, it was bid to $5,100, surpassing its high estimate by 60 percent. Another Colt, a .22 caliber revolver made in 1931 and known as a “Banker’s Special,” was offered together with a Colt factory letter and sold for $4,200.

“The Firearms department is growing very rapidly, and there’s a logical reason for that,” said Morphy. “Some of the finest antique and vintage guns in today’s marketplace are sourced right here in south-central Pennsylvania. On top of that, many of the leading collectors live in this region and know they can trust our operation. Especially now that Dave Bushing – a nationally renowned expert on firearms – has joined our team, we’re well positioned to serve both gun consignors and buyers. I see tremendous growth ahead for us in this category.”

Morphy Auctions’ next Firearms auction is slated for December 20, 2014. Consignments will be accepted until October 13th. To contact Morphy’s about consigning a firearm, call Dave Bushing at 630-235-3345 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . To contact the gallery, call 717-335-3435.

View the fully illustrated catalog from Morphy's July 19 sale, complete with prices realized, at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

# # #

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE
Top lot of the sale, a pair of 1857 Colt Walker Type 3 Dragoons with consecutive serial numbers, $54,000. Morphy Auctions image Pair of Colt .357 caliber pistols known as ‘Snake Eyes, new with original boxes, $13,200. Morphy Auctions image Winchester Model 1886 .50 Express Rifle, $11,400. Morphy Auctions image Winchester Model 1886 Takedown .45-.90 caliber rifle, $7,800. Morphy Auctions image 1871 Smith & Wesson 320 Revolving Rifle, $7,200. Morphy Auctions image
Last Updated on Monday, 28 July 2014 11:51
 

Internet bidding credited for strong results at Kodner Galleries

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Auction House PR   
Thursday, 24 July 2014 13:00

Auctioneer Russ Kodner standing beside the highlighted item of the auction, David Davidovich Burliuk’s ‘Paris Rue St. Rock,’ oil on canvas, which sold for $53,100. Kodner Galleries image.

DANIA BEACH, Fla. – Mid-Summer in south Florida is hot and steamy but it was a large selection of 20th century art that created the heat at Kodner Galleries’ July 16 auction. The highlighted offering of the evening was a large and vibrant David Davidovich Burliuk, American/Ukrainian (1882-1967) oil on canvas Paris Rue St. Rock selling strong at $53,100. LiveAucionteers.com provided Internet live bidding.

The auction featured works from several large prominent collections representing well-recognized 20th century artists including a John Koch Still Life with Cat, whcih hammered down at $11,800.

Additional highlights were a Chaim Gross bronze selling for $5,664, two Vicente Viudes oils bringing a total of $10,266, a Moses Soyer Ballerinas for $10,620 and several works by Jorge Sanchez totaling $8,024.

The sale also included works by Henry Moore, Karel Appel , Leonardo Nierman and others.

Also sold was Portrait of a Lady attributed to John Michael Wright, Scottish (born circa 1617-1694) for $11,800.

The auction also included a fine Russian Grachev Bros. champleve enamel and crystal cordial set selling for $21,240, an Edouard Ernie silver and horn fish set at $1,550, a Karl Greisbaum enamel singing bird box hammered down at $7,670 and a Faberge letter opener for $2,140.

As with every Kodner Galleries sale the auction included a selection of fine jewelry including a Mughal style 10.30-carat emerald ring that sold for $16,520, a 3.5-carat emerald and diamond ring for $5,425, a Ulysse Nardin chronograph for $4,484 among other quality items.

Thanks to very strong Internet activity, summer is not the slow season for Kodner Galleries’ auctions.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Auctioneer Russ Kodner standing beside the highlighted item of the auction, David Davidovich Burliuk’s ‘Paris Rue St. Rock,’ oil on canvas, which sold for $53,100. Kodner Galleries image.

Early 20th century Russian Grachev Bros. silver, champlevé enamel and etched and cut crystal eight-piece cordial set. Price realized: $21,240. Kodner Galleries image.

Antique enamel singing bird box automaton by Karl Greisbaum. Price realized: $7,670. Kodner Galleries image.

Moses Soyer (American, 1899-1974, ‘Ballerinas,’ oil on canvas. Price realized: $10,620. Kodner Galleries image.

Chaim Gross (American, 1904-1991) ‘Two on a Unicycle,’ bronze sculpture on onyx base. Price realized: $5,664. Kodner Galleries image.

John Koch (American, 1909-1978) ‘Still Life with Cat,’ oil on canvas. Price realized: $11,800. Kodner Galleries image.

Ulysse Nardin Maxi Marine Chronograph, Model: 353-66/314. Price realized: $4,484. Kodner Galleries image.

Mughal-style bezel set, approximately 10.30-carat emerald with carved Arabic inscription set in 22K yellow gold ring. Price realized: $16,520. Kodner Galleries image.

Last Updated on Friday, 25 July 2014 15:02
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Page 3 of 72
ADVERTISEMENTS

Banner Banner