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Auction Results in the News

Colored glass rarities excel at Jeffrey S. Evans auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Friday, 31 January 2014 14:15

Lot 11: pressed Eye and Scale hand candlestick/chamberstick, brilliant deep peacock-blue, circa 1830-1850, Boston & Sandwich Glass Co. Price realized: $9,775. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

MT. CRAWFORD, Va. – The market for 19th and 20th century colored glass is on the uptick, if Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates’ mammoth 1,167-lot Jan. 18 auction is any indication.The auction demonstrated that fine objects of great rarity will get bidders excited and that attractive and unusual examples are equally enticing to the market. Results were strong across the historical American section of the sale, as well as the Victorian opalescent and the art glass sections.

Internet live bidding was provided by LiveAuctioneers.com.

Two examples of mid-19th century Boston & Sandwich glass sold for $9,775 each at the auction, sharing the spotlight for the highest price of the day. The first item, a probably unique deep peacock-blue pressed Eye-and-Scale pattern hand candlestick/chamber stick (lot 11), was no less attractive than the pair of deep peacock-green pressed Loop/Leaf stand lamps (lot 37). Both lots had illustrious histories, having previously been in the Donald and Pamela Levine collection, and now being sold from the Greg and Joyce Prus collection. Brilliant amethyst, brilliant deep cobalt blue, and forest green glass objects also did very well in the auction, with a variety of vases, candlesticks and lamps realizing strong prices.

Another strong section of the auction was composed of Victorian opalescent glass. Virtually all of the lots offered sold above estimate, including those within the cranberry glass area. Two Swastika pattern cranberry opalescent items realized the highest prices for this section of the auction, with a water pitcher selling for $6,900 against a $2,000-$4,000 estimate (lot 453), and an Indiana mold syrup pitcher selling for $5,750 (lot 684). Both were made at Dugan Glass Co., circa 1904. Dugan also made a Swastika pattern nine-panel mold syrup pitcher, in green opalescent glass, which realized $3,737.50, over the $1,000-$1,500 estimate (lot 685).

The auction saw equally strong bidding for American art glass, European art glass, modern studio glass and cut glass. A set of eight Steuben engraved goblets, in shape 6596, sold for $2,990, estimated originally at $1,000-$1,500 (lot 905); a Charles Lotton “Multi Flora” studio art vase sold for $977.50, over the $400-$600 (lot 259); and a Thomas Webb & Sons English cameo cabinet vase, depicting scrolling foliage and flowers, sold for $3,450 against the original $400-$600 estimate (lot 999).

“This was our best performing glass auction since the recession started, grossing nearly $400,000. We saw many past buyers and numerous new buyers who were enticed by the high quality of merchandise and the conservative estimates, which combined to push some lots to near prerecession levels. Only three lots carried a reserve and all sold,” said auctioneer Jeffrey S. Evans.

Commenting on the antiques market in general, Evans added, “Things are really looking up. Collectors are beginning to recognize and take advantage of the great values presented by the current economy. We had a sizable in-house crowd throughout the day. The Internet accounted for 47 percent of lots sold and included buyers from 15 different countries. We have several very significant collections of glass lined up for the remainder of the year and anticipate a record breaking 2014.”

For details contact Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or 540-434-3939

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Lot 11: pressed Eye and Scale hand candlestick/chamberstick, brilliant deep peacock-blue, circa 1830-1850, Boston & Sandwich Glass Co. Price realized: $9,775. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

Lot 37: pair of pressed Loop/Leaf stand lamps, brilliant deep peacock-green, circa 1840-1860, Boston & Sandwich Glass Co. Price realized: $9,775. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

Lot 453: Swastika pattern water pitcher of cranberry opalescent glass, Dugan Glass Co., circa 1904, 9 inches high. Price realized: $6,900. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

Lot 684: Swastika Indiana mold syrup pitcher, also in cranberry opalescent glass, Dugan Glass Co., circa 1904, 5 3/4 inches. Price realized: $3,737.50. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

Lot 999: Thomas Webb & Sons, English cameo cabinet vase, white to deep red, fourth quarter 19th century, 4 inches high. Price realized: $3,450. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 04 February 2014 16:54
 

Richard Nevinson city etchings show strength at Sworders

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Written by Auction House PR   
Friday, 31 January 2014 13:40
Christopher Richard Wynne Nevinson ARA (1889-1946), 'Metropolis or 2 a.m., New York' (from the American set, 1921), drypoint, signed in pencil, plate 25.3 x 17.7cm. Sworders image. ESSEX COUNTY, UK – Three etchings by Christopher R.W. Nevinson unexpectedly sold for more than £19,000 ($31,269) at a sale Jan. 28 held by Sworders Fine Art Auctioneers. LiveAuctioneers.com facilitated Internet live bidding.

The artwork, featuring scenes of Paris and New York, is from the 1920s and by the British artist. Best known as Richard Nevinson, he was a famous World War I artist and many of his works are featured in the Imperial War Museum. After the war, he traveled to the United States creating art that captured his fascination with the architecture of New York. He is also credited with hosting the first-ever cocktail party in London in 1924.

At the auction at Sworders’ Stansted Mountfitchet saleroom, an etching of Paris sold for £2,500 ($4,114), four times the starting guide price of £600. A second image of Paris, which had a starting guide price of £1,000, sold for £4,000 ($6,583), and a drypoint picture of New York made £12,600, more than six times its guide price of £2,000 ($3,292).

Auctioneer John Black, said: “It’s great to see work like this reach recognition and become popular among buyers. There’s been quite a sudden increase in interest in Nevinson’s work and particularly his New York pictures. They were commissioned by Frederick Keppel, the American print dealer and publisher, who gave Nevinson his first exhibition in 1919.”

The Decorative Art and Design Sale also featured a selection of artwork by local artist, Edward Bawden. His watercolors of local scenes including Audley End were particularly popular among local buyers, but some pieces also sold to London galleries. The Edward Bawden collection sold for a total of £28,000 ($46,091).

An unusual Arts & Crafts-style piano, designed by Charles Robert Ashbee and thought to be the last of just five pianos of its type, sold for £10,600 ($17,448).

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE
Christopher Richard Wynne Nevinson ARA (1889-1946), 'Metropolis or 2 a.m., New York' (from the American set, 1921), drypoint, signed in pencil, plate 25.3 x 17.7cm. Sworders image. An unusual Arts & Crafts-style piano designed by Charles Robert Ashbee sold within estimate for £10,600 ($17,448). Sworders image.
Last Updated on Monday, 14 July 2014 10:35
 

Silver spurs top High Noon Western Americana auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Thursday, 30 January 2014 16:26
Lady Yule Visalia Saddle sold for $141,600. Annual High Noon Western Americana image. MESA, Ariz. – Thousands of collectors and lovers of the American West gathered from across the country at the Mesa Convention Center on Jan. 25-26 for the 24th annual High Noon Western Americana Show and Auction.

The High Noon Antiques and Western Americana Show was filled to capacity from start to finish with robust buying reported from the over 200 dealers who exhibited.

The centerpiece of the weekend, as always, was the High Noon Western Americana Auction that was held Saturday evening.

There was barely an empty seat in the house with over 1,000 floor bidders waiting to raise their bid cards for the chance to win one of the 329 exceptional lots of Western Americana art, artifacts, cowboy and memorabilia from the silver screen. LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

A top prize was the Lady Yule Visalia saddle from Gleannloch Farms (Lot 231). A triumph in functional art, this 1930s masterpiece in tooled leather from the Visalia Stock Saddle Co. also featured exquisitely engraved sterling silver by Schaezlein of San Francisco. The saddle ensemble included a fully matching bridle and dazzling breast collar. The provenance was equally rich as this saddle was made for Lady Ann Yule, considered to be the wealthiest woman in the world at the time.

This saddle came to the sale with an estimate of $60,000-$90,000. It opened at $30,000 but furious bidding from the floor, phones and Internet quickly escalated the final sale price to $141,600.

The evening was filled with “over-estimate” surprises. A pair of Jesus Tapia spurs (lot 279) got off to a quick start. Considered to be the Holy Grail of California spurs, this circa 1920 pair came to auction with an estimate of $30,000 to $40,000. Bidding opened at $25,000 but finished at an astounding $153,400.

Proving again that cowboys of the silver screen of years past are still worth their weight in gold, Lot 179, the Colt .45 used by James Arness in his iconic role as Marshal Matt Dillon on TV’s Gunsmoke, sold for $59,000, over five times its high estimate. Larry Hagman’s legacy to the sale (Lot 8) was his personal custom-made Edward H. Bohlin hand-tooled briefcase, toppled its high estimate of $11,000 selling for $20,060. And an important pair of Tom Mix’s personal California batwing chaps, (Lot 237) estimated to sell for up to $16,000, achieved $29,500.

In fine art, Frank McCarthy’s oil on board titled Where the Rocks Meet, (Lot 214) sold for $29,500, well over estimate.

Native American items commanded significant results with Lot 205, a Northern Plains pipe tomahawk achieving $26,050 against its $12,000 high estimate, and Lot 211, a stunning Navajo sand painting rug, sold for $22,420, well over its $15,000 high estimate.

For complete information call the offices of High Noon at 310-202-9010.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE
Lady Yule Visalia Saddle sold for $141,600. Annual High Noon Western Americana image. Colt .45/James Arness sold for $59,000. High Noon Western Americana image. Jesus Tapia Spurs, circa 1920, sold for $153,400. Annual High Noon Western Americana image. Larry Hagman Bohlin briefcase sold for $20,060. High Noon Western Americana image. Tom Mix chaps sold for $29,500. High Noon Western Americana image. Frank McCarthy, ‘Where the Rocks Meet,’ oil on board, sold for $29,500. High Noon Western Americana image. Northern Plains pipe tomahawk sold for $26,550. High Noon Western Americana image. Navajo sand painting sold for $22,420. High Noon Western Americana image.
Last Updated on Thursday, 30 January 2014 17:46
 

Table attributed to Meeks earns $33,350 at Stevens sale

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Written by Auction House PR   
Friday, 24 January 2014 17:18

Rosewood rococo marble turtle-top parlor center table attributed to J. & J. W. Meeks. Price realized: $33,350. Stevens Auction Co. image.

ABERDEEN, Miss. – A rosewood rococo marble turtle-top parlor center table with cluster carved finial, attributed to the renowned American furniture maker J. & J.W. Meeks, sold for $33,350 at an estates auction held Jan. 17-18 by Stevens Auction Co. The table was the top lot of the sale. Internet bidding was facilitated by LiveAuctioneers.com.

The auction featured more than 550 lots of select and rare antiques from prominent Southern estates, plus items from the estate of the late Paul Dobbs of West Plains, Mo. It was packed with period furniture items by prolific craftsmen, large Persian rugs, 19th century lighting, brilliant cut glass pieces, decorative accessories, home furnishings, early porcelains and art glass.

“It was a cold weekend, but it was warm inside the building and we may have generated some extra heat with all the spirited bidding going on,” said Dwight Stevens of Stevens Auction Co. “We were very pleased with the outcome. The merchandise spoke for itself, and the bidding in the room and online was brisk both days. The phones and left bids were active, too.”

Following are additional highlights from the auction. All prices quoted include a 15 percent buyer’s premium.

Additional lots attributed to Meeks included a pair of mirror image laminated rosewood recamiers in the Stanton Hall pattern, upholstered in silk with gilt Napoleonic bees ($11,500 the pair), a rosewood laminated parlor cabinet with original mirrors and finish ($4,025), and a rosewood rococo center parlor game table with drawers on both sides ($2,990).

Monumental beds featured a rosewood half tester bed in mint condition, attributed to Mitchell & Rammelsberg, with original mosquito net hardware ($12,650), a mahogany Empire full tester plantation bed that was made around 1840 but has had just three owners ($8,625), and an ornate mahogany rococo oversized bed with pierce-carved and rounded footboard ($3,220).

Pairs of chairs did extremely well. Two rosewood laminated parlor side chairs in the Cornucopia pattern, crafted circa 1855 by John H. Belter, changed hands for $10,350, and an identical selling price was realized for a pair of J. & J.W. Meeks laminated rosewood armchairs in the Stanton Hall pattern. The chairs were beautifully upholstered in silk with Napoleonic bees.

Also from the prolific workshop of Meeks was a pair of laminated rosewood parlor chairs in the Henry Ford pattern, upholstered in silk with Napoleonic bees. They sold as a single lot for $4,600. Two rococo revival pierce-carved parlor chairs – duplicates of a pair pictured in an 1849 advertisement for George Henkels, as shown in a March 1933 magazine – hammered for $4,600.

A Victorian crystal chandelier featuring eight tiers of crystal with silver rings and 30-35 strands of roping went for $3,910. Also, a monumental banquet lamp with marble columns, claw feet and winged cherubs, with a huge antique 11-inch amber shade with lily decor, made $2,070.

American Brilliant Cut Glass is still popular with collectors, and this sale had a wide selection. A console bowl that was heavily cut and extremely fine, in mint condition, 15 inches across, fetched $3,910; a stunning plate, 13 inches in diameter, went for $3,910; and a square bowl, extremely heavy, signed Hawks, was a bargain at $288.

Returning to furniture, a Victorian walnut breakfront bookcase with butler’s desk and an unusual crest, 8 feet 9 inches tall, gaveled for $3,450; a large mahogany Empire three-door breakfront, 9 feet 3 inches tall, realized $2,875; a solid mahogany heavily carved French rococo sofa with brown leather, in mint condition, circa 1890, went for $2,070; and a mahogany Empire revival breakfront with mirror back and acanthus columns, circa 1870, went for $1,955.

From the clocks category, an early grandfather clock by David Elias Bangor, 97 inches tall, sold for $2,875, and a rosewood beehive clock with Baltimore cemetery scene, 19 inches by 10 inches, made $1,035. Also, a National Cash Register candy store-size cash register in good working condition, with all original parts and key, found a new owner for $863.

Two French porcelain plaques in gesso frames, hand-painted and measuring 32 inches by 21 inches, circa 1870-1880, sold for $4,600 the pair; a 67-piece set of sterling silver flatware in the Grand Baroque pattern by Wallace (a service for eight, with extra serving pieces) breezed to $4,370; an outstanding rococo bronze dore mirror, 26 inches tall, commanded $2,250; and a Victorian rococo over-the-mantel mirror with ornate details, 55 inches by 60 inches, hit $1,035.

Other top lots included a bronze Victorian floor vase with the original amber glass insert, 55 inches tall, which sold for $1,265; a pair of Majolica figures in Arabian dress with musical instruments, sitting on an attached base, 19 inches tall, $863 the pair; and a diminutive 5-inch-tall Austrian gilt silver doll house bench with hand-painted enamel panels on back and seat, $518.

For more information call Stevens Auction Co. at 662-369-2200 send an e-mail to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Rosewood rococo marble turtle-top parlor center table attributed to J. & J. W. Meeks. Price realized: $33,350. Stevens Auction Co. image.

Rosewood half tester bed attributed to Mitchell & Rammelsberg in like-new condition. Price realized: $12,650. Stevens Auction Co. image.

American Brilliant Cut Glass console bowl, very heavily cut and 15 inches in diameter. Price realized: $4,140. Stevens Auction Co. image.

Beautiful early grandfather clock made by David Elias Bangor, 97 inches in height. Price realized: $2,875. Stevens Auction Co. image.

One of a pair of French hand-painted oval porcelain plaques in gesso frames. Price realized: $4,600 the pair. Stevens Auction Co. image.

Sterling flatware service for eight, 67 pieces, in the Grand Baroque pattern by Wallace. Price realized: $4,370. Stevens Auction Co. image.

Victorian eight-tiered crystal chandelier with silver rings and 30-35 strands of roping. Price realized: $3,910. Stevens Auction Co. image.

Pair of  laminated rosewood recamiers by J. & J.W. Meeks. Price realized: $11,500 the pair. Stevens Auction Co. image.

Last Updated on Thursday, 30 January 2014 17:46
 

Landmark photography collection hits $1.2M at Clars

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Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 21 January 2014 16:53
The highest price achieved in the Ruttenberg Collection was this large Cibachrome print titled ‘Revenge of the Goldfish’ (1981) by Sandy Skoglund, which fetched $20,230. Clars Auction Gallery image..

OAKLAND, Calif. – On Jan. 15-16 Clars Auction Gallery hosted their first sale of 2014 with impressive results across the board realizing over $1.2 million, the largest January sale in the firm’s history. All departments soared with sell-through rates over 96 percent. LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

The spotlight of this sale was the important photography and prints collection of David C. and Sarajean Ruttenberg of Chicago. Prices realized on the works offered soared past estimates and set new world records. Numerous collectors and dealers from both coasts aggressively participated in the bidding making this one of the most successful photography auctions in a decade.

Rick Unruh, vice president and director of fine art at Clars, commented, “The timing was right for this auction. Everyone who collects or sells photography was in on this sale either in person, by phone or on the Internet. We sold close to 98 percent of the lots offered – all well above their estimates.” This spectacular collection was the passion of Mr. Ruttenberg which he carefully amassed for the latter half of the 20th century.” Unruh went on to say, “This truly was a very special collection in which both the artists and dealers knew Mr. Ruttenberg personally. You can’t ask for better provenance that that.”

Over 300 lots of photographs were offered at Clars on Jan. 16 featuring numerous works by the foremost names in photography. While almost all of these lots sold at, or substantially above, their estimates, the highest price achieved on the day from the Ruttenberg Collection was a large Cibachrome print titled Revenge of the Goldfish (1981) by Sandy Skoglund, which fetched $20,230. Berenice Abbott’s portfolio of photographs titled The Science Pictures soared past its $3,000-$5,000 estimate to land at $7,735. With an estimate of $1,000-$2,000, Danny Lyon’s dramatic work Cell Block Table (1968), reached a new world record price of $3,867. As a whole, the six photographs by Wright Morris all exceeded expectation with one in particular, Gano Grain Elevator (1940), selling at $3,867, well beyond its $800 to $1,200 estimate.

Due to the enormous size of the Ruttenberg Collection (2,000 art items), additional photographs, portfolios, prints and sculpture are scheduled to be sold at Clars in upcoming auctions.

Decoratives arts and furnishings also had an exciting sale with one new world record set. Art glass opened the event achieving over $100,000 in the first hour. An Alfredo Barbini for Pauly Murano glass "Aquarium Block," circa 1955, was expected to reach a high of $600. Extremely aggressive bidding quickly escalated the final selling price to a new world record for Barbini of $11,900, nearly doubling his previous high of $5,800.

The top seller in this category was a lot of 12 German hand-painted porcelain cabinet plates, late 19th century, from the Franz Xavier Tallmaier Studio. Expected to achieve a high of $6,000, this set sold for nearly four times high estimate at $22,610.

Also selling for almost twice its high estimate was a Georg Jensen sterling flatware service for 12 in the Acorn pattern. Designed by Johan Rodhe, 1915, this set sold for $11,900.

Weighing in at approximately 150 to 200 pounds, a large collection of silver bullion including United States Morgan Dollars, Peace Dollars, Franklin and Kennedy half-dollars and pre-1964 coins was offered toward the end of the sale with the entire collection earning an impressive $75,000.

Asian art and antiques produced the top seller of the auction with a pot of Chinese hardstone Narcissus flowers from the late Qing/early Republic period achieving an astounding $35,700.

In jades, the top seller was a pair of Qing dynasty jade belt hooks with meandering chilong which sold for $10,115. Scholars’ items also had great results including a gourd-form cricket cage that hammered at $4,250.

Jade performed exceptionally well in the fine jewelry offerings. A man's large jadeite (24.7 x 17mm) and 18K gold ring sold for $15,470. A rare Rolex stainless steel chronograph wristwatch, ref. 3858, circa 1947, achieved a solid $10,115.

Overall, the jewelry department experienced one of their strongest sell-through rates in the company’s history.

For complete information and prices realized regarding Clars’ Jan. 15-16 fine art and antiques sale, call 510-428-0100 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE
The highest price achieved in the Ruttenberg Collection was this large Cibachrome print titled ‘Revenge of the Goldfish’ (1981) by Sandy Skoglund, which fetched $20,230. Clars Auction Gallery image. This pot of Chinese hardstone narcissus flowers, late Qing/early Republic period, was this highest sale of the day achieving an astounding $35,700. Clars Auction Gallery image. Setting a new world record for Danny Lyon was this dramatic shot titled ‘Cell Block Table’ (1968), which sold for $3,867. Clars Auction Gallery image. This lot of 12 German hand-painted porcelain cabinet plates, late 19th century, from the Franz Xavier Tallmaier Studio sold for an impressive $22,610. Clars Auction Gallery image. This man’s jadeite ring and 18K gold ring sold for an impressive $15,470. Clars Auction Gallery image.

A new world record was set for Alfredo Barbini with his ‘Aquarium Block’ for Pauly Murano, which achieved $11,900. Clars Auction Gallery image.

Last Updated on Friday, 31 January 2014 14:56
 

Lagerfeld sketches 100% sold at Palm Beach Modern's Jan. 11 auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Monday, 20 January 2014 13:16
Monumental ‘Sputnik’ chandelier with Murano spikes, $38,400. Palm Beach Modern Auctions image. WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. – South Florida became “fashion central” on Saturday, January 11th, as some 125 trendsetters and art buyers arrived in red-carpet style at Palm Beach Modern Auctions’ (PBMA) exhibition center. Some of the guests pulled up in Rolls-Royces, wearing smart designer outfits and Chanel hats. Others took a sportier approach, with Chanel T-shirts – the real ones – discreetly evident under their perfectly tailored blazers. They gathered at PBMA’s spacious venue with one goal in mind: to immerse themselves in a historic, one-time-only event – the auction of a long-held trove of 1960s Karl Lagerfeld fashion sketches. Originally the property of couturier Evan “Buddy” Richards and his Rome-based company Tiziani – where Lagerfeld once freelanced – the archive had passed intact through two estates before its consignment to PBMA.

“Everyone who attended was engaged in the moment – it was like an homage to Karl Lagerfeld, who is one of fashion’s most iconic figures,” said Palm Beach Modern Auctions’ co-owner and auctioneer Rico Baca, who presided over the $545,165 sale. Internet live bidding was provided by LiveAuctioneers.

But it wasn’t just the fashion-conscious set that wanted a chance to bid on Lagerfeld’s early sketches; art collectors, and prestigious museums and art institutions were after them, too. “They recognized that Lagerfeld’s 1960s sketches are the fashion world’s equivalent of early drawings by a great impressionist,” Baca said.

In addition to bidders participating in-house, 570 bidders took part online, with scores more on the five phone lines, and hundreds of absentee bids in place. The fashion portion of the 487-lot sale – which also featured modern furniture and decorative art – was 100% sold (with after-auction sales included). A 20% buyer’s premium applied.

The auction both opened and concluded with photographs of Richards’ close friend and favorite Tiziani client, Elizabeth Taylor. A signed photo of Taylor in a floaty gown, accompanied by a signed letter in which the actress wished Richards well with his new collection, sold for $4,800.

Taylor, Richards and Lagerfeld frequently collaborated on designs for the star’s personal wardrobe, as well as the costumes for several of her films. Among the Lagerfeld sketches identified as being for “Elizabeth Taylor Burton” was Lot 3, an ankle-length dress in a floral pattern of vibrant ’60s pop colors. It sold for $2,520.

The top Lagerfeld item was Lot 41, a sketch of a confident-looking woman in a 2-piece suit that bore similarities to classic Chanel designs. Hand-signed “Karl 64,” it opened at $1,600 against a $1,000-$3,000 estimate and sold for $4,500.

Among the many other sketches that attracted strong competition were Lot 73, an annotated color sketch of an Egyptian-style calf-length dress with faux-jeweled halter, $3,900 (Internet); a sketch of a day ensemble with fuchsia hat and tights, signed “Karl Lagerfeld 64,” $3,360; and Lot 11, a black cocktail dress with copious handwritten notes in the margin, $3,240.

A German bidder competed over the phone for more than 50 of the fashion lots. After the sale, he was among the many who asked if there were any unsold sketches, and ended up purchasing all that remained. “It’s our understanding that, like some of the institutional buyers who bought Lagerfeld art, he intends to mount a public exhibition,” Baca said.

Anyone wondering where the next generation of collectors will come from need not have looked any farther than a 7-year-old girl – picture perfect in a beautiful party dress – who snapped up 12 Lagerfeld sketches ranging in price from $700 to $2,800. “She was encouraged by her very chic mother, who thought her daughter should have some of the sketches for her bedroom wall. She was a very poised young lady and bid aggressively against the adults in the room,” Baca said.

As guests dined on a catered lunch featuring a choice of three bento boxes, with panda-shape cookies and chocolate/pistachio wafers for dessert, the modern design section of the sale commenced. Lot 246, a monumental gold-tone “Sputnik” chandelier with Murano glass spikes led the list of prices realized at $38,400, selling to a Palm Beach collector over the phone. It was a good day for lighting, as another Murano design (Lot 225), dome style and attributed to Barovier & Toso, realized $19,200.

Lot 200, a Paul Evans faceted, chromed metal and mica “Cityscape” cabinet, settled within estimate at $36,000. Two signed items from Vladimir Kagan’s personal collection were offered. Lot 177, a sleek upholstery and chrome sofa achieved $9,000; while Lot 180, a tri-symmetric cocktail table was bid to $7,200.

“We could not have asked for more from this sale,” Baca remarked afterward. “It captured the media’s attention worldwide – even Karl Lagerfeld’s cat, Choupette, blogged about it. With the additional help of the Internet, we had bidders from 15 countries, from Canada to New Zealand. Needless to say, our consignor was very pleased.”

Palm Beach Modern will conduct an Art, Decorative Arts & Modern Design Auction on Saturday, March 22. To contact PBMA, tel. 561-586-5500 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Visit PBMA online at www.modernauctions.com.

View the fully illustrated auction catalog, complete with prices realized, online at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

#   #   #

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE
Monumental ‘Sputnik’ chandelier with Murano spikes, $38,400. Palm Beach Modern Auctions image. Original Karl Lagerfeld sketch of ankle-length dress in 1960s pop colors, signed ‘Elizabeth Taylor Burton,” $2,520. Palm Beach Modern Auctions image. Original Tiziani sketch of black cocktail dress with handwritten notes in the margin, $3,240. Palm Beach Modern Auctions image. Original Tiziani annotated color sketch of an Egyptian-style calf-length dress with faux-jeweled halter, $3,900 to an Internet buyer. Palm Beach Modern Auctions image. Signed Vladimir Kagan upholstery and chrome sofa from the designer’s personal collection, $9000. Palm Beach Modern Auctions image. Paul Evans faceted, chromed metal and mica ‘Cityscape’ cabinet, $36,000. Palm Beach Modern Auctions image. Metal and marble sculpture attributed to Ernest Trova, 41.5in high by 38.75in dia., $10,800. Palm Beach Modern Auctions image. Original sketch portrait signed by Karl Lagerfeld and dated 1964, the subject believed to be Evan ‘Buddy’ Richards, a k a Tiziani, $4,200. Palm Beach Modern Auctions image. 1968 photograph of Elizabeth Taylor signed to Evan ‘Buddy’ Richards (Tiziani) and accompanied by a hand-signed note from Taylor wishing him well with his new collection, $4,800.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 21 January 2014 17:08
 

Pair of ivory figures sells for $45,000 at Ahlers & Ogletree

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Written by Auction House PR   
Friday, 17 January 2014 13:20

This pair of exquisitely carved Chinese antique ivory figures was sold as one lot for $45,000. Ahlers & Ogletree image.

ATLANTA – A pair of exquisitely carved and detailed Chinese antique ivory tusk figures on fitted rectangular bases sold as one lot for $45,000 at a New Year's auction held Jan. 4-5 by Ahlers & Ogletree. The tusks were the top lot in a sale that grossed a little over $1 million. LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

The monumental figures – one of a man, one of a woman, each 35 3/4 inches tall – were depicted at full length and in the round. One showed an emperor with a long wavy beard holding a document in his hands. The other figure was of an empress with eyes closed, holding a ribboned item in one hand and a basket of flowers in the other. Both had a storage box.

Headlining the auction was the collection of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas and Marie Patton of Atlanta.

“New Year’s auctions tend to be strong and this one was no exception,” said Robert Ahlers of Ahlers & Ogletree. “It was refreshing to see such vigor on the part of the bidders. There was a lot of energy, both in the room and online, and I attribute that to the fresh estate merchandise in the auction. That always leads to spirited bidding and we sure had plenty of that.”

Following are additional highlights from the auction. All prices quoted are hammer, exclusive of a sliding scale buyer’s premium.

A dazzling ladies’ diamond necklace featuring two vibrant blue tanzanite stones changed hands for $18,000. The necklace featured a diamond-studded flower bud decoration on a chain leading to a blue circular faceted tanzanite surrounded in diamonds, above another brilliant-cut tanzanite surrounded by diamond accents. The piece had a total diamond weight of 8.38 carats.

An antique hand-woven serapi rug, made circa 1900 and measuring about 9 feet by 14 feet, brought $15,000. A 1921 Steinway & Sons Music Room Model A baby grand piano in an ebonized satinwood case and with a leather tufted piano bench fetched $12,000. A large 19th century French sofa with carved gilt wood undulating frame in the Louis XVI style hit $10,000.

Original artwork did well across the board. A late 16th century oil on canvas work after Michelangelo de Caravaggio (Italian, 1571-1610), titled The Lute Player, 1597 and depicting a bust portrait of a boy musician rose to $13,000; and a finely rendered 19th century Italian School oil on canvas of an active Venetian carnival festival in the manner of Tiepolo breezed to $14,000.

An oil on copper panel depiction of a man with a white beard in knight’s armor in an outdoor setting by Charles-Emile Auguste Carolus-Durand (French, 1837-1917), titled Homme en Armure (Man in Armor) sold for $8,000; and a monumental oil on canvas painting of three nude female beauties as nymphs by Jules Victor Verdier (French, 1861-1926), titled Nymphs, hit $10,000.

In the watches and jewelry category, a Rolex Oyster Perpetual Submariner two-tone watch with a 3-carat diamond bezel around a black face, with a stainless steel watch band, gaveled for $8,500; and an 18-inch-long, 18K yellow gold and diamond necklace with two panther (or leopard) heads with mouths clamped around a diamond-mounted circular ring realized $6,250.

A National Basketball Association 2001 Los Angeles Lakers men’s championship 14k yellow gold ring with two .25 solitaire cut diamonds above 22 solitaire cut accent diamonds, size 11 1/2, achieved $7,000. Also, a circa 1898 English 12-gauge double-barrel shotgun with walnut stock, metal engraving and scrolled foliate decoration commanded $5,500.

Two very different tables each generated much bidder interest. One was a 17th century clockworks constructed from hand blacksmithing, possibly taken from an Italian church and later converted into the base for a rectangular glass-top table ($7,250). The other was an Italian marble table with round dentate patterned top, urn-shaped pedestal and three paw feet ($5,500).

Returning to fine art, an oil on canvas depiction of Still Life With Pears, Apples and Sunflower by British painter Gerald Cooper (1899-1974), 20 inches by 24 inches less the frame, knocked down at $6,000; and a 19th century Continental School four-panel folding screen hand-painted with an idyllic fictitious landscape, each panel 83 inches by 24 inches, sold for $5,500.

For details phone Ahlers & Ogletree at 404-869-2478 or send an email to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

This pair of exquisitely carved Chinese antique ivory figures was sold as one lot for $45,000. Ahlers & Ogletree image.

Diamond necklace with two tanzanite stones, a total diamond weight of 8.38 carats. Price realized: $18,000. Ahlers & Ogletree image.

Steinway & Sons 1921 Music Room Model A baby grand piano in satinwood case. Price realized: $12,000. Ahlers & Ogletree image.

Antique hand-woven serapi rug, made circa 1900, about 9 feet by 14 feet. Price realized: $15,000. Ahlers & Ogletree image.

Nineteenth century Italian School oil rendering of a Venetian carnival festival street scene. Price realized: $14,000. Ahlers & Ogletree image.

Oil on canvas portrait after Michelangelo de Caravaggio, titled ‘The Lute Player, 1597.’ Price realized: $13,000. Ahlers & Ogletree image.

Monumental oil on canvas by Jules Victor Verdier (French, 1861-1926), titled ‘Nymphs.’ Price realized: $10,000. Price realized: Ahlers & Ogletree image.

Last Updated on Friday, 17 January 2014 15:29
 

Collectors take aim at rare Colt pistols, Jan. 11 at Morphy’s

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Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 14 January 2014 15:33

Crate of 20 Model 1884 .45/.70 caliber ‘trapdoor’ rifles previously purchased from Montana National Guard, $34,800. Morphy Auctions image.

DENVER, Pa. – Morphy’s Jan. 11 Firearms sale, anchored by a fine 35-year private collection, grossed $1.8 million and was 100% sold, according to the central Pennsylvania auction company’s CEO, Dan Morphy. Two desirable Colt pistols shared top-lot honors in the 633-lot sale, knocking down $96,000 each. All prices quoted in this report are inclusive of 20% buyer’s premium.

“We knew from the amount of interest shown prior to the sale that it would probably end up being our most successful Firearms sale ever, and that’s exactly what happened,” said Morphy. “There were 2,800 registered bidders, 150 of them in the gallery, which was standing room only. Several of the country’s biggest firearms buyers were bidding, either in person or over the phones, and there were more Internet bidders [through LiveAuctioneers] than we’ve ever had for any Morphy’s gun sale. If I could describe their bidding style as a whole, I’d say it was very confident. It’s been our experience that whenever genuinely rare firearms appear in the marketplace, bidders don’t hesitate. They go for it.”

And “go for it” they did when Lot 146, a Colt production Model 1909 .45 caliber trial pistol, #11 of only 22 manufactured, opened for bidding. Accompanied by a Colt letter of authenticity, it soared to an above-estimate final price of $96,000. A second Colt .45 pistol, entered as Lot 162 and described as a “very early production with Serial #10 and United States Property on the frame,” also achieved $96,000, easily surpassing its $10,000-$20,000 estimate.

Making it a Colt trifecta at the top of prices realized, a Colt production Model 1910 9.8mm test pistol, the first of only four produced for government trials, was offered together with a very scarce box of 9.8mm Colt ammunition. Entered as Lot 147, it secured a winning bid of $90,000.

Lot 154, a .45 caliber Singer .45 caliber pistol was marked “US Property” and “Model 1911A1 U.S. Army.” A rare gun to find on the open market, it sold for $78,000 against an estimate of $15,000-$25,000.

Lot 396, a New Haven Arms production lever-action .41 caliber carbine – a short musket or rifle historically used by cavalry – exhibited a pre-Civil War magazine-loader design that influenced later Henry and Winchester lever-action rifles and carbines. “Firearms of this type are very rarely encountered on the market,” said Morphy Auctions’ general manager, Kris Lee. That statement was borne out by the price realized: $40,800 against an estimate of $15,000-$25,000. Another noteworthy rifle of the antebellum era was Lot 301, a rare Smith-Jennings .54 caliber model with a serial number of 115, achieved $34,800 – more than three times its high estimate.

Lot 389, a handsome Winchester 1886 45/90 caliber WCF Sporting Rifle with a full magazine in its octagon barrel, retained a Winchester letter of authentication and sold well above estimate for $16,200.

A Webley World War I production of the Webley-Fosbery Model 1914 .455 caliber Cordite automatic revolver was entered as Lot 114 and came with a leather holster engraved “Glen C. Holland, Gordon Highlanders,” referring to the famous Scottish Highlands regiment. Estimated at $8,000-$10,000, the antique weapon reached $18,000 at auction.

An unusual entry, Lot 305 consisted of an original armory crate containing 20 Model 1884 “trapdoor” rifles with bayonets in very good to fine condition. The consignor had purchased the crate of weapons from the Montana National Guard. It was offered complete with inserts used to protect the firearms during shipment. The lot was bid to an above-estimate price of $34,800.

“We were extremely pleased with the response to this sale,” said Kris Lee. “Buyers drove and flew in three weeks prior to the sale to preview the collection privately. The week of the auction was so busy we had to race to keep up with the requests for condition reports, questions and showings. It was a great sign that the sale was going to be a success.”

Lee said that after the event concluded, the feedback was “overwhelmingly positive…Many buyers were first-time bidders with us, and they were impressed with our operation and the quality of what we were selling.”

Morphy Auctions’ next Firearms sale will be held on July 19, with Internet live bidding through LiveAuctioneers. Consignments will be accepted until May 12. For additional information, contact Kris Lee at Morphy Auctions by calling 717-335-4570 or emailing This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

View the fully illustrated catalog for Morphy's Jan. 11 Firearms sale, complete with prices realized, at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

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Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

 Crate of 20 Model 1884 .45/.70 caliber ‘trapdoor’ rifles previously purchased from Montana National Guard, $34,800. Morphy Auctions image.

 New Haven Arms production lever-action .42 caliber Volcanic carbine, pre-Civil War magazine loader, $40,800. Morphy Auctions image.

Smith-Jennings .54 caliber rifle, pre-Civil War, $34,800. Morphy Auctions image.

Webley-Fosbery Model 1914 .455 caliber Cordite automatic revolver previously owned by a member of the Gordon Highlanders regiment (Scotland), $18,000. Morphy Auctions image.

Winchester production of the Model 1866 .45/.90 caliber WCF Sporting Rifle, with Winchester letter of authenticity, $16,200. Morphy Auctions image.

Colt production Model 1909 .45 caliber trial pistol, Serial #11 of 22 made, with Colt letter of authenticity, $96,000. Morphy Auctions image.

Colt production Model 1911 .45 caliber pistol, Serial #10, marked ‘United States Property,’ with Colt letter of authenticity, $96,000. Morphy Auctions image.

Singer production Model 1911A1 .45 caliber pistol, marked ‘US Property,’ $78,000. Morphy Auctions image.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 14 January 2014 15:48
 

Qi Baishi painting of rabbits hits $383,500 at Michaan’s

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Written by Auction House PR   
Monday, 13 January 2014 13:40

Qi Baishi (1864-1957), ‘Rabbits Under Osmanthus Tree.’ Price realized: $383,500. Michaan’s Auctions image.

ALAMEDA, Calif. – Michaan’s Fine Asian Works of Art auction on Dec. 15 closed 2013 with a bang, grossing $1,949,260 with an approximate 78 percent sell-through. A Qi Baishi painting titled Rabbits Under Osmanthus Tree (Tian Xiang) soared to $383,500 (lot 5243, $50,000-$70,000). LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

The quintessential work from the painting master of one black and one white rabbit huddling behind an Osmanthus branch was secured by a Shanghainese floor bidder at over five times the high estimate.

“Qi Baishi remains one of the most highly regarded names in the Asian antiquities marketplace; a definitive artist preferred by many collectors. The quality of the painting as well as the acquisition from Mr. and Mrs. Lt. Gen. Yu Pingtung made it an absolutely stellar piece at auction,” said Harry Huang, Asian art specialist at Michaan’s.

Rabbits Under Osmanthus Tree (Tian Xiang) set the stage for a lengthy list of Asian art works to achieve hefty figures. Zhang Daqian’s skillful brush painting titled Bamboo surpassed its $40,000-$60,000 estimate to finish at $118,000 (lot 5245). An album collection of 10 paintings of various insects and flowers followed suit, selling for over eight times projected estimates for $44,250 (lot 5237, $3,000-$5,000). Highlighting the selection of presented scrolls is Zhao Shaoang’s Birds and Flowers, which more than tripled estimates, as it sold for $26,550 (lot 5246, $5,000-$7,000). Fan paintings were also a hit with bidders, with groupings from the Reynold Tom Collection (lots 5241 and 5242) continuing their success at auction (lot 5236, $1,200-$1,800, sold for $16,520; lot 5242, $2,000-$3,000, sold for $14,160; and lot 5241, $2,500-$3,500, sold for $11,800). An offering of 16 woodblock prints by Japanese artist Utagawa Hiroshige also dazzled at a price point over eight times the estimations, selling for $10,030 (lot 5331, $800-$1,200).

A fine coral carving stood at the forefront of the successful decorative lots at auction (lot 5200). The 19th century figural group of Guanyin flanked by two attendants was of a unique branching form and creative composition, proving to be quite an unusual and artistic find. Bidding was fierce from all directions for the standing carving, eventually narrowing down to a lively floor battle. A Bay Area bidder placed the winning bid which culminated in a final sale of $47,200, over five times the given high estimate ($7,000-$9,000).

Rounding out the decorative lots in the sale was a beautifully enameled Chinese export silver punch bowl that realized a price of $29,500 (lot 5161, $4,000-$6,000) as well as a small gilt-silver box adorned with gemstone embellishments and bat and butterfly appliqués (lot 5169, $3,000-$5,000, sold for $22,420). A tripod censer bearing a Jiajing mark stood at the forefront of the cloisonné pieces in the sale (lot 5153, $5,000-$7,000, sold for $23,600) and a cylindrical ivory brush pot from the late Qing Dynasty sold for over five times its given estimates (lot 5186, $1,500-$2,000, sold for $10,030).

Demand for period jades was at a fever pitch, as 12 individual lots sold from anywhere from to to over seven times given estimates. Top sellers included a lot of four 19th century carved bangles that realized a price of $35,400 (lot 5033, $5,000-$7,000), a GIA certified lotus motif pendant for $29,500 (lot 5064, $10,000-$15,000), a white jade carving of a horse at $26,550 (lot 5058, $10,000-$15,000), an archaistic bi-disc for $20,060 (lot 5014, $4,000-$6,000) and a pair of pig carvings from the Han dynasty that amazingly sold for over seven times their estimates (lot 5010) for $15,340.

Chinese porcelains were yet another category to produce fruitful numbers. An outstanding lot was found in a set of 12 famille rose porcelain plaques inset into hanging wood panels. The pieces were listed at an estimate of $4,000-$6,000 and managed to sell for over five times the figures at $32,450 (lot 5269). Additional selections from the Reynold Tom Collection followed, with a pair of famille rose food containers achieving a price over eight times the estimate (lot 5294, $2,000-$3,000, sold for $26,550) and a large, vibrant Doucai charger from the estate that sold for $23,600 (lot 5264, $3,000-$5,000). Finishing the list of top porcelain successes is a pair of grisaille decorated planters (lot 5265, $2,000-$3,000, sold for $17,700), a Reynold Tom Collection famille rose jardiniere (lot 5272, $3,000-$5,000, sold for $11,210) and an ovoid form vase of the Republic Period (lot 5279, $2,000-$3,000, sold for $10,620).

Noteworthy pieces from a range of categories added to the substantial list of auction fortune. A pair of small huanghuali cabinets with intricate latticework realized a price of $38,350 (lot 5206, $3,000-$5,000). Sales from the religious art section saw gilt-bronze figures take off in the form of an eight-armed bodhisattva (lot 5321, $20,000-$30,000), which sold for $32,450, and a Phineus Schwartz Collection depiction of Vajravarahi that more than doubled projections (lot 5308, $3,000-$5,000) which sold for $12,980. A 19th century amber and glass court necklace astounded observers, as it sold for over nine times the given estimates at $29,500 (lot 5072, $2,000-$3,000) and a finely embroidered silk dragon robe tripled estimations at $18,880 (lot 5222, $4,000-$6,000). In addition, eight lots of snuff bottles significantly climbed past projections, with a grouping of three enameled glass pieces from the late Qing Dynasty topping the heap (lot 5113, $900-$1,300, sold for $8,850).

For general information call Michaan’s Auctions at 510-740-0220 ext. 0 or e-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Qi Baishi (1864-1957), ‘Rabbits Under Osmanthus Tree.’ Price realized: $383,500. Michaan’s Auctions image.

Amber and glass court necklace. Price realized: $29,500. Michaan’s Auctions image.

Zhang Daqian (1899-1983), ‘Bamboo,’ 20th century. Price realized: $118,000. Michaan’s Auctions image.

Attributed to Jiang Pu (1708-1761), album of 10 paintings of insects and flowers. Price realized: $44,250. Michaan’s Auctions image.

Large coral figural group, 19th century. Price realized: $47,200. Michaan’s Auctions image.

Cloisonné enamel tripod censor. Price realized: $23,600. Michaan’s Auctions image.

Pair of famille rose lidded food containers. Price realized: $26,550. Michaan’s Auctions image.

Chinese export silver and enameled punch bowl, circa 1900. Price realized: $29,500. Michaan’s Auctions image.

Last Updated on Monday, 13 January 2014 18:04
 
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