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Auction Results in the News

Local collector’s estate propels bidding at AGOPB sale Sept. 23

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Written by Auction House PR   
Friday, 18 October 2013 08:47

Image courtesy of Auction Gallery of the Palm Beaches.

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. – September in South Florida is typically very warm, humid and at the height of hurricane season. So when Auction Gallery of the Palm Beaches Inc. held their Major Fine Art and Antique auction on Sept. 23, the bidding was expected to be hot, but it turned out to be electric. The auction drew over 600 bidders from all over the world. LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

The auction featured several local estates including the estate of Robert H. Murphy, a Palm Beach resident who had some notable and desirable lots. In particular, the Russian bronzes, ivory pieces, Chinese items and fine art were raising the temperatures of the bidders in and out of the saleroom.

Two desirable Russian bronzes commanded interest from the floor, phones and Internet. Lot 128 a work by Evgeni Alexandrovich Lanceray (1848-1886) of Prince Vyazemskii on Horseback with an estimate of $6,000-$8,000 sold for $37,000 to a persistent floor bidder. Brian Kogan, gallery president, remarked, “these pieces from the estate of Robert H. Murphy were expected to draw significant interest and sell well because the pieces were of excellent quality and the estimates were relatively low.” A smaller bronze by Lanceray of an officer on horseback, Lot 106, stormed to $14,400.

Quality Chinese items were aggressively bid on by the phones and Internet. In particular, Lot 291, a rare and unusual bronze ring handle vase with over 500 jeweled diamond, emerald, ruby and sapphire paste stones, that was cataloged as a copy of an imperial Chien Lung vase, made in the late 1930s to ’40s, with Shou symbols had an estimate of $15,000-$20,000 and stormed to $52,400 by an internet bidder on LiveAuctioneers.com.

Demand for European antiques made for the Chinese market is strong and lot 292 a three-piece gilt bronze and cloisonné clock set, attributed to Lievre, and mounted with an ivory lohan, went for $24,000 to a bidder from California. Additionally, lot 290, a Chinese bronze of a Liao Guanyin, 10th century, sold to the phone bidder from England for $14,400, and Lot 215, an exceptional detailed cloisonné enamel snuff bottle with a Chien Lung mark, which blew past the estimate of $3,000-$4,000 and sold for $8,400.

Ivory pieces from the Murphy estate did exceptionally well. Lot 268, a half tusk heavily carved with the immortals battling dragons, 13 inches long, sold for $15,990 to an Internet bidder, and Lot 267, a heavily carved lidded dragon urn along with Lot 269, a pair of 29 1/2-inch-tall Quan-yin goddesses, were fiercely contested and ended up selling for $5,500 and $7,995 respectively to the Internet.

The most surprising lot of the evening was lot 58, a painting by Italian artist Angelo Dall’Oca Bianca (1858-1942) of a mother and children on a shore with fishing boats, which sold for $42,000 to a collector from Verona, Italy, where the artist established a home for the destitute in 1939. Bianca had a celebrated career as an artist exhibiting at the major expositions and as the painter for Queen Margherita (1851-1926). Bianca won the gold medal at the Universale Exposition in Paris in 1900. The painting was consigned by a local man who was trying to sell the work in a consignment shop for considerably less for about a year. After going unsold he decided to restore the painting and was referred to the gallery to sell it at auction. After the auction, the consignor was stunned by the results.

Fine art continues to rebound; in particular, the European paintings in the auction all brought competitive bidding from all the bidding platforms. The phones were all booked for lot 78, a port scene painting by Spanish artist Jose Amat Pages (1901-1991) that climbed to $6,600, and lot 273, a small Jean Dufy (1888-1964) oil on paper from his Circus series, which went to a Beverly Hills phone bidder for $9,600. Lot 273, a Georges Croegaert (1848-1923) intimate cardinal painting, went for $5,250 to an Internet bidder. Additionally, a David Burliuk (1882-1967) interior peasant table scene sold for $7,300 and lot 170, a Chaim Gross (1904-1991) lyrical bronze of three ballet dancers, sold for $3,900.

While furniture and decorations are not faring very well in the market, a few of the lots from the Murphy estate brought solid results. Lot 142, an attractive pair of Louis XVI-style marquis chairs lushly upholstered in royal blue velvet, sold at $4,500; Lot 185, a pair of 18th/19th century French trumeaus missing their tops, sold locally for $3,600; and lot 100, a LaVerne bronze table in the Ming pattern, ended at $3,300. Lot 107, a French 19th century gilded bronze mantel clock, was won by an Internet bidder for $2,700.

Auction Gallery of the Palm Beaches Inc. celebrated their 10th year in June at their 7,000-square-foot gallery in West Palm Beach and over the past decade has developed a reputation for selling quality fine art, antiques and heirloom consignments from South Florida and both coasts in Florida. The gallery holds nine to 10 auctions a year and last year in June was honored to sell the 1991 Kentucky Derby 18K gold trophy for $137,000.

All prices reported include a 20 percent buyer’s premium.

For additional information or consignments contact Brian Kogan or Leslie Baker at 561-805-7115.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

 Image courtesy of Auction Gallery of the Palm Beaches.

Image courtesy of Auction Gallery of the Palm Beaches. 

Image courtesy of Auction Gallery of the Palm Beaches. 

Image courtesy of Auction Gallery of the Palm Beaches. 

Image courtesy of Auction Gallery of the Palm Beaches. 

Image courtesy of Auction Gallery of the Palm Beaches. 

Image courtesy of Auction Gallery of the Palm Beaches. 

Image courtesy of Auction Gallery of the Palm Beaches. 

Last Updated on Friday, 18 October 2013 09:06
 

Jewelry, jades topped Michaan’s Oct. 6 auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 15 October 2013 13:11

Collection of two carved coral bead, cultured pearl, 14K gold necklaces. Sold for: $16,520. Michaan’s Auctions image.

ALAMEDA, Calif. – Michaan’s estate auction of Oct. 6 saw a sales stunner in jewelry lot 318. Two carved coral bead, cultured pearl and 14K gold necklaces were sold to benefit the Lace Museum in Sunnyvale, Calif., and the pieces certainly did not disappoint. Selling for over 23 times the high estimate of $700, the pair of necklaces realized a price of $16,520.

LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

Rhonda Harness, Michaan’s jewelry department director, was thrilled, noting, “I was absolutely wowed. Although coral is a hot item at auction, this could not have been predicted. Perhaps its link to charity helped push the selling price upwards; in any event, I am extremely pleased.”

The Lace Museum and Guild is a nonprofit organization that relies heavily on volunteers and donations. It is one of two museums devoted primarily to lace in the western United States, showcasing an extensive collection of lace and tools.

Jewelry continued to impress throughout the day, with hefty numbers evidenced by jade pieces. The second highest selling lot of the auction was No. 315, a jade, diamond and yellow gold ring that realized a price of $15,340 (est. $15,000-$20,000). A pair of jade, diamond and white gold earrings were also quite successful,  surpassing the high estimate at a final selling price of $10,620 (lot 316, est. $6,000-$8,000).

A carved coral suite (lot 330) sold for $3,245, over six times the high estimate. A coral bead necklace more than quadrupled estimates (lot 328, $300-$400) selling at $1,652. A jade bangle (lot 293) offered at $300-$400 realized $1,416. An unmounted emerald-cut diamond (lot 603) of approximately 1.25 carats more than doubled its high estimate, selling for $1,534.

Fine art realized solid numbers. Peter Ellenshaw’s oil painting titled Dunmore Head (lot 116) sold just shy of six times the high estimate at $3,540.

Also noteworthy were two Asian lots. An agate brush washer (lot 422, $400-600, $1,652) and a pair of blue and white dishes (lot 437, $400-$600, $1,416) both more than doubled high estimates.

For general information call Michaan’s Auctions at 510-740-0220 ext. 0 or e-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Collection of two carved coral bead, cultured pearl, 14K gold necklaces. Sold for: $16,520. Michaan’s Auctions image.

Jade, diamond, 14K white gold ring. Sold for $15,340. Michaan’s Auctions image.

Peter Ellenshaw (British 1913-2007) ‘Dunmore Head,’ oil on canvas, 29 x 47 inches. Sold for $3,540. Michaan’s Auctions image.

Gregory Kurasov (Russian Federation b. 1958), ‘American Beauty, No 177,’ oil on canvas. Sold for $3,540. Michaan’s Auctions image.

Duilio Bamabe, two contemporary Italian abstract floral reverse paintings on glass, signed ‘Dube Fontana Arte.’ Sold for $2,950. Michaan’s Auctions image.

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Last Updated on Thursday, 17 October 2013 12:42
 

British Colonial coins exceed expectations at Baldwin's auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Monday, 14 October 2013 16:55

This British West Africa George V brass 2-shilling, thought to be one of only two still in existence, sold for £12,000. Baldwin’s image.

LONDON – Sept. 26 was the final official Coinex auction and the start of a new adventure by Baldwin’s with the first part of the Arielle Collection of British Colonial Coins going under the hammer. This first sale featured the most comprehensive collection of coins of British Africa to have been offered for many years.

LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

In Randy Weir’s introduction to the catalog he suggested that, “The price you pay is quickly forgotten when you win the ‘must have’ coin that you have been chasing for years.” A roomful of eager bidders that had flown in from all over the world to witness this remarkable event, obviously had this in mind, resulting in a ‘white glove’ auction with all 818 lots selling for a total of £505,092.

Lots were offered in geographical order and the auction opened with coins from British West Africa. Although the area has not been extensively studied, lots sold well, achieving solid prices across the board. Lot 3202, however, set the bidders alight. This remarkable George V, brass 2-shilling survived the economic hardship of 1929 when 22 million of these coins were melted down. Thought to be one of only two still in existence, it is clear why this semi-prooflike coin ultimately sold for an outstanding £12,000.

The last section of the sale focused on the coinage of Zanzibar, a country that has a very limited history of coinage prior to 1882 when Sultan Barghash began to issue coins. The only gold coin in the section; Lot 3694 a very fine Sultan Barghash idb Sa’id, gold 5-riyals attracted a lot of attention selling for £19,200, double the estimate. Struck in Belgium at the Brussels mint, the 5-ryials was the largest denomination minted under Sultan Barghash, the second Sultan of Zanzibar and one of only two gold coins. During this period the Sultan controlled much of the East Coast of Africa and trading routes, but was targeted by the British and German powers from 1886 onwards for control of the area. Inscribed in Arabic this gold 5-riyals is not just a coin of beauty, but a rare survival from Zanzibar that achieved a worthy and superb price.

Two additional noteworthy lots were a George V farthing, 1928, South Africa (H S7), which sold for £3,600, and a Rhodesia silver proof set, 1939, consisting of a 3-pence, 6-pence, shilling, 2-shillings and half-crown (KM PS3), which brought £7,200.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

 This British West Africa George V brass 2-shilling, thought to be one of only two still in existence, sold for £12,000. Baldwin’s image.

 Rare South Africa George V trail/pattern silver florin, dated 1921. Price realized £13,200. Baldwin’s image.

British West Africa George V, brass pattern 3-pence, 1920KN. Price realized: £3,600. Baldwin’s image. 

Sierra Leone silver proof dollar, 1791, official mintage of only 40. Price realized: £7,200. Baldwin’s image. 

 Gold Cost silver pattern 1⁄2-ackey, 1818, head of George III on reverse. Price realized: £2,880. Baldwin’s image.

Gold Cost silver proof ackey, 1818. Price realized: £5,280. Baldwin’s image. 

South Africa, Orange free state nickel-plated pattern penny, 1888V, estimated mintage of only 20. Price realized: £5,760. Baldwin’s image. 

East Africa George V silver 50-cents/shilling, 1920A, struck in very limited quantities. Price realized: £4,320. Baldwin’s image. 

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 15 October 2013 10:38
 

Bidding for lapis lazuli mountain climbs to $72,500 at Kaminski

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Written by Auction House PR   
Monday, 14 October 2013 14:07

The top sale price at the Sept. 21 auction was $72,500 for this carved lapis lazuli mountain. Kaminski Auctions image.

BEVERLY, Mass. – From exquisite jade and lapis lazuli, to huanghuali furniture and exceptional watercolor works, Kaminski Auctions Fine Asian Art and Antiques sale on Sept. 21 saw many lots sell far above original expectations. Internet live bidding was provided by LiveAuctioneers.com.

Selling at a final price of $72,500, the top lot of the day was a lapis lazuli mountain, carved in the form of a mountain with a coastal village scene with a gilt poem on the reverse. The highly intricate carving includes forms of small figures among houses and gnarled trees. The quality of carving sets this piece apart from other examples of worked lapis lazuli, as does its provenance. The piece was originally made in the 18th or 19th century, and then came into the collection of Zhang Guohe, a noted collector and dignitary who often collected pieces directly from the artists and their descendants.

Also among the top lots were four watercolor paintings from the collection of Zhang. All four paintings carry a personal dedication to the collector from the artist. The highest grossing of these was a mountain landscape by artist Lu Yan Shao, which sold for $38,000. A second work by the artist, also depicting a landscape, sold for $21,000. Other paintings from the collection included works by Li Xioncai and Dong Shou Ping, both important players in the development of 20th century Chinese paintings. The waterfall painting signed Li Xioncai fetched $26,000, while Dong Shou Ping’s study of bamboo sold for $29,000.

Carved jade pieces also performed well with multiple pieces selling for over $10,000. One Imperial jade dog ornament with a carved gilt Qianlong character in gilt reached a final hammer price of $16,000. The top selling jade piece of the day was a set of 13 jade belt plaques, with scrolling and dragon designs that sold for $19,000.

A gilt bronze Buddha figure carved on a double lotus base and seated in the bhumisparsha mudra position from the 17th or 18th century sold for $31,000. Carved furniture also performed well in the sale, with an 18th century zitan table selling for $14,000, and a pair of huanghuali chairs from the same century fetching $21,000.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

The top sale price at the Sept. 21 auction was $72,500 for this carved lapis lazuli mountain. Kaminski Auctions image.

KChinese watercolor painting signed Lan Shao. Kaminski Auctions image.

Set of 13 jade belt plaques. Kaminski Auctions image. Kaminski Auctions image.

Kaminski Auctions image.

Chinese Ming gilt bronze Buddha. Kaminski Auctions image.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 15 October 2013 09:37
 

Bellflower jug rings up $5,463 at Jeffrey S. Evans glass sale

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Written by Auction House PR   
Monday, 14 October 2013 13:32

Bellflower double vine pint jug/cream pitcher, of colorless lead glass, attibuted to M’Kee & Brothers, third quarter, 19th century 6 1/2 inches, sold for $5,463. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

MT. CRAWFORD, Va. – Bellflower pattern articles proved the big hit at Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates’ auction of 18th and 19th century glass including Early American Pattern Glass, on Sept. 28. The auction was held in conjunction with the regional meeting of the EAPG club, thus enriching meeting goers’ knowledge with an auction of wide-ranging interest to glass enthusiasts.

LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

High price of the 1151-lot sale was lot 311, a Bellflower double-vine pint jug or cream pitcher of colorless lead glass, the straight-sided body with an upper shoulder and applied solid handle, which sold for $5,463 against the estimate of $2,000-$3,000. Attributed to M’Kee & Brothers and dating to the third quarter of the 19th century, the pitcher stands 6 1/2 inches high. A brilliant deep cobalt blue lead glass Bellflower spoon holder, probably from New England, realized $3,335, right in the middle of its $3,000-$4,000 estimate. Many other Bellflower pattern items realized strong prices.

A diminutive Loop pattern vase, of medium violet, with a gauffered seven-petal rim and lower compressed knop extension, on a raised octagonal baluster-form standard and square base, probably by Boston & Sandwich Glass Co., made in the mid-19th century, sold for $1,610 against estimates of $600-$900. Several collectors found the color and scale irresistible.

Other colored glass items reached strong prices. A blown-molded GI-29 quart carafe, strong bluish green, exhibiting a barrel-from body with paneled shoulder, molded ring, plain neck under flanged mouth, sold for $3,738, within the $3,000-$5,000 price range (lot 15), while a Greentown No. 450 Holly Amber cake stand, in golden agate color, by the Indiana Tumbler & Goblet Co., circa 1903, sold for $2,990 against the $300-$500 estimate (Lot 725).

After the auction, Jeffrey S. Evans said, “The American glass market continues its rollercoaster ride of high and low prices. Today’s collectors are presented with a great buying opportunity in numerous glass categories. More and more people are recognizing this rare chance and taking advantage. Because of this I see prices beginning a slow, but hopefully steady rebound in the near future.”

For details call 540-434-3939.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Bellflower double vine pint jug/cream pitcher, of colorless lead glass, attibuted to M’Kee & Brothers, third quarter, 19th century 6 1/2 inches, sold for $5,463. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

Bellflower single vine spoon holder, brilliant deep cobalt blue lead glass, scallop and point plain-band rim, Probably New England, third quarter 19th century. Price realized: $3,335. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

Pressed loop diminutive vase, medium violet, the deep conical bowl with a gauffered, seven-petal rim, probably Boston & Sandwich Glass Co., 1840-1860, sold for $1,610 due to strong demand for its hue, size and shape. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

Blown-molded GI-29 quart carafe, strong bluish green, realized $3,738. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

A Greentown No. 450/Holly Amber cake stand in Golden Agate by the Indiana Tumbler & Goblet Co., circa 1903, soared to $2,990. It measured 5 3/8 inches high by 9 1/4 inches diameter. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

Last Updated on Monday, 14 October 2013 14:02
 

Teapots, Royal Bonn bolster Jeffrey S. Evans auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Friday, 11 October 2013 16:25

Chinese red pottery pewter-clad teapot and cover with jade handle, spout and finial to cover, 4 3/4 inches high, 1790-1840, sold for $3,450. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image

MT. CRAWFORD, Va. – A Royal Bonn three-part jardinière on stand, sold for $4,600, the highest price achieved at Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates’ 19th and 20th Century Auction of Ceramics on Oct. 1. A collector from the Midwest liked the red-brown ground color, often thought of as somewhat less desirable than a pastel-colored ground. Estimated at $800-$1,200, the jardinière was the focus of a bidding duel between the Midwesterner and a Virginia collector.

LiveAuctioneer.com provided Internet live bidding.

Among American Arts and Crafts offerings, a Rookwood experimental vase by Sara Alice “Sallie” Toohey, modeled with swirls of water and built-up slip to the waist, and painted in delicate shades of blue and sea-green, sold for $1,380, just over the high estimate of $800-$1,200.

The first Teapot Extravaganza was a large portion of this auction, with over 300 lots of teapots. This global sale included a small but very good selection of Chinese Export teapots, including several pewter-clad examples that realized between $3,450 and $2,415 against estimates of $400-$600 and $300-$500, respectively.

The highlight of the 20th Century studio ceramics offerings was a set of six stoneware tenmoku-glazed footed tea bowls, probably by Shoji Hamada, from the estate of Beate Sirota Gordon. These sold for $4,313 to an English collector against a live Internet bidder.

Jill Fenichell, Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates’ vice president of ceramics, said, “I’m impressed with how well our sale did, considering that this area is new for our auction house. Great material, described accurately, found its market. We already have about one-third of next year’s sale in-house, including the second annual Teapot Extravaganza, so we will repeat the emphasis on 20th Century ceramics next autumn.”

For details call Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates at 540-434-3939.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Chinese red pottery pewter-clad teapot and cover with jade handle, spout and finial to cover, 4 3/4 inches high, 1790-1840, sold for $3,450. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image

Royal Bonn jardinière and stand, 50 inches, realized $4,600, the high price of the 20th Century Ceramics auction. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

Rookwood vellum-glazed experimental vase, 17 3/8 inches, decorated with boats by Sara Alice ‘Sallie’ Toobey, sold for $1,380. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

Japanese studio pottery group of six stoneware tenmoku-glazed footed tea bowls, Mashiko-area, attributed to Shoji Hamada, 3 3/16 inches high, sold for $4,313.

Last Updated on Monday, 14 October 2013 13:37
 

Coburn abstract painting tops Kaminski Modern auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Friday, 11 October 2013 10:24

This abstract painting by the American artist Ralph Coburn fetched $9,000. Kaminski image.

BEVERLY, Mass. – With over 600 lots, Kaminski’s 20th Century Modern Auction on Sept. 22 saw the successful sale of a wide variety of fine art, sculpture and furnishings.

LiveAucitoneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

The top lot of the day was an abstract painting by the American artist Ralph Coburn, which fetched $9,000 against an original estimate of $1,500 to $2,500. The painting captures well Cobern’s characteristic use of simple colors and dynamic geometric compositions. Coburn is an important figure in the development of modern art in Boston. Trained at MIT and at the Museum School at the MFA, Cobern has been featured in exhibits at both the Cape Ann Art Museum and the Museum of Fine Arts Boston.

Paintings from contemporary New England artist Scott Prior and American Pop artist James Rizzi also performed well. Sold as lot 8100, Prior’s hyper-realistic scene of a New England landscape behind a house, titled Backyard Barbeque, sold well above its high estimate for $4,600. James Rizzi’s colorful work, One Man’s Floor is Another Man’s Ceiling, also attracted many absentee and phone bidders, and represents the kind of work for which he is most known. The multilayered print of anthropomorphic city buildings was hammered down at $2,300 and sold to an online bidder.

A Freideberg cat clock also attracted many bidders’ interest. In Pedro Friedeberg’s work, one sees the sensibilities of a surrealist artist translated into furniture and decorative items. The cat clock features an feline torso supported by two hominid feet. The torso, in turn, backs a clock face with each hour designated by a hand displaying the appropriate number of fingers. In this way, the cat clock captures the same absurd and playful combination of body parts seen in Friedeberg’s most famous piece, Hand Foot Chair. Estimated at $3,000-$5,000, the clock sold for $4,250.

A four-panel Fornasetti screen was also among the top lots of the day. The screen, estimated at $6,000-$8,000, depicts a trompe l’oeil scene of an eclectic library bookshelf on one side and images of stringed instruments on the reverse. With many bidders vying to own the exceptional piece, the screen reached its high estimate of $8,000.

Of the furniture offered in the sale, bidders seemed most drawn to a coffee table from the designer Max Kuehe. The silver leaf and polychrome table features a delicate depiction of white petaled flowers inscribed into the surface. Estimated at a conservative $1,500 to $2,500, the table sold to an online bidder for $5,500.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

 This abstract painting by the American artist Ralph Coburn fetched $9,000. Kaminski image.

 James Rizzi’s ‘One Man’s Floor is Another Man’s Ceiling’ sold for $2,300. Kaminski image.

‘Backyard Barbeque’ by Scott Prior. Price realized: $4,600. Kaminski image. 

Pedro Friedeberg cat clock. Price realized: $4,250. Kaminski image.

Last Updated on Friday, 11 October 2013 11:24
 

Meissen urns enjoy royal returns at $2.2M Cottone auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Friday, 11 October 2013 09:43

The top lot of the auction was this spectacular pair of antique Meissen armorial covered urns, which sold for $201,250. Cottone Auctions image.

GENESEO, N.Y. – A spectacular pair of antique Meissen armorial covered urns sailed past their high estimate of $15,000 to gavel for $201,250 at a Fall Fine Art & Antiques Auction held Oct. 4-5 by Cottone Auctions. The urns were the top lot in an auction that grossed $2.2 million.

LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

No doubt driving up the final price was the fact that the Meissen pieces were made to commemorate a member of the Saxon royal house, with a portrait and coat of arms that probably represented Carola von Vasa (1833-1907), the Princess of Sweden and Queen of Saxony. She and her husband, King Albert (1828-1902), often gave Meissen objects as diplomatic presents.

Each urn stood 33 inches tall and was intricately decorated with figures, insects, flowers, cherubs, crowns and gold leaf. Only some minor loss and repairs prevented them from realizing even more. Meissen, enormously popular with collectors, was Europe’s first porcelain factory, founded in 1708. Costly to produce, Meissen was originally made solely for the very wealthy.

Around 200 people per day packed Cottone’s showroom, while another 3,000 or so registered to bid online.

Hundreds of absentee bids were also recorded. It was a successful auction, the most important event on Cottone’s busy fall calendar.

“Our strategy of sticking with fresh, quality merchandise, and offering it without reserve with conservative estimates, has been a winning formula for us,” said Matt Cottone of Cottone Auctions. “The bottom line is, it’s all about the merchandise, and we’ve been fortunate to have attracted some of the finest estates and collections in the area. This auction was a great example.”

Following are additional highlights from the auction. All prices quoted include a 15 percent buyer’s premium.

The Oct. 4 session was dedicated to sterling silver, Asian objects and fine estate jewelry. The top earners from the Asian category were a Chinese Kylin standing temple censer, cast bronze with cloisonné and gilt highlights, 15 inches tall, which sold for $50,600; a 19th century Chinese red lacquer cinnabar scroll case, $39,100; and a carved jade plaque with trees and foliage, $39,100.

A Frederick Carder clear and cobalt blue intarsia bowl from the Strong Museum, 5 3/4 inches in diameter and signed by Carder, sold for $8,050 to benefit the Strong’s collections fund. Frederick Carder (1863-1963) was a renowned British glassmaker who founded the Steuben Glassworks in New York in 1903. He served as the firm’s art director and designer for 50 years.

A 1954 Rolls-Royce Silver Wraith James Young Sports Saloon with six-cylinder engine and in excellent running condition, sped off for $48,300. The vehicle, with an all-aluminum body and just 39,000 miles on the odometer, came with pedigree and provenance. Its first owner was Wykeham Stanley, England’s Second Baron of Cornwallis. Other features of the black and silver car included right-hand drive, rear division window, a bar, tan interior and burl walnut trimwork.

A pair of mixed media works by the Brazilian artist Arthur Luiz Piza (b. 1928) went for $46,000 and $48,000. The artworks, framed and in original condition, were both signed lower right by Piza, who today lives and works in Paris, where he moved to in 1955. There, he became expert in the techniques of etching and aquatint. Later on he devoted himself to burin engraving.

Rounding out the auction’s top lots, a marble Roman torso from the second century, 20 inches high and pulled from the private collection of John Ritter, who bought it in the 1960s, garnered $86,250; and an early Delft charger with polychrome rooster decoration, 13 inches in diameter, attained $25,875.

Cottone Auctions is always seeking quality consignments for future sales. To consign an item, an estate or a collection, call 585-243-3100 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

The top lot of the auction was this spectacular pair of antique Meissen armorial covered urns, which sold for $201,250. Cottone Auctions image.

Chinese Kylin standing temple censer, cast bronze with cloisonné and gilt highlights, 15 inches tall. Price realized: $50,600. Cottone Auctions image.

The Asian objects category featured this 19th century Chinese red lacquer cinnabar scroll case. Price realized: $39,100. Cottone Auctions image.

1954 Rolls-Royce Silver Wraith James Young Sports Saloon car with just 39,000 miles on the odometer. Price realized: $48,300. Cottone Auctions image.

A pair of mixed media works by the Brazilian artist Athur Luiz Piza (b. 1928), including this one, realized $46,000 and $48,000. Cottone Auctions image.

Marble Roman torso from the second century, 20 inches tall, from the private collection of John Ritter. Price realized: $86,250. Cottone Auctions image.

Antique Chinese carved jade plaque with trees and foliage. Price realized: $39,100. Cottone Auctions image.

Last Updated on Friday, 11 October 2013 10:16
 

Baldwin's sells British India coins for princely sum: $1.9M

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Written by Auction House PR   
Thursday, 10 October 2013 13:18

This Tipu Sultan gold 4-pagodas from Mysore sold for £22,200. Baldwin’s image.

LONDON - A roomful of enthusiastic bidders found fierce competition from buyers on the Internet, and on the phone, as they fought to take home part of the celebrated David Fore Collection of Indian Coins, offered by Baldwin’s on Sept. 25-26. LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

This concluding two-day auction was well received and in a buoyant market lots achieved some fabulous and worthy prices. The sale total reached £1,189,032 ($1,899,372) inclusive of the buyers premium, which brought the final total for the three auctions to a stunning £3,370,397 ($5,383,561), reflecting the dedication of the passionate collector and numismatist who brought it together, and the reception it has received from the numismatic world.

Coins from the Princely States proved extremely popular, with the highest prices coming from this section. Lot 1618, a Tipu Sultan gold 4-Pagodas from Mysore shone as the star of day one. This extremely fine coin was struck at the most prolific of Mysore mint-towns, Patan, in southern India, under Tipu Sultan. Tipu Sultan was a ruler who set himself as a fierce rival to the British and although called “The Tiger of Mysore,” produced vast quantities of coinage with beauty and quality. The fine Persian inscriptions on both sides include the name of the denomination “Ahmadi” (another name for the Prophet Muhammad) as well as the date, in both the Mauludi era and also in Tipu’s new abtath system. John Henderson, writer of The Coins of Haider Ali & Tipu Sultan states that “The Tipu Sultan gold and silver pieces afford indisputable testimony to the decorative value of the Arabic script.” In the case of this coin, when coupled with its preservation and tone, the stunning script makes its numismatic and artistic value unquestionable. Against a conservative estimate of £6,000 this beautiful example achieved £22,200 (inc. buyers premium).

Auctioneers Seth Freeman and Graham Byfield, drove a receptive room as strong bidding on coins from the East India Co. tried to compete with the prices achieved for the Princely States. Lot 2009, a rare Bombay Presidency, gold mohur, in the name of “Alamgir II” from the Mumbai mint achieved £12,000 and along with Lot 2130, an extremely fine and rare Madras Presidency gold mohur, Chinapatan, in the name of Muhammad Shah, were the crowning pieces in a strong afternoon session.

Day two brought yet another burst of excited bidders as coins from British and Portuguese India, errors and tokens sold well over estimate. Despite a few light marks, Lot 2305, an extremely fine and toned silver half rupee, circa 1880 depicting ‘Victoria Empress’ on the obverse attracted much attention selling for £10,800. Other silver half rupees from the British India section also proved to be in demand with lot 2299 selling for £7,800 and lot 2323 achieving £10,560.

Baldwin’s British Indian coin consultant and principal cataloger of the David Fore Collection, Randy Weir, commented after the auction:

“It has been a long and exciting road selling this collection, and both David and I are absolutely delighted with the results. We hope that the dispersal of this collection will provide a few key pieces for existing collections and serve as inspiration for those budding numismatists interested in the series. It is a great credit to the Baldwin’s team that this collection has been so successful and the prices achieved further cement Baldwin’s standing at the forefront of the Indian numismatic scene.”

Baldwin’s reported that 33 percent of the total lots were purchased online, contributing 34 percent of the total hammer price.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

This Tipu Sultan gold 4-pagodas from Mysore sold for £22,200. Baldwin’s image. 

Extremely fine and toned silver half rupee, circa 1880, depicting  ‘Victoria Empress’ on the obverse. Price realized: £10,800. Baldwin’s image. 

Cooch Behar, Jitendra Narayan (1913-1922), gold mohur, CB 404 (1914). Price realized: £19,200. Baldwin’s image. 

Jaipur, Nazarana gold mohur, 1887, Year 8, struck in the names of Victoria and Madho Singh (1880-1922). Price realized: $13,200. Baldwin’s image. 

Tehri Garhwal, Sudarshan Shah (VS 1872-1906; AD 1815-1859), machine-struck gold mohur, extremely fine and very rare. Price realized: £19,200. Baldwin’s image. 

Travancore, Rama Varma V (ME 1057-1062; 1880-1885 AD), gold half sovereign, ME 1057/AD 1881. Price realized: £15,600. Baldwin’s image. 

Last Updated on Thursday, 10 October 2013 13:55
 
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