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Nevinson drawing sets record at Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

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Written by Auction House PR   
Thursday, 26 December 2013 14:23

‘La Geurre des Trous’ (the War of Holes) by Christopher Nevinson sold for £136,400 ($223,964), setting a record for the artist. Dreweatts & Bloomsbury image.

LONDON – A poignant World War I drawing by Christopher Nevinson, official War Artist for the British Government, set a new world record for a work on paper by the artist at Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auction’s sale of Modern and Contemporary Prints on Dec. 11. It was purchased by a by a private collector in New York for £136,400 ($223,964), breaking the record already held by the auctioneer.

Alexander Hayter, international head of modern and contemporary art at Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions commented: “We are absolutely delighted to have again broken the world record for a work by Nevinson on paper. In December 2012 we set the record for his drawing, ‘On the Road to Ypres,’ which sold for £111,600 ($183,239). The price achieved on Wednesday for a work by this remarkable artist shows that we still lead the market for the sale of Nevinson’s work.”

La Geurre des Trous (the War of Holes) by the futurist/vorticist artist was a moving tribute to the troops by an artist who was deeply affected by his experience caring for injured French soldiers as a member of the Friends' Ambulance Unit, during the war. Arguably the finest work on paper by the artist to have appeared at auction in a generation, the drawing depicts the soldiers’ anticipation, presumably in the moment before they exited the trench. By portraying French soldiers, Nevinson was able to reveal the grim side of the war while dodging government restrictions placed on imagery of active British servicemen.

The pen and ink, and brush and ink, drawing was done in 1914/15 possibly at Woesten, just North-West of Ypres, where Nevinson was stationed in November 1914.

Christopher Martin, a specialist on works by Nevinson, said: “Nevinson wrote of intending to give his pictures of that time an abstract, dynamic and mental impression rather than a concrete, static or optical. The abstract quality is seen in the shaping of the earth around the trench in this drawing, and generally in other drawings related to Nevinson’s war paintings.”

A Nevinson etching titled The Thames from Blackfriars also achieved a solid price of £39,680 ($65,153) against an estimate of £15,000-£20,000. It was almost certainly the largest intaglio work by the artist and was based on a painting currently part of the Courtauld Collection, London.

Elsewhere in the sale, a rare and integral part of the last great series of works produced by American pop artist Roy Lichtenstein, a screenprint titled Two Nudes realized a strong price of £124,000 ($203,600). Of the recent impressions offered at auction, this example was in the best condition and was purchased on the telephone by a London-based private collector.

Based on love and girls in comic books, The Nudes series, begun in the spring of 1993, are some of the largest the artist ever produced. Completed in December that year, they reflect the artist's fascination of the interplay between the two-dimensionality of the drawn image, and the three-dimensional effect created by the application of variably sized ben-day dots. The effect in Two Nudes is particularly successful, giving a genuine sense of depth to the image.

In an interview in 1997 with David Sylvester, Lichtenstein said: "It's a little bit the way chiaroscuro isn't just shadows but a way of combining the figure and the background, or whatever is near it in a dark area… You're not confined to the object pattern, but the subject matter excuse for this is that it's a shadow, and that's interesting to me."

Another Lichtenstein print, Sunrise attracted a great deal of interest. Signed by the artist, the 1965 offset lithograph printed in color sold for £5,952 ($9,773).

American artist Cy Twombly is known for his large-scale calligraphic style paintings, and an untitled print, signed in pencil by the artist, sold for £32,240 ($52,937). Two European and one American bidder battled on the telephone to secure the picture, with it being purchased ultimately by the buyer from New York. The 1969/71 screenprint in colors was an artist’s proof from an edition of 100, published by Edition Domberger, Stuttgart. Twombly served in the Army as a cryptologist and this influence can be seen clearly in this example, as in much of his other work.

Since his death in July 2011, Twombley’s work has been keenly sought by collectors.

“This print was part of a series very rarely sold as separate pieces. They are of particular interest because they are very similar to his paintings and, a premium is always paid for examples in rare and perfect condition,” said Hayter.

A selection of prints by Andy Warhol achieved strong prices, most notably, Red Lenin, a 1987 screeenprint in color. Signed in pencil by Frederick Hughes, the executor of Warhol’s estate, and numbered 14/24 on a stamped certificate of authenticity, it sold for £32,240 ($52,937) against an estimate of £15,000-£20,000.



ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE

‘La Geurre des Trous’ (the War of Holes) by Christopher Nevinson sold for £136,400 ($223,964), setting a record for the artist. Dreweatts & Bloomsbury image. 

Roy Lichtenstein screenprint titled 'Two Nudes' brought £124,000 ($203,600). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury image. 

Last Updated on Thursday, 26 December 2013 17:37
 

Dreweatts & Bloomsbury sells 18th century thangka for £522,000

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Written by Auction House PR   
Thursday, 19 December 2013 15:55
Sino-Tibetan thangka of Milarepa, 18th century. Price realized: £522,000 ($854,735). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image. LONDON – Telephone bidders battled with stiff competition in the room to secure the 18th century Sino-Tibetan thangka of Milarepa in Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions’ Asian Art sale Nov. 11. The scene of a yogi painted on silk sold for £522,000 ($854,735).

LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

Described as a piece of sublime beauty, tranquillity and ecstatic clarity by auction Dreweatts & Bloomsbury specialist Dr. Benedetta Mottino, the unique qualities of the thangka were universally acknowledged in its selection as one of the 10 highlights shortlisted for the “outstanding work of art” on sale during Asian Art in London.

Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions relaunched their Asian art department in 2012 with the appointment of Mottino, a respected academic. While the broader market for Asian works of art has become considerably more selective, Asian Art in London continues to provide a showcase for the highest quality objects and is a strong draw for collectors and dealers alike.

“We are very pleased with the results of our inaugural sale during Asian Art in London. The Sino-Tibetan Thangka was of course the highlight of the sale, though a number of other lots also achieved remarkable five figure prices,” said Stephan Ludwig, Dreweatts and Bloomsbury Auctions executive chairman.

Over 80 percent of the lots in the auction found buyers for a premium-inclusive sale total of £810,000.

Other noteworthy results in the sale include a finely embroidered 19th century Chinese Imperial consort’s formal court robe sold for £43,400 ($56,328) and an 18th century Chinese jade censer sold for £17,360 ($28,427).

From the Meiji period, a rare Meiji period Kinkozan Satsuma vase by Sozan, arguably one of the most sought after Satsuma artists and creator of finest Kinkozan works, sold for £37,200 ($60,914).

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE
Sino-Tibetan thangka of Milarepa, 18th century. Price realized: £522,000 ($854,735). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image. Chinese Imperial apricot-ground, consort’s formal court robe jifu, 19th century, embroidered in counted stitch with nine embroidered dragons. Price realized: £43,400 ($56,328). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image. A Japanese Kinkozan Satsuma vase by Sozan, Meiji period. Price realized: £37,200 ($60,914). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image. A painting of Boshisattva Avalokitesvara, walking on a lotus pond with a large halo behind him. Price realized: £28,000 (hammer price). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image. Chinese jade censer, 18th century, of compressed globular form, the handles shaped as mythical face masks. Price realized: £14,000 (hammer price). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.
Last Updated on Thursday, 19 December 2013 16:33
 

Finnish modernist floor lamps shine at Woodbury Auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Thursday, 19 December 2013 13:52
Finnish brass floor lamps, Paavo Tynell. Price realized: $58,800. Woodbury Auction image. WOODBURY, Conn. – Nine phone bidders and multiple Internet bidders competed for an unusual pair of Finnish modernist brass floor lamps that sold for $58,800 in Woodbury Auction’s annual Holiday Fine Estates Auction on Dec. 8. LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

The lamps were designed by Paavo Tynell (1890-1973) around 1950 and were produced by Taito. The stylish lamps each have six lights, two wirework finials over oval shades with cutout star ornamentation on two crossed supports and round bases. The lamps were stamped on top of the fixture with conjoined double "T" logo, "Taito NM 713 B made in Finland," 70 1/2 inches high, 19 1/2 inches wide. According to Thomas Schwenke of Woodbury Auction LLC, “the lot opened on the Internet, and all phones were bidding actively up to about $25,000, with three phone contenders continuing to bid competitively until the winning phone bidder claimed the lot for $49,000 hammer.”

Top lot of the several silver lots in the sale was a Tiffany & Co. sterling silver service for 12 in the Wave Edge pattern, circa 1891, presented together with four additional Tiffany hollow ware items. The service, 198.5 troy ounces, fetched $11,700. The service items and hollow ware were presented in the original Tiffany & Co. custom sycamore and brass mounted case, circa 1891, with paneled hinged top and lower long drawer, the top with brass plaque "Mr. & Mrs. Frederick Littlefield from JA and AH Morris Dec 25th 1891,” also with brass Tiffany & Co. label in interior. The items were given as a wedding gift from A.H. Morris, a prominent racehorse breeder, to jockey Frederick Littlefield, who rode Refund to his 1888 Preakness victory and Bowling Brook to win the 1898 Belmont Stakes.

The sale began with the rare 19th century Tibetan gilt bronze seated figure of Tara, cataloged as lot no. 1, which peaked at $31,250 to an Internet bidder. The figure had been consigned from descendants of Edmund C. Tarbell, the noted American impressionist painter, and had an incised Dorje symbol on base. Schwenke commented that “virtually all the bidding was Internet based, with the lot opening at $13,000 on the Internet and continuing until one Internet bidder prevailed.”

The sale included almost 100 lots of Asian decorative arts, including bronzes, woodblock prints, kimonos, jades, porcelains and netsukes. The second-highest lot of the sale was a Ming dynasty blue and white footed bowl on stand, consigned by a Long Island estate, which surprised at $38,750 to a determined internet bidder in China.

Two additional Asian lots consigned by the Tarbell descendants fared well. A rare Japanese woodblock print by Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849) Drum Bridge at Kameido Tenjin in Shrine from the series Rare Views of Famous Bridges in All the Provinces, sold to an internet bidder for $2,500 against an estimate of $1,000-$1,500, and a group of three Chinese silk embroidered robes, circa 1900, fetched a strong $3,375 to another Internet bidder, those carrying a presale estimate of $400.

Four Chinese amber colored hard-stone seals, 19th/20th century, one with a carved elephant, and three with carved fu lions, also jumped beyond estimate, selling on the Internet for $5,300 to an Asian buyer.

Jewelry lots saw active competition, with several yellow and white gold jewelry items crossing the block in price ranges from $600 to $2,800. The top jewelry lot, however, was a Chinese 18K white gold jade and diamond pendant, 19th/20th century, depicting Guanyin, having a suspension loop mounted with rose cut diamond, marked 750 on loop, approximately 2 inches high by one-half inch wide, which was claimed for $4,250 by an Asian bidder from England, bidding in person in the room.

Top furniture lot of the sale was a fine South German baroque walnut veneered pine three-drawer commode, mid 18th century, with crossbanded serpentine top above similarly shaped drawers, raised on a scalloped base and bracket feet, 32 1/2 inches high, 44 inches wide, 24 inches deep, which sold to a phone bidder from New York City for $3,360.

Prices quoted include the buyer’s premium.

For details contact the gallery at 203-266-0323 or send an email to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE
Finnish brass floor lamps, Paavo Tynell. Price realized: $58,800. Woodbury Auction image. Ming blue and white bowl. Price realized: $38,750. Woodbury Auction image. German walnut serpentine commode serpentine commode. Price realized: $3,300. Woodbury Auction image. Asian gilt bronze deity, Tara. Price realized: $31,250. Woodbury Auction image. Chinese gold jade pendant. Price realized: $4,250. Woodbury Auction image.
Last Updated on Thursday, 19 December 2013 15:00
 

Dreweatts & Bloomsbury auctions Ming embroidery for £16,120

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Written by Auction House PR   
Wednesday, 18 December 2013 13:47

A circular silk badge of the type worn by a Ming dynasty emperor sold for £16,120 ($26,429). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

NEWBURY, U.K. – A circular silk badge of the type worn by a Ming dynasty emperor, discovered by chance during a free valuation day at Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions, sold for £16,120 ($26,429) on Dec. 2.

Known as a kesi, or “cut silk,” the embroidery was among items taken to a valuation day at Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions where it was spotted by specialist Benedetta Mottino. Its owner had no idea of its significance and was delighted to be told of its estimate £8,000–£10,000.

From the late 16th or early 17th century, the badge is worked in peacock feather filament and threads of red, blue, green, yellow, beige, white and gold. It would have decorated the front and back of a surcoat belonging to a Ming emperor. A front-facing five-clawed dragon symbolizes blessing and strength and is associated with the Son of Heaven, an alternative name for the emperor. The dragon is in pursuit of the flaming pearl of truth, denoting the wearer’s wish to attain inner wisdom. Clouds and mountains, symbols of Imperial sovereignty, further embellish the composition. The Chinese character “wan,” meaning eternity, and the homophone meaning longevity, appears at the top of both sides of the badge and suggests that it may have been made to commemorate the emperor’s birthday.

The kesi (lot 50) came from a Surrey home and was purchased by a Chinese collector from Hong Kong.

“Having had a particularly successful sale during the week of Asian Art in London, we are delighted with the results achieved in our sale in Newbury yesterday, in which more affordable objects were offered,” said Mottino.

Elsewhere in the sale a private collection of 94 fine netsukes sold for a total of £50,220 ($82,297). Mostly in ivory they portrayed a variety of Japanese mythical figures and animals and are types that are scare and widely sought by collectors.

A 19th century ivory netsuke of Daikoku, one of Japan’s Seven Gods of Fortune associated with commerce and prosperity, was depicted carrying a mallet, also known as a magic money mallet, and large sack while balancing atop a large rice bale. It sold for £1,736 ($2,844) (lot 183).

Created in 1925, a finely painted portrait of Mao Tse-Tung was a gift from the Revolutionary Committee of Jingdezhen Art and Porcelain Factory to the Revolutionary Committee of Guangzhou Seafood Production Co. The highly collectable item (Lot 75) sold for £6,820 ($11,176).

A 19th century famille rose porcelain screen amazed bidders by selling for £22,320 ($36,580), more than 100 times its estimate. The freestanding screen (lot 99) was decorated ornately with figures engaging in various leisurely pursuits amid a river scene.



ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

A circular silk badge of the type worn by a Ming dynasty emperor sold for £16,120 ($26,429). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

Chinese calligraphy scroll, extract from the ‘Lantingji Xu’ (Poem of the Orchid Pavilion), 257 cm high. Price realized: £2,976 ($4,891). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

Chinese painting in inks and gouache on silk, 18th-19th century, 120.5 cm by 76 cm. Price realized: £2,976 ($4,891). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

Chinese blue and white baluster jar decorated with floral sprays, grapes and Buddhist symbols, 65cm high, Wanli period. Price realized: £2,976 ($4,891). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

Japanese boxwood tonkotsu with matching netsuke and ojime, 19th century, and a wood box and cover, Meiji Period. Price realized: £2,976 ($4,891). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

Chinese scroll painting in inks and colors on paper, cranes beneath a flowering cherry tree, 201 cm by 86 cm, 19th century. Price realized: £2,356 ($3,871). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

Last Updated on Thursday, 19 December 2013 15:44
 

Scotland library acquires composer’s papers at Halls auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Wednesday, 18 December 2013 11:14

Christmas Day dinner program from the Viceroy and Governor General's residence, Barrackpore, dated Dec. 25, 1907, signed by Lord Minto - 17th Viceroy, Field Marshal Horatio Kitchener and others. Halls Fine Arts Auctioneers image.

SHREWSBURY, U.K. – A small archive of manuscripts and letters by singer, conductor and composer Sir George Henschel, one of the leading English musicians of his day, sold for £1,000 ($1,639) at an auction conducted Dec. 4 by Halls Fine Arts Auctioneers. LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

The unrecorded archive was secured by the National Library of Scotland to the delight of the Irish seller who had family connections to Henschel (1850-1934).

Jean Rusden from Shrewsbury, who consigned the archive in the auction on behalf of her sister-in-law, Janet Miles, said “The archive was left to Janet by her grandmother, who was a good friend of George Henschel.

“I know she will be pleased that it’s going to the National Library of Scotland because she wanted it to go into an archive, and Henschel lived in Aviemore for many years and conducted the Scottish Orchestra at Glasgow.”

Born on Feb. 18, 1850 in Breslau, Prussia, Henschel began his career as a pianist but later found great success as a baritone and became a friend of Johannes Brahms. Moving to England in 1877, he became a British citizen in 1890.

He was first conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra (1881–84) and later conducted the Scottish Orchestra at Glasgow (1893–95) and taught at the Institute of Musical Art in New York, where he met his second wife, Amy Louis, who was one of his students.

Knighted in 1914, his compositions include two operas, a Stabat Mater, a requiem mass, and songs. In 1907, he published a collection of his journals and correspondence in Personal Recollections of Johannes Brahms and in 1918 an autobiography, Musings and Memories of a Musician.

The auction lot purchased by the National Library of Scotland consisted of a three-page manuscript titled Little Lamb, who made thee, described as “a Song of Innocence (for the little children to sing), humbly set to William Blake's beautiful words by George Henschel.”

With it were two pages of handwritten music dedicated to “Georgina and Peter” – believed to be Georgina Henschel, the composer’s daughter by his second wife and Peter Cloughton (1915-1968), Henschel's grandson – and initialed and dated Jan. 18, 1918.

In addition, there was a second manuscript titled The Knight of Bethlehem, set by George Henschel, two pages of handwritten music initialed and dated Nov. 20, 1918, both within a “Keepsake Cover” titled and signed by Henschel and enclosing three printed copies of his music.

Accompanying the manuscripts were two letters to Janet Dunlop Smith (1888-1984), the seller’s godmother, on Aviemore headed paper and dated June 19, 1914 and Nov. 23, 1914.

There was also a three-verse sonnet written and initialed by Henschel, dated Nov. 22, 1914 and a companion postcard, upon which he writes a new final verse stating, "I think the following distribution of the last six lines is better."

“Miss Dunlop Smith was the daughter of Lt. Col. Sir James Dunlop Smith, private secretary to Lord Minto while he was Viceroy of India,” said Halls’ books specialist Aaron Dean. “She was a singer under the professional name Janet Christopher and it is presumed that her close friendship with Henschel developed through their professional careers sometime around 1913.”

The first letter talked of a previous sonnet that Henschel had sent, mentioned that he would be traveling to London for a concert at the Queens Hall and hoped that they could meet for tea. The second referred to Dunlop Smith as his "grateful public" in regard to his prior verses, as well as general news and what had occupied his time in Scotland.

Also included in the lot was a program for “Dr. George Henschel's concert in aid of the funds of the Alvie Boy Scouts Association,” dated Sept. 4, 1913, signed by him, five of the other singers and initialed by Dunlop Smith.

The second lot, which sold for £290, included a Christmas Day dinner program from the viceroy and governor general's residence, Barrackpore, dated Dec. 25, 1907, signed by Lord Minto - 17th Viceroy, Field Marshal Horatio Kitchener, Lord and Lady Warrender, Mme Albani and Violet and Ruby Elliot, daughters of Minto.

In addition there was a program for Madame Albani O.M. at the Town Hall Calcutta, Dec. 24, 1907 and a photocopy of Dunlop Smith's diary for Christmas 1907. The diary entry states: "Then everyone signed our hand programmes – I have Kitchener, The Viceroy, Albani's, Sir George and Lady Maud Warrender & several others – it was quite a wonderful evening."

Dean said he shared the seller’s delight that the fascinating archive had been secured by the National Library of Scotland.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Christmas Day dinner program from the Viceroy and Governor General's residence, Barrackpore, dated Dec. 25, 1907, signed by Lord Minto - 17th Viceroy, Field Marshal Horatio Kitchener and others. Halls Fine Arts Auctioneers image. 

One of Sir George Henschel’s manuscripts. Halls Fine Arts Auctioneers image. 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 18 December 2013 11:50
 

Mulhaupt winter scene tops $25,000 at Kaminski Auctions

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Written by Auction House PR   
Wednesday, 18 December 2013 09:46

Frederick J. Mulhaupt’s winter landscape sold for $25,200. Kaminski Auction image.

BEVERLY, Mass. – Kaminski Auctions hosted their annual Thanksgiving sale on Nov. 3 and Dec. 1. Top lot was the highly anticipated Frederick J. Mulhaupt winter landscape that was featured on the auction brochure. Numerous phone and Internet bidders were competing for the piece. LiveAuctionerers.com provided Intenet live bidding.

Mulhaupt was a revered North Shore artist, having spent his summers in Gloucester and eventually settling there in 1922. He is well known for his landscape and seascapes of Cape Ann, Mass., and was an active member of the North Shore Art Association. Though not an auction record for the painter, the piece sold well over estimate to a phone bidder for $25,200.

Fine art in the sale did well, as a Ralph Albert Blakelock moonlight scene with a Native American figure sold for $16,800, while a John George Brown titled Girl on Seesaw sold for $11,400. A William Henry Hillard oil on canvas of Eagle Cliff and Profile Lake of Franconia Notch, N.H., sold for $5,280.

Several rare Audubon prints fared well in the sale, a ruby-throated hummingbird by Robert Havell with a J. Whatman 1828 watermark, circa 1859, sold for $8,400 while a similar piece of a painted bunting sold for $2,140. A.J. Bier Audubon chromolithograph of a purple grackle sold for $3,900.

A beautiful mid-19th century Austrian 14-carat blue enamel snuff box encrusted with cabochon square cut sapphires from a New York estate sold for $7,800.

Glass collectors vyed over a Bigelow & Kennard leaded hanging shade in a sunflower pattern that ultimately sold within estimate for $6,300. Additional top glass lots in the sale included a Bohemian enamel decorated glass service for six that sold for $3,900.

The rest of the day one lots were an interesting mix of items. A 1969 Fender Stratocaster guitar sold for $8,400, while a pair of 19th century French blackamoor sconces sold for $2,160. An early 20th century Russian bronze sculpture of Leda and the Swan signed Vladimir Bekiemishev on an onyx base sold for $5,100.

Huanghuali and zitan Chinese items in the sale brought good prices as well. A pair of Huanghuali wood carved chairs sold for $15,600, while a carved Chinese zitan table sold for $2,880.

American furniture in the sale included a Samuel Field McIntyre mahogany Salem chest, with rope turned columns and leaf carving with eagle, shield and cornucopia basket posts, from a West Newbury, Mass., estate. The piece fetched $5,400 and an Irish Chippendale mahogany card table, circa 1790, from a Cambridge, Mass., estate sold for $2,280.

Customers looking for a special piece of jewelry for the Christmas holiday were not disappointed. Jewelry lots were many and varied and all performed very well. In particular an 18K white gold and diamond necklace, approximately 9.0 total carats of diamonds, 16 inches long, sold for $6,600, while an exquisite 18K yellow gold and diamond ring, with 24 princess cut diamonds and a center marquise diamond sold for $6,000.

Day two of the sale presented the personal collection of Marla Maples and Tiffany Trump. The eclectic collection featured Art Deco sculpture as well as original furnishings from their Trump Tower residence. Other personal items of interest included a bottle of 1945 Chateau Laffite Rothschild, given to Marla and Donald Trump at their wedding.

A portion of the proceeds from Marla Maples’ collection benefited the newly formed Brain Cancer Research Institute headed by Santosh Kesari in San Diego, Calif. Having firsthand experience with a loved one battling brain cancer, Maples knows how important this research is to finding the cause and treatment of this terrible disease.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Frederick J. Mulhaupt’s winter landscape sold for $25,200. Kaminski Auction image.

After John Trumbull, needlepoint of George Washington at Trenton, Berlin woolwork needlepoint, circa 1840. Price realized: $2,000. Kaminski Auction image.

An Audubon ruby-throated hummingbird print by Robert Havell brought $8,400. Kaminski Auction image.

Samuel Field McIntyre mahogany Salem chest. Price realized: $5,400. Kaminski Auction image.

Pair of Huanghuali carved wood chairs. Price realized: $15,600. Kaminski Auction image.

Last Updated on Thursday, 19 December 2013 15:45
 

Asawa wire sculpture sets U.S. auction record at Michaan’s

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Monday, 16 December 2013 15:16

Ruth Lanier Asawa, wire sculpture, tied wire branching wall mounted wreath. Price realized: $102,660. Michaan's Auctions image.

ALAMEDA, Calif. – A Ruth Asawa tied wire sculpture was the top selling lot in Michaan’s Fine Art, Furniture, Decorative Arts and Jewelry Auction held on Dec. 6.

The sculpture became the highest selling Asawa wire wreath form sold at auction in the United States, realizing a price of $102,660 (lot 1059, $80,000-90,000). Rounds of heavy phone bids eventually closed with a winning bid from a prominent East Coast gallery owner.

LiveAuctoneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

Michaan’s 20th century design specialist Greg Favors was instrumental in bringing the piece to auction from its debut at a Michaan’s Auctions appraisal event. He remarked that, “It has been a wonderful experience for me to be a part of securing such a quality piece for auction, from its original appraisal to the final sale at Michaan’s. Ruth Asawa has not only become a San Francisco legend, but a 20th century design icon in her own right. It has been an honor to be involved in presenting this piece to the world marketplace.”

Fine works of art continually experienced success in the December auction. The second highest grossing sale of the day was an oil painting by Armin Carl Hansen titled Norwegian Fisherman that realized a price of $55,460 (lot 1034, $40,000-$60,000). Also noteworthy was Picasso’s Vase deux anses hautes, 1952 that sold for $32,450 (lot 1057, $20,000-$25,000).

Strong collector interest was evidenced for offerings of Grigory Gluckmann oil paintings as well. Lot 1044, $8,000-$12,000, sold for $20,060 and lot 1045, $8,000-$12,000, sold for $14,160.

Fine art specialist Susan Paffrath commented, “I was pleased with the great interest shown for California pieces in the sale. Modern pieces also picked up quite a bit of interest, most namely contemporary prints. Modern art continues to peak interest at auction and its presence has introduced a new clientele to Michaan’s as well.”

A range of items from the furniture & decorative arts department exceeded high projections at auction. A suite of 14 Georg Jensen sterling bread plates sold for over seven times the high estimate for $22,420 (lot 1257, $2,500-$3,000). A Vienna Amphora Turn Teplitz Fates vase astounded, as it exceeded the high estimate over 15 fold at a final price of $18,880 (lot 1214, $900-$1,200). Rounding out the lots was a Louis XV- style champleve clock garniture with pair of matching candelabras (lot 1147, $9,000-$12,000) that sold for $17,700, a Lalique Courges vase (lot 1273, $6,000-$8,000) that sold for $14,160, and a George III brass refracting telescope (lot 1179, $1,200-$1,500) that pulled in $3,835.

A rare Tiffany & Co. tsavorite, diamond and platinum ring was a top seller at $17,700 (lot 1425, $10,000-$15,000). The immaculate, approximate 5.50-carat tsavorite displayed an unparalleled color and clarity, especially hard to find in such a large specimen. Bidding also climbed high for a pair of jade and diamond drop earrings, secured by an absentee bidder for over seven times the high estimate at $10,620 (lot 1445, $1,000-$1,500).

Honorable mentions include additional modern design and jewelry lots. Serigraphs from Robert Motherwell’s African Suite sold for as much as triple expectations. Lot 1084, $1,000-$1,200, sold for $3,835, and lot 1083, $1,000-$1,200, sold for $3,540. A lot of six original hand-turned wood pieces by Bob Stocksdale with an estimate of $550-$650 managed to command an impressive $2,655 (lot 1106). Jewelry saw three handsome sellers as well in a cultured pearl, diamond and yellow gold foliage motif bracelet (lot 1385, $1,500-$2,000) that brought $6,490, a Tiffany & Co. Schlumberger coil ring (lot 1371, $2,000-$3,000) that hit $5,310, and an opal and garnet necklace with stylized Greek key motif accents (lot 1360, $1,500-$2,000) that raised $5,310.

For details contact Michaan’s Auctions at 510-740-0220 ext. 0 or e-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Ruth Lanier Asawa, wire sculpture, tied wire branching wall mounted wreath. Price realized: $102,660. Michaan's Auctions image.

Armin Carl Hansen (Californian 1886-1957), 'Norwegian Fishermen.' Price realized: $55,460. Michaan's Auctions image.

Pablo Picasso (Spanish 1881-1973), 'Vase deux anses hautes, 1952.' Price realized: '$32,450. Michaan's Auctions image.

Grigory Gluckmann (Russian-born Californian 1898-1973), 'Firebird.' Price realized: $20,060. Michaan's Auctions image.

Vienna Amphora Turn Teplitz Fates porcelain vase. Price realized: $18,880. Michaan's Auctions image.

Louis XV-style champleve enamel and gilt bronze clock garniture and matched pair of candelabra, Tiffany & Co., circa 1900. Price realized: $17,700. Michaan's Auctions image.

Tiffany & Co. tsavorite, diamond, platinum ring. Price realized: $17,700. Michaan's Auctions image.

Pair of jade, diamond, 14K yellow gold earrings. Price realized: $10,620. Michaan's Auctions image.

Tiffany & Co. Schlumberger, sapphire, 18K yellow gold coil ring. Price realized: $5,310. Michaan's Auctions image.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 18 December 2013 09:54
 

Transportation toys carry Bertoia’s Nov. 8-10 auction to $2.75M

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Written by Auction House PR   
Friday, 13 December 2013 17:17

Rare 19-inch German belsnickle depicting Father Christmas with glass icicle beard, garbed in purple robe and holding feather tree. Sold for $20,600. Bertoia Auctions image.

VINELAND, N.J. – “We’re proud of all of our sales, but this one was special,” said Bertoia Auctions owner Jeanne Bertoia, confirming the $2.75 million total for her company’s Nov. 8-10 Christmas Wishes auction. “We had a wonderful turnout, and interest was very strong across the board because of the important collections being auctioned. The top ten included boats, automotive, comic character, a figural doorstop and Christmas antiques. It was truly a sale for every collector.” LiveAuctioneers provided the Internet live-bidding services for the event.

The #1 slot was occupied by not one, but two imposing Marklin ships, which tied for top-lot honors at $77,800 apiece. A circa-1912 to 1915 second-series Battleship Cincinnati presented with a full complement of deck appointments, including four stacks, four lifeboats, searchlights, lifeboats and guns. The 34-inch-long vessel had been entered in the sale with a confident $40,000-$60,000 estimate. Its companion at the top of prices realized was a circa-1909 to 1915 Marklin George Washington, a 37-inch-long clockwork 4-stack ocean liner with several observation decks, a multitude of funnels and numerous lifeboats. All prices quoted in this report are inclusive of buyer’s premium.

Another important Marklin boat, a circa-1907 to 1912 clockwork luxury yacht Priscilla, featured a canopy-covered passenger area on its upper deck, plus wraparound railing and attractive port and window appointments. The 14-inch beauty more than tripled its high estimate to complete its pleasure cruise at $40,120.

The ultimate crossover toy, blending comic character with motoring, a coveted 1930s Tipp & Co. Mickey and Minnie Mouse on a clockwork motorcycle was expected to realize $25,000-$28,000. Its status as the premier Disney toy brought out the bidders, including one who captured the whimsical mice for $56,050.

A second example of character and transportation coming together in one desirable form, a rare CK Japan Santa car was described in the auction catalog as being “exceedingly rare…possibly the only known example.” Depicting Santa at the wheel of an open roadster decorated with images of children and toys, the 7-inch pre-WWII toy went three times the high estimate and then some, closing at $37,760.

The Christmas gift giver was the subject of much attention during the holiday section of the sale, which featured the exceptional Tom Fox estate collection. Lot 2070, a rare 19-inch German belsnickle depicting Father Christmas with a glass icicle beard in a rich purple robe, holding a feather tree, sold for $20,600 against an estimate of $5,000-$7,000.

An early pull toy comprising a jolly Santa riding in a wood and leather-covered sleigh drawn by four glass-eyed reindeer, measured an impressive 27 inches in length. The toy is now off to celebrate Christmas at a new home after selling for $17,700 – nearly eight times its high estimate.

Exhibiting Old World charm and an eye-pleasing cream with French blue and crimson color palette, a circa-1912 Carette tinplate limousine with glass windows had been estimated at $6,000-$8,000. The rare auto had its fair share of admirers and ended up fetching $21,240.

An extremely rare Vindex cast-iron motorcycle with sidecar was from a production run of less than two years. Painted green with a khaki-color driver and rider, the 8½-inch, spoke-wheeled ’cycle retained its Vindex label on the read fender. Near mint, it zipped off to a new owner for $25,960 – a full $10,000 more than its high estimate.

Finished in royal blue with yellow, an American-made Boucher #2500 locomotive and passenger train included New York, Chicago, Washington Pullman and San Francisco observation cars. It surpassed its estimate range in reaching a top bid of $25,960. Also highlighting the train section, an American Voltamp #2100 locomotive with B&O tender in light blue with copper domes and brass piping flew past its $2,500-$3,500 estimate to realize $18,880.

Doorstop fans had two large showcases of figural animals, buildings, characters and people from which to choose. Each example had been evaluated by doorstop expert Jeanne Bertoia, and many came with provenance from her personal collection, thus adding a premium to their value. The top doorstop lot was an A.M. Greenblatt Studios whimsical dog, copyrighted 1929. In pristine to near-mint condition, it brought $15,340 against an estimate of $800-$1,200.

After the sale, Bertoia Auctions associate Rich Bertoia remarked that there has been an untypically strong buzz in the toy-buying community lately, and not just at auctions.

“At toys shows and antique shows we’ve noticed a level of interest that hasn’t been seen for a number of years. The results of our three-day auction only served to confirm it. At this sale we saw a spike in new bidders through the Internet, absentee and in the gallery. A new wave of collectors is definitely entering the antique toy hobby, and they’ve relit the fire. Forget about kindling, they’re throwing on entire logs, and it’s benefiting everyone involved,” Rich said.

Information on Bertoia Auctions’ 2014 sale dates are available to view online at their website, www.BertoiaAuctions.com. To contact Bertoia Auctions call 856-692-1881 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

#   #   #

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Rare 19-inch German belsnickle depicting Father Christmas with glass icicle beard, garbed in purple robe and holding feather tree. Sold for $20,600. Bertoia Auctions image.

Marklin 2nd Series ‘Cincinnati’ battleship, circa 1912-1915, 34in long. Sold for $78,880. Bertoia Auctions image.

Boucher #2500 locomotive passenger set. Sold for $25,960. Bertoia Auctions image.

Vindex cast-iron motorcycle and sidecar, production run of less than two years, 8½ in, green with khaki driver and rider. Sold for $25,960. Bertoia Auctions image.

Tipp & Co. Mickey and Minnie Mouse on a clockwork motorcycle. Sold for $56,050. Bertoia Auctions image.

CK prewar Japanese Santa in open roadster decorated with Christmas images, 7in long. Sold for $37,760. Bertoia Auctions image.

From the personal collection of Jeanne Bertoia, an A.M. Greenblatt cast-iron dog doorstop, copyright 1929. Sold for $15,340. Bertoia Auctions image.

Circa-1912 Carette tinplate limousine, German, 16in long. Sold for $21,240. Bertoia Auctions image.

J. & E. Stevens ‘General Butler’ cast-iron mechanical bank. Sold for $10,030. Bertoia Auctions image.

Silver-colored Dresden Christmas ornament depicting a fancy horse-drawn coach with driver and footman, German, 6in long. Sold for $2,655. Bertoia Auctions image.

 

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 17 December 2013 10:22
 

Pink diamond sells for $81,000 in Cowan’s jewelry auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Friday, 13 December 2013 15:46
G.I.A. Certified Pink Diamond - realized $81,000

CINCINNATI – Cowan's Auctions fine jewelry and timepieces auction took place on Dec. 8. The sale included over 500 lots and realized $450,000. The auction featured fine collections of signed and unsigned jewelry, timepieces, handbags, and other couture. Of special note were designer pieces by renowned makers such as Tiffany & Co., Patek Philippe, Cartier, Vacheron & Constantin and others.

LiveAuctioneers.com provide Internet live bidding.

The highest selling lot in the auction was a G.I.A. Certified natural fancy pink diamond weighing .66 carats and estimated at $75,000-$90,000. This certified SI1 is a radiant cut and the G.I.A. certificate is included with the purchase.

The second highest selling lot in the sale was a 7.5-carat platinum engagement ring, which sold for $60,000. This European cut diamond also contains two H-I color straight baguette diamonds weighing approximately .25 carats.

A number of brooches performed particularly well in the auction. A platinum and diamond 18 carat brooch made for and once owned by the late Marge Schott, former owner of the Cincinnati Reds, scored $30,000. A Buccellati 18K “Dew Drops on Leaves” brooch sold for $10,200, an antique sapphire and diamond brooch realized $5,400, and a Harry Winston 18K diamond and sapphire circle brooch hammered down at $3,000.

Rings and bracelets had a strong showing in the auction. A Marcus & Co. 18K “Theatre” Ring sold for $12,600, a Harry Winston 18-diamond and sapphire articulated bracelet realized $12,000, and a ladies vintage 2.0-carat filigree ring realized $7,800.

The auction also featured a variety of timepieces. A men’s Blancpain 18K Villeret triple-date moon phase automatic watch sold for $5,700, and a ladies’ Rolex Oyster Perpetual “Datejust” watch brought $3,120.

For details contact Brad Wanstrath, Cowan’s fine jewelry and timepieces director, at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or 513-871-1670 ext. 217.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE
G.I.A. Certified Pink Diamond - realized $81,000 Platinum and Diamond 18 Carat Brooch made for and once owned by Marge Schott of the Cincinnati Reds - sold for $30,000 Gentleman's Blancpain 18 Karat Villeret Triple Date Moon Phase Automatic - $5,700
Last Updated on Friday, 13 December 2013 16:25
 
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