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Auction Results in the News

Aetna Insurance, El Bar Gin signs top $51K at Showtime event

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Written by Auction House PR   
Wednesday, 16 April 2014 16:31

El Bart Gin tin sign with original frame, copyright 1905 by Wilson Distilleries. Price realized: $51,300. Showtime Auction Services image.

ANN ARBOR, Mich. – An Aetna Insurance Co., Hartford, Conn., reverse-glass painted sign with mother of pearl inlay, 34 inches square and in excellent like-new condition, sold for $51,300 at an auction held April 4-6. The sale was conducted by Showtime Auction Services with Internet live bidding facilitated by LiveAuctioneers.com.

“That Aetna sign was one of the most impressive reverse glass signs we’ve ever seen, just beautiful,” said Mike Eckles of Showtime Auction Services. The sign tied for top lot of the auction with an El Bart Gin tin sign, housed in the original frame and copyrighted in 1905 by Wilson Distilleries, Kaufman & Strauss Co., N.Y. That sign also gaveled for $51,300.

In all, more than 1,800 lots from two major collections, plus consignments from over 100 other advanced collectors came up for bid, in an auction that grossed more than $1.3 million. Headlining the event were the lifetime collections of Robert and Janet Straub of Kansas and Neil J. Frick of Michigan. Both collections were diverse, with items in more than 40 categories.

The auction was a bit different than past Showtime sales, in that live, Internet and phone bidding were permitted all three days. “We used to have live-only auctions the first day of each sale, but that won’t be the case any longer,” Eckles said. “From now on, Internet bidding will be available the entire time. Real-time bidding has really taken hold, and we’re obligated to make our consignments open to all forms of bidding,” he said.

That said, Eckles was somewhat surprised by the large in-person turnout – around 200 people each day. “There were more folks at this auction than our fall sale,” he remarked, “and because of how we spread out all the categories, the audience kept changing.” He added internet bidding was heavy as well.

Following are additional highlights from the auction. All prices quoted include a buyer’s premium that ranged from 14 percent to 20 percent, depending on how the winning bid was placed.

A rare Hires Root Beer, the green version, showing a graphic of the Hires Boy and a price of 5 cents, went for $49,200. The dispenser – 18 inches tall and with no chips or cracks, was stamped “Mettlach 3098” on the bottom. Also, a full-size, bright red 1928 Model A fire hose and ladder truck, fully restored and complete with patriotic banners and ribbons, charged away for $31,200.

Two lots realized identical selling prices of $34,200. The first was a Happy Jap  Chewing Gum 1-cent machine patented in 1902, with the original porcelain sign and custom wall bracket. The machine stands 12 inches tall. The second was a Glencoe Brewing Co., Glencoe, Minn., Vitrolite corner sign, “Uncle Sam Beer,” in great shape and in the original copper flashed frame.

Another beer sign that did exceptionally well was a Yosemite Beer reverse glass sign for Enterprise Brewing Co., San Francisco. The sign, in excellent condition and measuring 15 1/4 inches by 19 1/2 inches, brought $27,600. Also, a De Laval Cream Separator die-cut two-sided flange sign, mounted on a wood display stand and showing just a few minor rubs and scratches, turned $6,400.

A Skinner’s Satins self-framed oval tin sign, Chas. W. Shonk Lithographers, Chicago, in near-mint condition and with a boldly rendered American Indian in full headdress graphic, rose to $24,000; a sheep weather vane made of zinc, in very good original condition, fetched $25,650; and an October Sweet Apple Cider stoneware crock, “Good to the Core,” commanded $2,700.

A Mills one-armed bandit miner-themed slot machine, taking 25 cents per play and possibly attributed to Frank Polk, 76 inches tall and in very good working condition, made $17,100; and a Union Pacific System die-cut porcelain shield sign, “The Overland Route,” professionally restored and in excellent condition, measuring 38 1/4 inches by 42 inches, breezed to $12,540.

Two other lots cracked the $10,000 mark. One was a Puffer Hubbard Co. salesman’s sample silo, the Minneapolis panel silo, in very good original condition, 16 inches tall and 8 3/4 inches in diameter, which sold for $11,400. The other was the earliest version of a oscillating gyro fan by Adams Bagnel. In excellent restored condition, it sold for $10,200.

A Model 716 Enterprise floor model coffee grinder, datent 1898, with the original paint, stenciling, eagle finial and pan, in very good condition, 58 1/2 inches tall, coasted to $9,000.

A Life-Savers die-cut cardboard string hanging two-sided sign, 10 inches by 12 inches, in very good condition except for some edge wear at the bottom and corners and at the top hole went for $9,600. A rare Merry War pure powdered lye tin match holder, “The girl who knows the best,” made by E. Myers Lye Co., St. Louis, Mo., 3 3/4 inches tall, commanded $4,500.

A hard-to-find Red Goose Shoes cast-iron string holder with most of the original paint intact and in very good overall condition, 14 inches by 10 inches, went for $4,200; and a Tuxedo Perfect Tobacco cardboard store display box, showing a picture of baseball player Harry Gowdy and with a quote attributed to him endorsing the product, hammered for $2,500.

Showtime Auction Services is always accepting quality consignments for future auctions. To consign an item, an estate or a collection, call Michael Eckles at 951-453-2415 or email him at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

El Bart Gin tin sign with original frame, copyright 1905 by Wilson Distilleries. Price realized: $51,300. Showtime Auction Services image. 

Aetna Insurance Co. reverse glass painted sign with mother of pearl inlay. Price realized: $51,300. Showtime Auction Services image. 

Hires Root Beer dispenser, the green version, depicting the Hines Boy, 5 cents. Price realized: $49,200. Showtime Auction Services image. 

1928 red Ford Model A fire hose and ladder truck, with patriotic banners, ribbons. Price realized: $31,200. Showtime Auction Services image.

Glencoe Brewing Co. “Uncle Sam Beer” Vitrolite corner sign, in frame. Price realized: $34,200. Showtime Auction Services image.

Zinc sheep weather vane in very good condition, 24 1/2 inches by 18 inches. Price realized: $25,650. Showtime Auction Services image.

Model 716 Enterprise floor model coffee grinder, patented 1898, original paint. Price realized: $9,000. Showtime Auction Services image.

Life-Savers die-cut cardboard two-sided string hanging sign, 10 inches by 12 inches. Price realized: $9,600. Showtime Auction Services image.

Mills one-armed bandit slot machine, 25 cents, possibly by Frank Polk. Price realized: $17,100. Showtime Auction Services image.

Skinner's Satins self-framed tin sign with Native American graphic in full headdress. Price realized: $24,000. Showtime Auction Services image.

Last Updated on Thursday, 17 April 2014 08:16
 

Dreweatts & Bloomsbury sells 'Casino Royale' first edition for £24,180

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Written by Auction House PR   
Wednesday, 16 April 2014 09:10

A first edition of Ian Fleming’s ‘Casino Royale’ sold for £24,180 ($40,612) at Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions’ sale of Modern Literature on April 11. Dreweatts & Bloomsbury image.

LONDON – A first edition of Ian Fleming’s Casino Royale thrilled bidders again April 11, selling for £24,180 ($40,612) at Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions’ sale of Modern Literature on.

LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

The first book in the 007 series, Casino Royale introduced Fleming’s renowned James Bond franchise to the world. Since it was first published on April 13, 1953, the book had been adapted for film three times, and in 2006 it became the 21st film in the Eon Productions film series of the Bond novels, and the film that introduced Daniel Craig as the eighth actor to play the fictional MI6 agent.

Written by Fleming in Jamaica, the book received stellar reviews and the first UK print run sold out in under a month. The dust jacket was designed by Fleming himself and the initial hardcover release was priced at 10s, 6d a copy. This rare first edition Casino Royale is in exceptional condition, and was the first of a complete collection of Fleming’s 007 novels to be offered during the sale. Also from the collection, a first edition of Live and Let Die, (1954), sold for £8,060 ($13,537), and a first edition of Moonraker, (1955) sold for £5,952 ($9,997). [Lot 51]

Another rare first edition, this time of J. J. R. Tolkien’s The Hobbit, or, There and Back Again (1937) sold for an exceptional £18,600 ($31,240). The classic fantasy novel has been celebrated by readers f or many generations, and has never been out of print. First published in 1937, Tolkien’s letters, and the records kept by his publishers, confirm that he was very involved with the design of the book. His original full-color drawings for the dust jacket were redrawn by him several times, removing colors until just four remained. In a bid to control costs, the UK publishers finally removed the red from the sun, leaving just black, green and blue ink to be printed on the white paper.

A copy of Moliere L'Avare (1918), owned by acclaimed novelist, playwright, poet and theater director Samual Beckett, sold for £8,060 ($13,537). Complete with Beckett’s ink ownership inscription to endpaper, and his annotations and notes to margins, the book is an early example of Beckett's study of French language as well as his growing understanding of one of the most important French playwrights. The notes largely cover translations of difficult words or phrases, although he highlights a particular exchange as being "A favourite trick with M." Beckett was awarded an honorary degree by Trinity College in 1956.

It is likely that Beckett sold his student books, post-graduation, to Fred Hanna's bookshop, where this was purchased some 25 years later by Daniel Rogers, whose family consigned the book for sale. Daniel Rogers attended Trinity College first as a student, then a junior lecturer, before moving to Durham University.

An almost complete collection of the works of P.G. Wodehouse garnered much presale interest from Wodehouse enthusiasts. Lots 150-208 included an extremely rare first edition of the author’s first adult novel, Love Among the Chickens. In 1921 Woodhouse rewrote the first five chapters to change the narrative from the third to the first person, making this first edition extremely sought after. The book sold for £4,712 ($7,194).

Also from the Wodehouse collection, titles that are rarely seen in their dust jackets included a copy of The Inimitable Jeeves (1923), which sold for £2,356 ($3,957), and Carry On, Jeeves (1925), which sold for £1,364 ($2,291).

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale on LiveAuctioneers, complete with prices realized.

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Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

 A first edition of Ian Fleming’s ‘Casino Royale’ sold for £24,180 ($40,612) at Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions’ sale of Modern Literature on April 11. Dreweatts & Bloomsbury image.

A rare first edition of J.J.R. Tolkien’s ‘The Hobbit, or, There and Back Again’ (1937) sold for £18,600 ($31,240). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury image. 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 16 April 2014 09:36
 

Asian arts earn strong prices at Schwenke’s Woodbury Auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 15 April 2014 14:21

Rare pair of Chinese fabric panels. Woodbury Auction image.

WOODBURY, Conn. – Schwenke’s Woodbury Auction sold 495 lots of fine Asian decorative arts and estate decorative arts on March 23. The Asian section of the sale included fine Asian porcelains, bronzes, jade and other hard stone carvings, snuff bottles, textiles, fine art and woodblock prints. The sale also included over 100 lots of estate property, all freshly gleaned from tri-state area estates and consignors.

LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

“The sale was timed to coincide with the close of Asia Week New York to afford the Asian buyers the opportunity to preview our sale during the week and arrange bids on items of interest,” said auctioneer Tom Schwenke.

The highlight of the sale, fetching $20,425 to a phone bidder from Great Britain, was a fine Chinese archaistic inlaid bronze ritual wine vessel in the manner of the early Western Zhou dynasty. The lidded bronze vessel had 24K gold and silver inlays of pear form cast with flanges on a flaring base and having a swing handle terminating in animal masks, boldly decorated with Taotie masks and bands of stylized dragons in relief against a leiwen background, with incised inscription to the underside of the cover and interior of the base, 13 1/2 inches high and 11 inches wide. Such ritual bronzes were used for funeral offerings of food and drink to ancestors in family temples, ceremonial halls or at ritual banquets in which living and deceased members participated. They were eventually buried with the owner so he could continue to pay his respects in the afterlife.

Second top lot of the sale was a textile – a vintage roll of Chinese imperial pattern silk in gold with five toed dragon pattern, signed at the end, and approximately 16 yards long, 30 inches wide. The fabric sold to an Internet bidder for a surprising $18,750.

Other Asian textile lots performed well, including a pair of Chinese framed embroidered and painted silk textiles, 18th/19th century, 71 inches high, 19 1/4 inches wide, selling to a Chinese bidder in Spain for $8,125. The cover lot of the sale, an important Chinese framed embroidered panel on silk, 19th century, depicting a family of six, and measuring 53 inches high, 50 inches wide, sold above estimate ($3,000-$5,000) at $7,200 to a Connecticut collector bidding in the room.

The sale featured two fine Chinese export porcelain items in the rare Don Quixote pattern: an oval platter, circa 1750-60, measuring 14 inches long, 10 inches wide, and a 10 inches diameter dish, the center of both enameled with Don Quixote in full armor, astride his horse holding a lance, Sancho Panza holding the reigns beside him and two women watching from behind a tree, the border with four “en grisaille” reserves painted with landscapes alternating with birds, gilt highlights. The platter fetched $9,375 from a phone bidder in Canada, and the plate reached $3,150 from an Internet bidder in Taiwan, for a combined result of $12,525.

Other Chinese porcelains brought strong prices, including a rare Chinese enameled porcelain jar, Yung Chieng period (1723–1736), depicting the Hundred Boys' Festival, having a pierced wood lid with carved jade inset, mounted on a carved wooden stand, 12 3/4 inches high, 9 1/2 inches diameter, which also went to the phone bidder in Canada at $2,250. The same successful bidder claimed a beautiful large Chinese famille rose baluster form decorated vase, 19th century, with decoration of women with spotted deer pulling a cart, 18 inches high, 8 inches diameter. The price for that vase was $4,065.

The top Asian furniture lot of the sale was a rare Thai lacquered and gilt decorated two-door tapering cabinet, with a molded top over two paneled doors above a scalloped base ornament set on short feet, late 19th century, measuring 51 inches high, 33 inches wide, 18 3/4 inches deep. The cabinet returned to Thailand, claimed by an Internet bidder in Bangkok for $6,900.

The second highest Asian furniture lot of the sale, crossed the block at $4,270 to a domestic phone bidder, was a very fine Japanese lacquer, gilt, and metal mounted Isho Tansu chest, 18th/19th century, with overall gilt, Manji and Mon decoration, the cabinet doors opening to reveal five drawers interior drawers and set on a carved rosewood stand, and measuring 49 3/4 inches high, 42 1/2 inches wide, 18 1/2 inches deep. This Tansu was collected by the consignor's ancestor, James A. Scrymser, in 1898 while he was in Japan as a guest of the Japanese government. Scrymser was a businessman, philanthropist and served as a trustee of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Other Asian furniture lots fared well, including a Chinese carved wood center table, 19th century, with inset marble top on elaborate pierce carved tripod base ending in paw feet, 32 inches high, 28 inches diameter. The table, from a Connecticut estate, sold for $5,100 to a Vietnamese bidder present in the room.

Japanese decorative arts were also offered, and the top lot from Japan was a fine Japanese Satsuma koro and cover, circa 1900, possibly by Kinkozan, the lobed body with reserves of birds amid foliage, signed on base, 6 1/2 inches high, 5 inches wide, which was claimed by a phone bidder at $4,800. A large and rare Japanese blue and white Arita porcelain charger, circa 1580-1620, with Wanli decoration of a star-shaped reserve in eight panel medallions with an insect on a rock, and eight rim reserves with peaches and valuables went out at $1,650 to an internet bidder.

Consignments are being accepted through May 5 for Woodbury Auction’s Fifth Anniversary Spring Fine Estates Auction, which will be early June. For details email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or call 203-266-0323.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Rare pair of Chinese fabric panels. Woodbury Auction image.

Chinese famille rose decorated vase. Woodbury Auction image.

Satsuma koro and cover. Woodbury Auction image.

Imperial dragon fabric. Woodbury Auction image.

Archaic Chinese wine vessel. Woodbury Auction image.

Chinese porcelain jar. Woodbury Auction image.

Chinese embroidered figural panel. Woodbury Auction image.

Chinese carved center table. Woodbury Auction image.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 16 April 2014 09:29
 

Jeffrey S. Evans sale shows strength of Southern decorative arts

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Written by Auction House PR   
Friday, 11 April 2014 13:09

Lot 1, a 3-gallon stoneware jar attributed to James Miller, sold for $74,750. The rare salt-glazed jar, circa 1825, sold for over twice the $20,000-$30,000 estimate. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

MT. CRAWFORD, Va. – In a 714-lot, nine-hour marathon session, Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates sold the entire Americana collection of the late John and Lil Palmer of Purcellville, Va., to a standing-room only crowd on April 5. The Palmers, well-know collectors, were killed in a single-car accident last July.

LiveAuctioneers.com provided Interent live bidding.

The auction totaled just over $1.5 million dollars including the 15 percent buyer’s premium. Top price of the day was $74,750 paid for lot 1, a rare and important stoneware salt-glazed jar of 3-gallon size, painted in cobalt with a Federal Eagle, attributed to James Miller (active 1797-1827). Made circa 1825, in Alexandria, Va., or Georgetown, D.C., the jar sold for over twice the $20,000-$30,000 estimate and realized a record price for pottery from the general D.C. area. The buyer was Clifton Anderson, of Lexington, Ky., the dealer who had originally discovered the jar in a West Virginia estate auction in 2002 and sold it to Woodbridge, Conn., dealers Allan and Penny Katz in 2003, who in turn sold it to the Palmers.

The Palmers’ stoneware and pottery collection was remarkable for its depth of offerings. One of the great surprise results of the auction was a salt-glazed stoneware diminutive canning jar made at the Thompson Pottery in Morgantown, W.Va., which sold for $48,875, ten times its low estimate. Palmer family members loved it, so did bidders on the phone and in the room. The bold image of a squirrel in typical profile pose, painted in cobalt blue on the body, had the saleroom abuzz. Lil Palmer had bought the piece in the mid-1980s, and it is one of a group of objects discussed in Ceramics in America 2011, in The Stoneware Years of the Thompson Pottery of Morgantown, West Virginia, an article by Richard Duez, Don Horvath and Brenda Hornsby Heindl.

Lot 293, a rare John James Trumbull Arnold oil on canvas folk art Portrait of Mary Mattingly, dated 1850, sold for $33,350, against an $8,000-$12,000 estimate. Additionally known and signed portraits by Arnold of Mattingly’s parents Ellen and Silvester, were offered at Christie’s in 1995 and there are other subjects painted by Arnold in the collections of Colonial Williamsburg. The warm, black-painted wood frame, and the soft browns and blacks on the dress make Mary’s frank expression and bright face, the rose in her hands and the white bow in her hair pop within the context of the darker background. The painting was purchased by Norma Wangel of Potomac Md., from the family, and later sold to John Dobricky of Warrenton, Va., who then sold it to the Palmers. Colonial Williamsburg was the successful bidder, against multiple competitors on the phone and in the saleroom. (Lot 293)

A rare and important painted poplar and pine closet/pie safe by Matthew S. Kahle (1800-1869) and John Henson (active 1819-after 1831), made in Lexington, Rockbridge County, Va., sold for $25,300, to the Museum of the Shenandoah Valley. The pie safe will be included in the “Safes of the Valley” exhibition at the museum, set to open May 11. With its wonderful, aged green paint and structural design by Kahle and its combined motifs of George Washington profiles, stars and urns hand-punched by Henson, it is no wonder the piece sold for far more than the $8,000-$12,000 estimate. The safe was in the article by Kurt Russ and Jeffrey S. Evans, The Kahle-Henson School of Punched-Tin Paneled Furniture, published in the 2012 edition of Chipstone’s American Furniture. The Palmers had purchased the safe from Ed and Delores Truitt of Roanoke, Va.

Another item of Southern regional interest, a rare and important fraktur made for John Kelley of Hampshire County, Va. (now West Virginia), sold for $32,200 against the $10,000-$15,000 estimate. One of a small and unusual group of mainly death records decorated with gilt lettering typical of a sign-painter, the Kelley example joins five others as being identifiable to one hand, possibly that of W.H. Jones, working actively in Winchester circa 1850.

After the auction, company president and head auctioneer Jeffrey Evans commented, “John and Lil Palmer were dear friends and their passing leaves a real void in the Virginia decorative arts collecting community. The overwhelming response to the auction and tremendous results are a testament to the Palmers’ great eye for folk art and passion for collecting.” He added, “John kept detailed notes about many of their pieces including family history as well as publication and exhibition records. This provenance was instrumental in the strong prices achieved throughout the auction. “

A full-color 198-page detailed auction catalogue is also available for this important collection.

For further information, call 540-434-3939 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . To speak with ceramics specialist Jill Fenichell, email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or call 917-302-1757.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Lot 1, a 3-gallon stoneware jar attributed to James Miller, sold for $74,750. The rare salt-glazed jar, circa 1825, sold for over twice the $20,000-$30,000 estimate. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

Lot 111, a salt-glazed stoneware canning jar made by Thompson Pottery in Morgantown, W.Va., sold for $48,875. The bold image of a squirrel, painted in cobalt blue on the body, had the saleroom abuzz. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

Lot 293, a rare John James Trumbull Arnold oil on canvas folk art portrait dated 1850, sold for $33,350 to Colonial Williamsburg. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

Lot 422, an important painted poplar and pine closet/pie safe made in Lexington, Rockbridge County, Va., by Matthew S. Kahle and John Henson sold for $25,300. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

A rare and important fraktur made for John Kelley of Hampshire County, Va., (now West Virginia), sold for $32,200 against the $10,000-$15,000 estimate. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

 

 

 

 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 16 April 2014 09:02
 

Treadway/Toomey reports strong results for 20th century design

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Written by Auction House PR   
Wednesday, 09 April 2014 15:28

L.C. Tiffany Tel El Amarna vase that brought $5,312. Treadway / Toomey Gallery image.

CHICAGO – On March 8, Treadway / Toomey Gallery of Chicago held another successful 20th Century Art & Design auction. Composed of three sessions – Arts & Crafts, Paintings and Modern – the first auction of 2014 garnered strong results. Exactly 1,070 lots were on the block, a number of which sold for well above their high estimates.

Internet live bidding was provided by LiveAuctioneers.com with the highest amount of lots sold online ever.

Session one focused on ceramics, lighting, glass and furniture. Strong results were seen in numerous lots, including a Marblehead vase which sold for $4,270 and an L.C. Tiffany “Tel El Amarna” vase that brought $5,312. Outstanding prices were realized in the fine silver and metalworks led by an important Kalo copper and brass samovar and tray bringing $14,640, while a Wiener Werkstatte silver spoon went for $9,760. The demand for Russian items continued, specifically two Russian enameled cigarette cases, one of which was estimated at $1,500 to $2,500 and brought $4,687, while another sold for $2,875.

The highlight of the second session of the sale was a LeRoy Neiman oil painting that went for $29,280. Chicago artist Gertrude Abercrombie’s work continued to be of interest with two paintings bringing $9,150 and $12,200. Chicago artist Ivan Albright’s Chicago Street Scene watercolor sold for $5,490, well over the $1,000 to $2,000 estimate.

The third and final session offered 1950s, Modern, and Art Deco artwork, furniture, and sculpture. A Barovier & Toso Intarsia vase from Murano brought $4,880, far over its high estimate of $1,200. Also impressive was the $6,100 that a Otto Prutscher goblet sold for, well over its high estimate of $2,200. Two Milo Baughman barrel lounge chairs sold for $6,875, while a Vladimir Kagan Cloud sofa made $6,710, over $5,000 more than its estimate of $1,000 to $1,500.

For details contact Treadway / Toomey Gallery by phoning 513-321-6742 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

L.C. Tiffany Tel El Amarna vase that brought $5,312. Treadway / Toomey Gallery image.

Marblehead vase sold for $4,270. Treadway / Toomey Gallery image.

Wiener Werkstatte silver spoon went for $9,760. Treadway / Toomey Gallery image.

Barovier & Toso Intarsia vase from Murano brought $4,880. Treadway / Toomey Gallery image.

LeRoy Neiman oil painting went for $29,280. Treadway / Toomey Gallery image.

Two Milo Baughman barrel lounge chairs sold for $6,875. Treadway / Toomey Gallery image.

Otto Prutscher goblet sold for $6,100. Treadway / Toomey Gallery image.

Chicago artist Gertrude Abercrombie painting sold for $12,200. Treadway / Toomey Gallery image.

Last Updated on Friday, 11 April 2014 13:18
 

Fresh Henry Farney painting bags $96,000 at Cowan’s

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Written by Auction House PR   
Wednesday, 09 April 2014 13:15

Henry Farny’s ‘After Big Game’  sold for $96,000. Cowan’s Auctions Inc.

CINCINNATI – Cowan's Auctions Inc. live salesroom American Indian and Western Art Auction took place on April 4 and realized just over $1 million. Competitive bidding on the phone, Internet and floor drove the prices for many of the lots well past their estimates. The auction featured an array of paintings, weaponry,  basketry, beadwork, moccasins and clothing.

LiveAuctioneers.com facilitated Internet live bidding.

The highest selling lot in the auction was a painting by Henry Farny, titled After Big Game, which hammered down at $96,000. This meticulously executed example had never been offered on the market since it was sold by the artist in Cincinnati.

The final portion of the Marvin L. Lince Collection attracted fierce bidding. An Iroquois figural ball club sold above its $40,000-$50,000 estimate and realized $57,000. A Plains Jukes Colson bone handle dag knife sold for $34,800, a plateau beaded hide blanket strip hammered down at $31,200, and a Great Lakes pipe tomahawk with decorated inlay sold for $22,800.

Exceptional weavings and blankets did particularly well in the sale. A Navajo Ganado room-size weaving sold for $19,680, a Navajo Klagetoh roomsize weaving realized $15,600, a Navajo Third Phase chief’s blanket sold for $12,000, and a Navajo crystal weaving sold for $6,765.

Jewelry items brought exceptional prices. A Navajo turquoise and silver cuff hammered down at $9,000, a turqouise and coral bracelet attributed to Dan Simplicio eventually sold for a phone bidder for $5,842, and a Tufa cast silver and turquoise belt buckle by Preston Monongye realized $2,640.

Pottery and basketry had a strong showing in the auction. A Maragaret Tafoya carved redware jar brought competing bids from the floor and phone, and eventually sold for a phone bidder for $19,200, a set of Pima baskets realized $3,690, an Apache basket sold for $3,360, and an Elizabeth Naranjo blackware jar hammered down at $2,400.

Additional notable items in the auction included a circa 1835 Cherokee bandolier bag collected by Michael Francis, which sold for $43,200, a pair of Apache beaded hide hightop moccasins realized $10,800, an Apache beaded hide sunrise dress sold for $11,400, and a Henry Farny bronze realized $9,840.

For details email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or phone 513-871-1670.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Henry Farny’s ‘After Big Game’  sold for $96,000. Cowan’s Auctions Inc.

Iroquois figural ball club from the collection of Marvin Lince sold for $57,000. Cowan’s Auctions Inc.

Cherokee bandolier bag collected by Michael Francis sold for $43,200. Cowan’s Auctions Inc.

Margaret Tafoya carved redware jar sold for $19,200. Cowan’s Auctions Inc.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 15 April 2014 14:02
 

Calder painting, Picasso linocut top the field at Cottone art sale

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Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 08 April 2014 15:20

Bold original gouache painting by Alexander Calder, titled ‘Loops Filled In.’ Price realized: $78,200. Cottone Auctions image.

GENESEO, N.Y. – A bold original gouache painting by the renowned American artist Alexander Calder (1898-1976), titled Loops Filled In, signed lower right and dated 1972, measuring 23 inches by 31 inches, sold for $78,200 at the annual Winter Fine Art & Antiques Auction held March 29 by Cottone Auctions.

LiveAuctioneers.com facilitated Internet live bidding.

The Calder painting was one of two artworks that brought identical selling prices. The other was a color linocut on Arches paper by Pablo Picasso (1881-1973), titled Faunes et Chevre. The work was numbered in pencil lower left (26/50) and on the reverse. Like the Calder, it also fetched $78,200. In all, just under 500 lots came up for bid in an auction that grossed about $1.5 million.

It was a busy day for Cottone Auctions’ staff, which had to tend to a packed house of around 250 people in the gallery, as well as nearly 3,000 approved online bidders. And, for some lots as many as 15 phone lines were humming, in addition to the estimated 1,000 left bids that were recorded that day.

“It was exhausting, but it was exhilarating, too,” remarked Matt Cottone of Cottone Auctions. “Fortunately, the market is very strong for better artwork and fine decorative accessories, as we had plenty from both categories in this auction. We stayed true to our philosophy of trying not to sell too much merchandise in any one sale and only offering better, fresh-to-the-market items.”

The auction was loaded from start to finish with original paintings by noted, listed artists, Tiffany lamps, estate silver, sculptures, Asian art, antiquities, art glass, Oriental rugs, period furniture and more. Headlining the event was the estate of William Levine of Rochester, N.Y., a businessman, philanthropist and modern art collector. His 43 lots accounted for $410,000.

Following are additional highlights from the auction. All prices quoted include a 15 percent buyer’s premium.

Picasso made more than one appearance on auction day. His limited-edition engraved bottle (Madoura, 147/300), executed circa 1954 and 17 inches tall, in excellent condition, went for $14,000. Also, a color etching and aquatint by the Spanish artist Joan Miro (1893-1983), titled Le Permissionaire, circa 1974, signed in pencil lower right and numbered 28/50, made $40,000.

A gorgeous Tiffany Studios Daffodil lamp, standing 25 inches tall, with the base signed and the 20-inch diameter shade also signed, in overall excellent condition, went to a determined bidder for $57,000. Also, a Tiffany Studios table lamp with the base signed “Tiffany Studios, N.Y.,” 17 1/2 inches tall, with a 10-inch diameter shade and original patina on the base, rose to $14,260.

A stacked walnut mushroom table by the American modern furniture sculptor Wendell Castle (b. 1932), purchased directly by the consignor from Castle and initialed by him the year it was crafted, 1972, finished at $48,300. The table, in the original finish and in excellent condition, will be included in the new book Wendell Castle: A Catalog Raisonne: 1958-2011, due out soon.

A charming 19th century three-quarter length portrait of a young girl, Marietta Ryan, wearing a lace-trimmed gown and carrying a basket of flowers, unsigned but rendered by Milton Hopkins (American, 1789-1884), breezed to $42,500. The oil on board painting is a classic piece of American folk art, rendered by an artist who made his living primarily by painting children’s portraits.

An oil on canvas painting by the German artist Felix Schlesinger (1833-1910), titled Feeding the Rabbits, artist signed lower right, measuring 16 inches by 20 1/4 inches and housed in the original frame, earned $39,100. Also, an oil on canvas landscape work by the Canadian painter Cornelius David Krieghoff (1812-1872), titled Caughnawaga Indians in Snowy Landscape, made $37,000.

An enameled Russian silver-handled vase, made circa 1900, 6 inches tall, totaling 39 troy ounces of silver, coasted to $17,800; and a Walrath art pottery vase having stylized cattails with a matte finish and standing 8 1/4 inches tall, $15,525. Also, an early Russian icon showing St. George the Warrior in half-length armor, 10 3/4 inches by 13 inches, Moscow School, commanded $19,300.

Rounding out just some of the auction’s top lots, a Native American painted elk skin hide depicting a war dance and hunting scenes, impressive at 60 inches by 50 inches, in generally good condition despite some staining and loss, achieved $18,500; and a fine and rare First French Empire Boutet engraved sword (circa 1804-1815), with a 32-inch blade, rose to $16,100.

Cottone Auctions is especially interested in fine artworks, Oriental rugs, silver, Tiffany, art glass, art pottery, folk art, Native American, old clocks and stoneware. To consign an item, an estate or a whole collection, call them at 585-243-1000 or send an e-mail to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Bold original gouache painting by Alexander Calder, titled ‘Loops Filled In.’ Price realized: $78,200. Cottone Auctions image.

Color linocut on Arches paper by Pablo Picasso (#26 of 50), titled ‘Faunes et Chevre.’ Price realized: $78,200. Cottone Auctions image.

Engraved bottle, executed circa 1954 by Pablo Picasso, marked on bottom #147/300. Price realized: $14,000. Cottone Auctions image.

Native American elk skin hide showing war dance and hunting scenes, 60 inches by 50 inches.  Price realized: $18,500. Cottone Auctions image.

Enameled Russian silver-handled vase, circa 1900, 39 troy ounces of 800 silver. Price realized: $17,800. Cottone Auctions image.

Tiffany Studios Daffodil lamp with base and shade both signed, 25 inches tall. Price realized: $57,000. Cottone Auctions image.

Stacked walnut mushroom table crafted in 1972 by Wendell Castle, artist initialed. Price realized: $48,300. Cottone Auctions image.

Early Russian icon, Moscow School, showing St. George the Warrior, 11 inches x 13 inches. Price realized: $19,300. Cottone Auctions image.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 09 April 2014 09:15
 

Chinese screen sells for $121,000 at Elite Decorative Arts

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Written by Auction House PR   
Monday, 07 April 2014 13:05

This large 19th century Chinese porcelain screen with four famille rose panels sold for $121,000. Elite Decorative Arts image.

BOYNTON BEACH, Fla. – An important 19th century Chinese porcelain screen consisting of four large panels mounted in a carved wooden frame and depicting mountain scenes with elders soared to $121,000 at a Fine Artwork, Porcelain & Decorative Arts Auction held March 29th by Elite Decorative Arts.

LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

The screen was by far the top lot of the sale and the final hammer price caught the Elite team, which had assigned it a modest presale estimate of just $1,400-$1,800, a little by surprise. “But it only proves what we’ve been seeing recently,” said Scott Cieckiewicz of Elite Decorative Arts. “Chinese porcelain plaques and screens have become extremely popular and bring high dollars.”

Case in point: a set of four Chinese famille rose porcelain plaques depicting the four seasons and housed in hardwood frames, with inscriptions, was offered recently by the British auction firm Charterhouse, with a presale estimate of $300-$500. By the time the final gavel fell, the set had reached a stratospheric $630,000. Undeniably, the market for certain Chinese antiques is red hot.

“Obviously we are seeking these items for consignment,” Cieckiewicz said, “not just porcelain plaques and screens, but other antiquities, too, like red coral carvings, jade carvings, porcelain, bronze and more.” At the firm’s March 15 auction, he noted, a palatial-size Chinese porcelain antique famille rose fish bowl (or planter), expected to realize $3,000-$5,000, reached $27,830.

The antique Chinese porcelain screen that topped the March 29 sale was a gorgeous example, and substantial, too, with an overall size of 38 1/2 inches by 46 3/4 inches. All four of the panels were famille rose. The sale, which grossed just over $250,000, attracted 80 in-house bidders, 21 phone bidders and 1,727 online bidders.

Following are additional highlights from the auction. All prices quoted include either an 18 percent buyer’s premium for in-house and phone bidders or a 21 percent premium for Internet bidders.

A blue and white Chinese footed wash cup from the Ching-Lung dynasty (circa 1736-1796), measuring 5 inches in height and signed to the base, changed hands for $10,030. This lot was intriguing because it became lost some years ago and again resurfaced just after World War II.

A large oil on canvas painting by Lithuanian-born American artist Max Band (1900-1974), titled Butcher Boy and imposing in size at 24 1/2 inches by 39 inches, garnered $8,260. The work is artist signed lower left and framed. Band studied at the Berlin Academy, authored the book History of Contemporary Art (1935) and lived a good portion of his life in Hollywood, Calif.

A bronze sculpture depicting a beautiful, partially nude woman by the French artist Jean-Baptiste Clesigner (1814-1883), 29 inches tall, fetched $5,082. The 1857 work was highly detailed, with the woman’s hair bound to the back with grape leaves. Clesinger was also known as Auguste. He learned from his father, a sculptor and stone mason, and maintained studios in Paris and Rome.

Another bronze – a limited-edition and large (92 inches tall) sculpture by the Israeli-Egyptian artist Itzik Asher (b. 1946), titled Virgin Bathing, signed and dated (1995), breezed to $7,965. Also, a 19th century 18K yellow gold micromosaic bangle bracelet with one side featuring a mural based on a fresco painted by Guido Reni, circa 1612, in Rome, Italy, reached $5,900.

Chinese carved red coral sculptures are hugely popular with collectors, and this auction had several. Examples included a grouping depicting a Quan Yin standing atop a floral decorated dragon boat ($5,082); a Shou Lou surrounded by seashells ($4,477); a peddler boy holding a bird, staff and jug ($3,025); and a Quan Yin holding a basket of flowers ($4,602).

For more information contact Elite Decorative Arts at 561-200-0893 or send an email to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

This large 19th century Chinese porcelain screen with four famille rose panels sold for $121,000. Elite Decorative Arts image.

Blue and white Chinese footed wash cup from the Ching-Lung dynasty (1736-1796), 5 inches tall. Price realized: $10,030. Elite Decorative Arts image.

Large oil on canvas painting by Lithuanian-born American artist Max Band (1900-1974), titled ‘Butcher Boy.’ Price realized: $8,260. Elite Decorative Arts image.

Mid-to-late 19th century Chinese carved red coral sculpture of Shou Lou with surrounded by seashells. Price realized: $4,477. Elite Decorative Arts image.

Bronze bust sculpture by French artist Jean-Baptiste Clesinger (1814-1883) of a partially nude woman. Price realized: $5,082. Elite Decorative Arts image.

Antique 18K yellow gold micromosaic bangle bracelet with intricate wire work and beading. Price realized: 5,900. Elite Decorative Arts image.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 09 April 2014 13:15
 

Navajo silver, jewelry excel at Allard Auction, March 8-9

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Written by Auction House PR   
Friday, 04 April 2014 15:48
Oversized turquoise and silver squash blossom Navajo necklace by Yellow Bird. Price realized: $3,163. Allard Auctions Inc. image.

MESA, Ariz. – An outstanding collection of 40 hand-wrought, Navajo-made silver pill, jewelry and trinket boxes, many with turquoise stones and made between the 1930s and the 1980s, sold for $9,200 at Allard Auctions’ Big Spring Phoenix Auction, held March 8-9. LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

The silver box collection was the top lot of the sale and contained 48 pieces overall. In addition to the boxes, the lot also featured two great canteens (one with coral), a small dish and five non-Indian pieces. The boxes came in various sizes and most boasted great patina. All had lids or covers. The largest two were signed by noted silversmiths “L. James” and “Suzie James.”

Over 800 lots of Native American art and artifacts came up for bid in an auction that grossed about $322,000. Between 100 and 125 people packed the house in person, while online bidding accounted for more than 500 registered bidders. Phone and absentee bids were also taken. In all there were about 300 successful bidders.

“There was a great deal of interest and excitement surrounding this sale way in advance of the actual event, and that told me it would be a huge success, which it was,” said Steve Allard of Allard Auctions. “It was one of our better auctions in the last two or three years. Just about all the major categories did well – jewelry, fine weave rugs, baskets, beadwork and unique items.”

Following are additional highlights from the auction. All prices quoted include a 15 percent buyer’s premium.

Many items sailed past estimates to bring high dollars – the hallmark of a successful auction. The silver box collection was expected to fetch only $2,000-$5,000. Also, a spectacular graduated green turquoise heshi strand necklace with fetish birds, bears and tear-drop extensions of turquoise and spiny oyster (est. $275-$550) ended up bringing $2,875.

Other overachievers included a large polychrome Acoma pottery jar by L. Concho, with classic floral motif in excellent condition, made circa 1978 (est. $400-$800) gaveled for $2,588; and an oversize Navajo turquoise and silver squash blossom Yellow Bird necklace set with about 200 carats of Morenci turquoise, beautifully crafted circa 1970s (est. $800-$1,600) garnered $2,750.

An early 20th century fully beaded ceremonial drumstick (Assiniboine/Gros Ventre), with a triangular drop and American flags in the design, in very good condition, made $1,840 against an estimate of $300-$600. Also a fine Navajo new wave storm pot, made circa 1990s by the renowned McKelvey Sisters, estimated at $500-$1,000), went for $1,955.

Hopi pottery jars, in particular, did well. A late 20th century Hopi olla by Hisi Nampeyo, with a flared rim and opposed polychrome parrot figures reached $1,035; while another Hisi Nampeyo example – a fine polychrome seed jar with four-way avian symbols, in very good condition and probably made around 1972, rose to $748.

A fine black-on-buff egg-shape Hopi pottery jar with bug and floral motif by the legendary Featherwoman (Silvia Naha), crafted in the late 20th century and in very good condition, breezed to $863, and another Naha creation, a fine polychrome-on-buff seed jar with a lizard figure and cornstalk on the shoulder, also in very good condition and made in the late 1900s, made $748.

An exceptional San Ildefonso blackware pottery plate by Maria & Santana, made circa 1960s, with feather designs and in superb condition, 10 inches in diameter, sold for $2,588. Also, a signed original pen and ink on paper work by Charles F. Lovato (1937-1987), depicting pottery and a stylized animal, circa 1972, 17 inches by 22 inches framed, made $805.

Rounding out just some of the auction’s top lots, a vintage flat beaded pictorial belt for a woman with sheep, a cow, horses and goat figures, made circa 1920 and measuring 6 inches by 36 inches, in very good condition, achieved $1,840; and a Navajo Two Gray Hills rug or weaving by Sadie Begay, done in beautiful earth tones and measuring 31 inches by 54 inches, gaveled for $1,725.

Allard Auctions Inc., which maintains its home office location on the Flathead Indian Reservation in St. Ignatius, Mont., has been selling exclusively American Indian artifacts and art at auction since 1968. The firm is always accepting quality merchandise for future auctions. To inquire about consigning phone 406-745-0500 or toll-free: 888-314-0343; or, email them at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE
Oversized turquoise and silver squash blossom Navajo necklace by Yellow Bird. Price realized: $3,163. Allard Auctions Inc. image. Graduated green turquoise heshi strand fetish necklace with figures, made circa 1960s. Price realized: $2,875. Allard Auctions Inc. image. Outstanding large polychrome Acoma pottery jar by L. Concho, with floral motif. Price realized: $2,588. Allard Auctions Inc. image. Fully beaded ceremonial drumstick with triangular drop and American flags. Price realized: $1,840. Allard Auctions Inc. image. Navajo Two Gray Hills rug or weaving by Sadie Begay, 31 inches by 54 inches. Price realized: $1,725. Allard Auctions Inc. image. San Ildefonso blackware pottery plate by Maria & Santana, made circa 1960s. Price realized: $2,588. Allard Auctions Inc. image. The top lot of the auction was a collection of 40 silver boxes, plus eight other items, which sold for $9,200. Allard Auctions Inc. image.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 08 April 2014 15:15
 
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