Payday Loans
payday loans
ADVERTISEMENTS
Banner
Banner

Get Free ACN Daily Headlines

LiveAuctioneers

Search Auction Central News

ADVERTISEMENTS
Banner
Banner
Bookmark and Share
Auction Results in the News

Noel Barrett’s $1.1M auction ventured into obscure and offbeat territory

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 27 January 2015 15:30

Baranger Studios Pirate Ship animated window display, made in 1945, $19,360. Noel Barrett image

NEW HOPE, Pa. – If variety is the spice of life, auction house owner Noel Barrett was the undisputed king of condiments over the weekend of December 5-6. His 926-lot Antique Auction colorfully ran the gamut from carousel figures and German Christmas ornaments to tattoo memorabilia and jewelry store motion displays. “And there were buyers for every single niche category,” said Barrett, known to collectors from coast to coast for his avuncular demeanor and expert appraisals on PBS Television’s Antiques Roadshow.

The auction, which had an online sell-through rate of 35.5% (by lot) through LiveAuctioneers, was anchored by two important collections: the Libby Goodman dollhouse and miniatures collection and a wonderful array of antique toys and trains amassed by renowned magician the late John Daniel and his wife, Kathy. In addition, the lineup featured a wealth of other toys, trains, signs and curiosities from approximately 40 other American and European consignors.

“This was one of our most eclectic sales ever. It contained a number of unusual single-owner pieces – family heirlooms that had been passed down through several generations,” Barrett said.

Grossing $1,120,000 (inclusive of 21% buyer’s premium), the sale breezed past its presale high estimate of $925,000. Leading the prices realized was a rare Marklin toy train replicating the real-life Stephenson’s Rocket that road the rails at record speeds from 1829 to 1840. Consisting of a locomotive with tender and two cars, the 25-inch-long train was offered with a $25,000-$35,000 estimate and ultimately sold for $121,000.

“It came to us from a German consignor and was purchased by a German collector, so the train went on quite a journey before returning to its homeland,” said Barrett.

The veteran toy appraiser went on to explain that the reason the train is so valuable is because relatively few were made in the first place.

“Marklin produced the toy more than 60 years after the real Stephenson’s Rocket was retired. It was not a good seller because it was not a train that kids could relate to. Because so few of the trains were marketed, it was rare to begin with, and even fewer survived over the century to follow,” Barrett said.

Known as Germany’s premier golden-era toy maker, Marklin also produced the Gauge 1 hospital car with 7 patients and 8 beds (est. $7,000-$8,000) and a circa 1923-1928 Locomobile steam plant with dynamo (est. $10,000-$12,000). Each of the two lots achieved $14,520.

Barrett said he was not expecting the $21,780 (4 times high estimate) price paid for a 19th-century Clinton fire pumper model consigned by descendants of its designer, Edgar Lasak. Accompanied by two framed fire company membership certificates issued to Lasak – one of them dated 1847 – the finely detailed, 18-inch-long model had survived in “brilliant condition,” according to its catalog description.

A 19th-century salesman’s sample of a Stebbins & Walker seeder (farm machine) cultivated an $11,200 selling price against an estimate of $3,500-$4,500. It was one of several rarities in the sale that had come to Barrett subsequent to an Antiques Roadshow appraisal.

“There were many eye-opening prices paid in this sale, but nothing was as shocking to me as the bidding battles over the Barangers,” said Barrett, describing the animated, tableau-style window displays produced from 1927 through 1957 for “mom-and-pop” jewelry stores. “The highest price I had ever seen for one at auction was $6,000. In our December sale, there were three from the collection of John Daniel, who wrote the book about Baranger Studios motion displays.” A 1945 Pirate Ship sailed to a $19,360 finish (est. $3,000-$5,000), a Turtle Sightseeing Bus with Passengers made $13,310; and a Rip Van Winkle with Nodding Elves was bid to $16,940.

Carousel animals and decorative elements from the collection of carousel restoration artist Tony Orlando were joined by a C.W. Parker striding camel that was formerly in the private collection of Leon Perelman. It trotted off to a new owner for the above-estimate price of $17,570. Other five-figure highlights included an animated Santa with toys window display, $10,890 (est. $1,500-$2,000); and a quarter-scale display model of 1932 Hudson made for the New York Auto Show. One of only seven known in all-original condition, it coasted to the top of its estimate range at $29,040.

Collecting “off the grid” seemed to be a consistent theme for the December sale. Quirky pieces that were in high demand included: an Edward Kelty Ringling Brothers “Congress of Freaks” panoramic photo, $5,700; an Art Deco zeppelin and crescent moon tubular metal lamp, $1,330; and an Adolph Friedlander (1851-1904) lithographed poster of a reclining tattooed lady with the message “Expert Tattooing Done Here,” $4,840. The latter poster, which was documented in early retail catalogs for tattooing equipment, had been conservatively estimated at $200-$400. It sold to a phone bidder in England.

Noel Barrett is currently accepting consignments for his next auction, which will be held over the weekend of November 20-21, 2015. Tel. 215-297-5109 or e-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

View the fully illustrated catalog for Noel Barrett's Dec. 5-6 auction, complete with prices realized, at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

#   #   #



ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Baranger Studios Pirate Ship animated window display, made in 1945, $19,360. Noel Barrett image

Animated window display of Santa in toyshop, 24in tall, $10,890. Noel Barrett image

Original C.W. Parker striding carousel camel, ex Leon Perelman private collection, only extant carousel camel of its era that was designed to move up and down, $17,470. Noel Barrett image

Quarter-scale display model of 1932 Hudson made for the New York Auto Show, one of seven known in all-original condition, $29,040. Noel Barrett image

Adolph Friedlander tattoo shop poster with image of tattooed lady, $4,840. Noel Barrett image

Edward Kelty Ringling Brothers ‘Congress of Freaks’ panoramic photo of circus sideshow performers, $5,700. Noel Barrett image

19th-century Clinton fire pumper model consigned by descendants of its designer, Edgar Lasak, $21,780. Noel Barrett image

Marklin circa 1923-1928 Locomobile steam plant with dynamo, $14,520. Noel Barrett image

Marklin locomotive with tender and two cars produced in 1902 to replicate the high-speed Stephenson’s Rocket, which was in service from 1829-1840, $121,000. Noel Barrett image

Marklin Gauge 1 hospital car with accessories including 7 patients and 8 beds, $14,520. Noel Barrett image

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 27 January 2015 17:27
 

Estate jewelry, Simonetti painting big draws at Kaminski auction

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Auction House PR   
Monday, 26 January 2015 16:22

Art Deco Chinese-style platinum and carved jade pin with circular diamond border and cabochon rubies, circa 1920-’30s, marked ‘T.B. Starr.’ Price realized: $11,400. Kaminski Auctions image

BEVERLY, Mass. – On Jan. 18 Kaminski Auctions presented the estate of Mary L. Alchian of Palm Springs, California. Alchian was a prominent Palm Springs businesswoman and jeweler with a discerning eye for fine jewelry and California art.

LiveAuctioneers.com provide Internet bidding services.

With over 10,000 signed up to bid on the Internet, 300 phone bids and 80-100 present in the audience there was spirited competition on every lot.

A vivid watercolor by Ettore Simonetti (Italian, 1857-1909) titled Market Scene and, signed lower right, was the top lot of the sale achieving a price of $21,600 against an estimate of $3,000-$4,000.

Alchian’s jewelry collection included rare Cartier pieces. A pair of 18K yellow gold earrings, signed Cartier, with 18 natural emeralds and 16 diamonds was hammered down at $20,400, while an unusual Art Deco Cartier 14 carat yellow gold compact with diamonds and sapphires, marked A1170, sold for $5,400.

Her vast collection of jewelry included many unusual Art Deco pieces. A featured lot in the sale was an eye-catching platinum, diamond and sapphire bow bracelet that sold for $14,400.

Numerous phone bidders and collectors online vied for a rare T.B. Starr Art Deco Chinese carved jade pin from the 1920s or ’30s. Set in platinum with a circular diamond border and cabochon rubies, it was valued at $2,500-$4,500 and was finally hammered down at $11,400. A pair of lovely Art Deco diamond and platinum drop earrings with 20 diamonds sold for $6,600.

More eclectic items in the collection included a circa 1920s 18K white gold, pearl and diamond purse in the style of Boucheron with 52 diamonds. It achieved a price of $11,400, while a 19th century harp by the Charles Lindeman Co. of Chicago, numbered 800, sold for $4,800.

Various lots from other estates achieved solid prices as well, including an English sterling silver lidded wine cooler with grape motif, hallmarked for London 1826-27, by makers Rebecca Emes and Edward Barnard that sold for $14,400.

For information call 978-927-2223.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Art Deco Chinese-style platinum and carved jade pin with circular diamond border and cabochon rubies, circa 1920-’30s, marked ‘T.B. Starr.’ Price realized: $11,400. Kaminski Auctions image  

Pair of 18K yellow gold earrings, signed Cartier, with 18 natural emeralds. Price realized: $20,400. Kaminski Auctions image  

Platinum, diamond, and sapphire bow bracelet, diamonds approximately 8 carats. Price realized: $14,400. Kaminski Auctions image   

 Ettore Simonetti (Italian, 1857-1909), ‘Market Scene,’ watercolor. Price realized: $21,600. Kaminski Auctions image

Last Updated on Monday, 26 January 2015 16:59
 

Jackie O's mystique, online bidding yield $900K at Palm Beach Modern sale

PDF Print E-mail
Written by CATHERINE SAUNDERS-WATSON, Auction Central News International   
Friday, 23 January 2015 09:32

‘The White House’ book signed and inscribed by Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis to interior designer Richard Keith Langham, $4,575. PBMA image

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. (ACNI) – After weeks of incessant media coverage, Palm Beach Modern Auctions (PBMA) brought the hammer down on 330 lots in a January 17 Modern Design & Luxury Goods Auction that grossed more than $900,000 (inclusive of after-sales and 22% buyer’s premium). LiveAuctioneers provided Internet live-bidding services for the event.

The allure of the auction’s core contents –premier examples of midcentury designer furnishings – was further enhanced by a selection of Kennedy family photos and correspondence handwritten by Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.

Offered in 20 consecutive lots, the Onassis grouping consisted primarily of original photographs taken by Palm Beach society photographer Robert Davidoff (1926-2004) and archival notes – some with hand-drawings – that Onassis had sent to two designers whom she counted as close friends. One of the recipients was Bill Hamilton, longtime design director for Carolina Herrera, who dressed Jackie Onassis almost exclusively from the mid 1980s until her passing in 1994. The other was interior decorator Richard Keith Langham, who designed rooms in several Kennedy/Onassis residences.

“Long before the auction began, we knew that, on the basis of absentee bids alone, all of the Jackie Onassis lots would sell,” said PBMA auctioneer and co-owner Rico Baca. “Even without the additional competition we anticipated would come during the sale, each lot had already met its reserve and then some.”

The top “Jackie” lot was an original edition of The White House, a book that Onassis had personally signed and gifted to Langham. The inscription reads: “For Richard – Perhaps this great house will know your touch one day – Your friend Jacqueline Kennedy.” With expectations of selling for $800-$1,200, it was bid to $4,575 over the phone.

Of the photographs taken by Davidoff, a lot consisting of two silver gelatin prints of Onassis in smart, casual attire led the pack at $2,200. An unusual bonus, said Baca, was that all of the Davidoff prints, which came directly from the late photographer’s estate, conveyed with copyright.

Two Robert Davidoff (1926-2004) silver gelatin prints of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, which sold as one lot with copyright for $2,200. PBMA image

“There was an incredible amount of media interest in the Onassis material. It started when Auction Central News and its parent company LiveAuctioneers took notice and started promoting the sale. Very soon after that, Associated Press ran a story that appeared in hundreds of newspapers, followed by a video feature on CBS This Morning. After that, it was off to the races. The energy level felt very much like the Steve Rubell/Studio 54 auction we conducted two years ago, which again, got its kick-start from LiveAuctioneers’ PR department,” said Baca.

The auction was a standing-room-only event. “All seats were taken, and people were even watching from outside the exhibition center. Those who had come just for the Onassis lots became intrigued by the modern furniture and art. Many of them stayed for the remainder of the sale. We had a very nice complimentary catered buffet available to all guests – I’m sure that was an incentive, too,” Baca said with a laugh.

The auction’s top lot was a 21.5-inch-tall nude bronze by Georg Kolbe (1877-1947), the leading German sculptor of his generation. Because so many of Kolbe’s works were seized and melted down for Nazi war armaments, his sculptures are in high demand, and not just in Germany, where the bronze sold in the auction will soon reside. Kolbe artworks are held in museum collections across Europe, the United States and Russia.

Georg Kolbe (German, 1877-1947), bronze nude, 21.5 inches high, top lot of the sale at $56,120. PBMA image

“Two German bidders and an American were very eager to win the bronze, which had a Berlin foundry mark. One of the Germans won it for $56,120,” said Baca.

There was intense interest in sculptures throughout. Two consecutive works by Minoru Niizuma (Japanese, 1930-1998) sold for $9,760 and $10,980, respectively. Within the fine art subcategory, the most sought-after work was a monumental Pace Editions Jean Dubuffet (French, 1901-1985) lithograph titled Parcours. Against an estimate of $6,000-$8,000, it realized $9,150.

“There were no weak categories in the sale at all – American, Danish, Italian, paintings – everything was strong,” Baca said.

John Seery (American, b. 1941-), ‘Espana,’ 76 x 93 inches, Hokin Gallery label on verso, $7,442. PBMA image

A monumental Italian starburst or “Sputnik” chandelier launched into orbit with an opening bid of $9,000 and eventually settled at $18,000; while a Joseph D’urso coffee table swept past its $3,000-$5,000 estimate to garner $7,320. A set of Afra & Tobia Scarpa chairs exceeded high estimate at $10,370, and a grid-like coffee table attributed to Gio Ponti met expectations with a winning bid of $10,370. Other furniture highlights included an Ico Parisi dining table, $6,100; a pair of Billy Haines slipper chairs, $5,185; and the top furniture lot: a Wendell Castle Parallelogram coffee table, $19,520.

Wendell Castle ‘Parallelogram’ coffee table, sold with certificate of authenticity, $19,520. PBMA image

PBMA’s first-ever offering of luxury goods and handbags was a big hit with the Palm Beach crowd and fashionistas worldwide. A classic Hermes Kelly Birkin travel bag was claimed for $10,370; while an intricately fashioned, crystal-beaded Coppola E Toppo for Valentino choker was bid to $7,930.

Coppola E Toppo for Valentino choker, black glass tubes and roses montees affixed to a weft of black half-crystal faceted beads, $7,930. PBMA image

Architectural Digest Editor Emeritus and Palm Beach resident Paige Rense Noland purchased the only classic car entered in the sale – a pristine 1956 red Ford Thunderbird convertible – for $43,920, then promptly donated it to the Humane Society of the United States. “She wants the charity to use it any way they desire to benefit animals in need. This is so typical of her and her never-ending generosity,” said Baca.

The majority of the 1,100 bidders registered for the sale were online participants, Baca confirmed. In total, 122 lots sold online through LiveAuctioneers.

“There were 602 approved registered bidders through LiveAuctioneers, and they placed 338 live online bids during the sale. But what really shocked us was the more than $500,000 in absentee bids that came to us through LiveAuctioneers. We had never before experienced such a high absentee total,” Baca said.

'Architectural Digest' Editor Emeritus Paige Rense Noland paid $43,920 for this 1956 Ford Thunderbird convertible and promptly donated it to the Humane Society of the United States. PBMA image

 

Another factor directly attributable to the sale’s success was underbidders. “The underbidder should never be underestimated,” Baca said. “When we began our business, we had no idea how important underbidders were, but it took only one auction for us to figure that out, and that's what LiveAuctioneers does for us – it brings us the underbidders.”

Baca said many auction records were set for individual artists during his company’s January 17 sale. “We think we’ve found the right formula in terms of what we sell and how we market and present it. Bidders are excited, and our consignors are really happy. That’s what every auction house strives for.”

To contact Palm Beach Modern Auctions, call 561-586-5500 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Visit them online at www.modernauctions.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog for PBMA’s Jan. 17, 2015 auction, complete with prices realized at http://www.liveauctioneers.com/catalog/65808_modern-design-jacqueline-kennedy-and-luxury/page1.

#   #   #



ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Set of eight Afra & Tobia Scarpa ‘Pigreco’ chairs, $10,370. PBMA image

Duilio Barnabe (Italian, 1914-1961), ‘Pescatori Sulla Spiaggia,’ 17.5 x 20.5 inches (sight). Provenance: R.S. Johnson International Gallery, Chicago (label on verso); and Palm Beach, Florida private collection. Sold for $8,540. PBMA image

Last Updated on Monday, 26 January 2015 16:57
 

20th century design shows staying power at Kaminski Auctions

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Auction House PR   
Thursday, 15 January 2015 16:42
C. Jere, brutalist starburst mirror, bronze, signed C. Jere. Kaminski Auctions image

BEVERLY, Mass. – On Jan. 4, Kaminski Auctions hosted a strong 20th century design auction, which offered an array of items for every type of modern collector. This sale displayed a strong sell-through rate of 76 percent and welcomed bidders from across the globe.

LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding services.

Buyers strongly encouraged the direction of this sale by displaying significant interest in mid-century furniture. A George Mulhauser chair and ottoman for Plycraft, done in vinyl upholstery the color of golden rod, sold early in the sale for $1,200. A pair of vibrant Swan chairs by Arne Jacobsen for Fritz Hansen brought a strong final price of $1,500 and a folding leather seat in the manner of Poul Kjaerholm achieved $1,100. Helping to continue the trend of interest in Kjaerholm was a set of four chairs attributed to the designer, in the style of his iconic PK9 chair. This lot hit the auction block with a low estimate of $500 and was ultimately awarded to the highest bidder at $7,500. Bidders fought to obtain an Eames rosewood 670 chair and 671 ottoman, which brought $3,200, while determined shoppers also appeared to covet an Eero Saarinen marble-top dining table that finally achieved a $3,000 hammer price.

Fine art also found significant success. An early 20th century watercolor by Leon Bakst drew bidders into a heated competition that resulted in a hammer price of $10,000. Following in quick succession was a well-known aquatint titled Steep Street, by Wayne Thiebaud that achieved an appropriate $8,000 and an original oil by John Piper, which hammered at $6,500.

A small group of bidders showed specified interest in contemporary jewelry and bid well on a collection of various Kieselstein-Cord pieces, with achieved prices ranging from $1,600 to $5,500. Also enticing to buyers was a Pomellato necklace from the Paisley Collection, which featured a pave diamond pendant set in 18K gold. This striking piece of jewelry brought a commendable $7,000 approximately half way through the sale.

Bidders also exhibited interest in a variety of decorative arts. Auction participants battled to win a Curtis Jere bronze Brutalist mirror in an interesting “starburst” design, which was awarded to the highest bidder for $1,700. A Lalique “Champs Elysees” center bowl hammered at $1,100 and a classic colorless glass Lalique “Bacchantes” vase achieved $1,600. Additional pieces of Lalique performed well, either within, or above their given estimates, while a small group of Murano items also seemed to attract attention at more conservative price points.

To discuss possible consignment for the upcoming Spring 2015 Modern sale, contact Modern Kathryn Wilkins at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE
C. Jere, brutalist starburst mirror, bronze, signed C. Jere. Kaminski Auctions image Leon Bakst (1866-1924), landscape with reflective pool, watercolor and pastel on paper, signed, dated 1921. Kaminski Auctions image Barry Kieselstein-Cord,18K gold necklace with cross pendant, matte finish, dated 1988. Kaminski Auctions image Wayne Thiebaud (American, b. 1920), 'Steep Street,' color spit-bite aquatint with dry point etching, editioned 43/50, dated 1989. Kaminski Auctions image Set of four PK9 style dining chairs, attributed to Poul Kjaerholmholm. Kaminski Auctions image
Last Updated on Monday, 26 January 2015 16:24
 

Treadway-Toomey's Arts & Crafts auction a resounding success

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Auction House PR   
Thursday, 15 January 2015 12:05
Tiffany Studios and Grueby Faience Co. Swirling Leaf table lamp, New York and Boston, favrile glass, lead, copper, matte green and yellow glazed pottery, 19 inches in diameter shade x 21 inches high. Price realized: $32,940. Treadway-Toomey Auctions image

CHICAGO – On Dec. 6, Treadway-Toomey Auctions sold the Collection of Robert and Elaine Diloff, described as of the best collection of Arts & Crafts to ever come to auction.

LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

To set the tone for the day, a rare Gustav Stickley table sold for $20,740 at the beginning of the sale, above its estimate of $8,000 to $12,000. A few lots later a Stickley sideboard with a high estimate of $20,000 sold for $36,600. Another Stickley item, this one a plant stand with a large matte green Grueby tile soared past its estimate of $10,000 to $15,000, finally selling for $51,850 after heavy bidding. Following this trend, two additional Gustav Stickley pieces brought well above their estimates: a portfolio stand estimated at $8,000 to $12,000 sold for $30,500 and a large hexagonal table went for $30,500 as well, far above the high estimate of $15,000.

A Grueby Faience vase by George Kendrick estimated at $12,000 to $17,000 brought $26,840, while a Tiffany Studios and Grueby Swirling Leaf table lamp sold for $32,940. Similarly, a Dirk Van Erp table lamp brought $79,300.

There was intense interest in color woodblock prints, specifically Sequoia Forest by Gustave Baumann that sold for $20,740, above its estimate of $7,000 to $9,000, and a vivid blue Morning Glories print by Edna Boies Hopkins that went for $15,000.

Metalworks also performed well. A Jessie Preston bronze candlestick that was estimated at $3,000 to $5,000 sold for $10,370, while a rare Mulholland Brothers tea and coffee service silver set far exceeded the high estimate of $8,000 when it went for $17,500.

The sale of this collection was a tremendous success, both in terms of price and participation. The next Arts & Crafts auction at Treadway-Toomey Gallery in Chicago will be March 7th. Consignments of quality works are welcomed.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE
Tiffany Studios and Grueby Faience Co. Swirling Leaf table lamp, New York and Boston, favrile glass, lead, copper, matte green and yellow glazed pottery, 19 inches in diameter shade x 21 inches high. Price realized: $32,940. Treadway-Toomey Auctions image Gustav Stickley and Grueby Faience Co., Yeddo plant stand, Eastwood, N.Y. and Boston, ebonized maple, mottled matte green glazed pottery, signed with remnants of earliest paper label, 15 inches square x 23.5 inches high. Prize realized: $51,850. Treadway-Toomey Auctions image  Gustav Stickley table, uncataloged form, Eastwood, N.Y., oak, original leather, original brass, unsigned, 37 inches in diameter x 29.5 inches high. Price realized: $20,740. Treadway-Toomey Auctions image Gustav Stickley sideboard, #901, Eastwood, N.Y., oak and iron, unsigned, rare and desirable form, 50 inches w x 23 inches in diameter x 40 inches high. Price realized: $36,600. Treadway-Toomey Auctions image Gustav Stickley, attribution, hexagonal table, variation of #410, Eastwood, N.Y., oak, original leather, original brass, 47 inches wide x 56 inches deep x 30 inches high. Price realized: $30,500. Treadway-Toomey Auctions image Grueby Faience Co., George Kendrick (1850-1919), decorator, vase, #33, Boston, matte green glazed pottery, impressed logo and number, 12 inches high. Price realized: $26,840. Treadway-Toomey Auctions image Gustav Stickley portfolio stand, #551, Eastwood, N.Y., oak, signed with early box mark, 30 inches wide x 12 inches in diameter x 41 inches high. Price realized: $30,500.  Treadway-Toomey Auctions image Gustave Baumann, (American, 1881-1971), ‘Sequoia Forest,’ color woodblock print, pencil signed and titled, edition 13/125, framed, 13 inches x 12 3/4 inches. Price realized: $20,740. Treadway-Toomey Auctions image Mulholland Brothers, tea and coffee service, #536, Evanston, Ill., hand-hammered sterling silver, stamped logos and numbers, rare and complete. Price realized: $17,500. Treadway-Toomey Auctions image
Last Updated on Monday, 26 January 2015 16:57
 

Le Pho painting the toast of Kaminski's New Year's auction

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Auction House PR   
Thursday, 08 January 2015 17:53

Le Pho (Vietnamese, 1907-2001), ‘Roses Tremieres,’ oil on canvas, sold for $13,200. Kaminski Auctions image

BEVERLY, Mass. – Kaminski Auctions ended 2014 with an impressive sale on Dec. 28 at their annual New Year’s auction. The sale drew bidders from Europe and Asia as the two top selling lots of the sale included a Sèvres portrait tea service and an important Vietnamese painting.

LiveAuctioneers.com facilitated Internet live bidding.

It is rare to find a complete Sèvres portrait tea service. This particular set was composed of 11 pieces on a cobalt blue background with finely detailed portraits on each, including images of Madame de Pompadour, Marie Anne de Mailly-Nesle and Marie Leszczynska. The set sold for $17,035 including buyer’s premium.

An important painting by the famous Vietnamese painter Le Pho (Vietnamese, 1907-2001) titled Roses Tremieres, from a California estate, sold for $13,200. The painting was a lovely floral bouquet of vivid yellow and red roses signed lower right by the artist.

Bidding on the Internet jumped from $3,000 to $13,000 for a rare Italian carved gilt mirror with beveled glass and an intricately carved frame decorated with putti, swags and birds from a Massachusetts estate. The final price was $15,600 including buyer’s premium.

Two sculptures in the sale performed well including a Demetre Chiparus (Romanian, 1886-1947), bronze on marble base, titled Ayouta, and signed "D. Chiparus" on the base that sold for $13,200 and a Henryk Kuna (Polish, 1879-1945), bronze sculpture of a kneeling figure, mounted on a green marble base, signed and dated 1913, Warszawa Foundry. It sold for $6,600 to an Internet bidder from Poland.

A collection of 18th century mahogany and dark wood furniture brought stronger prices than in recent months. An 18th century Philadelphia walnut grandfather clock, by Thomas Crow of Wilmington, Del., sold for $7,200 while an a 18th century English sideboard, with string, shell and bellflower inlay brought $6,240.

For more information phone 978-927-2223.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Le Pho (Vietnamese, 1907-2001), ‘Roses Tremieres,’ oil on canvas, sold for $13,200. Kaminski Auctions image

This Sèvres portrait tea set, 11 pieces, sold for $17,035. Kaminski Auctions image

Demetre Chiparus, (Romanian, 1886-1947) ‘Ayouta,’ bronze on marble base, signed, sold for $13,200. Kaminski Auctions image

Italian carved gilt mirror having an intricately carved frame decorated with putti, swags and birds. Price realized: $15,600. Kaminski Auctions image

Last Updated on Thursday, 15 January 2015 16:42
 

Purple Heart awarded to war hero earns $5,100 at Mohawk Arms

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 06 January 2015 17:30

Purple Heart awarded to Cpl. Joseph E. Oleskiewicz – a member of the ‘Filthy Thirteen’ in World War II. Price realized: $5,100. Mohawk Arms Inc. image

BOUCKVILLE, N.Y. – The Purple Heart awarded to U.S. Cpl. Joseph E. Oleskiewicz, a member of the “Filthy Thirteen,” the 1st Demolition Section of the Regimental Headquarters Company, 101st Airborne Division, that dropped into Normandy on June 6, 1944 in World War II, sold for $5,100 at Mohawk Arms’ Auction #72, a live and Internet auction that ended Dec. 5-6.

The ‘Filthy Thirteen” had orders to secure or destroy bridges over the Douve River in France. About half of the men in the unit were killed, wounded or captured during the mission. Oleskiewicz survived, but was killed in battle just a few months later, in September 1944, during Operation Market Garden. He appeared in a Stars and Stripes magazine photo taken on the night of June 5, 1944.

The auction, featuring 1,900 lots of military items from multiple wars and generations, was held in Mohawk Arms’ Bouckville, N.Y., as well as online.

LiveAuctioneers.com provided Intenet live bidding services.

The auction was packed with awards and medals, ethnographic weapons, bayonets and swords, Third Reich and other German memorabilia, reference books, American Civil War and Revolutionary War canteens, Imperial German helmets, British Napoleonic-era spontoons, American World War I uniforms, vintage firearms, Civil War leather goods, photos, letters, Nazi peaked caps and more.

Overall, the auction was a success, but not without some surprises.

“Areas I thought would do well fell flat, while some others far exceeded our expectations,” said Ray Zyla of Mohawk Arms Inc. “Categories that were somewhat disappointing included German steel helmets and Civil War swords and equipment, although Confederate canteens did do well and were the exception.”

Categories that held their own or surpassed expectations, according to Zyla, included swords (German Imperial, Third Reich and Samurai especially), Civil War handguns and revolvers, American combat knives, German Third Reich daggers, reference books and medals and badges. He added, “World War I items are coming on strong, but just in interest, not prices.”

The following are additional highlights from the auction. All prices quoted include the buyer’s premium, which ranged from between 16 to 22 percent, depending on how the bid was placed.

The top lot of the auction was a German Luftwaffe silver pokal, a silver footed cup, awarded to the Nazi flying ace Karl Nordmann, showing eagles in combat and a 1939 Iron Cross. The pokal brought $9,912. Also, a German World War II convex Maltese Cross award, with swords and an eagle/cutout swastika on the swords between the arms, with pin, fetched $1,068.

A cache of eight books from Adolf Hitler’s personal library, seized by an American major with the 713th MP Battalion and his French counterpart and containing Hitler’s hand-penciled notes and directives, were sold as single lots. An example, Das Saarbuch by Friedrich Heiss, sailed past its estimate of $450 to realize $2,200. Also, two items from Hitler’s mistress Eva Braun’s dressing table – a crystal square decanter and matching powder jar – went for $2,135.

A U.S. World War II 1st Ranger Battalion special combat knife with a 9¼-inch Bowie blade and engraved “Old Faithful” and “Australia – Aug. 20, 1943,” changed hands for $1,220. Also, a U.S. World War I 50th Aero Squadron camouflage helmet, with a painted insignia of the Third Army, the 7th Corps and the 50th Aero Squadron (a Dutch girl carrying a stick) garnered $1,525.

A Confederate wood drum canteen with iron bands and strap loops of irregular workmanship but in very good-plus condition, easily topped its estimate of $1,200 by hitting $4,200, while a Colt Army M1860 percussion revolver, a four-screw type (to accommodate a shoulder stock), with a worn but visible cylinder scene and matching numbers (“17452”), hit the mark at $1,708.

A German World War II TN (Technical Corps) officer’s dress dagger, with nickeled crossguard bearing a relief eagle/swastika/gear wheel and an 11-inch blade, in excellent condition, rose to $5,050; and a German World War II “Prinz Eugen” model dress sword (favored by Waffen-SS officers), bearing a single back strap, eagle/swastika pommel and relief oak leaves, made $1,037.

A German World War II Gau Sudetenland commemorative badge, with large detailed eagle and swastika mounted within an aged, blackened, open silver oak leaf wreath bearing the date (1938) commanded $5,100, while a rare German World War II army parachutist’s badge, unmarked but resembling a Juncker construction, with an eagle/swastika and open oak leaf wreath, hit $1,586.

A Prussian 6th Kurassier Regiment EM helmet, having a Tombak body with German silver visor trim and a matching “football” base with a short brass spike and convex gilt brass chin scales, went for $3,840. Also, an Imperial German 89th Regiment, 2nd Battalion, Mecklenburg Grenadier one-year volunteer helmet with brown leather sweatband and “split” tan silk liner, made $3,120.

Rounding out just some of the auction’s major highlights, a wooden suitcase containing 20 Japanese model warships from around World War II, made by the Comets Metal Co., Richmond Hill, N.Y., each one mounted on a board, brought $793; and an early German World War II Army M1918 “cutout” helmet with painted eagle-swastika and a Prussian shield, hit $2,640.

For more information contact Mohawk Arms Inc. at 315-893-7888 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Purple Heart awarded to Cpl. Joseph E. Oleskiewicz – a member of the ‘Filthy Thirteen’ in World War II. Price realized: $5,100. Mohawk Arms Inc. image

U.S. World War II 1st Ranger Battalion special combat knife with a 9¼-inch Bowie blade ($1,220). Mohawk Arms Inc. image

Well-made Confederate wood drum canteen with iron bands and strap loops ($4,200). Mohawk Arms Inc. image

Luftwaffe silver pokal, or silver footed chalice, awarded to the Nazi flying ace Karl Nordmann ($9,912). Mohawk Arms Inc. image

Two items from Hitler’s mistress Eva Braun’s dressing table: a crystal square decanter and matching powder jar ($2,135). Mohawk Arms Inc. image

Colt Army M1860 percussion revolver, a four-screw type to accommodate a shoulder stock ($1,708). Mohawk Arms Inc. image

Wooden case containing 20 Japanese model ships from around World War II, made by the Comets Metal Co. ($793). Mohawk Arms Inc. image

Imperial German 89th Regiment, 2nd Battalion, Mecklenburg Grenadier one-year volunteer helmet ($3,120). Mohawk Arms Inc. image

Last Updated on Thursday, 15 January 2015 12:04
 

Russian art and antiques highly valued at Jackson's Nov. 18 auction

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Auction House PR   
Friday, 02 January 2015 14:15

This Russian icon of St. Nicholas, measuring 12.5 x 10.5 inches, presented to Pope John Paul II by Boris Yeltsin, accompanied with excellent provenance, sold to a buyer from St. Petersburg, Russia for $143,750 at Jackson’s International Auction. Jackson’s International Auction image

CEDAR FALLS, Iowa – The Nov. 18 auction at Jackson’s International totaled $3.6 million with an amazingly high sales rate of a little over 90 percent, almost double that of recent sales at many of the large auction houses, especially in the area of Russian arts and antiques for which Jackson’s has gained an international reputation and following. The sale attracted over 700 registered bidders representing over 37 countries worldwide.

LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

The auction featured the lifelong collection of Russian icons from the estate of the late Jose Antonio Danobeitia (1942-2011) of Toronto, Canada, as well as examples from other smaller collections. There were no shortages of buyers for the fine and unusual, and when it came to Russian icons, the trend of late (circa 1880-1915), high-quality examples proved once again to dramatically outpace what was once the focal point of every Russian icon collection, early pre-17th century icons.

Perhaps one of the most unique icons offered was a 12-by-10-inch icon of St. Nicholas, circa 1900, which had been presented to Pope John Paul II during a visit to the Vatican by then President Boris Yeltsin on Dec. 20, 1991. The icon was in turn given by Pope John Paul II to his secretary Stanislaw Dziwisz, who in turn gave it to his Polish-American friend, Monsignor Michael Dylag, the consignor. It sold for $143,750 to a collector in St. Petersburg, Russia, against a preauction estimate of $10,000-$20,000.

The sale opened with a fine selection of Russian icons including a Western-style oil on metal icon of the Last Supper with ornate gilt-bronze Byzantine framework dated to circa 1890 and which ended up selling for $262,000 against a presale estimate of $15,000-$25,000. There have apparently been three similar icons contained in identical frames surface in the last decade, the first one sold was attributed to as having come from the famous Moscow Cathedral of Christ the Savior. However, further research has shed doubt on that attribution.

A scarce 12-by-10-inch icon depicting saints Vladimir, Alexander and Boris from the workshop of noted court iconographer Iosif S. Chirikov, signed and dated 1891, sold for $250,000 against a preauction estimate of $30,000-$50,000. The icon attracted seven phone bidders (all from Russia) and ended up selling to a collector in St. Petersburg. That was preceded by an 18th century icon depicting the Last Judgment and measuring 21 by 17 inches. It, too, sold to a phone bidder bringing $125,000.

Other noteworthy icon sales include an interesting western style example depicting St. Alexandra, executed on copper and with silver frame by Ovchinikov and with the verso displaying a dedicatory inscription on dated 1909 and related the Krupenskiy family, a very large and wealthy aristocratic Bessarabian family from Moldovia. It sold for $62,500 to the phone. A small (3.8 by 2.8 inches) finely painted miniature image of Christ with silver frame by Faberge went to a buyer from Moscow for $50,000. A small 4-by-6-inch presentation icon triptych presented to the Gen. Vladimir Antipov who from 1908-1915 was the headmaster of the Vladimir Military School in St. Petersburg, sold for and even $40,000, and a Russian icon of the Transfiguration measuring 12 by 10 inches and with Art Nouveau-style silver riza with the mark of the First Artel sold for $31,250.

There were, of course, numerous other icon sales of note (indeed, over 250 icons were sold at auction). However, the aforementioned icons represent some of the more significant examples. Other Russian works worthy of mention include a small nocturnal Paris street scene by Konstatin Korovin that sold after the auction for $16,250, whereas a 12-by-19-inch watercolor landscape by Benois did $9,375.

Lastly, a fine Tsar Nicholas II hand-signed photo dated 1916 sold for $10,000 and a small prayer book dated 1910 with dedicatory inscription to Tsarevich Alexi Nikolaevich was purchased by a Russian museum for $3,750.

The second section of the auction featured both European and American works of art with the highlight being a 16-by-23-inch oil on artist board painting of a festive Indian encampment by American artist LaVerne Nelson Black (1887-1938), which sold for $115,000 to a private Midwest collector. That painting was followed by a Sierra Mountain landscape by American artist Edgar A. Payne (1883-1947), which finished at $50,000, selling to a California buyer. A typical bayou scene by Joseph Rusling Meeker (1827-1887) and measuring 16 by 22 inches sold to a private collector for $33,750 against a preauction estimate of $15,000-$25,000. A fresh to the market landscape in an original Newcomb Macklin frame by Tony Angarola (1893-1929) set a new auction record for the artist when is finished at $21,250 against a rather conservative estimate of $800-$1,200, and a spring landscape by Indiana artist Claude Curry Bohm (1894-1971) sold for $12,500.

A good array of European paintings and art also crossed the block, including a large and impressive oil on panel painting depicting St. Ceclia by Belgian artist Julian Joseph de Vriendt (1842-1935), which sold for $30,000. That was followed by a 22-by-44-inch watercolor by Italian artist Gustavo Simoni (1846-1926), which depicted a carpet seller and was dated 1893. Estimated at $3,000-$5,000, the painting drew 18 phone bidders and a multitude of absentee bids, finally selling for $21,250.

Other interesting sales include an oil on canvas abstract by Indian artist Laxman Shrestha sold for $17,500 against an estimate of $5,000-$7,500 and a two volume set of the History of the Expedition (Lewis and Clark), published by Bradford & Inskeep, 1814, and including the important fold-out map found in the first volume sold for $55,000. Typically a rare offering, as it so happened, the aforementioned lot was one of three two-set volumes that were offered at auction within 30 days of each other at various auction houses in the United States. A number of items from the now closed Little Norway Museum west of Madison, Wis., crossed the block and included an interesting Danish silver presentation drinking horn dated 1886, which sold for $8,375, a small (7 inches in length) hand-carved Norwegian bent wood puzzle box dated 1782 sold to a private New York collector for $5,000, and a painted Norwegian wood wedding sleigh sold to a buyer in Moscow for $11,250.

Other decorative arts worthy of note include a Sevres style gilt-bronze mounted bisque pedestal, which sold for $17,500, a large KPM plaque depicting the Old Testament scene of Japhthan’s daughter and her young companions made $25,000, whereas a pair of other KPM plaques, one depicting Christ with the adulterous woman and the other depicting the banishment of Hagar and Ishmael, totaled $15,000.

The sale ended with a small offering of Asian works beginning with an oil on canvas painting of two women drinking tea by Vietnamese/French artist Le Pho (1907-2001) which sold for $40,000, another Le Pho depicting a composition of flowers sold to the same buyer for $31,250, and a pair of Le Pho floral still lifes totaled $19,375.

Other Asian works worthy of note include a Chinese blanc de chine figure of Kwan-Yin and measuring just under 10 inches in height sold for $21,250 against an estimate of $1,000-$2,000, a carved jade figure of a resting water buffalo made $16,250, and a Chinese carved jade belt hook mounted as a magnifying glass handle sold for $7,500.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

This Russian icon of St. Nicholas, measuring 12.5 x 10.5 inches, presented to Pope John Paul II by Boris Yeltsin, accompanied with excellent provenance, sold to a buyer from St. Petersburg, Russia for $143,750 at Jackson’s International Auction. Jackson’s International Auction image

This 12-by-10-inch Russian icon depicting three saints, dated 1891, and signed by noted court iconographer Iosif S. Chirikov, sold to a Russian bidder for $250,000 at Jackson’s International Auction. Jackson’s International Auction image

This oil on artist board painting of a festive Indian encampment by American artist LaVerne Nelson Black (1887-1938) sold for $115,000. Jackson’s International Auction image

This watercolor painting by Italian artist Gustavo Simoni (1846-1926) depicting a carpet seller sold for $21,250. Jackson’s International Auction image

This 39-by-32-inch oil on canvas painting by Le Pho (French/Vietnamese 1907-2001) depicting two women drinking tea sold for $40,000. Jackson’s International Auction image

This Chinese blanc de chine figure of Kwan-Yin, measuring just less than 10 inches, sold for $21,250. Jackson’s International Auction image

Last Updated on Thursday, 08 January 2015 17:22
 

Bohemian bonbonnieres bid to $190,000 at Artingstall & Hind

PDF Print E-mail
Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 30 December 2014 16:56
Pair of unique 19th century Imperial yellow cut glass Bohemian bonbonnieres that sold for $190,000 (hammer price). Artingstall & Hind Auctioneers BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. – Artingstall & Hind Auctioneers ended the 2014 calendar year with an outstanding and impressive sale on Dec. 7.

One of Great Britain’s oldest auction firms, established in Manchester, England in 1874 opened a showroom in Beverly Hills, Calif., in 2010. In less than half a decade the company became one of the fastest growing auction houses in Los Angeles. Artingstall specializes in rare Imperial and Export Chinese ceramics and art, fine Japanese works of art and European decorative arts and antiques from the 16th to 20th Century.

The Dec. 7 auction drew international attention for its large array of specialty fine arts and antiques, with bidders participating from Europe, the Middle East and Asia. LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

The predominant piece bringing vast amounts of attention was Lot 299, a pair of unique 19th century imperial yellow cut glass Bohemian bonbonnieres. The opaline glass, originally made for Persian and Turkish markets, was a truly distinguished feature. Its vibrant yellow color and enamel flowers painted on the lid, body and tray were exquisite. The lids were surmounted with French cast bronze clusters of grapes. It was a beautiful piece that deserved the soaring bids from across the globe. With aggressive phone bidders and online bidders the item sold at $190,000 hammer price.

Several other featured items brought a lot of attention and stellar prices. One was Lot 337, a bronze archaic–style gu vessel decorated with raised geometric patterns and marks on the interior. It sold for $110,000 hammer price.

In addition, Lot 1 was greatly admired by all. The antique bronze hexagonal handmade desk clock. The intricate details of the mechanics were visible through glass panels on each side of the body with the bottom opening up to show the magnificent cast bronze scrollwork. It sold for $5,500 hammer price.

This has been a remarkable year for Artingstall & Hind Auctioneers, especially given the expansion to furniture, jewelry and decorative arts. They are currently prepping for an even more successful year in 2015. To consign your fine arts and antiques with Artingstall & Hind, contact This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or call 310-424-5288.

 

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE
Pair of unique 19th century Imperial yellow cut glass Bohemian bonbonnieres that sold for $190,000 (hammer price). Artingstall & Hind Auctioneers Bronze archaic–style gu vessel decorated with raised geometric patterns and marks on the interior. Price realized (excluding buyer’s premium): $110,000. Artingstall & Hind Auctioneers Handmade bronze desk clock. Price realized (excluding buyer’s premium): $5. Artingstall & Hind Auctioneers
Last Updated on Monday, 05 January 2015 13:39
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Page 1 of 76
ADVERTISEMENTS

Banner Banner