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‘Moonwalk’ a giant leap for Warhol at Gray’s contemporary auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Thursday, 13 November 2014 17:33

Andy Warhol’s screenprint 'Moonwalk' sold for $120,000, a new record for this artwork. Gray's Auctioneers image.

CLEVELAND – Gray’s kicked off their first postwar and contemporary auction on Nov. 5, setting records on the day leading to the second biggest auction in the auction house’s eight-year history. LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

Leading the sale was Andy Warhol’s iconic screenprint Moonwalk depicting Buzz Aldrin in neon pink standing on the moon next to the American flag. Setting a new record at $120,000, this is the highest price achieved yet at auction for this work, well above its $40,000-$60,000 estimate. The proceeds from the sale of this piece from collectors Ann and Norman Roulet, will benefit the Cleveland Institute of Art’s new Ann & Norman Roulet Student and Alumni Gallery.

Steven Campbell’s monumental Young Camper Discovering Grotto in the Ground also soared, fetching $19,200, a new record for the Scottish artist. Todd Murphy’s King of the Birds from 1990 sold for $31,200, setting a world record for this artist.

Other notable sales included David Hockney’s Rain, from the Weather Series, 1973, which sold for $28,800; Francis Bacon’s August Series triptych, $31,200; and Gerhard Richter’s 1998 Guildenstern brought $36,000.

Gray’s Auctioneers and Appraisers conducts live auctions every month, accepts consignments daily and offers complimentary valuations for the community every day. For more information contact Serena Harragin at 216-458-7695 or by email at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

 Andy Warhol’s screenprint 'Moonwalk' sold for $120,000, a new record for this artwork. Gray's Auctioneers image.

Last Updated on Friday, 14 November 2014 08:58
 

Odundo, Rie vessels top Cowan’s contemporary ceramics auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Thursday, 13 November 2014 15:20

Lucie Rie (1902-1995; Austria/UK), ‘Flared Rim Bottle,’ circa 1986, stoneware; soft pink and gray crater glaze, 9 1/2 inches high. Sold for $12,300, inclusive of buyer’s premium, to a bidder through LiveAuctioneers. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image

CINCINNATI – Cowan’s Auctions Inc. modern and contemporary ceramics auction on Nov. 7, 2014 saw high prices for well-known artists such as Lucie Rie, Magdalene Odundo, George Nakashima, Akio Takamori and Michael Lucero. Following the ceramics sale was Cowan’s 20th century art and design sale, which highlighted exceptional pieces of mid-century and contemporary design, fine art, works on paper, photography and art glass.

LiveAuctioneers.com facilitated Internet live bidding.

The highest selling lot in the auction was a work titled Black Flared Rim Vessel by Magdalene Odundo, which sold for $30,000. Born in Nairobi, Odundo received her early education in both India and Kenya before traveling to England in 1971 to continue her training. She worked in Nigeria and Kenya to study traditional hand-built pottery techniques, and eventually found herself in New Mexico observing the making of blackware vessels.

A Flared Rim Bottle by Lucie Rie (1902-1995; Austria/UK) sold for $12,300 to LiveAuctioneers bidder. The 9 1/2-inch stoneware bottle exhibited a soft pink and gray crater glaze.

Pieces by Michael Lucero had a strong showing in the auction. A teapot titled Smoke in Eye sold for $8,400, and another pot, titled Chameleon on the House realized $7,800. Both vessels belong to Lucero’s series of teapot forms that both abstracted the shape and added his bright glazed palette to create something more than a teapot.

Other vessels that garnered high prices in the ceramics portion of the auction included a vessel by Akio Takamori, titled Female Bather with Mirror, $9,225; a work by Beatrice Wood titled Superb Gold Luster Chalice, $8,400; a work by Alev Ebuzziya Siesbye titled Exceptional Untitled Turquoise Form, $7,800; and a teapot by Adrian Saxe, $6,600.

The highest selling lot in the 20th century art and design auction was a George Nakashima table lamp, which brought $13,200, nearly tripling its estimate of $5,000-$7,000.

Additional notable lots included a Steuben Mosaic side table that sold for $7,800, a Dino Martens Oriente vase realized $7,800, a Tiffany Studios Nautilus desk lamp sold for $6,600, and a drypoint by Martin Lewis realized $6,600.

For more information about the auction contact Sam Cowan at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or call Cowan’s Auctions at 513-871-1670.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Lucie Rie (1902-1995; Austria/UK), ‘Flared Rim Bottle,’ circa 1986, stoneware; soft pink and gray crater glaze, 9 1/2 inches high. Sold for $12,300, inclusive of buyer’s premium, to a bidder through LiveAuctioneers. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image

Magdalene Odundo (1950; Kenya; USA), ‘Black Flared Rim Vessel,’ 1991, reduction fired earthenware; 14.5 inches high, artist ‘Odundo’ signature and date incised on base. Sold for $30,000. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image

George Nakashima (1905-1990) table lamp, Nakashima Studios, parchment shade on English oak burl and holly base, 30 3/4 inches high. Sold for $13,200. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image

Akio Takamori (1950; Japan/USA), ‘Female Bather with Mirror,’ circa 1984, stoneware vessel, 23 inches high, artist signature on reverse. Price realized: $9,225. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image

Last Updated on Thursday, 13 November 2014 17:41
 

Rare guns & frontier relics led Morphy's Wild West Museum sale

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Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 11 November 2014 10:48

Winchester shell advertising display board, top lot of the sale, $19,200. Morphy Auctions image

DENVER, Pa. – Aficionados who attended Morphy’s Oct. 31-Nov. 2 sale of contents from Dan Hardesty’s Wild West Museum came away with a well-honed sense of what life was like in America’s frontier days. The relics in the 2,590-lot auction formed a strikingly authentic overview of the historical personalities and lifestyles of the Old West, where every man – whether on the right or wrong side of the law – had a horse, a gun and an adventurous spirit.

Grossing $1.5 million (all prices quoted inclusive of 20% buyer’s premium) and with Internet live bidding provided by LiveAuctioneers, the sale included a remarkable 800-lot sub-collection of antique guns, rifles and other weapons, some owned by famous figures of cowboy lore. Special highlights included Lot 1702, a Colt 3rd Model Dragoon .44 caliber revolver manufactured in 1858, which sold for $11,400 against an estimate of $7,000-$9,000; and Lot 2421, a P.W. Porter New York revolving turret rifle in 100% original condition, described in Morphy’s catalog as “probably one of the rarest guns [they had] ever offered.” It was bid to $8,400.

Lot 1867, a Colt .38-caliber revolver that was the personal property of Col. William F. Cody (a k a Buffalo Bill), was presented in a custom velvet-lined oak case and reached the top end of its estimate range at $9,600. Lot 731, Cody’s personal leather show jacket – adorned with decorative appliques and a Native-American motif on its back – had been worn by the showman during a visit to England. Preserved in a wood and glass case, it realized $7,200. Lot 237, an early signed photograph of Buffalo Bill posing in full Western regalia, made $3,300 against an estimate of $1,000-$2,000. Lot 83, a poster promoting the film Adventures of Buffalo Bill, exceeded its estimate range in reaching $4,800.

The auction’s top seller, Lot 488, was a Winchester Repeating Arms Co., advertising display board with around 200 original shells arranged in an attractive pattern. Against an estimate of $10,000-$15,000, it sold for $19,200.

Lot 757 consisted of two Civil War flags: a Confederate flag and a 13-star Union flag. The duo swept past its $1,000-$2,000 estimate to settle at $13,200. Several Civil War swords were offered as well, including an example presented in 1862 to Union Maj. General James C. Veatch of the 25th Indiana Infantry. Veatch, it was noted, had fought at the Battle of Shiloh. His inscribed sword, cataloged as Lot 1009, was purchased at Morphy’s for $4,200.

A superb array of saddles included four that had been used by Civil War officers, plus a signed Tom Mix saddle, and Lot 1122, a dazzling example laden with 1920s silver dollars. Handmade in the 1920s or ’30s by the Newell Saddle Shop of St. Louis, Mo., it met its presale expectations with an auction price of $6,600.

Lot 1214 produced a nice auction-day surprise. Consisting of two bird-shape smoking pipes from Jefferson County, Kentucky, the lot estimated at $300-$600 flew skyward to roost at $12,000. Another unusual entry, Lot 1485, consisted of an 1840s-1850s riverboat gambler’s paraphernalia, including a double-shoulder holster set with two single-shot boot pistols, a dagger and a loading rod. Pictured in Flayderman’s Guide to Antique American Firearms, the group lot’s lucky streak carried it to a winning bid of $4,800.

Lot 1902 was a mini collection of items attributed to the “Poet Scout” Captain Jack Crawford. It contained the Indian fighter/performer/author’s 1876 Gemmer Custom Winchester rifle, an inscribed and engraved Colt 1878 Army double-action revolver, a fur-lined leather coat and an autographed edition of Crawford’s book titled Whar the Hand O’ God is Seen and Other Poems. The unique grouping of memorabilia sold for $14,400 against an estimate of $8,000-$12,000.

To contact Morphy’s about consigning to a future sale, call 717-335-3435 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

View the fully illustrated catalog, complete with prices realized, online at LiveAuctioneers.com.

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Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Winchester shell advertising display board, top lot of the sale, $19,200. Morphy Auctions image

Poster for movie ‘Adventures of Buffalo Bill,’ $4,800. Morphy Auctions image

Buffalo Bill’s personal show jacket, $7,200. Morphy Auctions image

Pair of Civil War flags: Confederate at left and Union 13-star at right, $13,200. Morphy Auctions image

Sword presented to Union Maj. Gen. James C. Veatch in 1862, $4,200. Morphy Auctions image

Nickel-silver mounted saddle made by Newell Saddle Shop, St. Louis, Mo., circa 1920s-30s, $6,600. Morphy Auctions image

Pair of carved bird-shape pipes, origin: Jefferson County, Kentucky, $12,000. Morphy Auctions image

Colt 3rd Model Dragoon .44 caliber revolver and shoulder stock, $11,400. Morphy Auctions image

Poet Scout Captain Jack Crawford archival collection, $14,400. Morphy Auctions image

P.W. Porter New York revolving turret rifle in 100% original condition, $8,400. Morphy Auctions image

Last Updated on Thursday, 13 November 2014 15:26
 

American landscapes in demand at John Moran art auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 04 November 2014 16:32

Buyers were especially attracted to Western genre works, such as this piece by Armin Carl Hansen (1886-1957 Monterey, Calif.), which fetched $102,000 (estimate: $40,000 to $60,000). John Moran Auctioneers image

PASADENA, Calif. – Attracting a crowd that has rarely been seen in recent years, John Moran’s California and American Fine Art on Oct. 21 featured works across price points from $2,000 up through $200,000. A lively preview was held at the Pasadena Convention Center, where over 200 collectors and American art enthusiasts gathered and stayed for the duration of the 270-lot sale, while hundreds of registered online, telephone, and absentee bidders were also in virtual attendance. LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

Excellent examples by top California and American artists were offered, primarily focusing on American Impressionist works as per John Moran Auctioneers’ signature fine art offerings. Notably, works valued under $15,000, as well as modern Western-themed works, brought especially strong prices.

Landscapes with partial ocean views and beach scenes were an especially popular theme throughout the sale. A sweet, small-scale landscape by prominent California impressionist painter Granville Redmond, executed in 1906 during his study of Southern California coastlines, was expected to earn $15,000 to $20,000; ultimately bringing $20,825. A post-Impressionist work by Franz A. Bischoff, titled Cypress & Sea, depicting the artist’s wife near the Carmel coast, found a buyer for $15,600 (estimate: $8,000 to $12,000). Another smaller work, this one an oil by iconic California watercolorist Phil Dike titled The Red Umbrella carried a conservative estimate of $2,000 to $3,000, which was handily outstripped when competing floor bidders brought the price up to $9,000. Another umbrella-centric work by Philadelphia-based, Russian-born artist Maurice Molarsky was offered for $3,000 to $4,000. Primarily known for his portraiture and figural works, the present example, which realized $5,700, uses a constellation of technicolor umbrellas to draw the viewer’s eye and play with the beachgoer theme. One of two Hawaii-themed works that did exceptionally well at the block, watercolorist Millard Sheets’s painting depicting Diamond Head beach with the Kaiser Hotel in the background surpassed the $8,000 to $12,000 estimate, flying to $42,000 in a matter of moments.

Landscapes across a number of American locales also proved desirable. A dark-toned, larger scale oil on canvas with an unexpectedly canted angle due to the rocky terrain it depicts, Partridge Grounds by prolific New England landscape painter Emile Albert Gruppe found popularity among East Coast telephone bidders, selling for $7,800 (estimate: $7,000 to $9,000). A dreamy, atmospheric landscape by Benjamin Chambers Brown, Mount Lowe and Lupines went home with a dedicated floor bidder for $20,400 (estimate: $12,000 to $18,000). Representative of the artist’s interest in atmospheric effects on landscapes and the subsequent differences in coloration of receding hills and mountains, San Diego-based Maurice Braun’s work Hillside and Valley sold to a California collector for $24,000, within the estimate range of $20,000 to $25,000. Jules Tavernier’s nocturne depicting Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii, created a stir among absentee and telephone buyers, selling for $24,000 to a private collector via phone (estimate: $8,000 to $12,000).

Desert landscapes proved fashionable during the auction, as well. Tehuacan, a tonally uniform Mexican landscape centering a solitary figure in the mid-ground by Lockwood De Forest was expected to find a buyer for between $1,000 and $2,000, which was handily achieved when the piece sold for $1,560. A work by Conrad Buff depicting a canyon interior in his iconic style was expected to earn $3,500 to $4,500 – in the end, floor bidders enamored with the oil brought the price up to $13,475. In a City of the Painted Desert (The Hopi village of Mishogonovi, Arizona), an oil on canvasboard by well-known Southwest genre painter Carl Oscar Borg, performed within the $15,000 to $20,000 estimate, earning a final price of $19,200.

Notable among the highlights were a small selection of Western works which captured the eye of bidders across the U.S. – online bidding activity on these lots was especially intense. The first, an intriguing large-scale work by Arizona painter Fritz Scholder, depicting two Indians and a cowboy against a dusty pink/red background, found a new home with an online buyer for $10,667.50 (estimate: $4,000 to $6,000). Competition for an ink and watercolor work depicting a bucking bronco by Southern California artist Olaf Wieghorst was equally fierce; a telephone bidder was the successful buyer, paying $6,600 for the work (estimate: $3,000 to $5,000). Estimated to earn $2,000 to $3,000, Buffalo Run by Yugoslavian-born painter Vladan Stiha realized $8,400. A highly energetic, dust-filled depiction of bronco busters at the Salinas Rodeo was one of the top earners of the evening; the piece by Armin Carl Hansen brought $102,000 at the block (estimate: $40,000 to $60,000).

Additional highlights include:

  • Los Angeles native Larry Cohen’s sweeping city view, titled Downtown L.A. Seen From Beachwood Canyon, went to a buyer in attendance at the auction for $7962.50 (over the estimated $2,000 to $3,000).
  • Leroy Neiman’s richly colored portrait-in-action of former star Dallas Cowboy quarterback Roger Staubach performed well within expectations; realizing $26,400 (estimate: $20,000 to $30,000).
  • Pasadena sculptor Susi Singer-Schinnerl’s terracotta work depicting a draped woman playing cards exceeded the estimate of $4,000 to $6,000, realizing $9,600.
  • A bright watercolor depicting a bird hunter and his dog among dense forest foliage by painter and illustrator Roy Martell Mason realized $2,040 (estimate: $1,500 to $2,000).

For more information about bidding or consignment, contact John Moran Auctioneers via email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ; or telephone: 626-793-1833.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Buyers were especially attracted to Western genre works, such as this piece by Armin Carl Hansen (1886-1957 Monterey, Calif.), which fetched $102,000 (estimate: $40,000 to $60,000). John Moran Auctioneers image

This beach scene by Maurice Molarsky (1885–1950 Philadelphia) did quite well at Moran’s Oct. 21 auction, bringing $5,700, surpassing the estimated $3,000 to $4,000. John Moran Auctioneers image

Millard Sheets’s (1907-1989 Gualala, Calif.) watercolor depiction of Diamond Head, Hawaii, was a desirable lot. The work was estimated to earn $8,000 to $12,000, and shot past the estimate to sell for $42,000. John Moran Auctioneers image

The second Hawaii-based painting to exceed expectations was a volcano nocturne by Jules Tavernier (1844-1899 San Francisco), which sold for an impressive $24,000 (estimate: $8,000 to $12,000). John Moran Auctioneers image

Estimated to bring $4,000 to $6,000, this work by Fritz Scholder (1937-2005 Scottsdale, Calif.) brought $10,667.50. John Moran Auctioneers image

This portrait of Dallas Cowboys quarterback Roger Staubach by Leroy Neiman (1921-2012 New York) went for $26,500 (estimate: $20,000 to $30,000). John Moran Auctioneers image

Last Updated on Tuesday, 11 November 2014 15:34
 

Imperial seal box secured for $90,000 at Converse auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Thursday, 30 October 2014 16:01

Fitted with 16 seals of green jade, this rare antique Chinese carved Imperial seal box sold for $90,000. Gordon S. Converse & Co. image

MALVERN, Pa. – A rare antique Chinese carved imperial seal box, fitted with 16 seals of green jade circling a large 4-inch square central Shi-mounted seal, sold for $90,000 at an East Meets West Auction held Oct. 3 by Gordon S. Converse & Co. The seals were this sale’s top lot.

Internet live bidding was provided by LiveAuctioneers.com.

Just under 400 lots came up for bid, with the East portion consisting of Asian – mostly Chinese – art and antiques, including an especially large selection of porcelains, as well as furniture, scrolls, bronzes and even some stamps and currency. Balancing these were Western lots, comprised of antique furniture, clocks, vintage fine and decorative arts, Civil War memorabilia and autographs. Overall, the auction was a success.

“We’ve had tremendous good luck conducting auctions that combine the Eastern and Western culture interests,” said Gordon Converse of Gordon S. Converse & Co. “We feel we’ve established a good market for buyers of Asian antiques, and we routinely attract bidders willing to pay strong prices for better items. It was certainly true in this sale, with all Asian categories doing well. Even watercolor art, artifacts and Chinese currency, which can be spotty, did well.”

Following are additional highlights from the auction. All prices quoted include a 20 percent buyer’s premium.

Antique Chinese zitan wood furniture did well. The auction’s second top lot was a Qing-era zitan throne chair featuring outstanding carved panels showing 19 five-clawed Ming dragons, among other figures. It sold for $30,000. Also, an armchair of thick and heavy zitan wood with three upper sides, mortised for easy transportation and central flowing back splat design, sold for $4,800.

Other antique chairs also fared well. Two Qing huanghuali folding horseshoe arm chairs having seat covers of webbed rope, plus brass bound frames and foot rests, went for $9,000; and two dark zitan yoke back chairs with carved dragon medallion and the old finish hit $3,900.

In the clocks category, a late 19th century French 400-day running clock-and-aneroid barometer combination – a rare compound “dumbbell” year running pendulum timepiece, with a beveled glass and heavy brass case – finished at $6,000. Also, a late 18th or early 19th century Chinese table clock featuring a calendar aperture through an engraved dial mask hit the mark at $3,900.

A set of 10 Royal Copenhagen Flora Danica reticulated plates, each 8 3/4 inches in diameter and all numbered en verso, with Latin botanical titles in curved script, garnered $6,600, while a Louis Comfort Tiffany gold baluster form vase, 9 inches tall with iridescent gold and pink sheen behind green vines, brought $3,900. The vase bore the bottom etched-on name of “L.C. Tiffany” and was dated to between 1915 and 1918.

Returning to Asia, an especially large 6 1/2 inch Imperial green jade seal and its incised carved box breezed to $24,000, a dragon jade, intricately hollow-carved with white jade, 3 1/2 inches by 3 inches, reached $600, and a 16 1/2-inch-tall 19th century gilt bronze finely cast Buddha on an elevated stand hit $2,160.

A pair of 23-inch Qing, possibly Qianlong, fine famille rose lidded porcelain jars with figure and landscape motifs, each one standing 23 inches tall, were sold as one lot for $4,200. A Ming dynasty lidded jar featuring reserves with three-color dragons, phoenixes, chimeras and more, 20 inches tall, went for $26,400.

A Chinese silver tea service featuring a handled tray, teapot, sugar and creamer, with bamboo edging and handles applied on dragons, hallmarked “Wosing Lung” and “Shanghai” and weighing 70-80 troy silver ounces total, brought $5,100. A Chinese rosewood zitan table screen with one side showing a lacquer landscape and the other carved hardstone relief figures, made $4,800.

For details contact the Gordon S. Converse & Co. at 610-722-9004 or send an e-mail to Todd Converse at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or Gordon Converse at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Fitted with 16 seals of green jade, this rare antique Chinese carved Imperial seal box sold for $90,000. Gordon S. Converse & Co. image

Set of 10 Royal Copenhagen Flora Danica reticulated plates, each 8 3/4 inches in diameter. Price realized: $6,600. Gordon S. Converse & Co. image

Late 19th century French 400-day running clock-and-aneroid barometer combination. Price realized: $6,000. Gordon S. Converse & Co. image

Ming dynasty lidded jar featuring reserves with dragons, phoenixes and chimeras, 20 inches tall. Price realized: $26,400. Gordon S. Converse & Co. image

Chinese silver tea service featuring a handled tray, teapot, sugar and creamer, with bamboo edging. Price realized: $5,100. Gordon S. Converse & Co. image

Qing-era zitan throne chair featuring outstanding carved panels showing 19 five-clawed Ming dragons. Price realized: $30,000. Gordon S. Converse & Co. image

Last Updated on Tuesday, 04 November 2014 16:42
 

Steinways, Mid-Century Modern heat up Capo Auction fall sale

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Written by Auction House PR   
Wednesday, 29 October 2014 14:25

Steinway Model O piano, serial number 203730, circa 1920. Price realized: $25,200. Capo Auction image

NEW YORK – Capo Auction Fine Art and Antiques recently hosted their “Autumn in New York” auction on Sept. 20. With New Yorkers back in town from the summer, the crowded room was full of their regular customers, dealers and collectors. All items were available through www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

Many bidders competing for the featured Mid-Century Modern furniture and other high-profile items including two different model Steinway pianos.

The two exquisite pianos brought heated bidding online, in the room and on the phones, setting the tone for a very fast-paced auction. The Steinway Model O piano, serial number 203730, circa 1920, sold $25,200, while the Steinway Model C grand piano, serial number 2485, made in 1856, sold for $11,400.

Capo Auction also featured an outstanding selection of Mid-Century Modern furniture, with an Edward Wormley two-tier table, inset with three Tiffany Studios tiles, height 23.5 inches, width 29 inches, depth 23 inches, selling for $3,000, while a Harvey Probber upholstered bench having rectangular upholstered seat on square legs joined by a box stretcher, height 19 inches, width 5 feet 10 inches, depth 19 inches, sold for $2,880.

Other pieces were from a collection designed in 1958 for the lobby and reception areas in the Royal Hotel, in Copenhagen, including a purple Arne Jacobsen Egg Chair, Fritz Hansen label, which sold for $3,300 and a dark red Arne Jacobsen Egg Chair, Fritz Hansen label, selling for $2,760.

In other areas, Capo offered a Mary Bauermeister (German/American, b. 1934) ink, shaped wood, paint, glass, plastic and mirror assemblage in a box, 1968, which sold for $6,600. A gold and enamel bangle, 14K yellow with a white and cobalt blue enameled flower and with emerald and ruby accents, sold for $5,400.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Steinway Model O piano, serial number 203730, circa 1920. Price realized: $25,200. Capo Auction image

Steinway Model C parlor grand piano, serial number 2485, 1859, rosewood. Price realized: $11,400. Capo Auction image

 

Edward Wormley table inset with Tiffany Studios glass tiles. Price realized: $3,000. Capo Auction image

Harvey Probber upholstered bench on square legs joined by a box stretcher. Price realized: $2,880. Capo Auction image

Gold and enamel bangle, 14K yellow gold with a white and cobalt blue enameled flower and emerald and ruby accents. Price realized: $5,400. Capo Auction image

Last Updated on Tuesday, 04 November 2014 11:04
 

Rare Sphinx lamp reveals its true value at Coker auction

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Written by ACNI Staff   
Tuesday, 21 October 2014 14:54
Image courtesy of John W. Coker

NEW MARKET, Tenn. – “From day one, I thought it might end up being the top lot, and that’s exactly what happened,” said Tennessee auctioneer John W. Coker, describing a cameo-glass Sphinx lamp in his Oct. 18 onsite sale.

One of 19 reverse-painted and scenic glass lamps from the estate of the late Elizabeth and Donald Bates of Seymour, Tennessee, the lamp was impossible to miss, either at the preview or in the LiveAuctioneers online catalog. Atop its finely formed bronze-on-marble base replicating an elephant was a domed shade executed in vibrant shades of orange, yellow and terra cotta, with the central figure being the Great Sphinx of Giza. In its background and encircling the shade were pyramids and an Egyptian village at sunset, amid towering palms and other trees.

The 18-inch-tall lamp was signed “Arsall” on its shade, referring to a French manufacturer best known for its designs of the first quarter of the 20th century.

Coker cataloged the lamp with a conservative $1,000-$2,000 estimate. “It’s a rare lamp. I knew the collectors would decide the value,” Coker said.

Bidding was fierce from the get-go, with absentee bids quickly upping the ante to $5,500. From that point forward, there was no stopping the rapid-fire action. “Internet – floor – Internet – phone – it was back and forth, going nowhere but up,” Coker said.

It finally boiled down to a LiveAuctioneers bidder against a participant on the floor. With the 70th bid, the onsite competitor prevailed, paying $19,200 (inclusive of 20% buyer’s premium).

“The buyer was a private collector from the South who had known about this lamp for more than thirty-five years,” said Coker. “She had actually seen it in the Bates’ home in Pigeon Forge (Tenn.) when she lived there, and had always wanted it. But the Bateses, who were lifelong antique dealers, would never sell it. It was the first lamp they had ever purchased for their own collection, and even dealers have things they prefer to keep and live with.”

To contact John W. Coker, tel. 865-475-5163 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Visit the company’s website at www.antiquesonline.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog from John W. Coker’s Oct. 18, 2014 auction, complete with prices realized, online at http://www.liveauctioneers.com/catalog/61812_elizabeth-bates-estate-on-premises-auction/page1

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ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE
Image courtesy of John W. Coker Image courtesy of John W. Coker Image courtesy of John W. Coker Image courtesy of John W. Coker
Last Updated on Wednesday, 29 October 2014 14:28
 

Cigar store figure packs a $102,600 punch at Showtime sale

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Written by Auction House PR   
Friday, 17 October 2014 12:38

Nineteenth century Punch cigar store wood figure, 69 1/2 inches tall and with a contemporary base. Price realized: $102,600. Showtime Auction Services image

ANN ARBOR, Mich. – A 19th century Punch cigar store wood figure, 69 1/2 inches tall and with a contemporary base, soared to $102,600 at a three-day auction held Oct. 3-5 by Showtime Auction Services. The Punch figure was the top lot in a sale that saw over 1,900 lots from the Bud and Sally Bassett lifetime collection sell to the highest bidder, with no reserves.

LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

Punch cigar store figures – and their more famous cousins, cigar store Indian figures – are highly collectible and can fetch dizzying dollars at auction. Examples by Samuel Robb, who produced both kinds in his New York City studio starting in 1886, can routinely command six figures. Not much was known about the Punch figure in the Showtime auction, but that didn’t deter bidders.

Headlining the auction was the Bassett collection of mostly advertising items and Western-related advertising signs, which included cowboys, cowgirls and Native American themed signs, more than 100 serving trays, and vintage papier-mâché figures of Halloween and Christmas items.

About 250 people attended the auction in person over the course of the three days. Online, hundreds more participated. Phone and absentee bids were also fielded. Typically, a Showtime auction will feature lots in a wide assortment of categories, with each item selling as one lot – and few lots of multiple items. This auction was different.

“This was a new experience for us, handling over 100,000 items, some of them in lots of 1,000 or even 2,000 pieces, but that’s how massive the Bassetts’ collection was,” said Mike Eckles of Showtime Auction Services. “Also, there weren’t nearly as many collecting categories as we’re used to selling. This sale was mainly advertising signs, trays, labels and such. It was a real learning experience.”

Following are additional highlights from the auction. All prices quoted include a sliding scale buyer’s premium, which fluctuated depending on how a bid was placed and/or paid.

An extremely rare Republic Tires “Staggered Tread” paper sign, one of only four known and in super condition, soared to $31,350. The 20-inch by 50-inch sign exhibited brilliant colors and graphics and, except for a few horizontal creases, was in near-perfect condition. It was made by American Lithographic Co. (New York) and boasted the original bands, both top and bottom.

A spectacular 1890 Brunswick, Balke, Collender “Princess” saloon back and front bar with the original mahogany finish, 24 feet long by 13 feet 11 3/4 inches tall, was the auction’s runner-up top lot, fishing at $79,800. Also, an extremely scarce Campbell’s Soup porcelain thermometer, 12 1/4 inches tall by7 1/4 inches wide and with just a tiny chip at the bottom, commanded $19,200.

A Thomas’ Inks and Mucilage embossed tin sign, made by the Tuscarora Advertising Co., Coshocton, Ohio, 19 3/4 inches by 13 3/4 inches (image only, minus the quartersawn oak frame), breezed to $14,400; and a Chancellor Cigars, “The Cigar of Quality,” celluloid easel back sign, possibly the only celluloid example in existence, 7 inches by 12 inches, in mint condition, garnered $13,860.

An R&G Corsets porcelain sign in a wrought iron frame with the original hanging bracket, 17 inches by 21 inches, brought $9,300; a North Western Brewery tin serving tray, one of only four known and showing a bare-breasted Native American maiden riding a buffalo, earned $9,120; and a Bloomer Club cigar lighter and tip cutter in excellent original condition topped out at $4,560.

Showtime Auction Services’ next big auction event will be held in spring 2015 (dates and times to be announced). Headlining the sale will be the outstanding ammunition, gunpowder and firearms posters and signs collection of Terri and Hal Boggess; and the lifetime collection of Mart and Kitty James, in many of the collecting categories that have typified Showtime auctions.

These will include petroliana, automobiolia, salesman’s samples, general store and country store, advertising signs, toys, barber shop, saloon, tobacciana, cigar store figures, hardware, store tins, whiskey, breweriana, gambling, soda fountain, drug store, ice cream, store displays, folk art, fire fighting memorabilia and more.

Showtime Auction Services is always accepting high-quality items for future sales. To consign an item or an entire collection, call Eckles at 951-453-2415 or e-mail him at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Nineteenth century Punch cigar store wood figure, 69 1/2 inches tall and with a contemporary base. Price realized: $102,600. Showtime Auction Services image

A Chancellor Cigars celluloid easel back sign, one of only two known, celluloid example in existence. Price realized: $13,860. Showtime Auction Services image

1890 Brunswick, Balke, Collender ‘Princess’ saloon back and front bar with original mahogany finish. Price realized: $79,800. Showtime Auction Services image

North Western Brewery tin serving tray, one of only four known and showing a topless Native American maiden riding a buffalo. Price realized: $9,120. Showtime Auction Services image

Republic Tires ‘Staggered Tread’ paper sign, one of only four known and in super condition. Price realized: $31,350. Showtime Auction Services image

Thomas’ Inks and Mucilage embossed tin sign, made by the Tuscarora Adv. Co., 19 3/4 inches by 13 3/4 inches. Price realized: $14,400. Showtime Auction Services image

Campbell’s Soup porcelain thermometer, 12 1/4 inches tall by 7 1/4 inches wide. Price realized: $19,200. Showtime Auction Services image

R&G Corsets porcelain sign in a wrought iron frame with the original hanging bracket, 17 inches by 21 inches. Price realized: $9,300. Showtime Auction Services image

Bloomer Club cigar lighter and tip cutter in excellent original condition. Price realized: $4,560. Showtime Auction Services image

Last Updated on Wednesday, 29 October 2014 14:29
 

'55 Porsche Speedster leads pack at Morphy’s auto auction debut

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Written by Auction House PR   
Thursday, 16 October 2014 13:45

Dan Morphy, president of Morphy Auctions, with the top-finishing lot of the Oct. 11, 2014 Automobile Auction. The 1955 Porsche Speedster sold for $198,000. Morphy Auctions image

DENVER, Pa. – Morphy’s Oct. 11 Automobile Auction, which introduced the company’s newest specialty division, was a roaring success, grossing $1.42 million (all prices inclusive of 10 percent buyer’s premium). More than 300 people attended the event in person, while hundreds more participated by phone and via the Internet.

LiveAuctioneers.com facilitated Internet live bidding.

Of the 40 select vintage and antique cars offered, 35 found new owners, resulting in an 87.5 percent sell-through rate (by lot). The auction’s top lot was a sleek 1955 Porsche Speedster, one of around 1,200 Pre-A models manufactured. Finished in triple black and with only 49,000 miles recorded on its odometer, the coveted German classic sold for $198,000 against a presale estimate of $150,000-$250,000.

Another connoisseur’s Porsche, a 1963 356B T-6 finished in Smyrna Green, had been an AACA first place winner. Offered with photos of its professional restoration, it swept past its $80,000-$90,000 estimate to settle at $121,000.

A stylish Brit – a 1952 Jaguar X120, silver with English red leather interior and black rag top – was an eye-catching presence in the palatial white tent where all cars were displayed prior to sale. “This particular Jaguar model was the finest production car of its year,” said Dan Morphy, president of Morphy Auctions. “Straight from the factory, these cars could hit speeds in excess of 120 miles per hour.” The jaunty convertible sold within its estimate range at $88,000. Another classy Jag, a one-owner 1972 XKE convertible with many desirable options, including air conditioning, was offered without reserve but still handily surpassed its $45,000-$60,000 estimate to reach $74,800.

Following closely behind was a red 1987 Ferrari Testarossa, whose aerodynamic lines made it look like it was in top gear even when it was standing still. Built for speed, it boasted a 12-cylinder, 4.9-liter engine that might have tempted far more road use, but it had not even clocked 20,000 miles. Against an estimate of $40,000-$60,000, it crossed the auction finish line at $85,800.

An all-American favorite, a 1966 Chevrolet Corvette convertible with a 427-cubic-inch, 390-horsepower engine retained its rare factory Laguna Blue paint, which was available for one year only. Showing off sporty knock-off wheels and GM sidepipes, the beautifully restored sports car headed for a new garage after securing a winning bid of $71,500.

An exotic little number in red and white with gold interior trim and grille, a 1954 Sunbeam Alpine Supreme boasted a wealth of quality accessories. Offered with paperwork and prior-ownership history, it breezed past its $25,000-$35,000 estimate to secure a top bid of $50,600.

Other big winners included the auction’s opening lot, a super-clean 1967 Ford Mustang GTA 2+2 in red with white trim, $46,200; and a low-mileage, nearly all-original 1939 Ford Deluxe Coupe, $41,800.

“It was very exciting for us to see the level of interest our first-ever Automobile Auction generated,” said Morphy. “From the very beginning, we felt there was a niche in the marketplace for boutique events in which the emphasis was on quality, not quantity. The prices we were able to achieve and the outstanding bidder participation confirmed that we are on the right track with our approach. We will continue to offer fresh to the market collectible cars in an honest and transparent environment that serves both buyer and seller.”

Morphy Auctions will hold its spring 2015 Automobile Auctions on April 25 at Morphy’s Victorian Casino gallery in Las Vegas, Nevada; and May 9 at the company’s flagship gallery in Denver, Pa.

For information on how to consign an automobile to a future auction at Morphy’s, call 717-335-3435 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Dan Morphy, president of Morphy Auctions, with the top-finishing lot of the Oct. 11, 2014 Automobile Auction. The 1955 Porsche Speedster sold for $198,000. Morphy Auctions image

1967 Ford Mustang GTA 2+2, $46,200. Morphy Auctions image

1963 Porsche 356B T-6, $121,000. Morphy Auctions image

1972 Jaguar XKE convertible in Sable/Biscuit color scheme, $74,800. Morphy Auctions image

1987 Ferrari Testarossa, $85,800. Morphy Auctions image

1966 Chevrolet Corvette convertible, $71,500. Morphy Auctions image

1952 Jaguar XK120, $88,000. Morphy Auctions image

1954 Sunbeam Alpine Supreme, $50,600. Morphy Auctions image

 

 

 

 

Last Updated on Monday, 20 October 2014 09:50
 
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