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Auction Results in the News

American Indian crafted jewelry in high demand at Allard auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 25 November 2014 17:00
Early 1970s 14K gold necklace with custom beads, squash blossoms and spiderweb turquoise stone. Price realized: $5,750. Allard Auctions Inc. image MESA, Ariz. – An early 1970s 14K gold necklace set with a #8 spiderweb turquoise stone sold for $5,750 at Big Fall Phoenix, an auction held Nov. 8-9 by Allard Auctions Inc. Approximately 800 lots of American Indian artifacts, art and related collectibles came up for bid.

LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

The original, one-of-a-kind, 26-inch-long necklace – co-designed by Andrew of Scottsdale and Alexander, Artist in Gold – boasted 26 custom beads and squash blossoms. The naja – the inverted crescent pendant on squash-blossom necklaces, a term coined by the Navajo – was set with a beautiful turquoise stone. The sides were Lone Mountain. The necklace was the top lot of the auction.

“Jewelry was strong across the board, so it didn’t surprise me the necklace did well,” said Steve Allard of Allard Auctions Inc. “Rugs and weavings were also a hit and a couple of the beadwork pieces from a collection in Nebraska got attention.” Some of the other major categories included handmade baskets, Kachina carvings, pottery and clothing. Allard called the auction a success.

Following are additional highlights from the auction. For publication purposes, all prices quoted include a 15 percent buyer’s premium, although the percent may have actually been different on some items, depending on how the bid was placed.

A rare, circa-1980s black-on-black San Ildefonso water bowl, or “spirit bowl,” by Carmelita Dunlap, with cutout access and accompanying ladle changed hands for $2,587. Its cut-in steps represented kiva steps. The bowl was in very good condition except for a tiny scratch and measured 7¼ inches by 11¼ inches.

An early 20th century, hand-crafted white buckskin Mandan war shirt set with matching leggings – both items featuring colorful, finely quilled ornaments, human hair suspensions and painted horseshoes – hammered for $1,840. The set was in excellent condition. The shirt measured 34 inches by 29 inches, while the leggings measured 35 inches by 12 inches.

A circa-1900 deep hard-sided Klickitat basket with intact rim loops and an interior containing 18 rare female figures, in fine condition, rose to $2,300. A Navajo rug made by Agatha Garnenez and measuring 38 inches by 66 inches, with some details – a Two Grey Hills runner – went for $1,955. The weaving won an award at the 1962 Arizona State Fair.

An outstanding pair of fancy parade gloves, or gauntlets, with extended beaded tops having fine floral motifs, well-worn but with the beadwork in very good condition, realized $2,587; and a circa 1970s all-silver squash-style cross Pueblo necklace with sandcast features, turquoise stones and early bench-made dime beads, 33 inches long and in very good condition, breezed to $1,840.

An early 1900s pair of sinew sewn and lazy stitch Arapaho beaded hard-soled moccasins, with a great design and only minor bead loss, went for $1,840. A hand-carved “Tlingit Chief” Shonaha doll, wearing a Chilkat blanket and with a fine Lelooska carved Potlach hat and staff, hit $2,185. A circa-1900 old sinew sewn and lazy stitch beaded two-sided buffalo hide Sioux pipe-and-tobacco bag with traditional geometric designs and faded quilled slat suspensions made $2,415.

Allard Auctions Inc., based in St. Ignatius, Mont., has been selling exclusively American Indian artifacts, art and related collectibles at auction since 1968. The firm is always accepting quality merchandise for future auctions. To inquire about consigning a single piece, an estate or an entire collection, call them at 406-745-0500 or 888-314-0343; or send an e-mail to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE
Early 1970s 14K gold necklace with custom beads, squash blossoms and spiderweb turquoise stone. Price realized: $5,750. Allard Auctions Inc. image Beautiful hand-crafted white buckskin Mandan war shirt and matching leggings, circa early 1900s. Price realized: $1,840. Allard Auctions Inc. image Rare black-on-black San Ildefonso water bowl, or spirit bowl, by Carmelita Dunlap, circa 1980s. Price realized: $2,587. Allard Auctions Inc. image Early 1900s pair of sinew sewn and lazy stitch Arapaho beaded hard-soled moccasins, with only minor bead loss. Price realized: $1,840. Allard Auctions Inc. image Outstanding pair of fancy parade gloves, or gauntlets, with extended beaded tops having fine floral motifs. Price realized: $2,587. Allard Auctions Inc. image Circa-1900 deep hard-sided Klickitat basket with intact rim loops and an interior containing 18 rare female figures. Price realized: $2,300. Allard Auctions Inc. image Navajo rug made by Agatha Garnenez and measuring 38 inches by 66 inches. Price realized: $1,955. Allard Auctions Inc. image Circa 1970s all-silver squash-style cross Pueblo necklace with sand cast features and turquoise stones. Price realized: $1,840. Allard Auctions Inc. image Hand-carved ‘Tlingit Chief’ Shonaha doll, wearing a Chilkat blanket with a fine Lelooska carved Potlach hat and staff. Price realized: $2,185. Allard Auctions Inc. image Circa 1900 old sinew sewn and lazy stitch beaded two-sided buffalo hide Sioux pipe-and-tobacco bag. Price realized: $2,415. Allard Auctions Inc. image
Last Updated on Wednesday, 26 November 2014 09:32
 

Jeffrey Evans auction underscores demand for Southern Americana

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Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 25 November 2014 14:38
Wythe County, Va., folk art watercolor and ink on paper fraktur birth and baptismal record, circa 1819, attributed to the Wild Turkey artist. Price realized: $27,600. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image MT. CRAWFORD, Va. – Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates’ Nov. 15 auction of Americana and Southern Decorative Arts demonstrated that the demand for exceptional pieces continues to surge. Even more importantly, however, the strength of bidding at the sale on items across multiple categories, from pottery to furniture to folk art, surprised more than a few and seemed to signal some degree of revitalization in the overall marketplace for art and antiques

LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

One of the more important pieces in the sale, a rare folk art fraktur birth and baptismal certificate, created by the so-called “Wild Turkey Artist” and made in 1819 for Anna Magdalena Scherertz, of Wythe County, Va., achieved the auction’s highest price. Very few fraktur birth and baptismal certificates by this artist have come on the market, and this one, with its vibrant, mirror-image tulips, facing turkeys, hearts, and other designs, was in remarkably well-preserved condition. Bidders battled aggressively for the piece, which sold for $27,600 against a conservative estimate of $8,000-$12,000 (Lot 495).

Another important piece, a rare half-plate daguerreotype, circa 1856, of “Main Street, Richmond, Va.” sold for $21,850, 10 times its high estimate. One of only a handful known from the period, the view of Main Street revealed many identifiable shops, including the “J.W. Randolph Book Bindery” and the “W. Allen Tailor, Gentlemen’s Furniture Store.” This stunning rooftop perspective of the city, taken on the eve of the American Civil War, generated interest from institutions and private collectors alike (Lot 346).

JSE & Associates continues to shape the market for top-quality Southern material, and this sale was no exception. Not surprisingly, two pieces of Virginia furniture stole the hearts of collectors and dealers. One, a rare and important Petersburg, Va., corner/smoking chair, circa 1765-1785, carved in scarce cherry or applewood, and in fine overall condition, sold for $20,700 to one of several phone bidders competing for the lot. The other, a fine Norfolk, Va., or northeastern North Carolina Chippendale mahogany barrel-back corner cupboard, circa 1790-1810, with complex glazing pattern and in excellent estate condition, sold for $18,400, twice the high estimate (Lots 409 and 439).

The sale also included a large selection of stoneware and earthenware, and was highlighted by the important collection of the late Eddie Wilder of Alexandria, Va. Wilder had steadfastly studied and pursued Alexandria stoneware for decades, and his efforts culminated in the 2007 publication Alexandria, Virginia Pottery, 1792-1876, the definitive reference on that region’s 19th century stoneware production.

Selections from the Wilder collection performed very well in the sale and were highlighted by an iconic 4-gallon jug, circa 1825-1831, marked “H. Smith & Co.” for Hugh Smith’s Wilkes Street pottery in Alexandria. With rare cobalt floral decoration, the piece sold for $12,650 to a major Virginia collector, against an estimate of $3,000-$5,000. Pottery in other categories, ranging from slip-decorated earthenware to regional stoneware, was strong as well and included several surprises. The most conspicuous example, a 3-gallon jar (circa 1817-1850) from the Richmond, Va., area with simple cobalt decoration, attributed to Samuel Wilson and/or his associates, sailed past its $100-$200 estimate and ultimately sold for $8,025, setting a new record far above previous results for similar jars (Lots 1 and 113).

After the auction, Jeffrey S. Evans commented, “Needless to say we are extremely pleased with the results of this auction. Southern material continues to perform strongly, especially when thoroughly researched and well documented. The biggest surprise for us was the amount of interest in the brown furniture we offered, which resulted in very respectable prices, some reminiscent of the prerecession market. I think people are beginning to recognize the great values that are available in this and other categories, and have decided to begin taking advantage of the great bargains.”

Evans added, “We keep our estimates on the very conservative side in order to engage bidders which usually results in spirited bidding. Only three of the 897 lots in the auction were passed and the auction total came in at double the preauction low estimate.” Evans also noted that his firm has already secured several very important Southern objects for their next Americana and Southern auction in June 2015.

For further information, email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or call 540-434-3939.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE
Wythe County, Va., folk art watercolor and ink on paper fraktur birth and baptismal record, circa 1819, attributed to the Wild Turkey artist. Price realized: $27,600. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image Half-plate daguerreotype, circa 1856, of Main Street, Richmond, Va., featuring signage for J.W. Randolph Book Binder and other establishments. Price realized: $21,850. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image Petersburg, Va., Chippendale carved cherry or applewood corner / smoking chair, circa 1765-1785. Price realized: $20,700.  Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image Stamped ‘H. Smith & Co.’ Alexandria, Va., decorated 4-gallon stoneware jug, circa 1825-1831. Price realized: $12,650. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image
Last Updated on Tuesday, 25 November 2014 17:09
 

‘Moonwalk’ a giant leap for Warhol at Gray’s contemporary auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Thursday, 13 November 2014 17:33

Andy Warhol’s screenprint 'Moonwalk' sold for $120,000, a new record for this artwork. Gray's Auctioneers image.

CLEVELAND – Gray’s kicked off their first postwar and contemporary auction on Nov. 5, setting records on the day leading to the second biggest auction in the auction house’s eight-year history. LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

Leading the sale was Andy Warhol’s iconic screenprint Moonwalk depicting Buzz Aldrin in neon pink standing on the moon next to the American flag. Setting a new record at $120,000, this is the highest price achieved yet at auction for this work, well above its $40,000-$60,000 estimate. The proceeds from the sale of this piece from collectors Ann and Norman Roulet, will benefit the Cleveland Institute of Art’s new Ann & Norman Roulet Student and Alumni Gallery.

Steven Campbell’s monumental Young Camper Discovering Grotto in the Ground also soared, fetching $19,200, a new record for the Scottish artist. Todd Murphy’s King of the Birds from 1990 sold for $31,200, setting a world record for this artist.

Other notable sales included David Hockney’s Rain, from the Weather Series, 1973, which sold for $28,800; Francis Bacon’s August Series triptych, $31,200; and Gerhard Richter’s 1998 Guildenstern brought $36,000.

Gray’s Auctioneers and Appraisers conducts live auctions every month, accepts consignments daily and offers complimentary valuations for the community every day. For more information contact Serena Harragin at 216-458-7695 or by email at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Andy Warhol’s screenprint 'Moonwalk' sold for $120,000, a new record for this artwork. Gray's Auctioneers image.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 25 November 2014 14:44
 

Odundo, Rie vessels top Cowan’s contemporary ceramics auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Thursday, 13 November 2014 15:20

Lucie Rie (1902-1995; Austria/UK), ‘Flared Rim Bottle,’ circa 1986, stoneware; soft pink and gray crater glaze, 9 1/2 inches high. Sold for $12,300, inclusive of buyer’s premium, to a bidder through LiveAuctioneers. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image

CINCINNATI – Cowan’s Auctions Inc. modern and contemporary ceramics auction on Nov. 7, 2014 saw high prices for well-known artists such as Lucie Rie, Magdalene Odundo, George Nakashima, Akio Takamori and Michael Lucero. Following the ceramics sale was Cowan’s 20th century art and design sale, which highlighted exceptional pieces of mid-century and contemporary design, fine art, works on paper, photography and art glass.

LiveAuctioneers.com facilitated Internet live bidding.

The highest selling lot in the auction was a work titled Black Flared Rim Vessel by Magdalene Odundo, which sold for $30,000. Born in Nairobi, Odundo received her early education in both India and Kenya before traveling to England in 1971 to continue her training. She worked in Nigeria and Kenya to study traditional hand-built pottery techniques, and eventually found herself in New Mexico observing the making of blackware vessels.

A Flared Rim Bottle by Lucie Rie (1902-1995; Austria/UK) sold for $12,300 to LiveAuctioneers bidder. The 9 1/2-inch stoneware bottle exhibited a soft pink and gray crater glaze.

Pieces by Michael Lucero had a strong showing in the auction. A teapot titled Smoke in Eye sold for $8,400, and another pot, titled Chameleon on the House realized $7,800. Both vessels belong to Lucero’s series of teapot forms that both abstracted the shape and added his bright glazed palette to create something more than a teapot.

Other vessels that garnered high prices in the ceramics portion of the auction included a vessel by Akio Takamori, titled Female Bather with Mirror, $9,225; a work by Beatrice Wood titled Superb Gold Luster Chalice, $8,400; a work by Alev Ebuzziya Siesbye titled Exceptional Untitled Turquoise Form, $7,800; and a teapot by Adrian Saxe, $6,600.

The highest selling lot in the 20th century art and design auction was a George Nakashima table lamp, which brought $13,200, nearly tripling its estimate of $5,000-$7,000.

Additional notable lots included a Steuben Mosaic side table that sold for $7,800, a Dino Martens Oriente vase realized $7,800, a Tiffany Studios Nautilus desk lamp sold for $6,600, and a drypoint by Martin Lewis realized $6,600.

For more information about the auction contact Sam Cowan at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or call Cowan’s Auctions at 513-871-1670.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Lucie Rie (1902-1995; Austria/UK), ‘Flared Rim Bottle,’ circa 1986, stoneware; soft pink and gray crater glaze, 9 1/2 inches high. Sold for $12,300, inclusive of buyer’s premium, to a bidder through LiveAuctioneers. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image

Magdalene Odundo (1950; Kenya; USA), ‘Black Flared Rim Vessel,’ 1991, reduction fired earthenware; 14.5 inches high, artist ‘Odundo’ signature and date incised on base. Sold for $30,000. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image

George Nakashima (1905-1990) table lamp, Nakashima Studios, parchment shade on English oak burl and holly base, 30 3/4 inches high. Sold for $13,200. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image

Akio Takamori (1950; Japan/USA), ‘Female Bather with Mirror,’ circa 1984, stoneware vessel, 23 inches high, artist signature on reverse. Price realized: $9,225. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image

Last Updated on Thursday, 13 November 2014 17:41
 

Rare guns & frontier relics led Morphy's Wild West Museum sale

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Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 11 November 2014 10:48

Winchester shell advertising display board, top lot of the sale, $19,200. Morphy Auctions image

DENVER, Pa. – Aficionados who attended Morphy’s Oct. 31-Nov. 2 sale of contents from Dan Hardesty’s Wild West Museum came away with a well-honed sense of what life was like in America’s frontier days. The relics in the 2,590-lot auction formed a strikingly authentic overview of the historical personalities and lifestyles of the Old West, where every man – whether on the right or wrong side of the law – had a horse, a gun and an adventurous spirit.

Grossing $1.5 million (all prices quoted inclusive of 20% buyer’s premium) and with Internet live bidding provided by LiveAuctioneers, the sale included a remarkable 800-lot sub-collection of antique guns, rifles and other weapons, some owned by famous figures of cowboy lore. Special highlights included Lot 1702, a Colt 3rd Model Dragoon .44 caliber revolver manufactured in 1858, which sold for $11,400 against an estimate of $7,000-$9,000; and Lot 2421, a P.W. Porter New York revolving turret rifle in 100% original condition, described in Morphy’s catalog as “probably one of the rarest guns [they had] ever offered.” It was bid to $8,400.

Lot 1867, a Colt .38-caliber revolver that was the personal property of Col. William F. Cody (a k a Buffalo Bill), was presented in a custom velvet-lined oak case and reached the top end of its estimate range at $9,600. Lot 731, Cody’s personal leather show jacket – adorned with decorative appliques and a Native-American motif on its back – had been worn by the showman during a visit to England. Preserved in a wood and glass case, it realized $7,200. Lot 237, an early signed photograph of Buffalo Bill posing in full Western regalia, made $3,300 against an estimate of $1,000-$2,000. Lot 83, a poster promoting the film Adventures of Buffalo Bill, exceeded its estimate range in reaching $4,800.

The auction’s top seller, Lot 488, was a Winchester Repeating Arms Co., advertising display board with around 200 original shells arranged in an attractive pattern. Against an estimate of $10,000-$15,000, it sold for $19,200.

Lot 757 consisted of two Civil War flags: a Confederate flag and a 13-star Union flag. The duo swept past its $1,000-$2,000 estimate to settle at $13,200. Several Civil War swords were offered as well, including an example presented in 1862 to Union Maj. General James C. Veatch of the 25th Indiana Infantry. Veatch, it was noted, had fought at the Battle of Shiloh. His inscribed sword, cataloged as Lot 1009, was purchased at Morphy’s for $4,200.

A superb array of saddles included four that had been used by Civil War officers, plus a signed Tom Mix saddle, and Lot 1122, a dazzling example laden with 1920s silver dollars. Handmade in the 1920s or ’30s by the Newell Saddle Shop of St. Louis, Mo., it met its presale expectations with an auction price of $6,600.

Lot 1214 produced a nice auction-day surprise. Consisting of two bird-shape smoking pipes from Jefferson County, Kentucky, the lot estimated at $300-$600 flew skyward to roost at $12,000. Another unusual entry, Lot 1485, consisted of an 1840s-1850s riverboat gambler’s paraphernalia, including a double-shoulder holster set with two single-shot boot pistols, a dagger and a loading rod. Pictured in Flayderman’s Guide to Antique American Firearms, the group lot’s lucky streak carried it to a winning bid of $4,800.

Lot 1902 was a mini collection of items attributed to the “Poet Scout” Captain Jack Crawford. It contained the Indian fighter/performer/author’s 1876 Gemmer Custom Winchester rifle, an inscribed and engraved Colt 1878 Army double-action revolver, a fur-lined leather coat and an autographed edition of Crawford’s book titled Whar the Hand O’ God is Seen and Other Poems. The unique grouping of memorabilia sold for $14,400 against an estimate of $8,000-$12,000.

To contact Morphy’s about consigning to a future sale, call 717-335-3435 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

View the fully illustrated catalog, complete with prices realized, online at LiveAuctioneers.com.

#   #   #

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Winchester shell advertising display board, top lot of the sale, $19,200. Morphy Auctions image

Poster for movie ‘Adventures of Buffalo Bill,’ $4,800. Morphy Auctions image

Buffalo Bill’s personal show jacket, $7,200. Morphy Auctions image

Pair of Civil War flags: Confederate at left and Union 13-star at right, $13,200. Morphy Auctions image

Sword presented to Union Maj. Gen. James C. Veatch in 1862, $4,200. Morphy Auctions image

Nickel-silver mounted saddle made by Newell Saddle Shop, St. Louis, Mo., circa 1920s-30s, $6,600. Morphy Auctions image

Pair of carved bird-shape pipes, origin: Jefferson County, Kentucky, $12,000. Morphy Auctions image

Colt 3rd Model Dragoon .44 caliber revolver and shoulder stock, $11,400. Morphy Auctions image

Poet Scout Captain Jack Crawford archival collection, $14,400. Morphy Auctions image

P.W. Porter New York revolving turret rifle in 100% original condition, $8,400. Morphy Auctions image

Last Updated on Thursday, 13 November 2014 15:26
 

American landscapes in demand at John Moran art auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Tuesday, 04 November 2014 16:32

Buyers were especially attracted to Western genre works, such as this piece by Armin Carl Hansen (1886-1957 Monterey, Calif.), which fetched $102,000 (estimate: $40,000 to $60,000). John Moran Auctioneers image

PASADENA, Calif. – Attracting a crowd that has rarely been seen in recent years, John Moran’s California and American Fine Art on Oct. 21 featured works across price points from $2,000 up through $200,000. A lively preview was held at the Pasadena Convention Center, where over 200 collectors and American art enthusiasts gathered and stayed for the duration of the 270-lot sale, while hundreds of registered online, telephone, and absentee bidders were also in virtual attendance. LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

Excellent examples by top California and American artists were offered, primarily focusing on American Impressionist works as per John Moran Auctioneers’ signature fine art offerings. Notably, works valued under $15,000, as well as modern Western-themed works, brought especially strong prices.

Landscapes with partial ocean views and beach scenes were an especially popular theme throughout the sale. A sweet, small-scale landscape by prominent California impressionist painter Granville Redmond, executed in 1906 during his study of Southern California coastlines, was expected to earn $15,000 to $20,000; ultimately bringing $20,825. A post-Impressionist work by Franz A. Bischoff, titled Cypress & Sea, depicting the artist’s wife near the Carmel coast, found a buyer for $15,600 (estimate: $8,000 to $12,000). Another smaller work, this one an oil by iconic California watercolorist Phil Dike titled The Red Umbrella carried a conservative estimate of $2,000 to $3,000, which was handily outstripped when competing floor bidders brought the price up to $9,000. Another umbrella-centric work by Philadelphia-based, Russian-born artist Maurice Molarsky was offered for $3,000 to $4,000. Primarily known for his portraiture and figural works, the present example, which realized $5,700, uses a constellation of technicolor umbrellas to draw the viewer’s eye and play with the beachgoer theme. One of two Hawaii-themed works that did exceptionally well at the block, watercolorist Millard Sheets’s painting depicting Diamond Head beach with the Kaiser Hotel in the background surpassed the $8,000 to $12,000 estimate, flying to $42,000 in a matter of moments.

Landscapes across a number of American locales also proved desirable. A dark-toned, larger scale oil on canvas with an unexpectedly canted angle due to the rocky terrain it depicts, Partridge Grounds by prolific New England landscape painter Emile Albert Gruppe found popularity among East Coast telephone bidders, selling for $7,800 (estimate: $7,000 to $9,000). A dreamy, atmospheric landscape by Benjamin Chambers Brown, Mount Lowe and Lupines went home with a dedicated floor bidder for $20,400 (estimate: $12,000 to $18,000). Representative of the artist’s interest in atmospheric effects on landscapes and the subsequent differences in coloration of receding hills and mountains, San Diego-based Maurice Braun’s work Hillside and Valley sold to a California collector for $24,000, within the estimate range of $20,000 to $25,000. Jules Tavernier’s nocturne depicting Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii, created a stir among absentee and telephone buyers, selling for $24,000 to a private collector via phone (estimate: $8,000 to $12,000).

Desert landscapes proved fashionable during the auction, as well. Tehuacan, a tonally uniform Mexican landscape centering a solitary figure in the mid-ground by Lockwood De Forest was expected to find a buyer for between $1,000 and $2,000, which was handily achieved when the piece sold for $1,560. A work by Conrad Buff depicting a canyon interior in his iconic style was expected to earn $3,500 to $4,500 – in the end, floor bidders enamored with the oil brought the price up to $13,475. In a City of the Painted Desert (The Hopi village of Mishogonovi, Arizona), an oil on canvasboard by well-known Southwest genre painter Carl Oscar Borg, performed within the $15,000 to $20,000 estimate, earning a final price of $19,200.

Notable among the highlights were a small selection of Western works which captured the eye of bidders across the U.S. – online bidding activity on these lots was especially intense. The first, an intriguing large-scale work by Arizona painter Fritz Scholder, depicting two Indians and a cowboy against a dusty pink/red background, found a new home with an online buyer for $10,667.50 (estimate: $4,000 to $6,000). Competition for an ink and watercolor work depicting a bucking bronco by Southern California artist Olaf Wieghorst was equally fierce; a telephone bidder was the successful buyer, paying $6,600 for the work (estimate: $3,000 to $5,000). Estimated to earn $2,000 to $3,000, Buffalo Run by Yugoslavian-born painter Vladan Stiha realized $8,400. A highly energetic, dust-filled depiction of bronco busters at the Salinas Rodeo was one of the top earners of the evening; the piece by Armin Carl Hansen brought $102,000 at the block (estimate: $40,000 to $60,000).

Additional highlights include:

  • Los Angeles native Larry Cohen’s sweeping city view, titled Downtown L.A. Seen From Beachwood Canyon, went to a buyer in attendance at the auction for $7962.50 (over the estimated $2,000 to $3,000).
  • Leroy Neiman’s richly colored portrait-in-action of former star Dallas Cowboy quarterback Roger Staubach performed well within expectations; realizing $26,400 (estimate: $20,000 to $30,000).
  • Pasadena sculptor Susi Singer-Schinnerl’s terracotta work depicting a draped woman playing cards exceeded the estimate of $4,000 to $6,000, realizing $9,600.
  • A bright watercolor depicting a bird hunter and his dog among dense forest foliage by painter and illustrator Roy Martell Mason realized $2,040 (estimate: $1,500 to $2,000).

For more information about bidding or consignment, contact John Moran Auctioneers via email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ; or telephone: 626-793-1833.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Buyers were especially attracted to Western genre works, such as this piece by Armin Carl Hansen (1886-1957 Monterey, Calif.), which fetched $102,000 (estimate: $40,000 to $60,000). John Moran Auctioneers image

This beach scene by Maurice Molarsky (1885–1950 Philadelphia) did quite well at Moran’s Oct. 21 auction, bringing $5,700, surpassing the estimated $3,000 to $4,000. John Moran Auctioneers image

Millard Sheets’s (1907-1989 Gualala, Calif.) watercolor depiction of Diamond Head, Hawaii, was a desirable lot. The work was estimated to earn $8,000 to $12,000, and shot past the estimate to sell for $42,000. John Moran Auctioneers image

The second Hawaii-based painting to exceed expectations was a volcano nocturne by Jules Tavernier (1844-1899 San Francisco), which sold for an impressive $24,000 (estimate: $8,000 to $12,000). John Moran Auctioneers image

Estimated to bring $4,000 to $6,000, this work by Fritz Scholder (1937-2005 Scottsdale, Calif.) brought $10,667.50. John Moran Auctioneers image

This portrait of Dallas Cowboys quarterback Roger Staubach by Leroy Neiman (1921-2012 New York) went for $26,500 (estimate: $20,000 to $30,000). John Moran Auctioneers image

Last Updated on Tuesday, 11 November 2014 15:34
 

Imperial seal box secured for $90,000 at Converse auction

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Written by Auction House PR   
Thursday, 30 October 2014 16:01

Fitted with 16 seals of green jade, this rare antique Chinese carved Imperial seal box sold for $90,000. Gordon S. Converse & Co. image

MALVERN, Pa. – A rare antique Chinese carved imperial seal box, fitted with 16 seals of green jade circling a large 4-inch square central Shi-mounted seal, sold for $90,000 at an East Meets West Auction held Oct. 3 by Gordon S. Converse & Co. The seals were this sale’s top lot.

Internet live bidding was provided by LiveAuctioneers.com.

Just under 400 lots came up for bid, with the East portion consisting of Asian – mostly Chinese – art and antiques, including an especially large selection of porcelains, as well as furniture, scrolls, bronzes and even some stamps and currency. Balancing these were Western lots, comprised of antique furniture, clocks, vintage fine and decorative arts, Civil War memorabilia and autographs. Overall, the auction was a success.

“We’ve had tremendous good luck conducting auctions that combine the Eastern and Western culture interests,” said Gordon Converse of Gordon S. Converse & Co. “We feel we’ve established a good market for buyers of Asian antiques, and we routinely attract bidders willing to pay strong prices for better items. It was certainly true in this sale, with all Asian categories doing well. Even watercolor art, artifacts and Chinese currency, which can be spotty, did well.”

Following are additional highlights from the auction. All prices quoted include a 20 percent buyer’s premium.

Antique Chinese zitan wood furniture did well. The auction’s second top lot was a Qing-era zitan throne chair featuring outstanding carved panels showing 19 five-clawed Ming dragons, among other figures. It sold for $30,000. Also, an armchair of thick and heavy zitan wood with three upper sides, mortised for easy transportation and central flowing back splat design, sold for $4,800.

Other antique chairs also fared well. Two Qing huanghuali folding horseshoe arm chairs having seat covers of webbed rope, plus brass bound frames and foot rests, went for $9,000; and two dark zitan yoke back chairs with carved dragon medallion and the old finish hit $3,900.

In the clocks category, a late 19th century French 400-day running clock-and-aneroid barometer combination – a rare compound “dumbbell” year running pendulum timepiece, with a beveled glass and heavy brass case – finished at $6,000. Also, a late 18th or early 19th century Chinese table clock featuring a calendar aperture through an engraved dial mask hit the mark at $3,900.

A set of 10 Royal Copenhagen Flora Danica reticulated plates, each 8 3/4 inches in diameter and all numbered en verso, with Latin botanical titles in curved script, garnered $6,600, while a Louis Comfort Tiffany gold baluster form vase, 9 inches tall with iridescent gold and pink sheen behind green vines, brought $3,900. The vase bore the bottom etched-on name of “L.C. Tiffany” and was dated to between 1915 and 1918.

Returning to Asia, an especially large 6 1/2 inch Imperial green jade seal and its incised carved box breezed to $24,000, a dragon jade, intricately hollow-carved with white jade, 3 1/2 inches by 3 inches, reached $600, and a 16 1/2-inch-tall 19th century gilt bronze finely cast Buddha on an elevated stand hit $2,160.

A pair of 23-inch Qing, possibly Qianlong, fine famille rose lidded porcelain jars with figure and landscape motifs, each one standing 23 inches tall, were sold as one lot for $4,200. A Ming dynasty lidded jar featuring reserves with three-color dragons, phoenixes, chimeras and more, 20 inches tall, went for $26,400.

A Chinese silver tea service featuring a handled tray, teapot, sugar and creamer, with bamboo edging and handles applied on dragons, hallmarked “Wosing Lung” and “Shanghai” and weighing 70-80 troy silver ounces total, brought $5,100. A Chinese rosewood zitan table screen with one side showing a lacquer landscape and the other carved hardstone relief figures, made $4,800.

For details contact the Gordon S. Converse & Co. at 610-722-9004 or send an e-mail to Todd Converse at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or Gordon Converse at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Fitted with 16 seals of green jade, this rare antique Chinese carved Imperial seal box sold for $90,000. Gordon S. Converse & Co. image

Set of 10 Royal Copenhagen Flora Danica reticulated plates, each 8 3/4 inches in diameter. Price realized: $6,600. Gordon S. Converse & Co. image

Late 19th century French 400-day running clock-and-aneroid barometer combination. Price realized: $6,000. Gordon S. Converse & Co. image

Ming dynasty lidded jar featuring reserves with dragons, phoenixes and chimeras, 20 inches tall. Price realized: $26,400. Gordon S. Converse & Co. image

Chinese silver tea service featuring a handled tray, teapot, sugar and creamer, with bamboo edging. Price realized: $5,100. Gordon S. Converse & Co. image

Qing-era zitan throne chair featuring outstanding carved panels showing 19 five-clawed Ming dragons. Price realized: $30,000. Gordon S. Converse & Co. image

Last Updated on Tuesday, 04 November 2014 16:42
 

Steinways, Mid-Century Modern heat up Capo Auction fall sale

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Written by Auction House PR   
Wednesday, 29 October 2014 14:25

Steinway Model O piano, serial number 203730, circa 1920. Price realized: $25,200. Capo Auction image

NEW YORK – Capo Auction Fine Art and Antiques recently hosted their “Autumn in New York” auction on Sept. 20. With New Yorkers back in town from the summer, the crowded room was full of their regular customers, dealers and collectors. All items were available through www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

Many bidders competing for the featured Mid-Century Modern furniture and other high-profile items including two different model Steinway pianos.

The two exquisite pianos brought heated bidding online, in the room and on the phones, setting the tone for a very fast-paced auction. The Steinway Model O piano, serial number 203730, circa 1920, sold $25,200, while the Steinway Model C grand piano, serial number 2485, made in 1856, sold for $11,400.

Capo Auction also featured an outstanding selection of Mid-Century Modern furniture, with an Edward Wormley two-tier table, inset with three Tiffany Studios tiles, height 23.5 inches, width 29 inches, depth 23 inches, selling for $3,000, while a Harvey Probber upholstered bench having rectangular upholstered seat on square legs joined by a box stretcher, height 19 inches, width 5 feet 10 inches, depth 19 inches, sold for $2,880.

Other pieces were from a collection designed in 1958 for the lobby and reception areas in the Royal Hotel, in Copenhagen, including a purple Arne Jacobsen Egg Chair, Fritz Hansen label, which sold for $3,300 and a dark red Arne Jacobsen Egg Chair, Fritz Hansen label, selling for $2,760.

In other areas, Capo offered a Mary Bauermeister (German/American, b. 1934) ink, shaped wood, paint, glass, plastic and mirror assemblage in a box, 1968, which sold for $6,600. A gold and enamel bangle, 14K yellow with a white and cobalt blue enameled flower and with emerald and ruby accents, sold for $5,400.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE

Steinway Model O piano, serial number 203730, circa 1920. Price realized: $25,200. Capo Auction image

Steinway Model C parlor grand piano, serial number 2485, 1859, rosewood. Price realized: $11,400. Capo Auction image

 

Edward Wormley table inset with Tiffany Studios glass tiles. Price realized: $3,000. Capo Auction image

Harvey Probber upholstered bench on square legs joined by a box stretcher. Price realized: $2,880. Capo Auction image

Gold and enamel bangle, 14K yellow gold with a white and cobalt blue enameled flower and emerald and ruby accents. Price realized: $5,400. Capo Auction image

Last Updated on Tuesday, 04 November 2014 11:04
 

Rare Sphinx lamp reveals its true value at Coker auction

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Written by ACNI Staff   
Tuesday, 21 October 2014 14:54
Image courtesy of John W. Coker

NEW MARKET, Tenn. – “From day one, I thought it might end up being the top lot, and that’s exactly what happened,” said Tennessee auctioneer John W. Coker, describing a cameo-glass Sphinx lamp in his Oct. 18 onsite sale.

One of 19 reverse-painted and scenic glass lamps from the estate of the late Elizabeth and Donald Bates of Seymour, Tennessee, the lamp was impossible to miss, either at the preview or in the LiveAuctioneers online catalog. Atop its finely formed bronze-on-marble base replicating an elephant was a domed shade executed in vibrant shades of orange, yellow and terra cotta, with the central figure being the Great Sphinx of Giza. In its background and encircling the shade were pyramids and an Egyptian village at sunset, amid towering palms and other trees.

The 18-inch-tall lamp was signed “Arsall” on its shade, referring to a French manufacturer best known for its designs of the first quarter of the 20th century.

Coker cataloged the lamp with a conservative $1,000-$2,000 estimate. “It’s a rare lamp. I knew the collectors would decide the value,” Coker said.

Bidding was fierce from the get-go, with absentee bids quickly upping the ante to $5,500. From that point forward, there was no stopping the rapid-fire action. “Internet – floor – Internet – phone – it was back and forth, going nowhere but up,” Coker said.

It finally boiled down to a LiveAuctioneers bidder against a participant on the floor. With the 70th bid, the onsite competitor prevailed, paying $19,200 (inclusive of 20% buyer’s premium).

“The buyer was a private collector from the South who had known about this lamp for more than thirty-five years,” said Coker. “She had actually seen it in the Bates’ home in Pigeon Forge (Tenn.) when she lived there, and had always wanted it. But the Bateses, who were lifelong antique dealers, would never sell it. It was the first lamp they had ever purchased for their own collection, and even dealers have things they prefer to keep and live with.”

To contact John W. Coker, tel. 865-475-5163 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Visit the company’s website at www.antiquesonline.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog from John W. Coker’s Oct. 18, 2014 auction, complete with prices realized, online at http://www.liveauctioneers.com/catalog/61812_elizabeth-bates-estate-on-premises-auction/page1

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ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE
Image courtesy of John W. Coker Image courtesy of John W. Coker Image courtesy of John W. Coker Image courtesy of John W. Coker
Last Updated on Wednesday, 29 October 2014 14:28
 
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